Butler citizen. (Butler, Pa.) 1877-1922, February 23, 1899, Image 4

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    RAILROAD TIME TABLES
P., Bessemer & L E.
Tmjr.s derart No 14, at 9:40 A. M;
No. 2, at 5:40 P. M Butler time.
Trains arrive ;No. 1, 10:00 A. M: No.
11. 3:00 P. M. Butler time.
Xo. 14 ran* through to Erie ana con
nects with W. N. Y &P-
Junction for Franklin ana Oil vjty,
and with N. Y L. E. & W. at bhenau
eo for all points east. No. - runs
thrnnrfito Hreenville and connects with
W N Y & P. for Franklin and Oil
City. WR. TI'RNF.k, Ticket Agent,
pITTSBURG & WESTERN
*■ Railway. Schedule of Pas
senger Trains in effect Nov. 20,
1898. BUTLER TIME.
! Ivpul Arrira.
Allegheny Ar«.nim.«Uti..n 25 *.* 9 17 *-■
Allegheny K\|ir.w < ,J „ ,* „
New i iu-tl» Aicommolutkiii ; ■'
Akron Mail. » J?
All < he ny Aeeaamodotion 10 05 ii i»
AlKvitenv Kxpr«*w.. ;t P M , 4
IVIi t Bait. and Now York Kxpr«*» 10 4. urn.
Chicago Expr» « :i 35 pin 11 am
Allegheny Mail •> J J Jj
Allegheny "Flyer" -.<>.« 7!« «
Ell\v<*«d Accommodaiion m J
Chicago Limited ; « r » " 7*7 A *
Kanc-aml Bradford Mail ® 50 A.M 5 20 i-.M
Clirion Accommodation r » P * M ,J< ' A M
Cleveland and tliica#* Express... «'• 25 am
8l T NI>AY TRAINS.
Allegheny Express.. 8 15 A.m 932 A.M
Allegheny Accoaun*"lfttion 5 42 P.m p -J®
Newcastle Accommodation 8 15 A.Jtj 7 03
Chicago Express 4 05 P.M.11 fiO am
Allegheny Accommodation 7 03 pm
Train arriving at 5.20 p.m. leaves B. & 0. depot,
Pittsburg at 3.40 p.iu and P. k W., Allegheny at 3.50
P. m. .
On Saturdays a train, known as the theatre tram,
will have Hntli rat .*..45 p. m., arriving at AHegiieujj
at 7returning leave Allegheny at 11.-10 p. m.
Pullman fdeeping cars on Chicago Express between
Pittshorg and Chicago.
For through tickets to all points in the w« *t, norcn
*e*t or southwest and information regarding routes,
tfino of traius, etc. apply to
W. It. TURNER, Ticket Agent,
R. H. REYNOLDS, Sup t, . _. Va
Foxbtirg, Pa. C. . BASSETT,
G. P. A.. Allegheny, Pa
PENNSYLVANIA RA A,
WFSTERN PENNSYLVANIA DIVISION.
gcuwu IN Krrtcr Nov. 21,1898.
SOUTH. * WEEK DATS
A. M. A. M. A. 31. P. M. P. M.
BUTLER Leave C 25 H OTi 11 l. r > 235 505
ftaonbnrg; Arrive. «54 * 3011 •« 3 ®j*
Butler Junction.. " 72<85312 02 " V '*»
Butler Junction...Leave| 73085312 r- 3 o
Natron* Arriv. 7 3X 'J "1 12 30 335 fi 02
Tmrentnm S* "7 la y._» 34_ >O7
Springdato 7 50 !j 16 lj. 4-. 1 <>- .....
ClareUMHit .. ; •■*< J"®
Sharjxbiirg * JjJ [' '''■ }'] *}i ' -
Alleelieuy 8 y 48 1 «5, 4 -u ti 4.J
.AlWgMu; A.M. A.M. P.M. P. M. P. M.
SUNDAY | TRAINS.—Leave Hutl<-r fur Allegheny
City and principal intermediate statkms at 7:35 a. ni.,
iii'i HM> p. rn.
NORTH. WEEK DATS
A. M.jA. M. A.M. P. M P. M
* AtMibeny City. ...leave 700 U CKJ 11 - 1 230 t, 10
Hharißburg I 1 «, # j2jU 37 2 45 ...
gsssS :::: •»!«£ I"
Natmna..:::::: 1 39 9«1212:331 «51
Butlor Juuetiun...arrive 7 40: 9 50:12 22 -1 4;» 1 (*)
Butler Junction leave 740j9 50 12 2-> 4 07j iOO
Saxonburg 816101j 12 4J 430 724
BCTLKB arrive, 8 4<':lo 1 1. 1 505 .50
[A.M.|A.M.;P. M.;P. M.;P. M
SUNDAY TRAINS.—Leare Allegheny City for But
ler and principal intermediate stations at 7:20 a. m. rod
930 p m.
Weekdays. FOB THE EAST. Weekdays.
P.M. AM , ;R. M. P M '
235 C 25: IT BCTLEU ? r , .1 II *
3 251 7 27.ar]Butler Junction lv 9 50; 12 25
4 00 7 46 lv Butler Junction ar 8 30 12 08
4 <ks{ 7 49jar Freeport l v g2812 00
409 7 531 41 Allegheny Junction.. 82412 01
421 804 M Leechbnrg " gO9 11 4i»
4*4<» 821 " Paulton (Apollo) 7 5.* 11 32 P
6*06; 8 51 " Saltstur# 44 7 30 11 09
5*41 9 22| " Blairsville " 70010 40 *
530 9 30j " Blairsville Intersection..." 5 56(10 10
8 50 11 40 " Altoona 44 j 3 15 8 00
1 00' 3 10 " Harrirtrarg 44 11 45 3 00
4 30! 0 23, " Philadelphia : 8 30 11 20
A.M. P. 31.1 |A.M. P. M
On Sunday, train leaving Butler 7:35 a. m., connects ;J
or Hamburg, Altoona and Philadelphia. 0
Through trains for the east leave Pittsburg (Lmon
Station), as follows: —
Atlantic Express, daily 2\
Pennsylvania Limited " 7:15 e
Day Express, " ♦:«*> a
Main Lino Express, c
Harrisburg Mail, 44 12:45 VM C
Philadelphia Express. '• 1 ~.. .. -1:50 "
Mail and Express daily. F«>r New York only.
Through buffet sleeper; no coaches 7:00
Eastern Express, " 7:05 44 1
Fast Line, 4 S**® 4
Pittsburg Limited, daily, with through cuarhmt
to New York, and sleeping cars to New York, J
Baltimore and Washington or';*. No extra
tare on this train KkOO "
Philad'a Mail, Sundays on>y 8:40 A.M _
Fflr Atlantic City (via Delaware River Bridge, nil
rail route), 8:00 A.M, and 8:30 P.M, daily. j
For detailed information, address Thos. K. Watt, Pass. I
Ant. Western District, Corner Fifth Avenue and Smith- (
field Street. Pittsburg, Pa. (
J B. HUTCHISON, T. E. WOOD <
General Manage. Gen' 1 .Piissr. Agent. i
WHITE I
<
PINE
TAR
DROPS.
