The Montrose democrat. (Montrose, Pa.) 1879-1926, February 18, 1909, Image 1

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THE - :$ ii DEMOCRAT. MONTROSE, PA. 1 I . s
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, ~ AI,LSTEND is naturally one of
t • the most beautiful and inviting
r- -
: shots, not only in Susquehanna _
county but in this region of the United are fine 1.;..-
..
- States. It waeorganized as a borOugh tions . •- -
~
. _
in
. :874, and was named 'for -a former - It is quite -a . musical commu....,
President of the D.L.& W.-railroad.. It there being. a male quartet, a.good brass -' -L
-was created 4 ,40 m Great Bend township, and reed band and two -orehestrai :
the villni s v.• 'Cif . , that - name lying' across among, its musical organizations .3 , - -
the StiSquehanna- river, and almost im- the people Of the town:and visite
nediately opposite: - : frequently regaled with mus; - '
The.town is situated on the apex 'of order. . ',....
the well .known fifty-mile curve of the A.......:
good base Is- -
river aid is'pestled amid the foot hilts. ganizati ,- e
.of the Blue Ridge Mountains.. The .; ,.. -- - is
.ole-. 131
river here is deep, wide and clear, a"
-it affords fine fishing and .13c..-
the numerous. visitors who go there iv, ..railroad
-rest and recreation in the summer. .cge numbe'
.Black - bass, pickerel and other species m have thr
of fish are plentiful in season' and th e ‘ '
sport is so god that it has : given much ,e . Stone tom
fame to the place.. • ..•
.-:, handling flay
•
It was on- the banks of ; the river in prOps; teleph"
that locality that Susquehanna County , etc.. and' its
. . . , .
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-- 7 Largest and Leading Indus-
Ira A. Thomas's Model Print- - -.
try m Hallstead , 1.,
I,
•in Plant and Paper • 23rE. HE American Chair Manufacturing
~-' CoMpany is one of , the important
ni I HE "COU'nty Herald" is the name indtistriet• of Susquehanna countyi lo-
W of; the local newpaper, and it is
_cared at' Hallstead, It was ineorporat-
One of the best and-most enterprising ed and begun' business in 1892. The .
Weekliei-in the county.. It was estab- plant_ was moved to. Hallstead in, June, j
lished iri 1893. 'ln zipor it waspurchai- rgoo. The company employ onll an
ed by Mr. Ira A. Thomas, who, being , average about roo men, sometimes !
a, p ctical newspaper man, at once more u .sornetimes less, depending , uPon ,
est l isped new departments and other- the condition of business. The out=
rejuvinated•tue plant. Besides a output is
.from too to 2 l oo chairs I per
fine job printing outfit, he • put in ap- day, depending upon style, qualityjetc. 1
paratus for t'.•.,e manufacture of post • They make a medium d high grade
cards, and has done a good business line of , wood and uphols tered seat 'tick
ever since, parti , cularly in cards of the ers,.morris and mission .
I chairs,‘ selling
beautiful snowy.' . nr; around Hall! . from as low as SE: -7- o for a little `Child's
`stead arid-areir • t_i. erald" rocker up' to 520 for large handheavrd
building is perhaps - -?, ' f ...neatest pieces in solid mohogany.' Their la r gest
kept businessest; ••" '''.., :"': ;; - ' town. selling'market is in New York cis . and
The interior '' - I ,t4Olierl'and in addition they are well represented, by
PLANT OP THE BLACK HORN LEATHER COMPANY, GREAT REND. _
,_ .
___ system and R TI '
...;/ . "" elleteted their own salesmen and have. atarge
~
- . . _ .. .. ,-?
upon lines en :- al , sit-the . trade established in Newl Englandi . the
a silk
, rooutio poSsesses num tkich,the Atlantic and Paci fi c states. '-, I'
was first settled, -(11137Y, and the region ,sold throUghout the Eks
lianc f rom itrindt, Pa. The present
tern states. moved the machinery and other , ap
.
average i counts .--,. - Vaal. :is
Slipshotteinsigh ... „., ...,r
The officers of the comPany a :• Pres
abounds with historical interest. Th-. 1 town supports (.41r,:_\bank.-
~,-,
"' • •
~ bas . kryhis . ideal, Wil iarn. j i , d;'vice-pr sident.:
operated: Unf
n •ng4 at -- • - -
erous a vantages
---t-sr e t I. • town re . ts a neat mill, a emote tif hotels, et
....._,-,--- 4-- i • over t t of the surrou _ _
.net 0 HQ., .
