The Potter journal. (Coudersport, Pa.) 1857-1872, March 03, 1859, Image 4

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ulturat.
• = O4E;FUL. INFOR3I4.IqIOIi..
Froze. the Ge.iesee Farmpr, for Feb.
i fkuirgaresting Letter from CoL Ware, of Virginia.
.3,1.E.4425..KPrf10a8:_-,-Tri your , April oum
luir, page lu . vow say, •1 editor of!
,the • ether Planter States that several
,bastaireez haye been . brought .to his notice
sybere_c;u,tle have died from eating ecru
stalks that had been . chewed - by ,hogs.
'.have, any of our readers observed the
sauce effe,et ?" This, the Valley, of Vir
ginia; is ;a stock-growing country, and it
js usual to cut up our core green, (after
he stubble is e:y.hausted,• toward seeding
feed•to hogs to keep them grow
jag and - lattcuiag anti! penned. They not
,ouly consume the corn, but chew up all
the stalks,
.e; ; tract the substance, and drop 1
the halawee. It has been known, ever t.
since we':adopted this plan, that if the cat-;
tle swallow thisitef use of the chewed stalks,
-it would . certainly cause their death, and I
therefore put it beyond their reach.
Again, page 131: " The duty
.of kind-1
ness to - dumestic animals." There is nut
,dive-r= s 4 of opinion, among humane per-1
pong,Pu - that subjeet ; but - is not kindness!
to animals - the interest of their owners ?,
As to the horse, I presume all tamers of!
.wild - boraes accomplish their purpose as!
effectually (if-nut more so) by kindness as!
•by any other course. You can not tamei ,
theml
properly by the lash. Whip a horse
into submission, and whenever anythintrd
llnusual occurs he looks for the whip, and
'PI et once for clearing himself of danger
by the use of his heels, and many time,s
Ayes are endangered if not lost by it. On !
the contrary, a horse broken by uniform I
and patient kindness, gives his owner hiJ
confidence; and when anything unusual
,occurs, he quietly and patiently awaits hi
primes voice. Ihave proved this very !
ffectually with the higlr‘tne.ttled blooded!
horse; With all animals, the tamer yon
.. .keep them, the faster they will thrive.
You can, net get them tame without oh
taining.their confidence, and that you cant
pot get :without kindness. Cattle, all
graziers know, will travel less and ruminate'
more, if so tame that you can approach
And handle them without disturbing their
repose, and consequently will thrive faster
pn the same food than if wild. With hogs,
who, among their raisers and feeders, does
.not know that such as he can approach]
And rub and handle, and that quietly fill
themselves and lie down and rest, will!
fatten infinitely faster than hogs wild with !
fear, that run at the approach of man ?
p4ee2, it is well known, thrive infinitely
faster when so tame that they oan be 1
ap
proached and handled in the open field.!
And will lose the habit of: jumping up and !
running when dogs come into the field,:
and be infinitely more safe from their des -1
_tractive tendency, and do better in every !
. 'way,
Again.: " Are
.shcep or hoos the most!
profitable stock to fatten ?" lam inc.:lir:l'r
ed to think neither are profitable, if opts
pf the right kind. If both are, I say!
sheep. They both can be brought to ma-1
turitv in early life. All must agree that]
the 6oc , c' is the most troublesome animal
pn thefarm, and requires, I contend, in- j
palculably more grain to mature and pre
pare
him for slaughter. The grain re
quired to fatted one hog would be suffi-i
pient to raise and fatten several sheep. j
But iu selecting the kind of sheep to /at- j
tot, a judicious farmer would hardly 1001:
for any other than the mutton sheep
• would hardly look for the finewooled sheep
to bum), for market by way of profit. Of
till sheep, I prefer the Cotswold, from ex
perience: They mature early, are large,
hardy, and take on fat easy, During the
suminer and fall that they are one year
• pld, (not fed on grain,) no mutton can be
more delicately fiavored, juicy, and tender.
