Butler citizen. (Butler, Pa.) 1877-1922, September 26, 1901, Image 4

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    Thai COM Spoon.
There are some men who seem to be
favorites of fortune. They are indus
trious, cheerful workers, full to over
flowing of the energy of splendid health,
and success seems fairly to drop into
their hands. It is of such as these that
the less hardy
.jSutiMfcki and less success-
ful man says
enviously,
was horn with a
gold spoon in
mouth."
W a And yet on
" anal y sis it wiH
found that
/ this success is
*■" largely due to
•pletidid health, the endowment of a
healthv mother.
Dr. Pierce's Favorite Prescription gives
the mother health to give her child. It
cnres nervousness, nausea and sleepless
ness. It makes the body comfortable and
the mind content. It gives physical
vigor and muscular elasticity so that the
baby's advent is practically painless.
"I will endeavor to tell you of the many
benefits I have derived from taking I>r. Pierce's
Favorite Prescription." writes Mrs. B. E. Robert
son, of Medicine todge. Barber Co.. Knni. "In
tl»c fall of 1599 I was expecting to become a
mother and suffered terribly with pains in the
back of head : m fact I ached all over. Suffered
■with awfu\ bearinar-d«wn pains; I was threat
ened for weeks with mishap. A lady friend
told me to use Dr. Piarce's medicines. She had
taren them and felt like anew woman. I began
using the ' Favorite Prescription' and took four
bottles befuue ruv baby came" and two after
watda. I suffered almost death with my other
two children, but hardly realized that. I was
tick when this baby was born and she weighed
twelve and one-quarter pounds. She is now
eleven months old and has never known an
hour's sickness • at present she weighs thirty
seven pounds. 1 owe it all to Dr. Perce's
Favorite Prescription."
«Favorita Prescription" makes weak
women strong, and sick women well.
Accept no substitute for the medieine
which works wonders for weak women.
Dr. Pierce's Pleasant Pellets are the
most desirable laxative for delicate
women.
Dr. Humphreys'
Specifics cure by acting directly upon
the disease, without exciting disorder in
any other part of the system.
so. CUBES. PRICES.
I—Fevers, Congestions, Inflammations. .22
'i—Worms, Worm Fever. Worm CoUc... .35
3—'Teething. OoUc.Crylng.Wakefulness .25
4—Diarrhea, ot Children or Adults 35
7—C onshs. Colds, Bronchitis 35
B— Neuralgia, Toothache, Faceache 35
9—Headache, Sick Headache, Vertigo.. .35
10—Dyspepsia, Indigestion,WeakStomach.3s
Jl—Suppressed or Painful Periods ... .35
13—Whites, Too Prof use Periods 35
13—Croup. Laryngitis. Hoarseness 35
14—8 alt Rheum, Erysipelas, ErupUons.. .35
15—Rheumatism, Rheumatic Pains 35
16— Malaria, Chills, Fever and Ague 35
19—Catarrh, Influenza. Cold In the Head .35
94>-Whooping-Cough 35
ST—Kidney Diseases 35
38—Nervous Debility 1.00
30—Urinary Weakness. Wetting Bed— -35
TT-Grlp. Hay Fever 35
Dr. Humphreys' Manual of all Diseases at your
Druggist a or Mailed Free.
Solid by druggists, or sent on receipt of price.
Humphreys' Med. Co, Cor. William £ John Sts.
•
Thousands are Trying It.
In order to prove the great merit of
Ely's Cream Balm, the most effective cure
for Catarrh and Cold in Hsad, we have pre
pared a generous trial size for 10 cents.
Get it of y JUT druggist or send 10 cents to
ELY BROS., 56 Warren St., N. Y. City.
I suffered from catarrh of tho worst kind
ever since a boy, and I never hoped for
cure, but Ely's Cream Balm seems to do
even that. Many acquaintances have used
it with excellent results. —Oscar Ostruin,
45 Warren Ave., Chicago, 111.
Ely's Cream Balm is the acknowledged
euro for catarrh and contains no cocaine,
mercury nor any injurious drug. Pri :e,
60 cents. At druggists or by mail.