„1,.... t. „ . , .
~...1 447c .
.. m.
latua..
1 )... IncririFol'e,"7" l ,< T contnbard sur
i
.tiiiii!,!.:p u t,..' . as. - 4tr,..,1117i tlift 4 .. ." . rrZi1." 1 ;F 1.-P:. ' — ,(l
.
liighness" patent, the plea was later men r ilar 4 in Wyoming (opposite Wilkes: and adjoining counties was - avast ct• 1-
.
made" by Pennsylvania that Cormi:ctieut .) Twenty of them were mas- derness. Then and for a long time t
i
had relinquished all claims to land sacred by Delaware Indians the following terwards elk, panthers; beats. Vats,
west of the Dela Ware. "Dutch courage': year, which disdouraged further efforts - wild cats and- Indians held full' sway.
having arisen in the meantime the Van for nearly seven 'years. In 1769 two. Late in that year a few settlements by
Vans got possession of the land once delegates wept to Philadelphia and - en-
-white persons were made at Brooklyn:
More; it:was again wrested from them deavored to bring about a peaceful set- Harmony, Great Bend and Oakland and
by the British, and a new charter waS tlement "out of court" with the propri- ;
the count} has since groan . slowly but
issued to the Duke of York. , This, etaries,but their mission carnet° naught,
•solidi} as compared N‘ith some other
brought' on a fresh contention between Pennsylvania absolutelv refusing t:o tee- . ;
counties in-the state, until todaV the
`royalty and the Connecticut burghers. ognize the Connecticut claim. To the
population (est imated)- is 40.2e6. In
The tine between that of the Connecti- contrary. an act was passed in 1774 -
area the county is Si;-square Miles of
* cut colon`and the possessions invested creating Vestmoreland "town," attach;
land surface. . • , :
in His • Ro)-al H ighpess was finally ad- ing it to Litchfield county., This "town' '
• The topography of the county is gen- .
- , ..justed. . . . was seventy miles.square and the town- , e . rally mountainous or hilly, diversified
-
Complicated " Rights. - . ships six Miles square: :
by inland lakes and mountain streams.
The 4 successive . gratis of different Hostilities then 'ceased on the re..com .
" The landscape sic is one of mount:4,in
„
mendation of a General Congres-of rep-.
king, complicated matters to such an repose and quiet pastosal appearance
extent that the proverbial Philadelphia resentatives:from all the colonies; as-
The highest land is in the eastern Part
sernbled at Philadelphia to consult up
laWyer would have been (and mayhap on of the county, on the Moosic diVide.
measures-of mutual defence against the •
r was) puzz_ed to know who was who It formsa belt, five or six miles'v. .•4:1• i E.,
and "what was what. British. forces. - - and is the northern prolongation' of the
In 1753 the foundation of the Sus- - TN 1 -r% •-1
xcevotuttortary Period .: - Carbondale coal basin.
quehanna Company was effected. The . • I
object of that "trust" may be inferred Not a civilized inhabitant was within : - . Water-ways Plentiful., . •
from the fact that .two years later the the boundaries 'of the territory now con- Water-ways in the county are t nw - a ~..
General Aisembly of Connecticut - man i. stituting Susquehanna county When the erous. The Susquehanna rive,in its '•i
ce •___ : .
tested:their ready acquiescence" in the Revolutionary
war was begun, but that- tortuous course, receives the wa t ers of 474 money, varying from $2OO down to
I purchase (?) • made from the Indians by part of Westmoreland- in the vicinity all the creeks that drain the couity, in Es, towards building the first court house
the Stisquehanna. Company, (lands we of WilkeS-Barre furnished nearly 300 whatever direction,they flow. Tie Sus- Were: Robert H. Rase, Stephen Wilson,
now inhabit), and gave their consent _m ento the Continental service. quehanna enters the county from New Abirioam Hinds, Conrad Hinds. Isaac
for ari application to His Majesty to When Cornwallis surrendered, the YOrk at its northeastern corner, hut:at- F,eckins,David Harris, Jonathan Wheat
"erect them into-a new COlony." The ever recurring dispute between Connecti-• ter goingsouth- five miles it turns abruPt- on, James Trane, Simeon Taylor, Cyrus
surveyors sent out were bushwhacked cut and Pennsylvania bobbed up again ly west, and after continuing abut ten Messenger, Samuel Quick, Joseph' Hub
by the redskins, who at that time were and congress appointed a commission miles makes its great bend (from which bard, Samuel Cogswell, Joseph Chap
endeavoring to cope with the French. to sit at Trenton and once • and forever Great Bend is named).. and passe north- Man, Edward Fuller; Joseph Batter
- This caused our Yankee predecessors to settle the vexed question. That com-',,,tard back into New York. T,herkit 'field, Hen Post, 'Levi Leonard, John
halt, and after see-sawing with William mission decided that Connecticut had no 'again veers west, and flows to the mouth Bard. Zebulon Deans, Edmond Stone,
• Penn, :to whom a charter had been g ran t. right tr - least Freeman Fishback, Thomas Scott, Sam-..