A Pleasant Palatable Remedy.
FOR ALL
THROAT and LUNG TROUBLE.
Manufactured and Solil by
J. A. RICHEY.
Butler, Pa
Now is The Time to Have
Your
CLEANED or DYED
If you want goou and reliable
cleaning or dyeing done, there is
just one place in town where you
can get it, and that is at
The Butler Dye Works
218 Center avenue,
do fine work in out- !
door Photographs. This is the
time of year to have a picture ot
your house. Give us a trial.
Agent for the Jamestown Sliding
Blind Co.—New York.
E. FISHER & SON,
EVE^f
my W fAR TWICE AS,{- ppi>
£*? , ASANY OTHF P '
Practical Horse Shoer
WILL ROBINSON,
Formerly Horse Shoer at the
Wick house has opened busi
ness in a shop (in the rear of
the" Arlington Hotel, where
he will do Horse-Shoeing in
the most approved style.
TRACK AND ROAD HORSES
A SPECIALTY.
JKEELEY CURE. J
5 LIQUOR AND OPIUM HABITS. J
P Removes all desire and appetite, builds up the f
a system, renews hearth and viaor, brightens the m
] | Intellect and fits one lor business. >
W TH« ONLY KKF.I.IY INSTITUTE T
£ Booklet frc*. IS WESTKEN PENNSYLVANIA. 4
fiMfc l I I" © ,,r Williams' Indian Pilo
I I E. 3%OintmenHvill euro Wind.
I II I r w Ului:t* hi; and Itch ids I
M—<oß a S ■■files. It absorbs the tumors. :
H ■ allays the ltchlni? at otiLi . act:>
S5 fa ■#■:« a jmulUce. nivos ins'iiut re
ft ■ llcr. Dr. Williams'lndian Pile O.m
--■ ment i<prepared for Piles and Itch
H !ng of the private parts. Every box is !
warranted. By drmrgUt?. by mail on re
ceipt oi price. .">0 cents and # I.<K». WiLLIJMb
MANUFACTURING CO.. Prop*, Cleveland, uluo. j
For Sale by D. H WULLEft. »
A more pitiful than a mother and i
her child, both captives and shackled in a
dungeon, could not well be imagined.
There are thousands of mothers and their
babes who lie shackled by disease in the |
dungeon of death.
Without knowing it, or having the faint
est comprehension of it, the fault lies with
the mother. Too many women enter upon :
the responsibilities of wifehood and moth
erhood while suffering from weakness and
disease of the delicate and important or
gans that make wifehood and motherhood
possible. A woman who suffers in this way
cannot be a capable wife and a competent
mother. Before entering upon the duties
and responsibilities of these positions, she
should see to it that her health, both gen
eral and local, is thoroughly restored. Dr.
I'ierce's Favorite Prescription is the best
of all medicines for this purpose. It acts
directly on the sensitive organs concerned,
making them strong, healthy and vigorous.
It promotes regularity of the functions,
allays irritation and inflammation, heals J
ulcerilion, checks unnatural and exhaust
ing drains and soothes pain. It tones and
builds up the shattered nerves. It turns
the dangers and pains of maternity into
safety and ease It is a medicine that is
intended for this one purpose only and is
good for no other. Dealers sell it and no
honest dealer will suggest a substitute.
"!>r Pierce's Favorite Prescription di<l me so
much good that to-day 1 am well again and
stronger than I have been for years." writes
Mrs. Alex. Lockie, of Wise, Isabella Co.. Mich.
•' I have a babv one year old and as fat and
healthy as one "could wish to see. I took two
bottles of Favorite Prescription.' I keep I)r.
Pierce's Pleasant Pellets in the house all the
time My family take no other kind of pills '
Dr. Humphreys'
Specifics act directly upon the disease,
without exciting disorder in other parts
of the system. They Cure the Sick.
KO. CCRES. PRICES
1-Fevern. Congestion*, Inflammations. ,25
a—Worms. Worm Fever, Worm Colic... .'45
3—Teethins. Colic. Crying,Wakefulness .25
4—Diarrhea, of Children or Adults 25
f—Touch>. Colds, Bronchi tig 25
B—Aeuralcia. Toothache, Faceache 25
9—Headache, Sick Headache, Vertigo .25
JO-Dy»pepsin. Indigestion, Weak Stomach.2s
U- Suppressed or Painful Periods 25
12— Whites, Too Profuse Periods 25
13—Croup, Laryngitis. Hoarseness 25
14—Salt Rheum. Erysipelas, Eruptions.. .25
15—Rheumatism. Rheumatic Pains 25
16—Malaria. Chills, Fever and Ague 25
19—Catarrh, Influenza, Cold In the Head .25
20—Whooplns-Coug .25
K7—kidney Diseases .25
2H— Siervous Debility 1.00
30—i'rinary Weakness, Wetting Bed. .25
77—Grip. Hay Fever 84
Dr. Humphreys' Manual of all Diseases at your
Druggist* or Mailed Free.
SoTd hy druggists, or sent on receipt of price.
Humphreys' Med. Co., Cor. William & Joliii btA*
New York.
2179
Any person!in need of pure Ikiuors will do
well by calling up the above telephone
number, and order will be filled and shipped
promptly. ~
We are headquarters for the following dis
tilleries:
FINCH. MT. VKRSON,
(iirCKENHEIXEB. DII.LIStiKR.
UIBSO.V. OVEBHOIiT.
LABUE. THOMPSOX.
BBIDfiKPORT.
and offer them to you unadulterated fl year
old at $1 00 per full quart, ti quarts, $5.00,
GRAXHFATHEB'S CHOICE,
Whiskey guaranteed 3 years old. J2.00 per
gallon.
On all C. O. D. or mail orders of $.">.00 or
over, we box and ship promptly: express
charges prepaid.
411 Water Street,
ROBERT LEWIN & CO.,
Telephone, 2 j79. Pittsburg, Pa.
Opposite H. &O. Depot
i! IF YOU HAVE NOT \>
: A CLEAR
i: COMPLEXION j:
it is only one of many indications <|
that your liver is out of order.
1 1 Use a remedy of < [
50 YEARS
« standing, that has acquired a , [
J > reputation for curing Livercom- <,
< I plaints—such, as < [
i: SELLERS' CELEBRATED
;i LIVER PILLS. . ;
< [ They are easy to take, will , >
J > improve your complexion and <,
< [ relieve you of those low spirits, J j
| > sleepless nights, sick headache, <,
< | costiveness and biliousness.
S W. J. GILMORE CO. <!
, » PITTSBURG, PA. S
< ; At all Druggists, 25c. >
MARKLETON
SANATORIUM
Has all the elements Necessary
for an Ideal Health Resort.