Over two years old, many muttons arel,
better, as they then tallow too heavily for
the appetite; but the butcher will then
..give.almost any price fur them; and what
- .prudent man wishes t.) keep muttons tot
four years old, When he can sell them at
one year old at much better prices thad •
,any other. sheep, at four ? I have. rarelyil
if ever, sold my muttons of this breed,
the fall after one year old, under $lO each,
and have sold • older ones much higher;
and never sold them, at the same age,
under $8 each without having fed grain
at all ;
.and the . fleece amply pays for the
keep. Can any breed of hogs show, such
clear profit. and in so short time , and
• they have no wool to pay cost of keep. To
* -- rheet any objection as to the danger or
• 'their loss • by dogs,* I will say I haVe had
this breed some years in its - purity, hav
ing always - imported the sheep that won
teelighprizes of the-Royal Agricultural,
Society of England, and have never lost'
a thorough-bred-by dogs. They are large,
heavy, sluggish sheep, with great apitude
`to take on fat; • Oey fill themselves and
Be down and ruminate like cattle, and do
rot jump up and run when anything comes
into the field. .It is to this I ascribe
their safety from dogs, as dogs are not apt
to seize,anything.,that does not run froth
. •
theta. titit I beliefe: that if *common
sheep: were in the same pasture, tjheir
running would indUce Cotswolds to do . ao
..too; and being bad 4uuners, from their
weight and sluggishness, the dogs would
be most likely tokill the Cotswolds first.
Pasturing sheep in orchards." I think
this would be hazardous, if the trees were,
of any - milue,..they , are so apt to bark diem,
unless the bark was always coated with
something offensive, to the sheep.
- • -• JOSIAH WM. WARE.:
Near Berryville, Clark Co., Va., Dec. isas.
FANNY FERN says, " if one half of the
girls knew the previous life of the men
they mlrry the list of old maids would be
wood .;rfully increased." If the men coul I
only Tool: into the future life of, e worue,rt
in
they uiarry, the k,ui3er . of old orifids•wouhl
be gteialy udynUced. • .
11 :*.ent rapey,.
-‘ John, 1713aq has : become of Jast
pape o r r ingnirpttlars. ,of her hug
banci.. ' . ,
''Surety, vac, I ,cannot . bell; it -was
brought- from the of(fLee, I thibk!
'lXes, James brought it hUme on Sat
urday evening', but neighbor N--- and
his wife-being here; he laid it on the par
lor table!"
l'‘ Oh 'N
-L---bas got the paper, - I re
member now of lending it to him.' -
am, yery sorry fur that think-you
do yery wrong, husband, iu lending the
papers before we have read them. He
who takes a paper and pays for il, is cer
tainly, entitled to the First peruSal of it.' •
Fkuoty it wife, but, neighbor N---
don't take 4 paper. and I can't refuse when
he asks to burrow ours. •
Don't N---- take a paper ?' inquir
ed Mrs. C— with sUrprise.
'No.' ' •
WhY not?' he is, as he says, always
very fetid of . reading.'
' Yed, but he seems to think himself
unable to take one.'
Unable! He is certainly as able' as
we are,: He pays a much larger tag, and
is almost always bragging of his superior
cattle, and —'
. hiush, wife ! It is wrong to speak of
ony neihbors' faults behind their' backs.
He promised to return the paper to-day.'
Id hope ho 4vtll. It contains an excel, :
lent article which I desire very ,much to
read.'
Ars: C-- *as an excellent lady, and
probably possessed as liberal feelings as
her:peace-10hp , husband_;. but she could
inot.believeit to be their duty to furnish
a tree paper to their more wealthy and
col/moils neighbor.
.1%;1 laid formerly taken a paper; but
thinking it to expensive, to the no small
diseonifiture of.bis wife and little ones,
he had ordered - its discontinuance. He,
howeter, dearly hived to read, and had,
for, a year or more, been in the habit of
sending " little Joe" on the disagreeable
errand of borrowing old papers from his
'neighbors.
waited patiently through the
day, expecting Co see "little Joe" coming
with the paper, but the day passed, as
likewise did the evening, and uo paper
came,.
'The next morning, after breakhist, she
was heard to(say— '
Well, John, the paper has not been
Oturued yet.'
Ah, 'indeed ; T guess neighbor,
Nis either forgotten his promise or is ab
sent from home,' replied C—.
I think,' she continued, we had bet
ter scud. J tunes after it:
' Would it not be best, wife, to wait
until afternoOn ? N— may return it
before that tines.'
As you think best,' was the reply.-
They waited antil nearly dark, but no
paper;' made its appearance. James, a
innartilad of ten years, was i ow instruct
ed to' proceed to neighbor' —'s and
. get the paper. He soon arrived and made
known his errand. He was very politely
inforulett that it was lent to R.— the
blacksmith, who lived half a mile further
ou. James, unwilling to return home
without it, notwithstanding the lateness
of the hour, 'continued .on to the black
smith's.
It was quite dark when he arrived, but
he soon made his business known, and
was informed by Mrs. R---that ' little
sis _apt hold of the paper and tore it up.'
VII take the fragments,' said James,
ivlip was fir having nothing lost.
4 The fragments. Jim exclaimed Mrs.
Old Donk, the pedler, came
along, here to-day, and I sold 'em with the
rags/ James, somewhat qispirited by his
unsuccessful Mission, and not being very
courageous in the dark, silently beat a
.hasty retreat for home, where in due sea
son he arrived, and reported the result of
his errand.
