Butler citizen. (Butler, Pa.) 1877-1922, January 09, 1896, Image 3

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    THE CITIZEN
tatwtil »t roft«ar* at Batlar at 2d rlaaa Batter
WILI.UM c. IMM.IT. -
THURSDAY, JANUARY 9. 1896.
Meeting of the Republican County Com
mittee.
There will be a meeting of the Repub
liean County Committee in Armory
Hall, Butler, Pa., on Saturday, January
18, 1896, at 1 o'clock P. M., for the pur
pose of fixing the date of the Republican
county primaries for this year, and for
the transaction of any other business
that may come before the committee.
A. T. SCOTT.
Chairman County Committee.
NOTICE— There will be a meeting of
all the Republican candidates for nomi
nation at the coming county primaries,
immediately after the adjouniment of the
County Committee, at Armory Hall, for
the purpose of arranging the details of
the canvass.
Borough Republican Primaries
The Republican primaries of Butler
borough for the purpose of making nom
inations to fill the ward and borough
offiices will be held in the several wards
at their respective polling places, on
Saturday, January 25, 1596, between the
hours of 1 and 7 o'clock P. M.
THOS. ALEXANDER, Ist ward,
J A MCDOWEL, 2nd ward,
A. B. C. MCFARLAND, 3d ward,
A T. SCOTT, 4th ward,
F L. STAUFFER, STH ward,
Committee.
ANNOUNCEMENTS.
The following named persons are an
nounced as candidates for the offices
specified below, subject to the decision
oTthe Republican voters of Butler count}
at the primary election:
FOR STATE SENATE.
W. 11. RITTER, of Butler
W C. THOMPSON, of Butler.
W. H. H. RIDDLE, of Butler.
FOR ASSEMBLY.
TAMES A. MCMARLIN, of Adams twp.
JOHN DINDINGER, of Zelienople.
ELLIOTT ROBB, of Centre twp.
M N. GREER, of Buffalo twp.
JAMES N. MOORE, of Butler.
FOR REGISTER AND RECORDER.
WILLIAM E. COOPER, of Worth twp.
WM J. BURTON, of Penn twp.
GEORGE E. THOMAS, of Butler, formerly
of Conoquenessing twp.
FOR SHERIFF.
M. L. GIBSON, cf Butler.
F. M. SHIRA, of Parker twp.
W B. DODDS, of Muddycreek.
J. B, BLACK, of Butler.
FOR PROTHONOTARY.
ROB'T I. THOMPSON, of W. Sunbury.
WILLIAM C. NEGLEY, of Butler.
FOR COUNTY TREASURER.
GEO. B. TURNER, of w. Sunbury, for
merly of Concord twp.
CYRUS HARPER, of Cranberry twp.
FOR CLERK OF COURTS.
WM. C. FINDLEY, of Butler, formerly of
Clav twp.
GEO. M. GRAHAM, of Connoquenessing
twp
ISAAC MEALS, of Butler
W. B. MCGEAKY, of Butler.
M. C. SARVER, of Buffalo.
CHAS. B. GLASGOW, of Clinton.
FOR COUNTY COMMISSIONER.
HARMON SEATON, of Washington twp.
J. W. STARR, of Butler, formerly of Penn
twp.
CHARLEY BREADEN, of Clav twp.
JOHN W. GILLESPIE, of Middlesex twp.
JOHN MITCHELL, of Butler.
JACOB ALBERT, of Franklin.
W. W. BRANDON, of Connoquenessing
twp.
FOR COUNTY AUDITOR.
WM. S. MOORE, of Muddycreek twp.
O. R. THORNE, of Clay twp.
The Butler Water Case.
The ruling of the Supreme Court in
the cases of the Butler Water Company
1 eaves the ground rather clearer as to the
mutual rights of people interested in the
purity of water, and those interested in
enterprises which do not contribute to
that quality of the streams. In the low
er court the water company was held to
be bound to furnish potable water to its
customers; but when it sought to re
st rain an oil well in the vicinity from
enriching the water supply with num
erous undesirable constituents the 3utler
court refused the relief.