Horsemen,
Attention!
.1 |We carry a full
CHAMOIS SKINS,
BUGGY SPONGES,
HARNESS SOAPS,
LINIMENTS and
CONDITION POWDERS.
Try us when you want your
favorite recipe prepared.
We use only the purest drugs
obtainable.
Reed's Pharmacy
The Low Priced Drug Store,
Cor. Main and Jefferson'Sts., Butler, Pa.
They Are Here
The car load of
# Pianos arrived S»turd a y-
What we mean by car load
is 12 pianos.
Come in and let us
show jou that they arc
the best that money c'an
buy.
Prof. Monk, the Pianois
at A'ameda Park, 4th of
im
V|!jPy July, says: "In every re
spect I consider the Merrill
Piano the best made "
6. Otto Davis,
Armory Building.
New Livery Barn
W. J. Black
Is doinr; business in his new barn
which Clarence Walker has erected
for htm. All boarders and team
sters guarranteed good attention-
Barn just across the street from
Hotel Butler.
He has room for fifty horses.
People's Phone. No. 250.
Cures Drunkenness.
eeley^
it KEELEY
Write for ■ INSTITUTE, |
tanuiau.tM, j
EUDDING THE APPLE.
low Very Popular and Hm Some
Advantage* Over Grafting.
Although grafting is ft much moro
common method of propagating the ap
ple than bidding, the latter has some
advantages over the former and can be
done at a time when grafting could not
be successfully performed.
The season for commercial budding
Is from early July to the middle of Sep
tember, August and September being
In many sections the best for budding
the apple. Young stocks of the second
season's growth from seed are much
used. The process of budding adopted
for apples consists In Inserting a bud
with very little or no ivood under the
bark of the stock and on the surface of
Its wood. It is called shield budding.
Budding is best performed when
there is still sufficient sap beneath the
bark to permit of tlie latter being easi-
Bimxn BTDDINQ.
ly raised with a knife. On the other
hand, if the work is done when the tree
is still growing vigorously the bud Is
liable to be "drowned out" or. In other
words, forced out, by reason of too
much sap and growth of stock.
If the proper season has been chosen
for the work, the bud should remain
dormant until spring. If It starts In
the autumn, it may be killed during
the winter. In the following spring
the stock should be cut off Just above
the bud, which will cause all the
strength of the stock to be directed In
to the bud and produce rapid growth,
three feet not being an exceptional
growth for the first season.
Budding is now a very popular meth
od of propagating apples. The first
season's growth is greater then from
root grafted trees, and there is a larger
proportion of straight trunked trees by
this method. If It Is desired al»o to
prevent trees from becoming on their
own roots, budding is preferable, as
trees propagated in this way may be
planted' so that the stock is Just at the
surface of the soil and all roots are
thrown from it. »
SOIL ANALYSIS.
Why It Ha* Little Value ■■ a Gnlde
to the Vie of Fertlll*er«.
The Ohio experiment station receives
many .such requests as the following:
"Will you make a chemical analysis of
my soil to determine whether I need
nitrogen, potash or phosphoric acid,
and. If so, what will be the charge?"
To this request we make the uniform
answer that such an analysis would be
very expensive and when made would
usually have very little value as a
guides to the use of fertilizers for the
reason that the chemist has as yet dis
covered no reagent which possesses the
same capacity for extracting plant
food from th» soil as that of the living
tissues of the plant.
To Illustrate: Potash is a character
istic constituent of granite rocks, and
a soil formed from such rocks may ap
pear rich In potash under the chemist's
analysis, and yet If that potash be still
Wj&e form of granite sand It will be
yleldbttxWS<£ slowly to the feeble
solvents of the plairt.
Again, in some of states
are Immense beds of roefcs containing
large percentages of phosphoric acid,
but If these rocks are merely ground
and mixed with the soil their phos
phoric acid, which has resisted the
solvent action of soil water for ages,
will continue Insoluble, and hence the
necessity for treating these ground
rocks with sulphuric acid In order to
make their phosphoric acid available.