„.
ed to :Pennsylvania, the,Connecticuters -- - - tiel Scott '
were finally and effectually relegated to - • ;;The first court house was a' diminu
• the rear by an act of the 'Pennsylvania - titre affair 'compared with the one now
in existence . Its corner stone was laid
legislature (2779) vesting in the corn- •
monweath the, "right of soil and estate
in 28/ 2, but the building was not finish
of the late Proprietaries of Pennsyl-
vania.!f
Shazp Redskins.
'` •
The -Indians had already received-
R2OOO sterling from the Susquehanna'
ComPany'fbr the lands, which they after
wards sold to Pennsylvania, and as they
never returnedhthe £2OOO it' is one n -
stanee and the only one 'ever heard of
in which an 'lndian "gOt the best'!'of a
Connecticut Yankee in a trade.
The y'ennamite war .1.769 to . I 771 )
ended with the Susquehanna COmpany
in full possession Or theseetion now - emall the ;territory in dispute "do of right" into Bradford. Wyoming and Lit
bracied in Susquelta — nna county. •At that belong to the state of Pennsylvania. co-antic."... ' • -
time the town and county of INTestmore- Thus. with the ctostc' of T 782, _by the „ nc „ •
i
I more mportant creeks are Tunk
ce -
land had asedtOexist. It was known Trenton decree, the jurisdiction of COn
.
hannock, Starrucca, Cana Wa eta, Drat 1:-
as the Wyoming NT-alley and - included necticut ceased. That decree, however, 6r , s,
Mitchell's, Martins Sal Litk,
what , is now known as. Luzerne, I n.cica. did not "go down", with our Yankee
Wiley's, Snake,4 Choconut, Apolaoo n,
wanna, Wyoining, Susquehanna, Wayne brethren, nor .did ,an act of the Penn-
Meshbppe' n. Tuscarora — gnd Wyalusing.
and a part of Bradford counties. sylvania legislature in 1783, bouncing
The Lackawanna river flows south alen g
' The Pennamite war comprised the the Connecticut settlers: -
the eastern line of the county There
struggles of Conneeticut.settlers to re- • en Lusenie Was Createct are many beattliful lakes in different
rain possession of the • Wyoming lands A parts of the county. :Crys i t al lake,'Heart
- second Pennamite !'war" ensued
which they had purchased from the - Sus-
extending over a year, and it two
quehanna . Company, hut • which were__..._ , was_lake_
_a_re _Alie - ibpst important in size.
Years later - tie ore_ `ng' — ineasures
claimed also- by the proprietaries of , Among the - mineral wateis in the county
Pennsylvania, who were determinedup- were adopted by tile state of Penns I
'' a sulphur spring in Rush is perhapg the
on securing either the recognition of vania creating: the i d coun ,r t i y of 'Luzerne
best known. Salt springs near Great
from Northurnber an itetmewcoun
their claims or the ejection of the set- Bend, also on'Silver Creek near Fr 7T.
tiers. - - ty extended from' the- mouth of the Nes- ~. „
:. lin Fork, exist.
Ttte •VlTmluti" Massacre copec to the north line of the state (12 o ' '
- •.. • - °---- - ---- 7 • miles north;and south) and insoine pares •In the valleys and along ' the courses
j Over zoo persons had come from Con- of 7o miles in width. , • ~ of rivers and creeks the lands are alluvial,
necticut, in 176.2, and began a settle- Prior to r 787 i'he area c3varedhy: thisani various kinds of grain crops are
. ;
''
• The population ail' whole is cultured ed peaks of great beauty. The town ed the lightest, softest and Most stylish
and refined. ' The high school building - derives its name from the bend of the leather sarment ever made for the bodi
1Y comfort of sportsmen, autmbilists, - ,
is one of the finest in - the state; •there river. , • •
.-.. golters,..;skaters and for winter driving.
are fine churches of several denomina- . _ •Itls as Warm as a fur coat, and as light
tions . • . • . . s a' feather—weighs a little over six ,
._ ,
_.