This judicial intimation that the water
company was at liberty to pick the oil
and salt out of its water supply, or to
seek a new stream where the wildcatter
ceaseth from troubling' is not sustained
in its entirety by the Supreme Court.
The decision establishes that a water
company which does not furnish water
that will assuage thirst or cleanse in
washing cannot collect rates for that
purpose; though, as it may by compar
ison dense the sewers, that portion of
its supply used for sewer purification is
to be paid for. On the other hand, -he
principle seems to be laid down than an
oil well has not the unlimited privilege
to contribute salt, oil and other condi
ments to the stream which a water com
pany depends on for public supply. It
is at least compelled to use some effort
to make its undesirable products flow
away below the influent pipes of the
water eompany.
This affords some definitiou of the
mutual rights of oil wells and water com
panies. ' The more general question of
the relation of oil wells to streams which
furnish water to considerable agricultu
ral communities still lacks adjudication
—Dispatch.
Life is a task to be done. We are
placed here, like a dog on a tread-mill,
and must keep going, or fail and be
crushed. To be free from pain, and to
have some pleasant dreams, is the l>est
we can expect. Work, worry and
trouble. And we kick about it, But
that is really what gives life its' zest. If
every individual possessed the magic
ring of Alladin, and could instantlv satis
fy every wish as tast as it arose, lite
would become a burden and a bore. To
struggle, to strive, and to triumph, is
the only joy.
Congress has passed a resolution au
thorizing and directing the Secretary of
the N»ry to accept the ram Katahdin.
This vessel was rejected because she fell
seven-eiglits of a knot behind the re
quired speed, But the act authorizing
her construction also prescribed the man
ner in which she should lie built, and
this, experts say, precluded the possibil
ity of higher speed. Besides, now that
there is to be a duty on wool, rams will
be more valuable than formerly.
The CITIZEN is constantly importuned
to help aspiring candidates by favorable
notices. It is hard to resist these appeals
but a little reflection will convince any
one that where there are a numlier of
good men aspiring for the same office,
we must treat them all alike in these col
umns. If we give the good qualities of
one, and say nothing about the other, we
throw ourselves open to the charge of
partiality. When the nominations are
made, it is different. Until then we
must treat all candidates alike.
The deepest artesian well is at Buda
pest. Depth 8,140 feet.
An Increase in Taxables,
Returns received at Harrisburg from
all the counties in the State show the
number of taxables in 1895 to be
281, as compared with 1,684,846 the pre
vious year. The most notable increases
were in Beaver, Carbon, Clearfield and
Philadelphia. In Butler, Dauphin, Fay
ette, Lebanon and Westmoreland there
were decreases. As compared with last
year Philadelphia increased her number
of taxables over 55,000, giving the city
an aggregate this year of 332,297. The
Secretary of Internal Affairs says when
it is understood that the amount of
school appropriation received by each
municipality and each school district is
based on the number of taxables it will
be seen how exceeding important it is
for each school district that the highest
return possible is made.
The correctness of the Philadelphia re
turn is questioned:
Discredit is thrown on the reports of
cleared and timber land in the State be
cause thev are at variance in many in
stances with natural conditions. The
number of acres of cleared land in 1895
is 16,270,157, as compared with 15,081,
061 in 1894, and the number of acres of
timber land 9,631,740, as compared with
8,417,327 the previous year. The Secre
tary of Internal Affairs claims that there
has been no increase of the acreage of
timber land, but on the contrary a mark
ed decrease in view of the disapperance
of native forests. As illustrations of the
unreliability of returns attention is
directed to those of Cambria, Clearfield
and Cumberland. In 1894 72,256 acres
of timber land were reported from Cam
bria, and. in 1895, 289,737- The acreage
in Clearfield was increased from 231450
to 468,996, and, in Cumberland, from
40,057 to 72,205. . „ ,
The value of real estate in Pennsyl
vania, including that exempt from taxa
tion, is <2,741,938,849, « compared with
$2,634,601,500 in 1894. Since 1890 there
has been an increase in the value of real
estate of $500,000,000. In Philadelphia
there has been an increase of about
000,000, and, in Westmoreland, sl9,°°°,*
000. There are marked decreases in Cam
eron, Chester, Cumberland, Greene,
Jefferson, Northampton, Perry and Wash
ington. . ,
The value of real estate exenu>t froni
taxation reported in 1894 was *245,368,
752, and in 1895, $270,920,645. In the
opinion of the Secretary of Internal
Affairs this sum does not approach the
great amount of money invested in
church, school, municipal and other
property not subject to taxation. The
increase of taxable real estate since last
year is $81,785,456.