Still further, when a piece of marshy
land has been drained, it is often found
that the crops planted upon It fail to
thrive, although it seems to be very
rich in nitrogen. The remedy here is
to add barnyard manure, something
which savors strongly of carrying coals
to Newcastle, but the explanation is
that the scmiaquatic vegetation which
formerly occupied the land decays so
slowly that cultivated crops cannot get
nitrogen rapidly enough for their
needs. When the manure is added,
however, it sets up a fermentation,
Which converts the nitrogen bearing
materials info a more soluble and
hence available form.
F®r these reasons the only practical
way of learning the needs of a partic
ular soil is to make experiments on
that soil and thus learn which combina
tion of fertilizing materials will pro
duce the greatest effect.—Charles E.
Thome, Director.
Dreachlaic the Manure Heap.
Bacteria are present in both the solid
and liquid portions of manures, but it
Is more especially in the latter that
they find a favorable medium for their
growth. Drenching the manure heap
witli the drainage liquid, therefore, not
only affords the necessary moisture to
retain the ammonia, but also intro
duces ferments which act beneficially.
—F. T. Shutt
Double Vision Glasses.
Glass comfort depends in a great
measure upon accuracy in frame adjust
ment. Doubly so in bifocals or double
vision glasses. A fraction of variation in
the fit of a frame may bring aunoyance.
Much of my success in Optics is due to
iccarate frame fitting. My double vision
lenses give perfect satisfaction for both
near and distant visiou antf my frames
i;cver pinch, pull or hurt —prices low—
satisfaction guarranteed.
Karl Schluchter,
Practical Tailor and Cutter
i
125 W. Jefferson, Butler, Pa.
Busheiing, Cleaning and
Repalrlngia Specialty
BRICKS WITHOUT STRAW.
•Jore than i thousand years aro—
Shadowf of time, how the days go by—
! There was a tran I used to know •
May (com strange, but you'll «e it's so
! After I tell you the reason why—
| W,*ked in a brickyard, same as you
And all of ua have to do;
Mixed in the trouble and worry and btrtfa.
The mirth and the other things of life;
Stirred In the hopes and the pains and f. ara.
Kneaded the mud with his sweat and his
llumanest mm that ever you raw.
"Poor brick!" «id tha man, "but I have no
itraw!"
Up to his kneel in the niry pit,
A pygmy's w»y, but a giant's grit;
His back was a chain ct throbbing aohea,
: Lifting the mold with its earthen cakea;
Elbows rusty as hinges of steel,
Knees so lame he could hardly kneel;
Mud so stiff it would clog a plow
And couldn't be stirred with a wheel nohow;
Nights as short as the days were long;
Nothing seemed right, but everything wrong.
"Best I can do," said the man; "but, pshaw,
You can't make brick when you have no straw!"
Taskmasters pitiless lashed the man.
"Can't!" sobbed Weakness, but Courage cried,
"Can!"
"Don't!" Slid Despair, but Duty cried, "Do!"
"AU right," said the man, "I'll worry bet
through!
Can't do much, and I reckon you'll see
Urick won't be just what they ought to he;
Ain't nigh so good S3 I know I could make
If 1 just had straw; but you'll have to
The t>est I can do for the work's own sake."
He finished his tale of brick and then
Went home to rest, and cne sons of men
Looked on his perfect work and saw
He'd have spoiled the brick had he put in straw.
—Robert J. Burdettc.
GREYHOUNDS.
They Are the Fleetest of All Pour
Footed Animals.
Comparatively few people realize of
what remarkable speed dogs are capa
ble. Some remarkable statistics in re
gard to this have been gathered by M.
Dusoller, a Trench scientist.
After pointing out the marvelous en
durance shown by little fox terriers
who follow their masters patiently for
hours while the latter are riding on bi
cycles or In carriages, he says that even
greater endurance is shown by certain
wild animals that are akin to dogs.
