The star-independent. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1904-1917, May 28, 1915, Page 6, Image 6

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    6
Important Furniture Bargains For To-morrow
One of the most significant facts in the wonderful progress of Miller & Kades is that from a small beginning, we have grown to be
Harrisburg's largest furniture store. The one thing accountable for this wonderful achievement we have gained is our unalterable policy
to give greater values—to maintain but one price—to advertise honestly and extend liberal, long time credit. No matter where you live or
what your occupation, if you are honest, we will trust you. We will gladly open an account with you and arrange your payments according
to your income. In this particular advertisement are listed many timely bargains, without equal at our prices. Let them be the means
of making you acquainted at Miller & Kades. x
Special Prices on Dining Room, Bed Room and Living
Room Furniture For To-morrow
Another Solid Car of this One Number Just Un- (|I|A AP*
J oa^ ed *p Greatest Cabmet Ever offered \|(|
|j ||j|| Study the Illustration and Learn Many Points of Superiority
IS BEAUTIFULLY WHITE ENAMELED" AND HAS VENETIAN ART GLASS DOORS-NEXT TO IT IS A
RHINTCIO! 11 >T TAL TL!" UR W,T '- S,FTER ,OP AND . ,RO " T OF VP »>ETIAII ART GLASS TO MATCH THE
J ' THE NICKELOID TABLE TOP |
| TBBMipags^J^ V«^R*RJ i THISK ; : C F!' I " ET T IT IS IULI ~,' A W* O UI S, . V,T '— |
'! I IBt. 'j For example—the work section is fitted withe glass sugar jar, large tea ami coffee jar |
!sf and . tour B,nal 7 f lass s P loe jars, all with metal caps—there are several handy wire i
U ¥ i racks—removable kneading board, convenient cutlery, utensils and sanitarv bread H
-iJS -f f f nd cake drawer, metal lined with sliding metal top—and the lower section is divided I
by a wire mesh shelf. *
Extra Special for 27x54 Rugs I
To-morrow Only TOMORROW ONLY | I |
TIVII - I '.isse u m I -ft. Solid <>AK PORCH LLJI V IF
' Swings, complete with chains and j 35 !/ "~~~ |
Neat patterns in handsome col |i|| ~
Brass White Enamel Bath ' |
I High Grade Rugs CostlllTierS Room Stool MiSSIOn s
Low Pricid To-morrow TO MORROW ONLY TO MORROW ONLY TSuOiSltfi |
These are the most service- TO-MORROW ONLY
able and handsome lugs ever Bgj'ftp
s* "" T ~ m " "oc qOa 25C
$14.85 Eithei dull or bright finish. | j Only Ito a customer. |j
NO PHONE, C. O. D. OR MAIL ORDERS ACCEPTED.
|[XlMiller & KadesCSl
I ' FURNITURE DEPARTMENT STORE 1
ijyjr| 7 North Market Square |™~
OF INTEREST
TO WOMEN
SEEN IN THE BOUDOIR
Cpttlcoata, Undermuslins and Negligees
I Turn From Their Straight and Nar
row Way to Follow Lead of Fulness.
Hoop Skirts a Practical Fashion
New York, May 28.
'5 No easy time will milady have with
Bpr lingerie this summer, for lingerie
having forsaken its straight and narrow
way shows no signs of slackening its!
mail rush towted fulness. It is useless 1
to deceive yourself by thinking you can !
make your petticoats and slips'of last
season do for this. The old tube like !
underrauslins are out of the question i
with the voluminous skirt of the present
mode. ?ar better bow to fashion and
buy a hoop skiri.
If hoop skirt sounds far fetched to
you, it's only because yftu have not seen
the dainty creation masquerading un i».T
tiie old name. They are useful and
graceful, these skirts with the reed, anil
they are actually going to wear them
with filmy frocks this summer. One
store features several in white and
pastel shades of crepe de Chine with a
flexible wire inserted above a deep lace
flounce. As the skirt measures only
two yards where the wire is placed, it
acts the same as a stiffly starched skirt,
without the bulk and clumsiness. An
other house, in the very heart of the
shopping district, heretofore noted for
its conservativeness, shows a model of i
HARRISBURFI STAR-INDEPENDENT. FRIDAY EVENING. MAY 28, 1915.
j ribbon and net, conspicuously placed in !
| the boudoir window. This in itself is
i not a petticoat, but merely a founda- i
tion coming to the knee, formed of a !
j shirred piece of net three inches wide, j
! stiffened on either side and suspended
from a waistband with half-inch rib
| bons.
