The Patton courier. (Patton, Cambria Co., Pa.) 1893-1936, October 10, 1895, Image 8

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    SCHOOL SHOES.
You can Fit
Your Children Out
In School Shoes,
The Kind that
Stand the Knocks,
At Trifling Expense.
If you but embrace the golden
opportunities now ready to
cape harvested.
All styles, sizes and prices.
We bought them right and
will sell them right.
George F. Streit,
1122 11th Ave,
ALTOONA, PA.
There are many good reasons why
you should use One Minute Cough
Cure. There are no reasons why you
"should not, if in need of help. The
only harmless remedy that produces
immediate results. C. W. Hodgkins.
“The Only” for 1895.
‘The COURIER is pleased to announce
jt clubbing arrangements with The
Pittsburg Post, the great home news-
paper of Pennsylvania, and to persons
who want the best daily or semi-weekly |
paper published in the city, we recom-
mend The Post. : F
The Daily Post, a large eight-page
paper, and The CoURIER one year each
for $3.00. The price of The Post alone
is $3.00. Send us your order at once
and get seven papers a week for the
- price you formerly paid for one.
The Sunday Post, twenty pages
every Sunday, containing as much
reading as any of the monthly maga-
zines, and The COURIER one year each
for only $2.25.
"The Semi-weekly Post and The Cou-
RIER one year each for only $1.50. Just
think of it, The Post twice a week, and
your county paper for the price of one.
Write us for sample copies.
Say, why don’t you try De Witt's
Little Early Risers? These little pills
cure headache, indigestion and consti-.
pation. They're small, but do the
work. CC. W. Hodgkins. :
_ diameter.
BAALBEC'S RUINS.
They Are the Grandest: Momaments of the
Past |n the Orient.
The ruins of Baalbec, the abcient
seticpolis of Syria, especially those on
the ‘‘platform’’ where the temples stood,
are the grandest in the orient. The
platform referred to above and. upon
which the largest of the famons Baalbee
temples were erected is an artific ial
"mound about 30 feet higher than the
surrounding plain, which gave room for
immense vaults under the gigantic
structures which in ancient times graced
the ‘wonderful city of the east.’
“A good idea of the immensity of
these rnined temples: nay be gained
‘when it is known that there are several
stones in what remains of their founda-
tions which. are 65 feet long, 15 feet
“wide and 13 feet thick, and what is
still more remarkable some of these
giant blocks of limestone were raised to
a height of 20 feet from the ground.
Three temples formerly stood npon the
artificial platform—the Temple of the
Sun, the Temple of Jupiter and the
great circular temple. The first was 290
feet long by 160 broad and was sur-
. rounded by Corinthian colamns of gran-
ite 75 feet high and 7 feet 8 inches in
Six only of these immense
columns now remain standing. The
" ruins of the Temple of Jupiter stand on
I have just received a fine lot of
wall paper which 1 can sell very cheap.
Good white back 5 cts. per roll. Gilt
papers at 6 and 10 cents per roll. Call
and get a bargain. ot
A. CO. FISHER,
~The Painter and Paper Hanger,
9542 ~~. Beech avenue.
- Nothing so distressing as a hacking
cough. Nothing so foolish as to suffer
from it. Nothing so dangerous if al-
lowed to continue. One Minute Cough
Cure gives immediate relief, C. W.
Rogue
EPORT of the condition of the First Na-
tional Bank of Patton at Patton, in the
te of Pennsylvania at the close of business,
ob 16 ng 1895; Commenced business October
.
RESOURCES,
: Loans and discounts,..
Overdrafts secured and unsecured.
U. 8. bonds to secure circulation, .....
Preminmson UU. 8 bonds.
Banking House, furniture & fixtures
Dué from State "Banks and bankers, .
Due froma approved reserve agents, ..