' Ah,' very eompoiedly remarked Mr.
I suppose R. asked ue'glibor . N.
to lend him the paper 'and he did not like
to deny him. We cannot, I think, accuse
either of doing intentional wrong; and one
paper,' continued he, is of little value.'
'You may argue N.'s case as you please,'
replied Mrs. U. but be assured of one
thing.' •
What is that ?' asked C
fear
' Nothinf*, only neighbor N. will .not'
long be at the inconvenience of troubling
people for old papers.
In about three weeks after this conver
sation, N. was informed by the postmaster
that he had a paper in the olae. He
was highly pleased at this announcement,
but cuuld not think who was so very kind
as to send him a paper. After many con
jectures, however, he came to the conclu
sion. that it was frolic some friend whom
lie had assisted in former years.
One year had passed : the paper con- -
tinned to come and N. was stilt ignorant
frqui whence. it came; but one day at a
hauling' he informed his, neighbors of his
good fortune; and expressed some fears
that he would have to do, without a paper
soon.
No you shan't,' said James C. 'in a
loud tone of voice, 4 for mother ; sent on
two dollars for you last week.
Well done, Jim r shouted a dozen
voices, while a Simultaneous roar of laugh
ter ran alQpg the line of teamsters.
N., who- had previous to this announce
ment been remarkably cheerful and talka
tive, became suddenly silent, while a deep
!red color, the emblem of-shame, 'mantled
his brow. This was a good lesson for N.
•Early next morning he went and paid
31.6 - U. the ,64, pcknowledaed his * error
and as never known afterwards to take
leAs tllan two weekly papers.--IViletirs'
News Letter. • ,
• A MAUTIFUL Tllolju hen en.
gincers would briidgoastream, they often
carry over at first but a single , thread.
WWI that, they nest stretch:a wire across.
Then strand is added , to' strand, until a
fonudation is laid for aukS - ; 'and now the
bold engineer 111)4 a safe , footway and
walks frutu side to side. So God „takes
front us. some golden-threaded pleasure,
and stretches it hence into,heav,en. Them
he tabes a child, and then a friend. l Thus
he bridges death, and teaches the thoughts
Of the most timid to find their way . hither
and thither between the shores.
PICTURES .0P SLAVERY.
1N PRESS, mud will b r e published January
15, 1839. • •
THE ROVING EDITOR ;
ou
Talks with Slaves in the Southern States
BY JANiE:i ftEDP-ITII, of Kansas:
Ohe pent vol., 12in0., 275 - pp., Illustrated
This book is a narrative of three journeys
afoot, between Washington and New Orleans ;
contains lengthy reports of confidential con
versations with the slaves in Virginia, . the
Carolinas, Georgia, Alabama and Louisiana ;
lively descriptions of social SoUthern- and;
plantation life ; a graphic sketch of adventure I
in-Missouri ; and the must searching and thor
ough and reliable investigation of mericau
slavery ever published in our country. The:
author has given a full and ana fearless report
.of slave sentiment—a thing never hitherto at
tempted
in America. Let every one who would
know what Southern slavely is—slavery as
seen by the slaves—read this volume of their
oral evidence, and startling record of their
hopes and future designs,
As to the aathor's skill as aWriter, it will be
seen that extremes have met and agree ;
" fiedpatlt could not be dull, or tame; or
slavish if he were to try ; he has not an idle
bone in him and if eccentric and humorous,
'tie all for humanity. Betas a rare mind and
nature; both full of grit, and will war agaiu4
wrong and tyranny with all their miglit."—
non. .r. C. vaugh., in Leavenworth Times.
" A vigorous writer."—St. LoWis Republican.
" A d---d rascal, but the best writer we
ever had out west.'—Gen. Stringfellow.
Copies sent by mail, postage paid, to any
part of the United States, on . receipt Of the
price, $l, Address,
A. B. BURDICK, Publisher,
.8 Spruce Street, Noe York,
*.„*. Editors publishing , the ttdove adver
tisement and this note a few times, and notic
ingdt editorially, by sending a marked copy
of their , paper - to the publisher, will receive a
copy by return mail.
Miss SOUTHWORTH,
CoLoNEI. G. NIP. CLOCLETT,
CHARLES. BURDETT,
THOMAS DUNN ENGLISH, E. D,
lIE:sIRY CLAPP,
GEORGE ARNOLD,
SAMUEL YOUNG,
Mits. ANNA WHELPLF.Y,
Miss VIRGINIA VAUGHN,
Mas. DI. NERNON,
MIAs HATTIE CLARE,
FINLEY JOHNSON.