It is quite a musical communitY:" ..
' BLACK HORN - LEATHER :unees.„,. • , . , .
, .1 Besides manufacturing jackets, vests,
there being a male quartet, agood brass -' L- - . COMPANY . drawer Sand what maybe.termed strictly
and reed band and two orchestras . • as garMents, the corn any also turn out
• large quantices of leggings and spats,
among its musical organizations and -
. - socks, ;hospital . • shoes, - heel pro
the people of the town : and visitors are Ele t Garments From Tan. tectors,finger cots, mitts, foot slips, to.
Elegant
frequently regaled with music of a high. basso Ouches, razor, knife, scissors,
order. ned Chamois Skins Comb, s abre - and gun cases, money bet s,
~
shop Pin a hot water bottle covers.
_..
A good base ball team is another or- , 'WHAT is without doubt the largest table silver c :and, What is one oZ
ganization. of ; which the citizens are
_. ! V industry in Susquehanna county
,' • iS the tanning establishment of the. ' 1
the most Popular articleson the market
, —funne s for gasoline straining. These
justly proud and it prtivides enjoyaole . .
Black Horn _Leather Company,.situated funnels have supplied a long-felt chant
recreation during the season. in Great Bend. It is an establishment at garages - and among automebilists.
sof the D. L. &W. that is fast gaining a foothold in the The funnels are cut at an angle so as, to
The sho ps c mimercial circles of the United hang free all around. ' A draw string is
afford employment fora large number States and its products are so excellentp ro 'deil.
in .asid-the..whole gives full strain-%
of men, many of whom have their and unique that, notwithstanding bun- ing surface instead.,of at ape. - v, as
dreds of men and women ,are employed in the 4ise of a piece of eh ois ag
ho mes in the town. -'-----,
of the "AdVertiser" for in long tirne,
and that the '
plant is fitted up with ail ged loosely into a funnel. . ,
conducted
. .a jab office of, his own lot
- • • i
All the above .mentioned excellent
The Hillsteacl Blue Stone `Company kinds of machinery and apparatus, it is
awhile and later was foreman of a large
is a large enterprise, handling fl agstone, difficult to supply the demand . . articles are made from the cod oil' tan-
In July, Inca the cum ad purchased ned charnois skins and all are•actually
lumber, mine .- prOps, telephone and
moved to Hallstead in tB : 9 r., where he
printing concern for siX years. it-le
the Keystone factory and property v,' -ashable. " . - .
has s i nce con d uc t ed the "Herald."
telegraph poles, etc.. and its goods ar (some thirty acres) in Great Bend and The name of the company is derived
• - from the black horns of ' the chamois,
• and it will in all probability figure as ;
. i
- - one of the best known trade-marks in - i ;
America... ; ' AMERICAN CHAIR MAN
, ..
. . ,
. . UFACTURING CO. I'
BOAtING ON HEART LAKE.
COUNTY 'HERALD
MEM
1. , ; , '7?:F';';4!:• - -Y:;_`.':::: - :'
,f,s-
,-- --n :--,,,t;',,,";:-.%2
,
where la• the county. /t 4/retn
BOAT HOUSE AND LANDING, SILVER LAKE
1'
shiftless and prone to idleness, he would
better tic a milli stone abOitt. his neck
and jump into mf,d-ocean than to try his
"fortunes" in ourcounty. *e have few
.paupers within oiir boundaties now and
Niant less, but there is lots ,of room and
good opportunities for hustlers and'men
of brains, who care to come to this re
gion and are willing to work and wait.
Good, Induirtri l ous
Men who are ,skilled i the ails,
will also find splendid
,chances in Sus
quehanna county to:engagO, in business
on their own account First-clais, so
ber, industrious Carpenters !can soon be
come builders and contract'ors; machin
i
, „: - :,: -, : ,- ,:;'; - ,: - ,;_..:;,;y'.1-,ii,:: 7 „t!
-.':-.''-''"C:::':,:s'i:-...';',':.}..f:',:.1-ir.,--.•.,'.:,3...