Checks and other cash items,.......... :
Notes of other National Banks
Fractiohal paper currency, nickles
; BRA OORIR,............ cilia anin
- Lawful mon- | Spec ie 7,472 0)
ey reserved: vs
in Bank...... | notes 7
Redemption fund with U.
urer, (5 percent. of cire ‘li ston)
Total,.... ;
~3 118, 180 §
ine
LIABIL Tries,
capital stock paid in
Surplus fund,.. a
Undivided Profis, Tess e xpenses and
taxes
National
‘Due to other National Banks
Due to State Banks and bankers...
Individual deposits subject to check
Demand certiflcates of deposit
Time certificates of deposit...
Notes and bills rediscounted.
STATE OF PENNSYLVANI A, lw
County of Cambria f
I, Wm. H. Sandford, Cashier of the above
named Bank, do solemnly swear that the
above statement is true and correct to the
best of my knowledge and belief.
I. SANDFO RD, Cashier.
Subscribed and. om to before me this 2
day of October, 1
ESSE E. DALE, Notary Public.
Oovrect—Attest:
. E. PATTON
tina Kerr, ;
} pirectors.
E. C. Brown,
a portion of ‘the artificial mound some
10 feet lower than that upon which
those of the Temple of the Sun are mow
scattered about. Its dimensions were
originally 230 by 120. The circular
ruin, almost as imposing as either of
the two whose dimensions are given
above, is supposed to have been the
chief seat of the sun worshipers of very
ancient times. The gigantic blocks of
stone which contributed toward forming
the graceful outlines of this once most
famous circular temple ware so scatter:
ed about by the earthgnakes of 822, 975
and 1759 that its dimensions in feet
cannot be ace urately given. These three
temples and the. foe upon which
they were erected were once surrounded
by a wall which was u wonder withiu
itself, many of the separate blocks which
formed it being U0 feet long, 15 feet
wide and 12 feet thick. ''—-St. Louis Re-
public. a
MARRIAGE IN KOREA.
A Bimple Coresony. but: With It Comes
the Dignity of Manhood.
Korean girls, according to Mr. H. 8
Saunderson, after enjoying freedom till
they are 8
the women's quarters, where they live
in seclusion till they are married at 16
or 17 years. After murringe the woman
is allowed to see no man but her hus-'
band. The boys, on the ther hand, are
taught that it is undignified for them to
enter the women's part of the house.
‘They never see their brides till the wed-
ding day, all having been. arranged for
- them, often when both bride and groom
are infants.
The marriage ceremony is very sim-
ple. The bride and bridegroom invite
their most intimate friends to assist
them in dressing their hair in the man-
ner befitting their new estate. Then the
‘bridegroom mounts a vrhite pony, which
is led by two servants, while two others
on either side support the rider in his
saddle. Thus he proceeds to the bride's
house, accon: nanied by his relatives. At
their destination they find a pavilion
erected in the courtyard of the house, in
which the bride and her relatives are
awaiting their arrival A goose (the
Korean symbol of fidelity), which the
bridegroom brings with ‘him, is then
produced.
The bride, who has to cover her face
with her long sleeves, and the bride-
groom then bow to each other until
their heads almost touch the ground
This they do three or four times and are
then man and wife. A loving cap is
passed round, and then the bride is
taksn off to the women's apartments of
her husband’s home, where she is locked
after by her mother aad mother-in-law,
while the groom entertains lis friends.
The. husbar 1 must maintain his wife
properly an. treat her with respect.
Marriage is the great event in a Ko-
rean’s life, for he then attains man’s
estate. Before marriage, no matter how
old be may be, he is treated as a boy,
and has to maintain a deferential atti-
tude toward the married men, even
though they be only Lalf his age. —Pop-
ular Science Monthly.
Welleslsy's “Conch.”
Miss Lucile Eaton Hill is a young wo- -
man who has carved a niche for herself
in guite an unusuul place. She is
coach’’ to the Wellesley boating crew.