Referring to an inquiry made two years
ago to ascertain the modes of assessment
prevailing in the State, the Secretary of
Internal Affairs says:
This investigation showed that the real
estate of the Commonwealth was assessed
for taxes at not more than 50 or 55 P er
cent, of its actual value. Therefore,
when the returns of 1895 show an assess
ed valuation of $2,471,018,204 it must
not be assumed that these figures rep
resent anything like the actual value of
real estate subject to taxation. In all
probability $5,000,000,000 would be near
er the actual value. These figures
are significant when compared with the
total wealth of the country, which is es
timated at $65,000,000,000.
"For many years the tax reformers
have been trying to mature plans to com
pel an honest and fair assessment of real
estate for the purpose of taxation, and
the efforts that have been made are cer
tainly to be commended, for it is a fact
that there are irregularities; inconsis
tencies and acts committed in the assess
ment of real estate that are little less
than fraud, the inevitable result of which
is to produce inequalities in the payment
of taxes. That is, through favoritism,
neglect of duty or other methods, one
man is exempt from paying the amount
of tax which he should pay on his real
estate, while another man, perhaps a
neighbor, is compelled to pay more than
in equity he should be required to pay,
In a great majority of assessment dis
tricts of the Commonwealth property
owners forget political affiliations when
electing assessors, and the property own
er is strongly induced to vote for the
assessor he may think will best serve his
interests ia making up the return of the
district in which his real estate may be
situated. It is conceded that the law as
it stands is equitable, anil thr only fig
ure consists in the manner in which it is
executed."
While the number of horses in the
State increased from 550:134 in 1894 to
576,760 in 1895 their value diminished
from $30,162,309 to $25,403,400. Since
1891 the value of horses has decreased
about $7,000,000. This big drop is main
ly ascribed to the introduction of elec
tricity as a motive power to operate street
cars, thus displacing a large number of
horses and diminishing the demand for
them.
The number of neat cattle over four
years old in the State is 667.788, a de
crease of nearly 5,000 as compared with
the previous year. In value they in
crease from $11,565,283 $11,660,891.
The Secretary of Internal Affairs says:
"Recent legislation may give some re
lief to the owners of his species of per
sonal property. One of the State de
partments has been thoroughly organiz
ed with a view of preventing in the Com
monwealth the sale of oleomargarine,
and if this is successful it will undoubt
edly result in making the manufacture of
butter and cheese more profitable and in
increasing not only f he number of neat
cattle, but also their valuation, a condi
tion certainly to be desired, as during
the past five years their value seemed to
have been decreasing.
Butler County's Turn.
[Communicated]
This year we elect a congressman, and
we claim it is Butler County's time for a
good many reasons. The' last congress
man we had was in the person of Cap
tain Fleeger elected in 1884. Captain
Fleeger should have been re-elected in
1886, but after ineffectual effort to make
a nomination in the conference it was re
fered to the State committee and resulted
in the nomination of Dr. W. B. Roberts
of Crawford county, who was defeated
in the fall; Norman Hall of Mercer coun
ty elected. After the present district
was formed and in 1888 Newton Black
was presented by this county, and in the
convention he, several times, came with
in one vote of making the nomination,
but it finally resulted in the nomination
of C. C. Towusend of Beaver Co. with
the express understanding that Beaver
Co. would return the compliment next
time. In 1890 Mr. Black was presented
again by Butler Co. and expected the
the Beaver Co. delegation would be as
good as its word and nominate a Butler
Co. man, but after two meetings of the
convention they not only refused to do
so, but three ot' their delegates sold out
"for so many pieces of silver," which re
sulted in the Phillips-McDowell contest;
and E. G, Gillespie of Mercer Co. was
elected, In 1892 to help bury the hatch
et and get away from that old fight that
only helped the Democracy, Butler Co.