Significant of the change in under
' wear fashions, lingerie petticoats meas
ure from three to ten yards in width.
| Now, when you buy an underskirt you
do a patriotic act, for these cambric
and muslin skirts consumed a large;
j share of those famous bales of cotton
|we heard so much of last fall. Some
! especially pretty fine cambric and mus
-1 tin models are shown in three and five
gores, trimmed with galloons of em
; broidery and Valenciennes, filet or li
erre lace. These threaten tho vogue
! of crepe de Chine which has come to
i bo almost a staple. The novelties of
| the season are skirts of mull combined
: with narrow net ruffles. An Empire
I design, made to tvear with the new
Kmpire dresses, is fashioned in this
fabric and hangs straight from the bust.
All in all, however, staples outnumber
the novelties this season. The white
washable sateen skirts offered with
wide-pleated flounces are splendid to
wear with thin froeks. The" texture is
so close, that there isn't the slightest
ehance of the wearer's figure being sil
houetted in the sun.
Drop skirts for cloth suits are, of
course, more moderate in width, meas
uring from two to three and a half
yards. Here, taffeta predominates, and
as in the suit itself, blue is the leading
color, although there are some white
taffetas and Dolly Varden effects, which
bid fair to be extremely popular during
the summer. Ruchings and pinked ruf
fles are the two modes of trimming.
It, is surprising how many designs can
be accomplished with these. A taffeta
skirt of the deep Rocky Mountain blue
shows an odd effect in the niching
which is placed zig-zag fashion in the
center of the flounce. Others have the
ruchings in straight rows, and the
pinked ruffles are put on in the zig-zag
manner or draped like garlands, on the
lewer skirt.
Many of the stores display these
skirts with brassieres, the tighter the
better, no doubt for contrast, or per
chance because there is so much new in
brassiere fashions. It is interesting to
note that the front closings have com
pletely replaced the old crossed-in-the
back styles, which at best were ill-fit
ting, uncomfortable garments. Above
the bust line, some of the new waists
are elaborately embroidered and trim
med with lace. One expensive, hand
made model of linen has a yoke anil
short sleeve embroidered with a conven
tional rose design, and the edges but
tonholed with tiny scallops. However,
brassieres are not fancy. Others have
degenerated into mere strapless bust
supporter*. A rubber brassiere they
offer for sale at $6.00 is said to reduce
the bust tvo inches. If this is true,
there iimy be no doubt of its future
popularity.
Indeed, so many type* arc featured,
it is difficult to say what is what in
underwear fashion*. lu the summer
Taffeta Petticoat That Flares to th«
Limit of Fulness
sales of white, where everything white
is shown, each garment seems different
and more adorable than the one before.
Nightgowns, chemises and combinations
for instance, find inspiration in every
period of the past hundred years and
to make the choice more bewildering
the garments are taking special names.
"Simplicity" is a batiste set, chemise
and nightgown, with baby waist and
puffed sleeves of the first Empire. "Vic
toria." a set in chiffon cloth ot' "Dawn
Hose," a fabric similar to indestructible
voile in a filmy rose color, comes from
Victorian styles as one might readily
guess, being made in sections joined to
gether with fagoting. There is a name
to fit every style and almost as many
fabrics. 111 soiue of the sheerest mod
els, striped Georgette crepe is used and
then there are the cotton crepes, French
\oiles, mousseliues, nainsook and chif
fon clothes in Dolly Varden patterns,
elaborately frilled or plainly piped,
trimmed with Flemish, lierrc, Valen
ciennes, filet or Baby Irish crochet lace.
Just as this season, when the parks
bloom with flowers and the shops with
lingerie, it is refreshing to linger over
the fluffy frills for the boudoir. How
charming the Robes de interior are!
Again, crepe de Chine is the fabric of
the moment, coming in attractive leaf
pattern, srtipes ami polka dot designs.
The polka dot idea is used in a smart
kimono in an Avenue shop. The silk
is white with large and small green dots
and is made with an Empire bodice and
full skirt; the neck, sleeves and lower
edge are finished with wide ruffs of
outline and the waist with a twist of
ribbon and a pink rose in front. Crino
line wrappers are also featured for
morning wear in dainty dimity, Swiss,
mull and point d'rsprit, ruffled in flower
like formation, tier upon tier. Other
kimonos of China silk, taffeta and crepe
de Chine show the art of the smocker.
Polka Dotted Crepe de Chine in a
Negligee, Pattern in the Style
of the First Empire
A Nattier blue taffeta matinee has a
yoke effect of this needlework and nar
row ruflles of white maline which match
the ruffles on a taffeta petticoat. Then,
for milady who breakfasts in bed, there
is a pretty jacket of peach blow satin
trimmed with swan'sdown, nnd one
of the new shirred, circular pillows of
FRECKLES
i
Don't Hide Them With a Veil; Remove
Them With the Othine Prescription
This prescription for the removal of
frecikles was written by a prominent
physician'and is usually so successful in
removing freckles and giving a clear,
beautiful complexion that it is sold by
druggists under guarantee to refund the
money if it fails.