Write only for the
GOLDEN PRIZE.
GOLDEN PRIZE.
GOLDEN PRIZE.
GOLDEN PRIZE.
GOLDEN PRIZ g.
- GOLDEN PRIZE.
cr p
'l 3 ri - 1 3 'j r•k- E
ILLUSTRATED,
DEAN & SALTER, SUCCESSORS TO BECKET & CO,
The New York Weekly GOLDEN PRIZE
is one of the largest and best literary paper:3
of ill?, day—an Imperial Quarto, containing
e i g ht pages ,
co/unuo, of the most inter
eAing-and fascinating reading matter, from
the very first writers of the day,
ilit(strateD
A ?RESENT.,
WORTII FROM 50 CENTS TO $5OO 00,
Will be givento each subscriber immediately
on receipt of the'subscription money,. This is
presented at a . Mernento of Friendship, and not
as an inducement to obtain subscribers.
TERMS :
One copy for 1 year, $2 00 and 1 Present.
Ono copy for 2 years,' 350 and 2 Pregents
One copy for 3 years, 500 and 3 "
One cepy for 5 years, 800 and 5 '
AND TO CLUILS,
Three copies. 1 year, $5 00 and 3 "
Five copies, 1 year, 800 and 5 "
Ten copies, 1 year; 15 00 and 10 "
Twenty-one cop's, 1 y'r,.3o 00 and 21 "
The articles to lie given away are comprised
in the following list :
2 Paeliakes of Gold, con
taining $5OO 00 each.
5 do do do 200 00 each.
10 do do do 100 each.
10 Patent Lever Hunting Cit S
- Watches. 100 each.
20 Gold Watches, 75 each.
.50 do do 60 each.
'lOO do do 30 efich.
300 Ladies' Gold Watches, 33 each.
200 Silver Hunting Cased
evident
Watches, 30'00 each
500 SilVer Watches, $lO 00 to 23 00 each
1000 Gold Guard, Vest,
and Fob Chains; $lO 00 to 30 00 <tact
Gold Lockets, Bracelets, Brooches, Ear
Drops,- 'Breast Pins, Coif Pins, Sleeve Buttons,
Rings, Shirt Studs, Watch Keys, Gold And Sit
vet Thimbles, and o . variety of other articles,
worth_ from 50 cents to sls' eaell.
present to every person sending us
50 subscribers, at ,32 each, a Gold • Watch,
worth $4O; to any one sepding, us 100 sub
s'cribers, at S 2 each, a Gold Watch, $9O. Ev
ery subscriber will also receive a present.
Immediately on receipt of the money, the
subscriber's name will be entered upon our
book, and the present Will be forwarded with
in one week, mail or express, post paid.
121.A1l communications should be ad
dressed to DEAN Si, SALTER,' -
Proprietors, 335 Broadway, New York
lIEAVY CORN-FED HOGS, from Wyo
ming and Livingston.Connties, are being
packed, and will Be until Janmlry, 1859, by
20 CLARK & PHILLIPS.
Price $1
MD
HOAUTION .
lilerebants and Tradeni will be on their guard and'not
be ircip?sed ;upon by it Ciinuterteit of liorse's Indian Rent
Villa, signed A.. B. 'Moo& All genuine Indian Root Pita
base the name and algtAture of
,t d. Mae of Co., on
each box.
, : - . . . i•
Abovel we ,presentf you. wttli„n trkene . ss of
DR. MOltSE4,the inventor of 3104SE'S IN
MIA:N ROOT - PI-LLS. This philanthropist has
spent the greater part of his Pfeil'. traveling.
haying* Visited Europe, Asia, ! and -Africa, as,
well as North Anierica—has spent three years
antong_the Indians of our Wester country—
it was iri this way that, the India Root Pills
It
were first dislCovered. Dr. Morse Was the first
man to establish the- fact that all ( iseasesttrise '
front bIPURITY OF .TIIE BLOOD—that nor
strength, hetilth.and life .depeattal upon this
vital fluid. ;
'When the various passages become clogged,
and do not trot: in perfect- harnionV' with the
differe•ti function's - of the body', thehlood loses
its action. liecomes thick, corrupted and dis
eased; thu.s causing all pains, sickness and
! distress' of every name ; our strength is ex
hausted, ohr health we are deprived of, and if
nature is nut assisted in throwing off the stag
. nant hOmors, the blood. will become eheked
land cease to act, and thus our light 0f 7 ,1i11.1 will
forever . be blown out. How important then
that we should.keep the various pas Sages of
, the body free and open. And how pleasant
Ito us that We have it in our power to put a
medicine in your reach,. namely. Morse's fil
-1 diau ..(tohtl l Pills, mauttfirctured from plants
'and roots which grow around the monntain,
bus cliffs in Nature's garden; for the health and
recovery of diseased man. One of the roots
from Widelythese Pills are made is a Sudorific,
which opens the pores of the skin, and assists I
Nature in throwing out the finer parts of the
corruption within. The second is a plant 1
which is an Expectorant, ,that opens and un
clogs
the passage to the lungs, and thus, in a-I
soothing manner, performs its ditty by throw- I
ing off phlegm, and other huniors from the
lungs' by copious spitting. The hird is a Di
uretic, which gives ease and &able strength
1 to the kidneys ; thus encouraged, they draw
large amounts of impnrity front the blood,
which is then thrown out bountifully by the
urinary or Water passage,. and which Could
not have been discharged in any other way.