Thus the wolf can run between 50
and GO miles in one night, and an arctic
fox can do quite as well, if not better.
Nansen met one of these foxes on the
ice at a point more than 70 miles north
west of the Rannikow territory, which
is 480 miles from the Asiatic coast. Es
kimo and Siberian dogs can travel 43
miles on the ice in five hours, and there
Is one case on record in which a team
of Eskimo dogs traveled G% miles in
2S minutes.
According to "M. Dusoller. the speed
of the shepherd dogs and those used in
hunting ranges from 10 to 15 yards a
second. English setters and pointers
hunt at the rate of 18 to 19 miles an
hour, and they can maintain this speed
at least two hours.
Foxhounds are extraordinarily swift,
as is proved by tli* fact that a dog of
this breed once beat a thoroughbred
horse, covering four miles in CVi mlQr
utes, which was at the rate of nearly
18 yards a second.
Greyhounds are the swtftest of all
four footed creatures, and their speed
may be regarded as equal to that of
carrier pigeons. English greyhounds,
wiiich are carefully selected and which
are used for coursing, are able to cov
er at full gallop a space between 18
and 23 yards every second.
How great an achievement this Is
may be judged from the fact that a
thoroughbred horse rarely If tivcr ex
ceeds 19 yards. Moreover. It is said
that a hare at its greatest upeed never
goes faster than at the rate Df 18 yards.
These interesting statistics are ex
citing much comment among sports
men and other lovers of dogs, and the
opinion is unanimous that M. Dnsolier
has fully proved the right of the grey
hound to rank as the swiftest crl the
quadrupeds. Express engines only sur
pass them.—London Mall.
Tentative Interment.
A poor Scotchwoman lay dying, and
her husband sat by her bedside. After
a time the wife took her husband's
hand and said:
"John, we're goin to part. I have
been a gude wife to ye, hnven't I?"
John thought a moment.
"Well, just middling liie, Jenny, ye
know," anxious not to say too much.
Again the wife spoke.
"John," she said faintly, "ye maun
promise to bury me In the auld kirk
yard at Str'avon beside my mlther. I
could na rest In peace among unco' folk
In the dirt and stuoke o' Glas^gie."
"Weel, weel, Jenny, my woman,"
said John soothingly, "we'll just try ye
in Glasgie first, an gin ye dinna be
quiet we'll try ye in Str'avon." —Spare-
Moments.
He Didn't Complain.
Toting Wife —This talk about men
being so Impatient when u woman Is
getting ready to go anywhere is all
nonsense.
Friend—Doesn't your husband com
plain at all?
Youug Wife—No, indeed! Why, last
evening I couldn't find my gloves and
had a long hunt for half a dozen other
things, and yet when I was finally
dressed and went down stairs to my
husbaud there he was by the fire read
ing and smoking as calmly as if I
wasn't half an hour late.
Friend—Well, I declare! Where were
you going?
Young Wife—To prayer meetings-
New York Weekly.
As She Saw It.
Mrs. Kleener—What is the matter
with you this evening, John, that you
ain't smoking?
Mr. Ivleencr—The doctor says I
mustn't. He says 1 must stop smoking
or die.
Mr*. Kleener—Oh. I'm »o glad! You
won't be scenting up my curtains any
more, will you?— Boston Transcript.
A Chinese philosopher says there Is
an ounce of wisdom at the root of every
gray hair.
A Tnll Smoke CoTnmn.
During the burning of the Standard
Oil company's tanks at Bayonne, N. J.,
in July, 1900. an ir.fmeuse column of
smoke, shaped at the tup like an um
brella. rose into the air. where very lit
tle wind was stirring, to an elevation,
measured by triangulatlon. of 13,411
feet, or more than two miles and a half.
Above the column white clouds formed
in an otherwise cloudless sky and re-
mained visible for two days, the fire
cpntlnuiu.z to burn and the smoke to
rise. After the explosion of an oil
tank flames shot up to a height of 3,000
feet, and the heat radiated from them
was felt at a distance of a mile and
three-quarters, where it was more no
ticeable than close to the fire.—Youth's
Companion. .