yielded her chances, Mr. Black stepped
aside and Mr. Phillips received the qnan
iamous support of our delegation find be
came the nominee in the district, and
Alex McDowell received the support of
Butler county's delegation in the State
Convention that nominated him for Con
gressman at large, in 1894 to still fur
ther heal the breach Mr. Black agpin
stepped aside to let Mr, Phillips have the
party usage of two terms All this was
done for the good of the cause, that we
might get away from the old fight in the
district that was in no way chargeable
to the delegation frotitf Butler ponflty or
the candidate. Siuceißutler Co, had =1
congressman twelve years ago, Mercer
Co. has had three congressman, and now
has the position of chief clerk of congress
man. Beaver County has had the U. S.
Senator and a congressman, Lawrence
Co. has had the Congressman two terms
and, in all fairness, Butler Co. )s entitled
to the liominination this year. Our
county will present a nominee to the
Convention wnen it meets and will claim
at the hands of the other counties the
fair treatment that we in the past have
extended to them.
SPECTATOR,
THE Boers of South Africa lately de
; feated and captured Dr. Jameson, the
, English adventurer who had invaded
their territory with an armed force. Em.
peror William of Germany congratulated
. the Boers, and the English do not like
it.
MILLERSTOWN MUSINGS
Second quarterly meeting services will
be held in the ME. Church beginning Sat
urday evening. Protracted meetings after
this week.
Harry, Charles and Earl Hoch left Tues
day morning for Grove City where they
will pursue the coarse of that College.
Last Saturday evening the consumers of
gas held a meeting for the purpose of de
vising ways and means by which cheaper
gas could be obtained. The meeting was
very interesting. The erection of a new
plant was discussed, and between ten and
twelve thonsand dollars have been railed
towards it. It looks very probable that
we will have a new gas company before
many months.
Misses Berl and Freda Showalter left for
Pittsburg where they will enter some col
lege.
On New Year's morninp at 6 o'clock,
Mrs. Maggie Wilson, wife of Alex Wilson,
died at her home near Foxburg. Cai-cer
was the dread disease which caused her
death. She was a sister of Mrs. J. M.
Bell and Mrs J T. Shane of this place and
was the first of a faintly of 12 children to
pass away. She leaves a husband and
three children to mourn the loss of an afiec
tionate wife and loving mother, She was
a devout christian lady, being a communi
cant of the Allegheny Presbyterian church.
She was an av-iive member of the "i . P. S.
C. E., which society sent s beautiful s:and
of flowers, and was President of the Mis
sionarv Society, this society bad a wreath
made "Mrs Wilson," "Our President,
worked in white roses. The services were
conducted by Rev. ilaslett and the inter
ment was in Allegheny cemetery.
FAIRVIEW FACTS.
Mary Palmer, who was visiting her pa
rents here during the holidays, took ill
last Friday morning and was unable to re
turn to her home She is a daughter ot J.
J. Maxwell.
Nora Black of Uarrisville is at W. C.
Hawn's.
The Hotel Adams is doing its share of
business. In addition to its transient eis
tom, it has ten boarders.
The coal bank belonging to J. A. Wilson
sold 4520 bushels of coal during December
Wm. McCbestney has tbe bank leased.
R«y. Sberard preaehed in the U. P.
Churo.h Sunday on the text, "Where art
thouT" the question asked by the CreatoT
to Adam when he disobeyed.
The gas supply was scarce during the
cold snap.
Rev McClure announced that services
will be held on Jan. 19, at 3 p.m. instead
of at 1, the usual hour.
DENT.