Skillful Medical Service,
Invigorating Mountain Air,
Pure Waters,
Scenery Unsurpassed in America.
Only three hours' ride east from
Pittsburg, in the Allegheny moun
tains.
Open all tho year, under the medical con
trolof Dr. E. O. Grossman. graduate of Uni
versity of Vermont, assisted by skillful phy
sicians. Appoint ments of the most approved
kinds, and first-class in every respect.
Treatment by medicines and baths or all
kinds, massage and electricity. Hot, and
cold, salt Turkish, Roman, sit/., electro
thermal, electro-chemical and needle baths.
Building heated with hot water, lighted by
electricity, supplied with pure mountain
water, surrounded by quiet, restful moun
tain scenery. Located Pittsburg division
of ii. &O. 11. K., which connects it with the
principal cities and their railroad systems;
also with the Pennsylvania railroad at
Hyndman, Johnstown. Connelsville. Ilrad
doek. Terms reasonable. Special rates for
ministers, missionaries, teachers, physicians
and their families
For further information and circulars
address
THE MARKLETON SANATORIUM CO.,
Markleton, Somerset Co.. Pa.
C. SELIGMAN & SON
TAILORS.
No. 416 W. Jefferson St.,
Butler,JPa.
A line of latest Foreign
and I'omestie Suitings
always in stock.
Fit, Style and Work
manship guaranteed
to give satisfaction
PRICES REASONABLE
When in Butier stop at
Mitchell's Restaurant
For MEALS and LUNCHES.
Everything NEW
and FIRST-CLASS.
Room formerly occupied bv K<l. Goss,
116 West lefferson Street, Butler.
> Subscribe lor the (JixixiN
THE CITIZLKN.
HADE IX ONE NIGHT.
How the Harbor of Marshfield, Cape
Cod Bay, Was Formed.
k. XortWn»t Gale filed Ip «»»e Said
and Created n \alualile An
eheraice for the CoMt
Shipping.
Years afo Marshfield, situated on
Cape Cod bay, atx>ut half way between
Cohasset and Plymouth, was a bus
tling- little coast town, and was in fact
one of the shipbuilding- towns of note
}n the country's earliest history. The
famous trading- brig Columbia, after
which the Columbia river was named,
was built here, as were also several ves
sels used as privateers in the war of
ISI2. If it had been allowed to work
out its own destiny, Marshfield might
even now be a thriving town like Es
which is known for its honest and
thorough ship-building wherever the
fishermen of New England guide their
restless keels. But nature intervened,
and walled the town up in a prison, the
like of which may be seen at many
places on sandy Cape Cod.
Originally the mouth of the river
was at a point nearly opposite the town,
but gradually, as the soil washed down
by the river and the sand worked up
by the seat met, a bar formed extend
ing from the north side of the river s
mouth across it, thus stopping the
swift, direct flow which had always
kept the channel free and clear, lhen
the river turned south, and the sandbar
followed it, growing in size as the
How of the river decreased, until it
had Ijecome a good-sized promontory
jnslde of which the river flowed, with
an outlet far to the southward of the
original one opposite the town. Being
turned out of its regular channel in this
way, the river also broadened and shal
lowed. The current slackened, and the
deposits carried down by it were
dropped inside, instead of outside, the
mouth, while throughout the little
roadstead inside the old mouth islets
formed, so that there were few good
places for a boat to lie, even if any
thing more than the shoalest draught
could have got in over the bars at the
mouth.
So Marshfield remained behind its
barrier of sand and peat until the night
of November 26, when the big storm set
in. All night long tho lierce north
east gale piled the water up against
the outside of the promontory, and on
the following day, in conjunction with
the gale, came one of the highest tides
of the year. The water rose until at
length it broke clear over a low place
In the promontory, between what are
known as third and fourth cliffs, and
swept up into the river with all the*
power of the high tide and hurricane at
its back. The river was filled until the
water rose over the bridge aud up
into the street at Marshfield, and hun
dreds of acres of the big marshes ly
ing to the southeast of the town, and
from which it takes its name, were
covered several feet with water.
When all this immense body of water
started on its return to the sea with the
falling tide, it was impossible for It to
get out quickly enough by the shallow
and devious way through the mouth of
the river, so it went out in the way
most of it had come in, by the break
made by the sea over the promontory,
and the scouring of this strong tide
undid in a single night the work of
many years. When the Marshfield folk
visited the place the next day they
found, where there had been solid
ground 48 hours before, a clean-cut
channel, 250 feet wide and 13 feet deci>
for its full width, through which the
tide ran like a millrace, while in the
older mouth of the river there was
hardly and movement. For a mile or
more outside of the cut the water was
discolored by the dirt and refuse
which were being carried out by the
current, and even then it was evident
the bars and islets which had filled the
harbor were being washed away.
The work that begun then has been
going steadily on ever since. Many of
the little islets which had formed in
the harbor have entirely disappeared,
and others are growing smaller every
day. There Is a straight, free entrance
to the sea, which is in a more direct
line with the flow of the river than
even the old mouth of years ago, and
through which a good-sized vessel can
enter at any stage of the tide. Inside
of it is a harbor large enough for quite
a fieet to anchor, with good holding
gn ■ ! and from 30 to 40 feet of water
in t places, while the rush of the
tide appears to be deepening both chan
nel and. roadstead.
If matters continue as favorably as
they have begun, the harbor thus
strangely created will be a very val
uable one, not only to Marshfield itself,
but to our coast shipping, and even
more to our yachtsmen. Up to now
there haa not been a single good harbor
on the south shore, as the outer harbor
of Plymouth is not a safe anchorage
for small craft, and the inner harbor
can be gained onty by a skilled pilot.
Between Plymouth aud Hull there are
only Scituate and Coliasset. Both of
these are shoal, and the latter is with
out sufficient protection from a north
east gale.—Boston Transcript.
Lard Sauce.
This is a delicious cold sauce to serve
with hot puddings, notably apple pud
dings and tarts and all boiled suet pud
dings: One white of egg, four ounces
fresh butter, two ounces powdered
sugar, one-balf teaspoonful of vanilla
or four teaspoonfuls brandy. Beat the
butter till it looks like whipped cream.
It must be quite soft. Mix in the sugar
and beat again. Whisk the whiteof egg
till it is a stiff froth: add to the butter,
and beat again till light and frothy.
Add the vanilu or brandy gently. Heap
up in a glass dish, grate a dust of nut
meg over the io|> and put In a cold place
to harden.- ii.>>; ..) ('.lobe.
"The White Man's iiurdeii."
Take up the White Man's burden,
Nor stop to mourn and sob —
The tilling of the office.
The giving of the job.
Too small now grows your country.
The places won't go round:
Among those new-caught people
New chances must be found.
Take up the White Man's burden—
Those fluttered folk and wild
Know naught of holding office,
As devil, man or child.
While ye have such a surplus
Twould really be a shame
To let this chance slip past you,
Increase your power and fame!
Take up the White Man's burden —
Your duty bids you rule—
Of course, you do not want to.