An Effort to Speak.
Dogs in a native,or wild state never
bark. They simply whine, howl and
growl. The noise which we call bark
lug is found only among those that are
domesticated. Columbus found that to
be the case with the dogs he first
brought to America and left at large,
for on ills return he tells us that they
had lost their propensity to bark. Sci
entific men say that barking Is really
an effort on the part of the dog to
epeak.
He Knew.
She —How beautifully Miss Heavy
weight dances! She doesn't seem to
toucli the lioor sometimes!
He (whose feet are still suffering
from the last polka with her)— She
ifloesn't!—Punch.
In a Great Hurry.
Beuiiam—Why did that woman keep
you standing at the door for half an
Lour?
Mrs. Benham—She said she hadn't
time to come in.—Brooklyn Life.
iiiiiiiiiiiiiaiii
| New House §
1 Furnishings l
! M THAT ARRIVED LAST WEEK, M
| S Seasonable goods that are right S
gj in price and quality, ||e
GAS STOVES, A neat house stove, well made
: and nicely finished- Price $5.00
GAS RANGES That use a small quantity of gas.
: Good bakers, neat and durable, Price $17.50
WOOL BLANKETS. All-wool factory blacket,
soft and fleecy: large size and very serviceable. ||i*
gj „ Price $3.75 g
fjjpi COMFORTER. Full size, fancy covers: no* the
finest quality, but cheap at $1.50
ROCKING CHAIRS, New ones arrived this week, ||S
|jpj Golden oak. well made: cobbler seat. Price $2.50 g
1 Campbell ft Templetoni
Asthma Cure Free!
£ Asthmalene Brings Instant Relief and Permanent 5
# Cure in All Cases. 5
$ Sent Absolutely Free on Receipt of Postal.
There is nothing like Asthmalene. It brings
Iffijftfi'' irstant it lief, even in the wort c -c> It cure** *
' when all else fails. r
LS, <>f Villa kid>je, 111., sa\s: "Your r
ill trial bottle of Asthma!' i.<- leceived in iood condition I
cannot tell jov bou thankful I l»«i t. r tlv- good derived J
/r 10Ui ' l - ' wa> a! ' xl > chain* d »i'.h putrid s.fre throat and f
fcfctbn a I'r un *r;<iv 1 of tv>r being cured, 4
I 'aw yf ur aciv<.rtisen.mt for the curt of this dreadful and X
Qx\vvra|lli tonr.«-nting dise«.-e, aMhmp, and thought yen had over- \
spokeu youist-Wt . but re=olvtd to gi\e :t a trial. To my J
L I "*astonishment, lie itial iicted lite a rhurm. Send nie a full- x
size bottle."' J
® We want to s end to every sufferer a trial treatment of P sthmalene, similar J
the on e that cured Mr. Wells. We'll send it by mail POSTPAID, ABSO- r
rLUTEI/Y FREE OF CHARGE, to any sufferer who wi.l write for it, even on #
0a postal. Never mind, though you are d£spaiiing, however bad your case. «
•Asthmileae will relieve and cure. The worse your case, the more glad we are m
ito send it. Do, not delay. Write at once, a-idregsing DK. TAFT BROS.' J
CO., 79 East 130 th St., N. Y. City Sold by ail Druggists.
innniP'^MMicW
PROMPT RELIEF. CERTAIN CURE
The Latest Internal Remedy. Easy to Take.
FIFTY CENTS per Bottle~A Week's Treatment.
FJL WALKER'^!
| SOAP 1
Is good soap y
IT Contains no alkali *
I I Be sure you get the soap with the SI
game rooster on the wrapper. We take H
the trouble to wash all the free alkali out H
OF WALKER'S SOAP. That saves your fc*
*%P«fei3S clothes, paint, varnish, hands—anything H
-- y OU was j l alkali would eat. II
WHEN TIME IS IN DISPUTE
A watch from our store can be relied
upon. We guarantee our watches to be
satisfactory time-keepers, and-', quality
makes the price. A big stock of all the
standard makes to select trom. We also
repair any kind of a watch that is made.