She studies ‘‘strokes’’ scientificially,and
it is confidently believed by enthusiastic
Wellesleyians ‘that the Cornell crew
would have done well to study the art
of rowing under her. She was at Pough-
. keepsie while the crews were in train
ing there, and she also went to New
London to study her specialty. She
comes of a rowing family, her cousin
being Captain Johnsen of last year's
Yale crew. She has charge of all the
gymuastic work at Wellesley.
Easy.
‘“‘Nirvana,’’ said the business man’s
wife, who hus taken to occult subjects,
‘‘is a place where wu see, feel and hear
nothing. How to reach this peaceful
condition is the great question.’
‘Huh !"’ replied her husband, *‘if yon
‘had been in business as long as I have,
. you would know that it’s easy."
¥ Washington Star.
5150 61
205,701 31
‘““How would you go about it?"
“I'd simply quit advertising. ''—
Boise City’s Club.
Mrs. Emma Smith De Voe lately or-
ganized an equal suffrage club at Boise
' City, with the chief justice's wife as
i
president, and the wife of the con-
gressman elect as secretary. Many wom-
en of high moral and social standing are
members.
The aviouit * wealth invested in our
| manufactures is increasing in a larger
proportion than that put. into any other
form of production.
ars old, are consigned to.
THE TROUT BROOK.
Half hidden by tall meadow grass that sways
2 with every breeze
And running through deep, silent pools and
under spreading trees;
Now stealing through the quiet ways of soli-
‘tary wood,
And now beneath a timbered ar: ‘h where once
an old m.ll stood;
Across the fields and to the brow where val:
Jevs fall away,
Then over begs of shelving rock its waters
dance and play,’
And now and then, 8s though in joy of such
delightful fun,
It springs into a waterfall that glistens in the
sun
And eddies ro and and ro
fantastic glee,
Then steadies down and fowes aw
to the wea.
Frank Ii. Sweet in 81 Nicholas
ied bout in strange
‘ay sedately
- SKETCH ING.
Its Practice Essential to the Success of
the Stadent In Art.
Originality and skill in inventing or
telling a story and in expressing the
passions depend, like everything else in
art, on a painter's powers of observa-
tion, and the difference between the
greater or Jess painter re sults very much
from this—that the first thinks of his art
everywhere and at all times, the last in
his painting room only and at set hours.
Hogarth, describing his own habits,
‘says: ‘‘Be where I would while my eyes
were oper. 1 was continually at my
studies and acquiring something useful
to my profession, ’’ and Stot hard’s sketch-
books were filled with groups of figures
and scenery inade withont selection, but
merely of what chance offered to his no-
tice while traveling—sometimes objects
which the windows of an inn presented
while horses were changing, and some-
times what he saw froin the top of a
stageconch.
Students should be assured that the
practice of redeeming spare moments of
time by sketching whatever is thrown
in their way is an invaluable aoe. Those
who adopt it will be sure to te reward-
ed by often finding memoranda so made
of far greater interest than they had
imagined, and it will correct the habit,
always fatal to originality, of going to
pature for things only that resemble
what they have seen in art. Among the:
drawings by Raphael collected by Sir
Thomas Lawrence were many evidently
of what chance presented to him. One
in particular was singularly elegant, of
three or four young men in the dress of
his time sitting at a table, and their at-
titudes but very slightly varied—an ac-
cidental group in all probability of his
pupils.
In the works of ‘Michael Angelo we
meet with very many attitudes that bear
the stamp of being adopted almost im-
mediately from nature, and indeed most
of the noble range of his prophets and
gibyls have thir look. A subject bappily
adopted from natore should not deprive |
the painter of the credit due to inven:
tion, for indeed the mere faculty of in-
venting an incident is far more common
than the nice and quick perception of
that in nature which is fitted ro the pur-
poses of art, and which ordinary ob-
servers would pass by or reject perhaps
as trifling or unworthy. Burns tarned
up a mouse with his plow and was
heard to say by a man who was at work
with him, “I'll make that mouse im-
mortal.”’ And he kept his word. ~-Lon-
don Architect.