But, then, you're not a fool.
You've often proved your fitness
In caucus aud on stump;
The Lord made Anglo-Saxons
To make jioor natives hump.
Dr. Bull's, Cough Syrup is the best
medicine for pulmonary troubles. One
• bottle will convince you of its excel
! lence. Try it.
From Pancapan toOvaro,
From Tando on the bay;
: From Santa Cms to Sampaloe.
And by Mandalay:
From Pasig down to Valero,
i From Miguel—what fun!
, From Ermita to Caloocan,
We got 'em on the run.
RHEUMATISM CURED IN A DAY.
'Mystic Cure" for Rheumatism and
Neuralgia radically cures in i to .$ days.
Its action upon the system is remarkable
and mysterious. It removes at once the
causes and the disease immediately dis
appears. The first dose greatly benefits;
■75 cents. Sold by J. C. Redic, and J. V.
i Balyh Druggists Butler \pr 916
SCIENCE AND INDUSTRY.
liuss.ia'6 export of eggs exceeds I.SoO.
000,000 a year.
Frost has a variety of effects upon
different products. Under the Mime in
fluence eggs. will burst, apples contract
and potatoes turn black.
The utilization of grain elevator
waste for sheep and cattle food has
given rise to a new industry in the
northwest. The waste brings seven dol
lars a ton.
The whirling winds of Arabia some
times excavate sand pits to the depth of
2,000 feet, the rim usually being three
times that depth in diameter. A sand
pit thus made may be entirely obliter
ated in a few hours, and another exca
vation within a short distance of it.
The Lick observatory has done won
ders in photographing nebulae, the sun
and its corona. The party from this
observatory was most successful in its
observation of the sun's eclipse in India
last. January. It was ascertained clear
ly that the sun spots are due to solar
activitv. and that the earth only :nter-
cepts one-half a millionth part of the
heat radiated by the sun.
Steel rails now figure as the cheapest
finished product in wrought iron or
steel. A good lesson in the finances of
modern industry is also afforded by
them. To establish a steel tail works,
an expenditure of $3,000,000 is required
before a lingle rail can be turned out.
The steel is made to conform to an accu
rate chemical composition —the most
accurate in the ordinary range of tech
nical operations.
Mushroom juice is a sure cure
against snake poison, according to M.
Phisalix's statement before the Paris
Academie des Sciences. He has found
that all mushrooms possess a substance
which acts as an antitoxin against ser
pents. Unfortunately his preparation
possesses toxic qualities of its own,
which he has been unable to eliminate
entirely. The patient, however, wiTl
have the satisfaction of knowing that it
is not from snakebite that he dies.
STORIES FOR CHILDREN.
There Should lie Variety, But the Oil
Favorite, Hear Frequent
Repetition.
When one speaks of telling stories to
the little people, prose narratives seem
to be commonly understood, and as
commonly used, but there is no mistake
greater than to suppose that children
are not susceptible to the charms of
poetry.
They care more for poetry, on the
contrary, than the majority of grown
people, whether for the melody, the
rhythm, the rhymes, the short lines,
the simplicity and picturesqueness of
expression, or for all these reasons to
gether, which makes it a thing pleas
antly different from common speech.
Goethe advised that every child should
see a pretty picture and hear a beauti
ful poem everj* day, and if we would
not banish the charm of poetry from
mature life it behooves us to follow his
advice and subject the child to its in
fluence at the time of greatest suscepti
bility.
We must beware, however, of giving
a one-sided development by confining
ourselves too much to one branch of
literature; we must include in our
repertory some well-selected myths,
fairy stories which are pure and spirit
ual iu tone, and a fable now and then.
Nature stories, hero tales, animal anec
dotes, occasional narratives about
good, wholesome children, neither
prigs nor infant villains, plenty of fine
poetry, as has been said, and, for the
older ones of the family, legends, alle
gories and historic happenings. A
large stock of stories is not essential
for little children. They feel, as Bul
wer said, the beauty and the holiness
that dwell in the customary and the
old; and they are well pleased—and it
is best that ft should be so —with hear
ing the same old favorites repeated
again and again, in song or in story,
from their mothers' lips.—Nora Archi
bald Smith, in Ladies' Home Journal.
IRON IN EGGS.
An Intfcnlou* Feed* It
to III* Hen*—Medicine In
Hen Krnlt.
There is scarcely any branch iu which
medicine has not advanced in the last
<2O years, but in no one branch has more
improvement been shown than in the
compounding and putting together of
drugs. No more is the unwilling pa
tient made to swallow large doses of
nauseating medicine, for sugar-coated
pills, capsules and wafers have come
into use, and patients can now take the
most vile-tasting medicines without
any discomfort. Xow comes along a
Frenchman with a still more ingenious
plan which opens up to pharmacy un
bounded possibilities of going still fur
ther ahead.
On account of the difficulty of as
similating iron as a medicine, a
French druggist has sought to intro
duce it in a digestible way by what he
terms ferruginous eggs.
Hens can digpest iron easily, while
rendering it back through the albumen
of their eggs in a form that is easily di
gested by the weaker stomachs of man
kind. A salt of iron is given to the
hens with grains of wheat. A dozen of
these medicated grains of wheat a day
makes the hens, after three or four
days, lay eggs which are very rich in
iron already digested.
The Frenchman is experimenting
further with other drugs, and it is not
without the bounds of possibility that
we shall shortly be able to take all our
medicine in the form of eggs.—New Or
leans Times-Democrat.
Sore To.
George—Do you think that your fa
ther will consent to our marriage?
Ethel —Oh, yes! he has always hu
mored my silliest wishes.—Brooklyn
Life.
Dr. Bull's Cough Syrup has saved
many a life. Tt is a positive cure for
brouchitis and incipient consumption
Price 35 cts.
The lower house of the Kansas Leg
islature has capped the climax of
shameful legislation by preparing to
pass a bill fixing the price for dyeing
whiskers at 15 cents. There has prob
ably never been a law so ill-advised and
unjust as this. The sumptuary laws of
the Middle Ages which forbade persons
of a certain class of society wearing
garments of moreLthan certain values
aiul qualities, no matter what the pos
sessor's wealth, were the wisdom of
Solomon hitpself compared.vviih this bit
of Western lawmaking.
Get rid of scrofula taints in your
blood by taking a few bottles of Hood's
Saisaparilla.
When he talks in his sleep is about
the only time a man can get his wife's
absorbed undivided attention.
One reason that Eve got out of the
garden so quickly was that she didn't
have to wait to dress.
HOOD'S PILLS cure l-iver Ills, Bil
iousness, Indigestion. Headache.
Easy to take, easy to operate. 25c
No matter how badly a lisps she
is always able to prononnee "yes" with
out any possibility of being misunder
stood.
A Corry lady is said to have been
without doubt the most. Hurried female
in seven counties', last Sunday. When
coming out of ehnrch she discovered
that her bran new hat was adorned
with a tag on which was inscribed the
legend: "Reduced to $2.75.