The fotirth is a Cathartic, and accompanies
the other properties of the Pills while engaged
in purifying the blood ; the coarser particles
of impurity which 'cannot puss by the other,
outlets, are thus takenup and conveyed off in
great quantities by the bowels.
. From the -above, it is shown that Dr. Morse's
Indian ROut Pills not only enter the stomach,
but become united with the blood, for they
find;way to every part, and completely rout out'
andelVa'nse the system from all imp,:rity, and
the lite of the body, which is .the blood, be
contesll perfectly healthy ; conseqnently all
sickness awl pain is driven from the system,
for they cannot remain when the body becomes
so pu e :pad clear. . • •
Th reason why . people are so distressed
f
when sick, and why so many die, is because
they lo not, get a medicine which will pass
to the atilieted parts, and N.,'llich will Open the
natural passages for the disease to be cast out;
heoce, a large quantity 4,f food and other mat
ter is lodged, and the stoumeh tad intestine ,,
arts literally overflowing with . the corrupted
miss; thus nadergoing disagreeable fermen
t:l;Mo, constantly mixing with the blood.which
-thrOws. corrupted Matter . through every vein
anal artetty, until life is taken from the •body
It v' dis - easte. Dr. Morse's PILLS have added to
tfdmiselves victory niam vietory, by restoring
millions of the sick to blmmthig health and
, IMppiness. Yes„ thomm ads who have been
nuked or tormented 'with sickness, pain and
! anguish, anti whose feeble frames have been
I scorched by the imCning (dements of raging
tever, and who have been. brought, as it were.
Within a . step of the silent grave, now stand
ready to testify that they would have been
numbered with the dead, had it not 'been for
f this great and wonderful medicine. Morse's
Indian (blot ['ills. After one or two doses had
puce taken, they were astonished, and abs , )-
lately surprised, in witnessing their charming
effects. Not only do they give immediate ease
Hind strength, and. te.ke 'away all sickness,
1 pain and anguish, hat they at enec go to
i work . at the foundation of the disease.
Which is the blogd. Therefore, it will he
shown, especially by those who use these Pills,
that they will SO cleanse and purify, that dis
ease—that .dendly enemy—will take its flight,
and the flush of youtkand beauty will again
return, and the prospect of a long and happy
life will cherish and brighten your days. '
1 Sold by tiMITLI ig JONES, Coudersport; also
by all Medicine Dealers in the county. A.
.I. WHITE & CO.. Sole Proprietors, ..‘.;:o. 50
Leonard St., New York ; WIL MUDGE .k.. GO.,
ilproprictors of Dr. A. Trask's Magnetic Dint
, Meat,)- Earlyille, Madison Co., N. Y., General
Agents. 1.0:4G-ly.
HOW AR U ASSOCIATION,
PIIILADELPRIA
A Benirolent itution, estahlWhed by special
endowment lin- the relief of the sick and dis
-fressed, afflicted with Virulent and -
Epidemic diseases.
MITT , : HOWARD ASSOCIATION, in view o
the awful destruction of human life, caus
ed by s,•x n ut diseines, several years ago direct
ed their Consulting Surgeon; to open a Diiptin
sure for the treatment of this class of diseases,
in all their forms, and to give MEDICAL AD
VICE GRATIS, to all who apply by letter.;
with a description of their condition, (age,
occupation, habits of life, &e,.) and in cases
of extreme poverty, to FURNISH MEDICINES
FREE OF unAriGH.
lfhe Directors of the ASSociat'on, in their
late Annual Report express the highest s'ltis
faction with the success which has attended
the liihors. of their Surgeons in the cure of
Spermatorrhica, Seminal Weakness, Gonorr-
Gleet, Syphilis, the rice of Onanism or
Self-Abuse, Disease of the Kidneys and Blad
der, and order a continuance of the same
plan flir the ensuing year.