The Widely Distended Skirt.
Our prayers have been ansviered ! The
heavy, widely distended skirts will very
soon be a thing of the past. They are
an abomination and ought never to have
been allowed to become fashionable.
Why. it would take four hands to jua-
nipulate the folds in such. a way as to
keep the skirt out of the dust, and when
a woman tries to accomiplisa the task
“with two her gown in socn forgotten in
her cramped fingers and she gives it up
in despair. How anything so totally un-
fit to be worn in the street ever became
a fashich is a mystery to every one, ex-
cept, perhaps, those who manufacture
the haircloth. Bat physicians have de-
nounced the heavy linings as injurious
to health, and thi with the good sense
of long suffering and heroic women,
who have patiently tried to endure the
burden for fashion's sake, has brought
about a decided reaction against them,
and the heavy skirt must go.—Philadel-.
phia Times.
Looking Forward.
The girl pianist in the nest flat who
had sprinted over the teeth of the tor-
tare box for hours at a time was going
to be married.
The: society columns of the Sunday
papers had given it a two stickfal no
tice.
“The face of the weary man in the
next flat lighted up with joy, but as
he locked out of the window and saw a
‘tired eyed woman wheeling in a peram-
bulator a fat, husky baby, charged full
of holier, cow's milk, baby food and
ugliness, his face hardened, and he
hissed between his clinched teeth, *Re-
venge eM innean lis Je mrnal
Doctors’ Language.
Patient—1 s'pose, doctor, you make
out your prescriptions in Latin so that
your patients won't know what it is?
Doctor—Possibly.
Patient—And you make out your bills
in English so that your patients will
know what it is?
Doctor— Exactly. —London Answer.
Reason Bhough
“Why are you making such a din?
asked the bald eagle, who sat in the
re
front row, addressing himself to the
crows, who occupied the gallery
“Oh, caws!"’ replied the sanéy birds
in chorus. —Pittsburg Chronicle-Tele-
graph. on
The United States has all kinds of
climate from that of the Sahara in the
sandy deserts of Arizona to that of the
Amazon in southern Florida and that
of Greenland in northern Idaho and
Missouri Ftd, arcaing to the
last census year, 308,807 bushels of rye |
from 24,383 acres.
M AHAWFEY HOUSE
Mat affey, Clearfield Co., Pa.
Ap commodations frst dass, Bess of Liguors
+A Wines at the bar, Stabling atfached
- GEORGE FERGUSON,
(nf Prop'r.
Harnes, Bridles, Saddles, Collars, Nets
and Whips, Blankets, Har-
ness Oils, Ete,
Repairing a Specialty.
E. J. SEUERIN, Prop'r,
ra TION, PA,
J. F.. McKENRICK,
Attorney and Counselor at Law,
EBENSBURCG, PA.
Will attend to all business with pron ptoess
and fAdelity,
Office op posite the Mouritain Honss,
Reuel Somerville,
Attorney-at-Law,
PaTroxN, Pa.
Office in the Go Suliding..
W. H. SECHLER,
Attorney - at
~~ EBENSBUR(,
£ ambria County, Pa.
M. DAVIS,
Ww:
Attorney and Counselor at Low,
: EBENRBUR/G, PA.
Ali jegal business promptly attended 0
OfMice if Armory Hall,
Law,
R. L. GEORGE,
ATTORNEY - AT - LAW,
GALLITZIN, PA.
Solicitor for German National B. &
L.. association. a
FISHER & CO.
Wholesale.
Fine Old Whiskies and Im-
ported Liquors.
California Wines and Brandies
147 Clinton & 609 Main Sts.,
Johnstown. Pa.
Telephone 175.
‘Bottlers and Proprietors of
OLD CABINET,
OLD FAVORITE
AND
COXEY’S COMMON-
WEAL
Pure Rve W hiskies.
\. LINTEY
Dealer mn
Wines Liquors,
Beer. Etc.
Phoenik BrewinG Co.'s Beer.