Muddycreek Murmerings
The schools of the twp ate in a flourish
condition, under tbe control of a good
corps of teachers.
The singing clas* at Pleasaut \ alley
school, numbers seventy-five scholars.
Prop. Updegraph is itn excellent teacner.
Tbo school house is crowded almost every
night.
Mrs. King Lawrence and Jefferson
Wimer *ho went to Kansas to see Mr.
Wimer's sister, have returned home.
Mrs. Smith had died Before they n-ached
her home.
Rob Lawrence, the genial storekeeper
at Piano, still ereets his customers with a
smile. He is doing first rate.
Henry Hay, who was pumping the well
on W. B. McCollough's farm, has thrown
up his job.
Isaac Moore Esq., one of the old citizens
of the county is vet hale and hearty, and
Is well preserved excepting his eyesight.
He is in his 91st year.
Miss Maude Mooro is staying with her
annt Elizabeth Tebay, sinco the death of
Miss Tebay's brother, Clark.
PETROLIA PENCILINGS.
H. A. Stonehonse is visiting among his
friends here.
Mrs. Mary Wilt and Mrs. G. D. Robert
son are very sick at this writing.
R. G. Carlin left Tuesday to attend
Gr«ve City College.
Miits Postlewait is visiting lelatives in
Great Belt.
Dr. S, N. Andre has returned from a
business trip.
S. G. Coffin of Bradford is in town on
business.
Miss Francis Miller of Bruin is visiting
among her friends here.
Mrs. Lillie Hays of Glade Mills is visit
ing her parents Mr. and Mrs. Bottner.
Mitts Lulla Baker spent the holioays
with hei Mother in Conneaut Ohio.
Resolutions
Resolutions of respect on the death of
our worthy sister, Dr. Eliza J. Grossman,
adopted by Butler Lodge No. 248, Order
of the World:
WHBRKAS, The Supreme Rulor ot the
Universe in His infinite wisdom las
thought it proper to call from our midst
oar sister Dr. Eliia J. Grossman, a worthy
menber of our order, the Order of the
World. , ..... j
Resolved. That in her death this lodge
has lost one of its st ead last members a true
sister nhd one who will pot soon be forgot
ten an we gather in our meetings and note
onr sister's vaoant chair.
Resolved, That we ex'.end to the hus
band and little son of our deceased Ulster
our sincere and heartfelt sympathy in this
the hour of their bereavement, and we can
say, He doeth all things well, and we
also extend our sympathy to the mother,
brother and Bistors in their sad affliction.
Resolved, That our charter be draped
in mourniug for tho period of thirty days,
and these resolutions be entered on the
records of ou." lodge, and a copy be sent to
the bereaved family and be Dublished in
the Butler papers and The Reflector.
Committee —Newton C. Zuver, Mrs. M.
J. Bickel, Miss Mabel Zeigler.
SECRETARY CARLISLE has given no
tice that sealed proposals will be receiv- 1
ed at the office of the Secretary of the ,
Treasury', at Washington, D. C., until 12 j
o'clock m, on Wednesday, February 5,
1896, for the purchase of one hundred
million dollars ($100,000,000) of United
States 4 per cent coupon or registered
bonds, in denominations of fifty dollars
(SSO) and multiples of that sum, as may
be desired by bidders.
The right to reject any or all bids is re
served.
Denmark has three inlands in
the West Indies group; St. Thomas, San
ta Cruz and St. John, that she wants to
sell to the United States, St. Thomas,
Island has a very commodious harbor,
and would make an excellent coaling
station. We'll take'em,
The life of the of the idler is tlje mast
laborious of all. The hardest work is
trying to escape work.
One touch of winter makes the whole
world edd,
There are several patches on Cuba's
seat of war.
Salisbury's silence seems to be sincere,
fl 1 "
&AKIN 6
POWDER
Absocutoly Pure.
A cream oi tartar baking powder. High
est of all in leavening strength.— Latrt
United States Government Food Report
OoriL jumru Powew CO,. ioa Wall el., K. *
DEATHS.