An admirable ffeport on Spermatorrhcen, or
Seminal' Weakness, the vice ofOnanism, Mas
turbation.- or Self-Abuse, and other Diseases
of the. Sexual Organs, by the Consulting Sur
geon, will be seat by mail, (in a sealed : euvel
ope,) FREE OF CHARGE, on receipt.cif Two •
STAMPS for postage.
Address', for .Deport or treatment, Dr.
J. SKILLIN HOUGHTON, Acting Burgeon,
Howard Association, No. 2 South Ninth Street,
Philadelphia, Pa. : [1].:24-Iy.
grillOICE STONE LIME, in bbl. or bulk, at
greatly reduced prices, can be had at
20 CLARK & PHILLIPS.
BOOTS, SHOES, HubbOrS, Buffalo Over-
Shoes, for men ; women and children, by
the case, dozen or pair, at
20 faaRK & PHILLIPS.
PLANOS, - MELODEONS & ZUOIC
lit F.': EASIt, S VSTE3I APPPTEP. 1
Prices Gre tlv feduce 1,
:-RORAUEIVATERS' ..
Ko. .333: Broadlcath'
&GENT 'FOR nil ICEST BOSTON
.1136.4trithiChlti: •
rE Largest Assortment of Piano's,
deans, Musical Instruments, andl,liiiMical
Nlerchandise of , all lands, in the Oniteot!,ates.
Pianos from Tim different Manufactories, Com
prising those of 'every variety* of style, from
the plain, neat and substantial t 3 oeirtyt's,*
Walnut or RosetrOod eases, front $l5O to $2OO,
to those of the most elegant
,tinish up to One
Thousand Dollars. ..Nor house in the Onion
can compete With the above in the number,
variety and celebrity of its. instruments i l nor
in .the Extremely low prices at whieli they are
• , ,
•lIORACE.WATERS' MODERN IMPROVED
PIANOS, with or without Trot{ Fratue:s.l pos
sessing in their improvements of over-strings
:aid aetion,: a length of scale and etimpass of
' tune equal to Oita Grand Piano, united; with
, the beautyand oflstructitrelif the
Square Putno. They are justly pronOunCed by
the Press and by the first Musical Mits'ters, to
be equal to those of any other manutiteturer
They are built of the best and most thorough
ly seasoned material; and guaranteed td stand
the action of every clithate. Each Instrument
uaranteeil to give .satifaction, or purehase
)
money refunded. , V •
111511. ACE WATEIS' MELODEONS.—Su•
perior Instruments in touch and dui-ability of
make. (Tutted tile equal temperament.) Me
lodeons of all other styles and make::, Price
$45,- .$6O, $75, *lOO,- $125, Sl4O--idoubh.
Reeds and two banks of Keys, $206-Liess
liberal discount. Clergymen and Cli!urebes,
an extra discount,
MARTIN'S G UIT A Ft S.
lIIIONVN'S HARPS,
• FLUTES.
FLUTINAS, -
. ACCORDEONS,
-• VIOLINS,
and Musical •Instrr meats of ail kinds. at lower
prices than ever 1::fore offered to the! public
A large discount to Teachers and :Sehools.
The trade supplied• on the most liberal terms.
SECOND-lIAND PIANOS, at gre r at bar
gains, constantly in store,price from $3O to
$l4O.
INIIUSW.--One of the largest and best se
lectel catalognee of Music now pnbliAed,
comprising many of the choke and thost pop
ular air , 'of the day,, and will he sold at pne
third off front-.the regular.prices.
Ausic sent by mail to all parts Of 'the coun
try, post-paid. Particular and perstinal atten
tion paid .to all orders received by mail. Sat
isfaction guaranteed in every instance. MIKIS
and Melodeons for rent and rent allowed on
pnachase., Pianos,an.l Melodeons for sale on
.monthly payments. Second-hand Nanos ta
ken iu exchange for new. General and select
Catalogues and Schedule of prices forwarded
to all parts of the country by mail.
It —Great inducements oll'ered to AGENTS
in all parts of the country, to ,sell the Horace
Waters' Pianos, Melodeons, add Catalogue of
Music. ts:l6
Eyes Open! Ears Open
RIGHT ABOUT F.
LBO! all r tlnit bath ear_. let him hear.
and he that bath eves, let - him come and
see the wonders Luling done in Wellsville, the
City of Tanneries, and especially at the Old
Regulator, where !thirty- tfku) men and seven
boys are wanted CO work fifteen hours every
day, (Sundays excepted,) and lie that bath no
matey eoinu. Brip!x n haard. bring a shingle.
bring a bog. brit 4 a bring s deer, bring
a hide, bring a in bk. bring a pelt;- bring your
butter—bring whit you like, you 'shall not he
turned empt..• ii\Vay because eon have not the
filthy lucre to buy your bread.' endeth
the lire.t. lesson. - CLAR! & PUILLWS.