Susan Van I>oozeii.
I'll write, for I'm witty, a popular
ditty.
To bring to me sheekles and fame.
And the only right way one can write
one to-day
Is to give it some Irish girl.s name;
There's " Rosy O'Grudy," that sweet.
' steady lady,"
And dear ' Annie Roonev." and such.
But mine shall be nearly origional,
really.
For "Susan Van Doozen is Dutch.
"Oh' fMisan Van Doozen. the girl of my
choos'n'.
Von stick in my bosom like glue.
When this you're perus'n' remember
I'm mus'n'
Sweet Susan Van Doozen. on yon;
So don't be abus'n' my offer, and
bruis'n'
A heart that is willing to woo.
And please be excus'n not cold and re
fus'n".
Oh! Susan Van Doozen. please do!'
Now, through it I'll scatter —a quite
easy matter -
The lines that we all of ns know.
How the neighbors all cry as she pas
ses them by,
'There's Susan, the pride of the
row!" "
And something like "daisy" and "set
ting me crazy"—
These lines the dear public would
miss-
Then chuck a "sweetheart" in. and
"never to part" in
And end with a chorus like this:
"Oh! Susan Van Doozen. before I'd l>e
los'n'
One glance from your eyes of sky
blue,
I vow I'd stop us'n' tobacco, and
booz'n' —
That word is not nice, it is true—
I wear ont my shoes'n I'm los'n' my
roos'n'
My reason, I should say, dear Sue-
So please change your views'n become
my own Susan,
Oh! Susan Van Doozen. please do'"
A good many married men blame
heredity for their troubles. Their
fathers were married before them.
Young men like to make a display of
their superfluous cash before they're
married. They know that after they're
married they won't have any.
Don't think all amateur photogra
phers are pessimists because they take
poor views of life.
A monarchy has subjects. A repub
lic has citizens, and cannot have sub
jects without self-stultification.
Half the people in the world are un
happy because they can't afford the
things that make the other half miser
able.
II IM Trouble.
Brown —What sort of a man is Sprig
gins?
Smith—Well, you can't get an idea
into his head, and you can't get an idea
out of his head. —Puck.
Art.
Guest —That's a very fine picture, Mr.
Packinhain.
Mr. Packinhain —Well, it ought to be.
I paid SSO for the frame alone.—Chicago
Daily News.
Xo Hope.
He—Are you sure jour love for me ia
dead?
She —Yes. Heart failure.—Harlem
Life.
A Cnnaril.
Gusherly—They sdy Guzzle drinks
like a fish!
Lusherly—lt's a lie! Guzzle never
touches water. —N. Y. Evening Journal.
He Unity.
"You don't judge a man by his
clothes, do you, Robinson?"
"Oh, no! I always consult has tailor
first." —ruck.
All Honest Atlmiiwiloii.
"So you want to marry my daughter,
young man? What are your pros
pects?"
"Pretty poor. uuJess you give your
consent." —Town Topics.
liotli Unfortunate,
Man can't regulate himself accord*
ing to history. There was Samson, who
lost his life because he had his hair cut,
and Absalom, because he didn't. —N. Y
World.
Soflleicnt.
The Sweet Young Thing—But why
slionld not women enter politics?
The Savage Bachelor —Too many
bosses there now. —Indianapolis Jour
nal.
Mr. Sninrt Aleck Talks.
She —Why do thev call a battleship
"she," do you suppose?
He —I suppose because there are so
manv arms about her. —Yonkcrs Stateß-
A Bit Historical.
When our grandfathers a hunting went,
in the long ago, they took down, from its
peg 011 the wall, a gun of 110 mean dimen
sions long of barrel and strong of stock.
Over o.ie shoulder was thrown the polished
powder horn, and over the other the buck
sltln bullet pouch embroidered in fancy
worsted by the good man's wife. Then the
Hint was carefully tented against good steel
that it might, without fail, strike fire, when
the hunter took aim and pulled trigger on
the bounding buck.
And in those same days came a wonderful
invention of picture takiiiß and with much
pain and sulTcrlng our grandfathers, in still
stocks and with face chalked, "looked pleas
ant" for full twenty minutes together, that
we. their defendants, might see their featur
es In little pluslied lined cases, gay with
brass trimmings.
AND TO DAY! We defy the very el
ements wo use. The crack of the sports
man's rifle is no longer accompanied by a
puff of smoke. The photographer is no long
er obliged to seek the dark room when re
loading ills camera.
I The nitrous cartridge has removed the
'smoke nuisance"; the Film cartridge has
done away with the dark room.
Get a Kodak at the only place in town
DOUGLASS'
Near P O.
Peoples Phonei62.
Pearson B. Nace's
Livery Feed and^SaleSStable
Rear of
Wick House, Butler, Penn'a.
The best of horses and first class ritfs al
ways on hand and for hire.
I»rst accommodations in town for perma
nent boarding and transient trade. Speci
al care guaranteed.
Stable Room For 65 Horses.
A GOOD class of horses, ln>tli drivers and
draft horses always on hand and for sale
under a full guarantee; and horses bought
upon proper notification by
PEARSON 3. NACE.
Telephone. No. 210.
I„ E. WICK,
DEALER IN
Rough f Worked Lumber
OK A 1,1, KINDS.
Doors, Sash, Blinds, Mouldings,
Shingles and Lath
Always in Stock.
LIME. HUR AND PLASTER
Office opposite P. &|W.Jl)epoL
BUTLER, PA.
A< TIVE SOLICITOUS WAN'TF.H KVEllV
"whore for "The Story of tin-
by Murat Halstead, commissioned by the j
Government :is (>tti<-tal Histoiian to t li«* \\ ir
Department. The book was written In arniv |
camps at San Francisco, on the I aeitie witii
General Merritt, in the hospitals at Mono- (
lulu, in llong Kong.in the American trcnehes i
at Manil i. in the insurgent can-ps with !
Aguinaldo. on the deek of the Olympia with
Dewey, and in the roar of battle :it the fall
of Manila. Bonanza for agents. Brimful of
original pictures taken by government pho
tographer-on the spot. Large ', K * V» ,
prices, iiig profits. Freight paid. Credit
given. Drop all trashy unoftieial war books.
Outfit free. Address, F. T. Barber. Secy
Insurance Bldg. Chicago, I
ROAD AND BRIDGE REPORTS.
Notice Is hereby pi von that the following!
road &n«t bridges* have t*?en confirmed nisi f
by the Court and will lie presented on the
fir>t Saturday «»f Mar.. Court. l>vt*. u-lng the
11th day «>f -.aid month, and if no exceptions
ar* filed they will be confirmed absolutely.
T>. No. l. IKvemlier term. I<K In re pe« j
tition Citizens of Clay township for a pub
lic road l»eginning at the intersection of the |
I ri\ ate road of s It. Smith and J. 11. Timblin
and the Ituddycreek and Svnbvry road, and i
and ending at a point where the same priv- |
ate road intersects the Beaver Dam road.