In addition to our complete line of
jewelry and optical goods we sell
Cameras, Photo Supplies, \ ictor, Edison
and Columbia Talking Machines.
R. L. KIRKPATRICK,
Jeweler and Graduate Optician
Next to Court House
BUTLER
BUSINESS
COLLEGE.
Fall term begins, Monday, Sept. 2, 1901
COURSES.
I —Practical Book-keepers. 2—Expert
Accountants. 3 —Amanuensis Shorth and.
4 —Reporter's Shorthand. s—Practical5 —Practical
Short Course in Book-keeping, for those
who merely wish to understand the
simpler methods of keeping books. 6
English.
Our Teachers—We have four at present
always as many as we need, no more.
POSITIONS.
We filled 53 position last term anil ex
pect to fill twice that many this term.
We could place two or three times that
uiany every term if we had them. We
need an abundance of first class material.
All young men and young women having
a good English education shouUl take
advantage of one or both of our courses.
Many new and important improve
ments for next year. Call at the office
and see us. If you are interested be sure
to get a copy of our new catalogue, also
circulars.
BUTLER BUSINESS COLLEGE.
A. F. REGAL, Prin.,
319-337 S. Main St.. Butler, Pa.
' J.V. Stewart,!
(Successol to H. Bickel)
LIVERY.
I
Sale and Boarding Stable
YV. Jefferson St., Butler, Pa.
Firat class equipment—eighteea
good drivers—rigs of all kinds—
cool, roomy and clean stables.
People's Phone 125.
J. V. STEWART.
CH:_ . .SITR'S ENGLISH
/ROYAL PILLS
We. '. • • r -liable- Lad I en, oak Drw .ict ftff
EXULIHH in Keel And
(•old mrtauiic boxen, mated with blua ribbon.
Y .Uo in 'her. K«*fu«»e dangrroan an»>«»l-
Ik Matt <».u<l iitiiinliomi. Bay of your Druggist,
or s;*. in stamps for Fartirnlar*. Teatl*
naonial . vi 1 " Krlfrf for Ladle*." in te««r,
riy mu/M >1 all. 10.000 Testimonials. Sold by
«i; l)i .i .
CKI CHESTER CHEMICAL CO.
1 .!«»0 nudiiKiu Square, PHILA.. PA
Hcatlvn (hit paper.
Eyes Examined Free of Charge
R. L. KIRKPATRICK.
Jeweler and, Graduate: Optician.
loir to Court House. witW PH.
| PHILIP TACK, I
|H CONTRACTOR IN
I Cleveland Berea Grit |
STONE I
| r
j [ Suitable for Building
Ornamental and |
|: Paving purposes. j
II This Stone is guaranteed 1
\\ not to shell off, nor |
H become rotten.
n |
Prices reasonable. VJ
j \ Work done well j
and promptly,
\ 'I Stone yards on 3
East Etna street.
if 3
1S Residence on *
\ [ Morton avenue. '
\ \ People's Telephone 320. *
1 r I
YOUNG LADIES]
GIRLST
YOUNG MEW,
BOYSJ
everywhere can earn $6.00 per week in span
time or evenings, addressing envelopes, a<
money required, hundreds of workers not
employed, proof sent free anywhere to thosi
sending addressed envelope to FRANKLH
CHEMICAL COMPANY, 830 Filbert Street,
Dept. A PHILADELPHIA. PA
Irnaflanr-£?h. Dean's I
A safe, certain relief for Huppremed I
Menstruation. Neverknowntofail. Safe! ■
Sure! Speedy! Satisfaction Guaranteed H
or money Refunded. Sent prepaid for ■
SI.OO per box. Will.send tbemoa trial, t* ■
be paid for when relieved. Samples Free. ■
UNITED MCOICALCO.. BOK 7*. LAWCAeTCII. e*. J
Sold in Butler at the Centre Ave.