SS
=SE
En
1522
El
NT OFT lE.AMERIC-.4N
,
i
INNE
- p•
•. " 7 . Vrt,
; "T-'
• 't
EMI
of .their line fOrsele?tion
- Mr. Jiarmes, the ir..!asurer. is alio the
i
local manager . H •is one of the most
enterprising, enet etic young business
men in tho. secti n, and much of .the
success
,of the-connpany is due to . his
unceasing watchfutnes.s of the com
pany's interests 1 and fine executive
ON
V.' H. norbIAN
Hall 'stead Blue Stone CO
New. York and Pennsylvania Blue Stone,
LUM.I
BER,
And Telegraph Poles.
tiallstead,
Mine and Raili r. 2 . tl Timbers Bov
ir.477Mitititativo
hand of fellowship to extend to those
who are hozzestly ambitious, to succeed
in life and are hampered imootfier 'sec
tions of the World-by undesirable envi
ronment.
Farming and Dairying.
.The plow and the • cow are Ahe ruling
means_ of livelihood in Susquehanna•
bounty. kinds of grairi,...esculents
and many varieties of fruits are raised
with profit in almost:every Part of, the
county, I This region'is famous for its
dairying interests: It 'is 'one of '-the most
extensiveindustries in the County.
merous ! creameries abdund—enters
which buy the milk, bottle and ship 'it
or make butter; cheese, etc. These
lii ,
a~~,~~
reameriLeshandle large quantites of raw young. - ptCople who- would enter light
milk every- day . and, pay farmers and factories as workers,, and we are far re-,
dairyinri a good price for it. -:, .. moved' from all :labor . troubles • and •
- - We frankly admit that the agricultural strikes.. • The question of wages, too; . is
fectioti•S of our county are nevertheless' an - blip . dant factor in considering le=
susceptible of the farm up . -lift President cations of enterprises in this Cowan .
ltoos.e.Ve i lt is So anxious, about and for the cost of livirig, mats, etc., is snot_ so
Which he has 'appointed a:cot:omission,. high as in the larger , cities. , - :
.... .
This co mission_ is intended to create Other tOwits in.the county, such as
oriditi ns that will improve the
r farnis Forest:City,- SUSquehanna,. Hallstedd
rid fa ming- in the United States and • and Great T4end,-, New 'Milford, Iliiion•-•
anythi g which wilt accomplish so .ale-• dale, etc., witli better railroad=facitfes
, •
. . , • .. . -
. . 1 . ..
'; 2. : .2
7F ACTURiNG CONti'AN . Y, HAIA.STE AD.
ability4for h'e knows all that is going
on, at nlUtnnes, in the mechanical de. ,
partment as well as handling the vol.
qminous business of' the office. Mr.
Harmes is .personSlly wry popUlar
Hallateaddybere he'resides in a band. -
somi.thorne . .incir4 , the Susquehanna
river. • t -
Wholesale Dealers in
Mine Props,
' _. H _ _ _
EIFiD'S EYE YIEW- OF K IZCGSLEY
P. S. 'Ross
TELE.
PHONII
Pa.
,-, _. ,ag0.1116.:.
ME
clans and others 'of the learited 'prOfes
sions are the intellectual equals of those
in any part of the world.
Lidlistrietr That Would Pay.
.
MOntrose' is not adapted ford general
manufaCturing center, with - iisattend-.. •
ant volumes of smoke and grime. There
are unmistakable adiantages here, how._
exec\ for the Jighter industries - and en
tems,ises embracing the fine arts and up-. f'
on educational lines. No seetion . of the
United States . atiOrds opening
fora 'military , school for bOys, and a fe-,
'male college, 'a.; instances, andit is our
sincere hope that movements may be
started span looking to the-establish:.
ment of such-enterprises:" MontrOse is
also ripe for some enterprising-person of
persons to inaugurate such concerns as:
A machine. shop capable - of doing. ail
kinds of Machinery repairing. .
Woodworking establishments of. all
kinds, inauding cooperage, the, manu
facture of furniture,_ ax handles, hoe
handles, etc... _ •
Carpet weaving..
Fruit canning.
A silk-bobbin factory
A wagon and carriage manufactory.
Brick Making.
A large cheese manufactory.
A large modern sanitarium.
An incubator manufaCtory.
A mill. .
A basket manufactory.
'A hat manufacto;y.
Knitting mills. •
Novelty works. " •
Glove manufactories.
Toy manufactories.
Pure food products.
Mattress making. -
- -
There is. a
s considerabre "amount of
El
RE
-
.