Flasks, Corks, Jugs, Ete.
Hastings, Penn‘a.
JAMES QUINN,
134 and 138 Clinton St.
Johnstown, Pa.
All wool new Fall and Winter dress
| foods at 25¢. full 50 in. wide. New
laids and Boucle goods, choice pat-
terns. Black wool dress goods war-
ranted. Ladies Jackets and Capes in .
all sizes. © The
Philadelphia and ittsburg.
Millinery Goods a Specials.
Give us a call.
; Mah alley ud
t stock between
scfm
TOBACCO and CIG ARS
The finest line in Paton at r
CG. J. FITZPATRICK'S
Restaurant on Magee avenue, near
- P. R. R. depot.
MEALS AT ALL HOURS
AUGUST K. HUBER,
STOXE 5A SON, 3
\TTON, PA
Meilon
Borall Kinds
§
Zan ren heed,
ASSETS of Fire Insorarn » Ox om panic
Foose nied by ¢
PATTON INSURANCE EGY
Amount to over $25, 000,000.00, :
Best Kind of Protection.
ALSO THE PREFERRED
ACCIDENT INSURANCE
CO. or NEW YORK,
The best in the world for business or
professional men.
Harvey Patterson,
~ Agent.
Dr. S. W. Worrell, ;
PATTON, PA.
General Surgery
AND
THE EYE A SPECIALTY.
Room No. 3,
GOOD BUILDING.
RI-P-A-N'S
The modern stand-
ard Family Medi-
cine: Cures the
: C——— ;
common every-day
ills of humanity.
ONE GIVES RELIEF.
ioe uti Peopie vv cat
| 2 Doles Stioos
i" HAND . ~ “FA DEST
Pe RAN pin Tage GO
cmurED & 2. ad wr
. + TH THE
£3 CESS. B= ed WORLD.
o3 rr
\ [P30 |
$4.00 $2.50
|
$2.00
$1.75
» For Bors
"and Youths
y shoes “and save from
00 nn pair. ill Styles and
he atv nee in feather has increased the
price of srer makes bat the quality amd prices of
Ww. L. Donglas shwoen remain the same.
Take nosubstitute ; soo (hat nnne and price (5 :
0 sole. WW, Douglas, Hauck tox, Mass. by
MIRKIN &KUSNER.
P, R. R. Time Tables.
Ine oct Way 20th, 1895.
Main Line, t Teme Creston — Blast wand,
wy Mhore FE yp eK, wivk day % 8 3 an
Altoona Accomodation, week days... 9 Bam
Beech Orel
Main Line E x} re a es 106 7 am R.¢
Altoona. Accomaodadion, daily : } x pm
Mail Fxpress, dally : ; SIT pm
Philadelphia Expass, daily ® 2 pm
© Main Line, Leave Crosson — Westward,
Johnstown Accom. week days... 8 dam
Pacific Express, daily : RT am
Way Passenger, dally 28pm
Mail Train, daily i 26pm
Fast Line, daily ‘ . RXpm
Juhnstown Acca, week days. wo XH pm
CAMBRIA tnd CLEARFI ELD
CoG hward.
Moming train for Patton and (Cresson leaves
Mahatfey at 3a ng La Jose, RE Westover,
dr. Garway, for Hastings, 8:30 Hastings, &:48
trarway, (for Cresson: TUE Patton, 3%: Brad-
ley: Junetion, TO% Kaylor, 7:0, armving at
Cresson at loa mm. Afternoon toain for Patton |
and Cresson leaves Mu shun fey at 2% p m; la
J wer, 13; 2dl: Gmrway, for Hast
. . pr VEASWARY, for Cresson
310: HEEE Bradiey Junction, 4% Kay-
lor ng, arviving al Jresson al 4 $19 :
Noarthward
Morning tra in tea ves Cresson for Mahaffey gt
#35: Kavi 51: Fradley Janetiat: Ol: Pate
ton, Il Garw ay, wr Hasti 4 Hastings,
for Ma hi hey ;oLaarw nh sr. Mia hauttiey
11435: W estove se 11748 Tan Jowes, arriving at
} : i for Patton:
and Maha fey t s Kaylor,
dl; Bradles 403 { , ®eld Gar-
way, for Hast ngs ; Ha gs, for Maka
fev 6:45; Lmrwias M: vita Wost-
over, TAR La Jose, IU armvimg at Mahstfey
tT pm.