LAVERY—At his home in Penn twp.,
Jan. 6, 189 C, Joseph Lavery Jr. aged 24
years.
PARK—At his home in Adams twp. Jan.
2. 1896, Levi J Park, aged H>om p6jw
WlLT—Atherhomein Allegheny, J»n.
5 1896, Mageie, daughter of Henry
Wilt, in her 17th year.
SMITH—At her home in Allegheny, Jan.
4, 1896, Jnlia, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
C. R. Smith, formerly of Butler.
ANDREWS—At his home in Allegheny,
Jan. 8, 1896, son of J. F. Andraws,
aged 3 years.
HELLER—Jan 7, 1896, infant daughter
ol W. Q. Heller of Penn twp.
J. P. T. Stk*LK.
The death of John Stehle, Jan. 1. 1896,
in the prime of his manhood waa an un
usnally sad one. A year ago he was in hig
usual health, was enjoying his quiet life,
and was attending to the business that had
prospered in his hands; but he was strick
en by the grippe, last February, and it af
fected his throat and lungs, and oaused
bim intense suffering till the day of his
death.
He was the third son of Thomas Stehle,
who died seven years ago. He and his
younger brother, Tom, started in business
when they were yet boys, about twenty
five years ago. Tom died about ten years
ago, and John succeeded in the business,
and maintained it until ill health required
him to sell his store to Mr. Grove. He was
the last of the four sons of Thomas Stehle
Sr., but bis three sisters, Mrs. Pape, Mrs.
Aland and Miss Liizie, are yet living, as
is also his mother, now in her 82ad year.
He leaves his wife, whose maiden name
was Lena Morrel, and five sons.
In the (torn
ach or feeling W [Ol P I
fulness at- 4 LAJL^^H
ter eating la
effectually j^U^HHpHHj
prevented by
Pill*. VH
They di- xWB
••limitation
of food, move t v .< bowels easily aad thus
prevent and cu'- Biliousness, Torpid Liver,
and Constipation. They are tasteleaa and
do not gripe or canse pain. Sold by all
droggi»t». 25 centa. Insist upon HoODV
RODRIGUES
OTTOLENGUI
Easily takes first rank as a
writer of clean and clear
cut detective stories. He
is called
THE AMERICAN
CONAN DOYLE
And his New York detec
tive is quite as ingenious
as the famous Sherlock
Holmes, though in a dif
ferent style.
AN ARTIST
IN CRIfIE
Is Ottulcujjui's greatest
work. It will be printed
as a Serial in this paper.
Opening Chapters Next Week
(83( THE CULTIVATOR
Country Gentleman
THE BEST OF THE
AGRICULTURAL WEEKLIES.
DETOTED TO
Farm Crops and Processes,
Horticulture & Frult-Growlng,
Live Stock and I 1 f
While it also includes all minor depart,
mcnts of Kural interest, such as tbe Poul
try Tard, Entomology, Bee-Keeping,
Greenhouse and Grapery, Veterinary Re
plies, Farm (Questions and Aaswers, Fire
ide Heading, Domestic Economy, and a
summary of the News of the Week. Its
MARKET KEPORTS are unusually complete,
and much attention is paid to thn Prospects
of the Crops, as throwing light upon one ol
the most important of all questions — H hen
to Buy anil When to Sell. It is liberally
slllustiated, und contains more reading
matter than ever before. The Subscription
Prico is $2.50 per year, but we offer a SPE
CIAL REDUCTION in our
CLUB RATES FOR 1896.
T*o Subscriptions, lnou remluo,,c « ~ $4
Sii Subscriptions, d - d 0 •••• \
Ten Subscriptions, d - 1,0 - 1
all New Subscribers for 1890, pay
lint/in advance now, WE WILL SEND THE
PAPKR WEEKLY, from our RECEIPT oj the
remittance, to January lsf, 1890, WITHOUT
CHARGE.
COPIES FREE. Address.
LUTHER TUCKER A SON, Publishers
ALBANY, N. Y.
NEWTON BLACK..
»tl'y at Law- Office on Bou>ti side of Diamond
ourjer. PH.