>eptemlier 2. I**. viewers appointed, and t
December 3, report of viewers filed in i
favor of locating said proposed road.
l». . « : il.vr 10. 1 approved, and tiv width t
of road at 'Si feet. Notice to be given accord- j
Ing to rules of Court.
BY THE Cot* KT
R. I). No. ». Decerning term. I-'.**. In r«- j
petition of citizens of Wintield and Clearfield
townships for a public road to lead from a
point on the public* road leading to Wintield j
Furnace, on lands of Melissa I*. McKee and j
F. W. McKee. atiout rods west from the j
east line of said land in Winfield township, j
to a point on the public road on lands of Me- i
lis>a r. McKr.' and 1. V\ McKe«-. about ten i
rods from the south llneofland of Mana»ah
Dugan in Clearfield township. SeptemU'i
27. lsv>. viewers appointed, and Novemlier 11.
Is I .!**. report of viewers tiled In favor of locat
ing said road.
Pecemlier 10.1*118, approved, and fix width
of road at feel. Notice to be given accord -
Ing to rules of Court.
BY THiCorRT.
K. I>. No. 4. Decemlier term isys. In re pe
tition .»f Supervisor* of Buffalo township for
vacation and supply of a portion of the road
leading from llannahstown to Saxotiburg
and Tarenturn road. the same being the por
tion which leads from the south line of
Reamer's land to the intersection of said
road with the Saxonburg and Tarentum
road. November 11. Nfc, viewers appointed,
and DecemlnT lsiis. report of viewers filed
in favor of t he desire of t he petitioners.
Decern)»er 10, 1 •»'.*>. approved, and fix width
of road at :*i feet. Notice lobe given accord
ing to rules of Court.
BY THE COURT.
U. I>. No, rt. December, term I st .**. In re pe
tition of citizens of Parker township for va
cation. change and supply of a portion of the
road leading from the Stat** road to a point
near the west line of lands of George Daub
enspeck, the oortlou desired to lie vacated,
changed and supplied being that which
leads from the point at or near the county
bridge over Hear creek, on the State road,
in the village of Martinsburg. to a point at
or near the residence of Thomas D. Kelly.
Novemlier 12, IKK viewers were appointed,
and Decemlier \ l>i*s. report of viewers filed
in favor of t he desire of t he petit loners.
Decemlier 10, !*•*». approved, and fix width «if
road at 'Si feet. Notice to be given according j
to rules of Court.
BY THE CorRT.
K D. No. 7. December term. l>ys. In re
petition of Citizens of Forward township for
a county bridge over Connoquenessing creek
where tne road leading from the Evans City
road to the Butler and Harmony road crosses
said creek. November 14. lsus, viewers ap
pointed, and November 30, IsUs, report of
tiled In favor of locating the propos
ed bridge.
December 10, Ist)*, approved. Notice to lie
given according to rules of the Court, and be
laid before the grand jury at next term.
BY THE COURT.
R. D. No. 4. June term. ls<>. h, Tv petition
of citizens of Butler IN trough and vicinity for
a county bridge over Connoquenessing creek
near Walter's mill, in said iMirough. Septem
ber 17. isys. viewers appointed, and December
.*». lsu>. report of viewers tiled.
Decemlier 10. ls*»s. approved, Notice to be
given according to the rules of the Court,
and to lie laid before the grand jury at next
term. BY THE COURT.
Certified from the record this 4th day of
February. 1 sW.
ISAAC MEALS.
Clerk U. S. Court
REGISTER S NOTICES.
The Register hereby gives notice that the
following accounts of executors, adminis
trators and guardians have been filed in
this office according to law, and will be pre
sented to Court for confirmation and allow
ance on Saturday. the llth day of March.
Istm. at «.♦ A. M.. of said day:
I Final account of Mrs. Ida Williams, ad
ministratrix of W. G. Williams, deceased,
late of Sllpperyrock township.
'J. Final account of Elisha Hemphill and
Chas. Warner executors of Jacob Hemphill,
decessed. late of Lancaster township.
a. Final account of li. C. Montgomery, ex
ecutor of John Montgomery, deceasetT. lute
nf Clinton township.
4. Final acconnt of L. S. I.artlin. adminis
trator of Wm. Lardin. deceased, late of Clin
ton towusliip.
5. Final account of W. A. Forquer, admin
istrator of l.'hurles K. Green, deceased, late
of Clearfield township.
ti. Final account of Michael H. Ivnouff,
guardian of Emma Ivnouff. minor child of
John M. KnoulT. of Jackson township, us
stated by John M. Knouff, executor of Mich
ael 11 Knouff, deceased.
7. Final account of Eliza J. Stoops. guar
dian of Tillie Stoops, minor child of James
Stoops, deceased, late of Cherry township.
s. first partial account of llarian Book,
executor of William L. Book, deceased, late
of Allegheny township
!>. Final account of .lames N. Moore, guar
dian of tieo. M. Mcßride. now McKee. tnlno
child of Heorge A. Mcßride, deceased, late of
Butler borough.
It). First partial account of liobert M. 8011,
administrator C. T. A. of John I'. Koll, de
ceased. late of Cranberry township.
11. Final account of J. I). Marshall, trustee
in the estate of Uottieb Hieronymous, as
stated by Tlios. M. Marshall, administrator
of J. I). Marshall, deceased.
li. Final account or Ruth E. Shira. admin
istrator of Samuel Shira. deceased, late of
Washington township.
i:i. Final and distribution account of J. A
Ripper, executor of Anna Eva Kauss, deceas
ed. late of Forward township.
14. Final account of Edward S. Wright, ad
ministrator of Samuel Wright, deceased, late
of Connoquenessing township.
15. Final account of Annie Weidhos and A
Krause. executors of Lewis Weidhos, deceas
ed. late of Winfield.
lti. Final and distribution aocouut of Win.
K. Cuthbcrt, executor of A. Cuthbert, de
ceased. late of Connoquenessing tow nship.
17. Final account of Hugo F. Miller and
llenry Langhorst, executors of Fredrick
Langhorst, deceased, late of Cranberry
townsnip.
is. Final account of Ellen J. Hrownlleld
and Margaret C. Brownfield, administrators
of Wm. Brownfield. deceased, late of Donegal
township.
lit. Final account of J. M. Mcßurney.execu
tor of Rev. Geo. A. Wenzel, deceased, late of
Zelienople borough.
at. Second account of J. M. Mcßurney,trus
tee in the estate of Geo. A. Wenzel, deceased,
late of Zelienople borough.
21. Filial, account of A. C. Robb and J. H.
liobb. trustees of Wm. Robb, deceased, late
of Oakland township.
22. Final account of John Kully, adminis
trator of Curtis R. Ward, deceased, late of
Parker township.
21. Final account of Jacob Keck, executor
of John C. Hoffman, deceased, late of Butler
borough.