SUSQUEHANNA EXTENSION
I “astward,
Morning train dmves Cherryiree at 6:35
Barnesboro, #:3% Spangler fi: ow: Carrofltown
Tonad, 7018, an i$ oo indieets with Train tor Cresson
at Brudley Ia on NE, 4
Afternoon ‘train eaves Cherrviree at 200:
Barns whoro, 2k Spangler, 285 Uarroltown
Towiad, Band conrecss with min far (Cresson
at Bradley Junction at hah, ’
Westwind,
Morning train leaves Bradley Junction. for
Cherry tree at loi; Carrolitown Road, Hess;
Spangler 1:53 Baonesboro THO2, arriving at
“he rrvtree at l: 3. : i
Afternoon train leaves Bradley Janetion for
CHerrviree at #48 Carrclitown Road, #17;
wngler, @32 Ro rieshoro, 6:07, arriving at
che FEV ires at ou, : .
8am the Fhershurg Branch trains leave
Ebe nsburg for tresson at 7:3 a om, and
30 p om. leaves Cresson for Ebensburg
and intermediate pointson the arrival of all,
ing from Fast and West, both morning and
. Apply to ticket a ent, or |
PAW. D, tio Finh |
tur oe
PRES OST A
eral Manager.
J. R. WOOD,
General Pas. Agt.
*Trmily
phia and New York, and has
Westwand, 70I8 a my, 1
' Besch Creek Railroad
New York Central & Hudson River R. R. Lessee.
x IN DEXRED TIMETABLE.
Resid op
in Effect May 12.1895.
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BEE
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1H 7 Jersey ili Junction,
+400 47 0 Le a EWTMRT AY.
FF. M.A ns ovr
P OMAN oP & R RR:
#2 4 5 SR Ar WIMRPT i Ss
= 331 3 Lv. PHIL ADEL PHIA. Ar. am
+4 Ia. New Yorkvis Tam Ar, é #
73 Lv. New Yorkvia. PhilnAr 7 59
AM (PM
8 NERERRS M
ACT VEE nesewny
AELLL
x2 RTMMBE WBHELEHR 8
ih x
FWeak-dave, #H.00 p.m. Ruled)
110.30 a. my. Banday.
nrongh Paliman XI leeping Car betwech Du
Bois, Clearfield, all intermediate pointe and
Philadelphia in both directions daily, exe
sunday, on trains Nos 38 and 35,
CONNECTIONS -A1 Williams of Tes with
Philndeiphin and Roasts F Rastlroy ty
shore Junction with Fall Brook Rail uy fon,
ints in New York Rtate and the i A
ii} Hall with Central Railroad of Pen
vanis. . At Philipsburg «with Pennsivania.
. Rated. AL Clearfield with Baffle, Rochester
and Pittsburg RBsflway. At Mahaffey and
Patton with Cambria and (learfield division
of Pennsyivania ratiroad,
ALG. PALMER. F. BE. HERRIMAN, -
KRaperintendent, Gen’l Passenger x 5
: Phiiadelphi
B.R. & P, Time Table.
The Short Line between DuBois, Ridgway.
Bradford, Salnmenea, Butfhiilo, Rochester
agara Fall, and points in the upper Of
Region,
Um and after Nov, 5,
wili arrive and deps "
Stwuon, daily, except re
5 a. m.—Buffalo and Rochester nail For
Brock wayvilie, Ridgway, Johnmiaburg, ot
Jewett, Bradford, Sulamusicas Buffalo, and
Rochester, eon neti
P.& ¥ imin 3 for 3 nies Rane,
_ Corry, and Erie
7:55 a. m.— Accommaodation—For DuBois, Sky
es, Big Ran, and Puanxsutawney.