Pharmacy.
A. M BERKIMER,
Funeral Director.
45 S. Main St. Butler. PA
Hotel Nixoq
215 N McKean St., Butrdr
Having rented this hotel for another
years, I again invite the patronage of
my old friends and the public generally.
R. O. RUBAMUGH,
WANTED— Honest, man or woman to irave
for large house; salary iOo monthly and
expenses, with Increase; position perman
ent ;in<»k>»* sid t-Mldsessed euvek>p«
M4NAGEK i*G Oaxtoo bldg , Chicago.
"Peerless"
Wall + Paper
Absolutely Without Equal.
XIII" GREATEST VARIETY
I Hr BEST QUALITY
a 111. LOWEST TRICES
New Goods Now In
For Season 1901.
MCMILLANS
Next Door to °ostoffice.
Annual
Wall Paper
Clearance SALE
AT
60 per cent on the dollar
It will pay you to at
tend this sale.
Patterson Bro's
136 S. Main St.|
Phone. 400.
Wick Building.
We are opening up our new
fall stock and showing the
most beautiful goods in the
city.
Our stock of
Hats,
Shirts and
Neckwear
is complete.
Come and see the new
things.
Jno. S. Wick.
MEN'S
HATTER AND FURNISHER.
Opposite P. 0.
L. S. McJUNKIN,
Insurance and Real Eslate
Agent.
. 17 K. J hPI !• F.SCI-.
JUTTLKR. PA
Special Notice.
'! i. \ t 'es at cost' to close them
out, •' mc y and gri . bargain.
Ail ki:.it.s >f repair -•» rlc given
. j>i'< >rrij)t jl.t-niiuii at
Geo. W. Mardorf's
Bicycle Store aDd Repair Shop,
109 W. Cunningham St-
Pearson B. Nace's
Livery Feed and Sale Stable
Rear of
Wick House Butler Penn'a.
Tha best of horses and first class rifts »i
wavs on band and for hire.
Best accommodations In town for perma
nent boarding and transient trade. Speci
al care guaranteed.
Stable Room For 65 Horses.
A good class of horses, both drivers and
draft horses always on hand and for sale
under a full guarantee; and horses bought
«pon proper notification by
PEARSON B. NACE.
elepbone. No. 210.
Sunday Dinners A Specialty
Meals 25 cts. Rooms 50 cts.
Regular Rates sl.
Local and Long Distance Phones
South McKean Street,
Hotel Waver! y,
J. W HA WORTH Proo'rJ
BUTLER, PA
Steam Heat and Electric Light.
The most commodious office 1 the
city.
Stabling in Connection.
' f ,or . e ' Da New Store -' '
. 2 21 Eas J r 3.D6 S 121 E«» 11
< Jefferson St. 1 ° Jefferson St j >
V Leading nillinery House
i iCall and see our Fall and AutumnX
|j[ Millinery just trom New York. \ !
| Styles and Lowest Prices. | [
! I PAPES, ;j
f hi East Jefferson St., Butler. * *
e.
Mrs. J. E. Zimmerman.
NEW FALL AND WINTER GOODS.
NEW GOODS coming in daily all over the house, such as-.-
NEW DRESS GOODS,
NEW JACKETS SUITS AND DRESS SKIRTS,
NEW WALKING SKIRTS,
NEW FALL MILLINERY,
NEW SILK WAISTS,
NEW TAFFETTA SILK—
LOUISINE AND SATINS.
NEW WASH TAFFETA SILKS AT 75c. REAL VALUE, sl.
LADIES' SUITS, $5.00 TO $25.00
LADIES' SKIRTS, $5.00 TO $15.00
We are showing a very special number in a Skirt at $5.00; real value, $7 50.