24. First partial account of I'. Schtnid and
I' l.angiiaus, executors of John Halstlen.
deceased, late of Zelienople borough.
25. First partial account of Johq Ferguson,
executor os John M. Mcßride, deceased, late
of Middlesex township.
SB. Final account of Wm. Allison, executor
of Mosses Thompson, deceased, late of Cen
tre township.
27. Final account of John A. Barrickman,
adm'r of Mary E. Barrickman, deceased, late
of' Cranberry township.
2s. Final account of S. J. Crowe, executor
of Oliver C. Crowe, deceased, late of Adams
township.
2!i. Final account of Mary A. Green, admin
istratrix of George R. Green deceased, late
of Allegheny township.
:iit. Finat account of Mr M. !<• fHurr and J.
I'. Murtland, executors of John Starr, deceas
ed, late of Concord township.
W.J.ADAMS. Register.
WIDOW S APPRAISEMENTS.
The following widow's appraisements of
personal property and real estate set apart
for the benefit of the widows of decedents
have been tiled in the office of the Clerk
of Orphans' Court of Butler Co.. viz:
Widow of John Jardin, pers. property. $300.00
John B. Slalian " " ..300.00
" John Kiester, " " . HCJ.OO
" J. W. Starr. " " •- 111.00
i . " J. H. Peters, " " .. 300.00
I'atton Bell, " - 835.74
'• Daniel Kape, " " .. 300.00
" .lames 11 am el, *' " .. 300.00
Geo. F. Miller. " " . 21)9.90
H. K. Elliott. " " .. HO.ISO
•• J. A. Gallagher " '• .. 209.54
Henony I'atridge, real estate 300.00
All persons interested in the above ap
praisements will take notice that they will
lif presented for confirmation to the Orphans
' court of Butler county. Pa., on Saturday, the
11th day Of March. A. !>., 1599, and If no ex
ceptions be filed they will IK' confirmed ab
solutely.
ISAAC MEALS. Clerk O. C.
NOTICE.
Notice is hereby given that Mary A.
McGnire, guardian of the estate of
Mary Slater, a lunatic, has filed her
final account in the office of the Pro
thonotarv of the Court of Common
Pleas of Butler county. Pa., at Ms. D.
No. 10, March term, 1898, book 7, page
'7t> and that the same will be presented
to the said Court for confirmation and
allowance on Saturday, the 11th day of
March, 1899. R".T THOMPSON,
Prothonotary s Office, Feb. 7, 1899.
TAFTTS I "Ji
IOH -DENTAL ROOMS.-- I]
I fSp&dOV 39 " sth Ave '> Pittsburg, Pa. lj
8 SFSMR V.VRCPRACTICA!.LV DU,U « T, '.« , 88
jIBST CROWN »"<» BF.IDJE work M
I 'Km. JBk"' l iltshurg— WHY NOT DO U
i AS#!, JMYOURS? i-u CROWNS "
YLLWT W"" 1 BRIDGE w»rk reduced (•: U
LLWLJ Hss PER TOOTH Also the LR
I y l,esl set LY y
< D. L. CLEELAND. 4
£ Jeweler and Optician, \
< 125 S. Main St., /
( Butler, Pa. v
I
I -
L*/ANTKT>—SEVERAI. TIUHTWORTH Y I'KHSONS
"In this state to maliap' our business 11
their own and nearby counties. It is mainly
office work conducted at home. salary
->tral)tlit sw a your and expenses definite,
ilMinafliie.nomorc.no less salary. Monthly
j7.v References. Enclose self-addre»saa
- stamped envelope Herbert E. He*s. 1 rest.,
I Dept. M. 'Jhicatfo
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
VKWTON BLACK,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Office on South DiamorulJStreel.
HH. GOUCHER,
• ATTORNKY'AT LAW.
Office in Mi chell building.
4 LKX RUSSELL,
A ATTORNKYJAT LAW.
Office with Newton Black, Esq. South
Diamond Street.
(LOL'LTKR & BAKER,
V. ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
Room 8., Armory buildin^.
JOHN W. COULTER,
FL ATTORNEY AT-LAW.
Special attention given to collections
and business matters.
Reference: Butler Savings Bank, or
Butler County National Bank.
1 B. BKEDIN,
F' • ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office on Main St. near Court House.
T T. BI.ACK,
A. ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Room J. —Armory building.
I M. PAINTER,
rJ • ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office Ijetweeu Postoff.cc and Diamond
C H. PIERSOL,
O. ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office at No. 104 East Diamond St.
r 1 F. L. McQUISTION,
V • CIVIL ENGINEER AND SURVEYOR,
Office near Court House.
I\R. C. AT WELL,
lJ Office 106 W. Diamond St., [Dr.
Graham's old office.]
HOUJS 7 to 9 a. m. and 1 to 3 and 7 to
8 p. m.
DR. CHAS. R. B. HUNT,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Eye, ear, nose and throat a specialty.
240 South Main St.
VU 11. BROWN,
II • HOMOEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN AND
SURGEON.
Office 236 S. Main St., opp. P. O.
Residence 315 N. McKean St.
QAMUEL M. BIPPUS,
U PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
200 West Cunningham St.
T BLACK,
L. PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
New Troutman Building, Butler Pa.
p M. ZIMMERMAN
IT . PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Office No. 45, S. Main street, [over City
Pharmacy.
DR. N. M. HOOVER
137 E. Wayne St., office nours. 10 to
12 a. m. 1 and to 3 p. m.
HW. WICK,
• DENTIST.
Has located in the new Stein building,
with all the latest devices for Dental
work.
DR. J. E. FAULK,
DENTIST,
Painless extraction—No Gas—Crown
and bridge work a specialty.
Office—Room No. I. new Bickel buihl
iug.
T J. DONALDSON,
J I DENTIST.
Artificial Teeth inserted on the latest
improved plan. Gold Fillings a spec
ialty. Office over Miler's Shoe Store.
DR. S. A. JOHNSTON.
DENTIST.
Gold Fillings Painless Extraction of
Teeth and Artificial Teeth without plates
a specialty .Nitrous Oxide or Vitalized Air
or Local naistlietics used.
Office over Millers grocery, east of Low
ty house.
DR. W. P. MCILROY,
DENTIST.
Formerly known as the "Peerless
Painless Extractor of Teeth." Located
permanently at ill East Jefferson St.,
Opposite Hotel Lowry, Butler. Will do
dential operations of all kinds by the
latest devices and up-to-date methods
\ r McALPIN.
V • DENTIST,
Now permanently in Bickel Building,
with a reliable assistant, and facilities
for best and prompt work.
People's Phone for Drs. V. or J. Mc-
Alpin—House No. 330; office No. 340.
WM. WALKER. J. S. WICK
Walker & Wick,
—GENERAL DEALERS IN—
REAL ESTATE,
OIL PROPERTIES-
LIFE INSURANCE, ETC.
AETTEIIEII BUII.DINO. OPP. POSTOFFICK
L. S. McJUNKIN,
Insurance and Real Estate
Agent.