0 a. m—Acoom jon from Bradford
Jonhsonbarg, Hid ay: A rT and
intermediate stati for DuBois and
RA XSUTAWHEY.
20 p. m—~Rodford Accommodation—For
Reee hit ree, Brock way ville, on :
Ridgway. Johnsonbarg, Mt Jewett,
Bradford,
310 p.m Mail for Dubois, is, Skyen, Big
Pun xsatawney, and
Trains Arrive—700 a, a.
aE
04. passenger Salus trains :
ual s us al 8
1
»
: Al Mabafley with
| Pennsylv gi and North Western railroad.
A modution lions
Punxsutawney, sa5a. mn, Mail from Wals
ston aml Punxsammowney: IO pom, acoom-
modation from Punxsatawney: &i0 po mu.
Mail from Baffle and Rochester.
a ht
3
wR
"ii
a0
3 a0
A
% &
® 30
= 37
*n 04
lurket Mt NK 50
wT
CAFAM PM PMae
*
AND
SLEARFIELD
PoBols
Bois Jet,
Harber
Blooms
- Bridgport
Wrights
Hh Ureek $0
Depot
20 Clearfield
i 3
FALLS CREEK
Ar .
Fails Creek:
Anderson Viaduct
Curwensy ile
7110
r REY
* bee Pe dm
* Flag. (Daily, except Sunday.
Trin No. 71 eonnects nt Do Rois for Big Run
Punxsntdawney, Ridgway, Jt rsanbung, Brad-
ford But alo, and Rowe hoster,
Trin No, 72 connects at Cloargeld for Ty- :
mone, A Hoon, Hantingdon and Harrisbu
Trin No. TR connects at DuBois for Brad Tord
and Pintsbarg and bus Pullman Sleeping tar
fron Phitude iphia’ to» DuBois
Train No. 3 connects at Clearfield with
RR. for Philipstay Lock
Haven, Jersey Sn W filinmsport, ihadel-
Hman Sloep-
ing Car from DuBois to Philadelphia,
Thousand mile tickets at two cents per | mile,
| good for passage between all stations,
MATTHEWS, FEopw arp C. LAPEY,
= ren, Napl., Gren, Pas. Agtl.
Rochester, N. Y. ‘Rochester, N. Y.
Be Passengers ane requested to purchase
tickets before entering the eam, An excess
charey of Ten Cents will be collected by Con
ductors when fares ar- paid on trains, from ail
stations where a Ticket Otflon | is mainmined.
P & N WwW Railroad.
Read u Read down
Na iG NEY
3 [Hy Am . am
a0 1 a5 ar Pun xsatawn viv 3 5
5335 100 Metres
p- 13 Mahaffey? 9 Fd
a 002 La Jose #17
3 a Berwindale oH
3 i Co Irvonn a3
Comiportd 10 a0
PW < 30 Lioyvdsvilie 0
} 2X S00 1v Bellwoodaar i1 io
Connections] With Buffalo Rochester and
Piutsbury RoR. With Beech Creek phil road.
IW ith Cambri and Cleirteld mibrond. With
Cresson and Clonrfield miirend. SWith Penns
s¥ivanin rmilrmsd, :
Cust Creek Bah Tins leaves MeGeoes
Eg
WG ede de LG
SEEEERES
4
TL a 14
for (vlen tampbetl at 1230 a mand 550 pm.
Arrive at MeGees from Glen: Campbell at 7:40
am and 255 pm,
Pennsvivania railroad tmink arrive and
leave Bellwoods as ‘bilows: Rastward, 7301
and 11347 a om, 126 218, #31 and 28 p wm.
2, 328, TOF and 150 p m.
W. A. BORD, Supt., Bellwoud, |
STATING Nat Nols «
isnt on
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