Comes in Black, Blue, Brown and Gray. We do all fitting aud altering necessary
in our own Cloak Room —an experienced fitter employed all year round; no extra
charge fcr alterations. This store has long been recognized as the Ladies'
emporium for ready-to-wear garments of all kinds; also MILLINERY. We have
striven this year to make it more complete and attractive in every detail—each de
partment under the management of competent sale- people with years of experi
ence. We must not forget to mention our Underwear, Hosiery, Blankets, Flannels,
\ arns; as usual, one of the most complete stocks of Domestics—Muslins, Calicoes,
Ginphams and Onting Clothes in the county.
Prices Right, Styles Right, Quality Unequaled.
Mrs. J. E. ZIMMERMAN.
y J)
if New Bal^ery
cl AND . |S
alee Cream Saloor\J<
)! * ICECREAM. IP
) i rS, OCT CAKES AND BREAD, |)
SI I llr SODA WATER. f>
C| HOME MADE CANDIES fc
J I IN SUTkER. M
; § Bread, Cakes, Ice Cream, f f
f £ Delivered to all parts of town. $ J
/ 1 142 S Main Street. § \
IP®op'®'s1 P®op'®'s Phone 190.
Talking Machine
Beats the World!
| t Friers—s.•? 00, |i 2.f o, $25. co, /40.C0,
COME, SEE, HEAR and buy ore.
You're all welcome at all times.
A full stock of tlie rle'oiaied Cnase Bros., Hackley and Carlisle PIANOS.
Everything in the music line sold on terms to suit YOUii coi vtnunfr.
THE LEADING MUSIC HOUSE OF THE COUNTY.
W. R. NEWTOIN.
WITH ITS NEW^^
JI I OPENS SEPTEMBER 4, CLOSES OCTOBER 19. /
MUSIC BY THE WORLD'S GREATEST BANDS; C
J SO US A AND HIS BAND, Sept. 4th to Sept 17th. I
5 DAMROSCH'S NEW YORK SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, C
/ WALTER DAMROSCH, Conductor. Sept. 18th to Oct'r Ist. /
) THE FAMOUS BANDA ROSSA, ITALY'S GREATEST MUSICAL <
5 ORGANIZATION. Oct'r 2d to Oct'r 12th. f
S EMILPAUR, AND THE NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC (
) ORCHESTRA. Oct'r 14th to Oct'r 19th. /
> mow ATTRAcmona. )
< , $16,000 TOBOGGAN SLIDE. CHILDREN'S EDEN MUSEE AND WONDERLAND. \
I > A DAT IN THE ALPS. THE LATEST MOVINQ PICTURES. MAGNIFICENT ELECTRIC DISPLAY. J
( 1 EVERYTHINQ ABSOLUTELY NEW. /
I ADMISSION 25 CENTS. £ r .,
The People's National
New York Tri«Weekly Tribune
Published Monday, Wednesday and
Friday, is in reality a fine, fresh, every
i>ther-day Daily, xiving the latest news
an days of issue, and covering news of
the other three. It contains all import
ant foreign war and other cable news
which appears in THE DAILY TRI
BUNE of same date, also Domestic and
Foreign Correspondence. Short Stories,
Elegant Half-tone Illustrations, Humor
jus Items, Industrial Information, Fash
ion Notes, Agricultural Matters and
Comprehensive and Reliable Financial
ind Market reports.
Regular subscription price, $1.50 per
pear.
We furnish it with THE CITIZEN for
J2.00 per year.
Send all orders to THE CITIZEN, Butler
Family Newspaper.
New York Weekly Tribune
Published on Thursday, and known for
nearly sixty years in every part of the
United States as a National Family
Newspaper of the highest class for farm
ers and villagers. It contains all the
most important general news of THE
DAILY TRIBUNE up to hour of going
to press, an Agricultural Depart
ment of the highest order, has
entertaining reading for every
member of the family, old and
young, Market Reports which are ac
cepted as authority by farmers and coun
try merchants, and is clean, np to data
interesting and instructive.
Regular subscription price, l:.oo per
year.
We furnish it with THE CITIZEN
for $1.50 per year.