1175 K. JEFFERSON.
BUTLER, - PA.
M. C. WAGNER,
ARTIST PHOTOGRAPHER,
139 South Main street-
Over Shaul & Nast's Clothing Store
M. A. BERKIMER,
Funeral Director.
337 S. Main St., Butler.
Butler Savings Bank
HLitler, Pa.
Capi'-al - |60,000.00
Surplus and Profits -- $ 170,000.00
JOS. L PURVIS President
J. HENRY TROUTMAN Vice-President
WM. CAMPBELL, Jr Caf hier
LOUIS B. STEIN leller
DlKECTO lis— Joseph L. Purvis, J. Henry
Tro'Uraan, W. I>. Brandon. W. A. Stein. J. 8.
Campbell.
The Butler Savings Hank is the Oldest
Banking Instltutlor.l n Butler County.
General banking business transacted.
We solicit accounts of -11 producers, mer
chants. farmers and others.
All business entrusv-d to us will receive
prompt attention.
Interest paid on time deuoslts.
TH K
Butler County National Bank,
Gutler Penn,
Capital paid in - - T L J0,000.00
Surplus and Profits - Jl 14,647.87
los. Hartman, ;President; J. V. Ritts,
Vice President; C. A. Bailey. Cashier;
John G. McMarlin, Ass't Cashier.
/ general banking buslne transacted.
Interest paid on time deposits.
Money loaned on approved security.
We Invite you to open an account with this
b.tnk. ...... „
DIRECT JR.- I—Hon. 1 —Hon. Joseph llartman. Hon.
\V. S. Waldron, 1 >r. is. M. Hoover. H. Mc-
Sweeney, E. K. Abrums, C. P. Collins. I. ti
Smith. Leslie I" llazlett. M. Klnegin. W
W. 11. I.arkin. John Humphrey. Dr. W. C.
McCandless, Ben Masseth. Levi M.' Wise
J. V. RltU?
I Clearance D. T. F»f3 I
The Leading Millinery House of Butler Co. < >
GREAT CLEARANCE SALE. ] [
All Holiday jjoods left over will be sold at almost J former price '
All Milliner}' Goods prices cut in ' *
Mourning goods for immediate use always in stock. i >
122 S. Main St D. T. Pape. BUTLER. PA.g
pAI riO tr«'«•-.:!.! ■ u afflictions :tt present. miiiiv cas«>s turn into the seemingly harm
liULUO rv:tllv dangerous din. ;ise "THE lilil Trout men t should Ik*
C"mim ii« » d when the first symptom is felt and only those who re<*eive the
greatest care recover without it leaving any til aflVct% When your physician prescribes
fur you hrin j the prescription to us ami wo will fill it carefully and with pure dru»?s onlv.
You should also have a hoi water bottle to keep your feet warm at night which will add
much to a speedy recovery. -Don't suffer from cold feet when we can sell you one at a very
reasonable price.
REDICK & GROHMAN
Prescription Druggists.
109 NORTH MAIN ST. BUTLER.
1899 1899 ' 1899
GOOD BUSINESS -
FOR
JANUARY AND FEBRUARY.
All our left Holiday go.~xls must ba sold and in order to do so we liave
cut prices almost in half.
All silver novelties that were si.oo now 6oc
" " 50c now 30c
All silver novelties and staples that were 1.25 now Soc
Solid silver thimbles that were 25 and 35c now 15c
First class 8 day clocks with alarm that were 3.25 now 2.25
First cj.iss 8 day clocks without alarm that were 3.00 now 2.00
A good watch, Gent size 2.50
A good silverine case with American movement 5.00
All other goods m our stock reduced tn prices so that it will pay you to buy
vonr watches, clocks, jewelery, si'verware, &c., at
PAPP7B»
122 South Main Street, ______ Butler, l'».
Repairing of All Kinds. Old Gold and Silver Take Same as Cash.
Whislcey
AS A
TWeclicine!
We don't claim th.it whiskey is u "cure-all", but physicians* tell
us that a Utile good whiskey as a stimulant is helpful in nearly ail
cases brought on by changes in the weather.
Have you the "GRIPPE"? Have you a heavy COLD? If so
get some whiskey and note it's good eflect.
We have a reputation for keeping good liquors.
Guaranteed absolutely pure and free from all impurities—Here are
some of our prices:
Anchor Rye—A good whiskey for the money, $2.00 per gallon.
Cabinet Rye—Can't be beat, - 3.00 "
Bear Creek Rye—A very fine whiskey, - 400 " "
Gin, Rum, Kummel, Brandy, $2.00, $2.50 and $3.00 per grJ.
We have some very fine Cailfornia wines of 1892 vintage, Port,
Sherry and Angelica at $2.00 per gallon. They are of good body
and of exquisite flavor.
Remember we pay expressage on all orders of $5.00 and over
except where a transfer is necessary from one Express Co., to
another, when we pay expressage to point of transfer.
MAX KLEIN.
Wholesale Liquors,
82 FEDERAL ST., ALI EGHENY. PA
Send for catalogue and price list, mailed free
THE NEW YORK WEEKLY T RIBDNE
THE GREAT
NATIONAL
FAMILY
* \ NEWSPAPER
FOR FARMERS AND VILLAGERS
and your favorite home paper,
THE BUTLER CITIZEN.
BOTH ONE YEAR FOR $1.50.
THE N. V. WEEKLY TRIBUNE has an Agricultural Department of the
j highest merit, all important news of the Nation and World, comprehensive and re
liable market reports, able editorials, interesting short stories, scientific and
mechanical information, illustrated fashion articles, humorous pictures, anil 18 in
structive and entertaining to every member of every family.
THE CITIZEN gives you all tilt local news, political and social, kee_ps you in
close touch with your neighbors and fri ends, on the farm and in the village, in
foims you as to local prices for farm products, and is a bright, newsy ind welcome
weekly visitor in many homes.
Send all subscriptions to THE CITIZEN Butler Pa.
DRIVING Lamp JJ
5 ■ J I JWR IT IS the only perfect one. C
/ I IT throws all the light straight ahead X
V JSJ / \ vis/- fnt M M Irom aoo to 300 feet. w
11 XTr Jratpfo' Mm IT looks like a locomotive headlight. A
X "1 / IT gives a clear white light.
I r burns kerosene iCoal Oil) n I n
*IJ ', llt wiM not blow nor jar out I JJF C
V SPECIAL OFFER, CUT THIS ADVERTISEMENT OUT E b
A rind send It to us and wc will send yy IJfeJ "|" C
y book describing our lar.in, and will agree to send you one single lamp or VpMr \ m V
a p.ur at oar wholesale price (very much lc:»s than the retail price). t: Ej[ 4m A
| R. E. DIETZ COMPANY, 60 l-iight St., New York. £
•A FAIR FACE MAY PROVE A FOUL BAR
GAIN." MARRY A PLAIN GIRL IF SHE USES
SAPOLIO
Subscribe for the CITIZEN.