.
VVRYTHINL; botight rind sol i d :LL tltc' Old
i d 11 t•Nc.ept (las, Gas, Scandal aad
Son Saap pad SialiA,•at sixpence a
unist.he had at Surae ilrothers, at Some
Brothers, in this town.
1 1 .0 'PHILLIPS.
tfILARK & PHILLIPS render their the
1._.) to all the 'good people of tl3is Common
wealth for their most Literal patronage, nod
they do tender- their thrinks to their
vompoitorst and any others. for their gentle
harking; for all time. C.lleoetea 'falsehood t'ot•
all time. envy and jealousy; f4r no doubt it
was meant fur evil, hat has proVed our good.
So go ttheack. The more the better.
20 CL,1ItI•: &
vLncrt, Poi a: and Ileans,c Horse Feed,
Corn .:11eiti. Oats, Shorts enough to sup
ply a steal[ nation, at the old I;egulator.
- 2(,1 CLARK .kII'HILLIPS.
March Appointments.
lilt. JACKSON ,
-- Nn'afint 131)115ttiatt,
of St. Louisi):
OF ERIE CITY, RENN'A,
May be consulted as follows-4re° of Charge
;COUDERSPORT, PA,, "Glass:nilTe's Hotel"
Saturday & Sunday, Marah 12th & 13th
WELLSBORCO, PA,, "Stage qousc,"
Wednesday & Thursday. Match 9th & 10th
WELLS N, Y. " Van 1 11 ren's Hotel,"
Baturday & Sunday, .relfry 19th & 20th.
INDIAN BOTANIC REMEDIES !.
10 treatment of diseases ofl the LUNGS and
Cnrsr, Liver, Stomach. Bowels. Heart, Nerves.
Skin, Scrofula, Salt Ilhearn ) , 'Erysipelas, or
any and•all diseases arising frqm Impure Blood.
FEMALE WCasscss and Fmkle DISEASES, of
all KINDS•; also all forms of ' PIIRONIC or lon'g
standing diseases. have given Dr. JAcKsoc a
lrorld-wide repalation.
INVALIDS SHOULD MAIRK WELL THE
TIME, and CA:LL EARLY as polisible.- The time
• • •
is limited and the appouituu,
,•nts Nvill be paw
tuakit kepi Its 'above.
If sick with any CHRONTI diseases, do not
delay, as time only tends,tO onfirm and ren
der a cure more protractedLii r til difficult.
t
Dr. JaCkson will make ex' tninations of the
Lungs and, Oticsr,•by the lIS i O ' of the STET4O
- FREE of CHARGE.
I
Dr. Jackson will not prescribe without pros
pect •of . betiefitting his patients. INo false
promises ,will be made, or ,/expense incurred;
withouteorresponding prospect of recovery.
Dr. 'lackson does not tear down to build up
and" uses no mineral poisons any case.
Dr. Jackson procures his I medicines from
the wilderness of- the Far West, analyses 'awl
compounds, them-himself. I.
Dr Jackion, although Baying special atten
tion to LUN ' G,Tunoxr, iismyr ;and FEMALE Du
ca:ins. also invites to consultations in ALL
CHRONIC diseaseS incidCut to the human
system. • Seeing many thousand cases every
year, he is well prepared it cOgive an op nion
as to the curability ofanyl case. •
b'eNO . CHARGE FOR CO NSULTATIO N." 131
C. JACKSON; Indian l'h y.tieian.
Post Oftice address—E# Pa., lox :222.
=imam •I
A irgitzE:Fort
WllO SUBSCRIBES FOR THE
NewlOrk Weeldy Press
4 1 3 EAUTIFULL't
ILLUSTRATED
rAmiriv. NEWSPAPER;
rvIIE 3 . ..;EW. YORK WEEKLY PREsg is op,
of ilia beat literary papers of the do t , A .
large Qtrarto cohtaiiilng 'TWENTY PAGES,
or six Ty. cOl;IMINS. of entertaining matter;
and ELEGANTLY S T lI.A.TED every
week. •-• •
A GIFT WORTH FROM 56 CENTS TO
$lOOO 00 WILL BE SENT- TOEACII sun.
SCRIBER ON RECEIPT OF : THE Stg,
SCIIIPTION HONEY. • • .