Don't hide your freckles under a veil;
get an ounce of othine and remove them.
Even the first few applications should
show a wonderful improvement, some of
the lighter freckles vanishing entirely.
Be sure to ask the druggist for the
double strength othine; it is this that is
sold 011 the money-back guarantee.—
Adv.
Parisian
Ivory
For
Commencement
and
Wedding
Gifts
Pretty—dainty—lasting
—Parisian Ivory is always
appreciated as a gift. This
store is showing an unus
ual assortment, including
many articles that will de
light the girl graduate ami
the June bride.
The stoek here includes
the newest and most ar
tistic productions from the
best factories.
Comb and Brush Sets
Manicure Sets
Clothes Brushes
Mirrors
Combs and Hair Brushes
Velvet and Bonnet Brushes
Hair Receivers
Powder Boxes
Cuticle Knives
Salve Jars
Corn Knives, Shoe Hooks,
Files, Etc.
Hundreds of other arti
cles are here that will
make acceptable and en
during gifts. We will ap
preciate your visit very
much if you will call and
allow us to show you the
many new and pretty
things that we have pro
vided for those who have
occasion to select gifts.
• Master's guarantee is
back of every sale.
H. C. CLASTER
Gems, Jewels, Silverware
302 MARKET ST.
V *
SOS LOCUST STHKKT
Oppoxltr Orphciun licit
Kje» I'hnniini'il l.ciisea Urounit
Open \\>«lilcHdny nnd Saturday
the same satin, to tuck behind her back.
Breakfast jackets of lierre lace and
point d'esprit are also shown. Each of
these has its own particular boudoir
cap and here again names come in play.
The "Normandy" cap of maize, pink,
white, or laven'der crepe de Chine takes
its style from the headdress of the Nor
mandy peasant ami the "Colleen" cap is
a confection of ecru net. Oriental
lounging robes are also receiving con
siderable attention, on account of their
now shaded colorings. One butterfly
kimono of tine silk crepe is embroid
ered in a wisteria pattern, graduating
in tone from dee), purple to white.
.Styles for the boudoir go more than
skin deep. Besides the kimonos and
dainty caps, there are supporters and
stays to think of. For those who do
not wear a corset when lounging in
their own rooms, there are round gar
ters of broad elastic, covered with
shirred ribbon and finished with a
flower to suit the color scheme of the
negligee and room. However, if the
negligee is seini-fitting, a stay must be
worn. For this purpose, there are satin
corsets in white and pastel shades, made
from the waistline up, like bodices of
olden limes. With flexible whalebone,
inserts of elastic and stocking support
ers, they spell boudoir comfort, grate
and luxury.
STEAMER SINKS IN STORM
Fourteen Reach Maine Shore. Rowing
Seven Miles in Small Boats
Rockland, Me., May 28.—The mail
passenger steamer W. (i. Butman saal;
in a rough sea while on her regular rilii
between Mctinicus and Hock land late
yesterday.
The ten passengers and the crew of
four took to the ship's two small boats,
and, after a hard-row of seven miles,
safely reached Mctinicus Island.
MALAYS SACK AND MURDER
Uprising in Northern Part of Peninsula
Against Taxation
Tokio, May 28.—Reports of seriofis
rioting in the northern part of the Mi
lay peninsula have been brought here
by steamer from Nagasaki. The upris
ings are said to have been started as a
protest against tnxation.
It is reported that a force of 3,000
rebels repulsed a punitive expedition
and pillaged villages and towns, inur
dering many white residents. The Brit
ish administrator has advised white
women to take refuge in Siam.
GOMPERS ANSWERS TAFT
Says Ex-President Is Not in Touch
With Life
Washington, May 28.—Questioned
yesterday concerning Ex-Presidcat.
Taft's assertion that the American
Federation of Labor exercises excessive
power, Samuel tiompers sahl:
"Naturally, he hasn't changed tfee
opinions he held when on the benuh.
He hasn't been in touch with life and
hasn't had a chance to change them.''
EUlled on Auto Trip to Fair
East Liverpool, May 28.—Mrs. Juli
us P. Dodge, one of-a party of Wash
ington, D. C., autoists traveling ovfcr
the Lincoln highway to Ban Francisco,
was instantly killed north of here yes
terday when the automobile overturued
on a steep hill. Her husband and Mr.
and Mrs. A. M. Sliapp were thrown
from the machine, but were not injured.