TERMS-4N ADVANCE:
One copy for one yeaiyand I gift, $ 2 op
Three . coPis• one year, and 3 gifts, t
Qa
FirecopiesAone year, and 5 gifts, gtia
Ten copies one year, and . 'lo gifts, i t ot
T*enty=one copies one year, and 21 gifts 30 o
The articles to be distributed are comprizt4.
In the following . list
1 United States Treasury •
Note $lOOO 90, -
dodo 500 00, eftel
dos do 2OO bo,e3cl
10 do •do do 100,1)0,cl:el
10 Patent Lever lluntiug -
Cased Watches,
20 Gold - Watches,
50 do
100 do
300 Ladies'-Gold Watches,
200 Silver Hunting Ciised
Watches, 30 no, eacl
500 ilvei-Watches, $l5 00 to 25 00, tad
1000 Gold Guard, Vest
and Fob Chuitis, 10 00 to 74 . 00, eac
1000 Gold l'eus and
Pencils,
Gold Lockets, Bracelets, Brooches, Eft
Drops, Breast Pins, Coif Pins, Sleeve 'lances
Rings, Shirt Stnds, Watch Keys, Gold nu
Silver Thimbles, and a Variety of other ani
cles, worth from M) cents to ,slr, 00 each.
On receipt of the subscription money, the
subscriber's name will he
_entered upon oar
books opposite a number, and the gift norm
ponding with that number will be forwarded
within one week to him, by mad or npren,
p os t paid. -
There is neither humbug norlottery shoot
the • above, as' every subscriber' is sure of
prize of value. We prefer •to make this fit ,
coal distribittion among them instead of giv,
ing is large commission to Agent's, giving to
I the subscriber the amount that would go to
I the Agent and in many eases to hundred-fold
more.
la—l communications simuld be ad
dressed to '
DANIEL A DEE, PUBLISIZER,
211 Centre erect, Sao YurP,
{10:43]
D. L. &M. 11. DAME
IJAITE
31; ,57 PACceildi
From New York,
A COMPLETE
Fall and Winter
.A,SSORTY.V . 7 OF
DRY. GOODS,
BOOTS & SHOES, HATS .C• CAP'
CUTLERY, GROCERIES,
Crockery & Glasswarel
Also, a good stock Of MISCELLANEOUS an
Schoo Books,
- STATIONERY, &C., •
411 of which they will sell AS LOW ASC
RE BOUGHT ELSEWHERE IN
TH
PRODITOE OF. A 1..); KIND 4
IMMEI
IN EXCHANGE FOR GOOPS,
For which the HIGHEST PRICE tyillbept
They can be found at all times, (Satard
and Sunday eacepted,) at the Store form
occupied by D. BAKER,
lIJ LEWISIITLLA
nails to wait upon Customers.
N. H—We have come to the conclusion th
"READY PAY"
is better for all parties, and we shall, the •
fore do business on this system..
D. L. & 3VII. DANIELS ,
Ulysses, Nov. 4, 1858. 7 ‘iGtf. - •
EIILLFORT- fIgAD-QUARTERS,
rplIE subscribers _take this • method of i
. forming their friends that they are is •
ceipt of, and are now opening, a choic e °
desirable stock of
STAPLE - AND FANCY DRY GOODS,
to Which they invite the attention of ally
desire ta make purchases., Our stockisls •
has been selected With great care, and W.
ticularly adapted to the wants- of this Fttli
of our country. Our stock of. Dry 60 °' 13°-
sists of
DRESS GOODS, TRIMMINGS, RIBBONS,
_EMBROIDERIES, - PARASOLS
• CLOTHS, CASSPIERES
• • -
YESTINGS,,DO
ti EsTics,
sninTlNGs,
- • LINENS, PRINTS,,
•• HOSIERY, SHAWLS,
and a variety of other articles, tea auras
to mention; We have.aLso st,ooraplctes a
'Pent of. -
GROCERIE*, 11 . ARDWARE AND
• CROCKERY;
- - „
all of which trill be sold anconnnonly
for ready pay, and 'fc;r approved credit
ct
reasonable terms as any other establifh,
- -MANS 'OlOlO
Milfpo rt, Aug. 11, 186.-9:l3.ly:via
Z. J. THOMPSON ,
CARRIAGE k WAGON MAIM asd •
• -PA I HER, Coudersport, Potter Co., Pa,
this method of informing the pub..
lie in general that he is prepared
to do all work in his line with probe
iu a workman=like manner, and
most accommodating terms . .
Repairing
Repairing invariably required on dc 1111 ,,(:
the work, Is_ All kinds a vtilv„
i re
taken on account of work,
100 00;ear
75 - 00; tat ,
GO 00, tic'
00 00, e 4,
30 00, etc,
5 00 to 15 00, enc,