A. T. SCOTT.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
OSce ai No. 8. boutn Diamond. Butler, Pa.
J M. PAINTEK,
Attorney-at-Law.
Hoe— Between Postotflce and Diamond. Butl
PI. „
A. T. BLACK.
ATTORNKY AT LAW.
S. H. PIERSOL.
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office at No. 104 East Diamond St.
W. C. FINDLEY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office on Becond floor Jf the Hoselton Dlock
Diamond. Butler, Pa.. Koom No. 1.
H. H. GOUCHER.
A ttoruey-at-law. Office In Mltclicll.bulldln.
Butler Pa.
COULTER & BAKER.
ATTORsfKYtt AT LAW.
Offi'-a lu room 8.. Armory Building, Butler
Pa.
V. McALPINF.
Dentist,}
s now located In uew and;?elegant trooms ad
lului? lila (ormer ones. All kinds of clas
ates and modern goldtwork.
"Gas Administered,'•
HOOD'S PILLS cur® Liver Ills,
I Biliousness, Indigestion, Headache.
A ptaMMt UuttTe. All Drmlitti
FINE FOOTWEAR
AT
fIILLERS
At Reduced Prices
how 1 Got Them.
It is an unusual thing to buy so
heavy at this time of the year, but
I received such a tempting offer
from an Eastern jobber "who ttss
overstocked" that I made a very
large purchase, too large if the
prices were not so low, but I am
now in shape to give you goods the
balance of the winter at greatly re
duced prices.
Read These Prices
Men's Kip Boots, box-toe, "James
town" f2 "5
Men's Kip Boots, long leg, reduc
ed to 2 50
Men's Kip Boots, tap sole, reduc
ed to 1 40
Boy's Kip Boots, tap sole 1 5°
Boy's Kip Boots, tap sole 1 25
Youth's Boots, tap and % D. S.
Men's Candee Rubber Boots 2 25
Boy's Candee Rubber Boots. 1 7°
Ladies' Candee Rubber Boots. I 25
Children's Rubber Boots 1 00
Still Better and Better.
Ladies' good solid Oil Grain Button
Shoes 95c
Ladies' good solid A Calf Shoes 95c
Laeies' Warm Lined Shoes s°°
Ladies' Warm Lined Slippers 25c
Misses' Oil Grain Button Shoes,
high cut 95 c
Misses' Calf Button Shoes, high cut...95c
Misses' Fine Dongola Shoes, lace or
button 95 c
Children's Fine Shoes fr0m...20c to ft tx>
These few prices will give you an
idea how we are selling Boots and
Shoes and why we are kept so
busy. \V 7 e expect no dull dsyrs this
winter, for we have the goods and
can sell them for less than other
dealers pay for them.
Ladies' Rubbers reduced to 2ix
Men's four stay Felt Boots \ 1 rjO
and Candee Overs J * 'Y
Boy's Felt and Overs, $1.75
Youth's Felt and Overs, 51.35
REPAIRING AT REDUCED RATES
AT
Butler's Progressive Shoe House.
C. E. MILLER,
2i5 Sooth lain St., BUTLER PA.
Your Not Afraid
To Look in the Glass
when you have on a suit of our making.
A tailor who doesn't suit his customers
has to be continually hunting up new
ones. This takes time, We haven't the
time to hunt up new customers. Our re
gular customers keep us pretty busy and
tllp tl#»w (*li«tnmprc hunt lie up When
you want a suit of clothes that is a sure
fit, at a reasonable price, let us take your
measure.
It takes a fine tailor to make a fine
suit, that's reasonable. Tne tailor in
Butler that has the best reputation for
using first quality materials and making
perfectly fitting garments is Cooper. Let
him make your next clothes.
Be it Sack Coat or Overcoat, we can
suit you perfectly in our f25 Suits. Don't
Eut otf getting a comfortable winter out
t until the worst need is past. A splen
did winter suit at S2O. Call on
COOPER & CO
Cor. Diamond, Butler, Pa
J. J. DONALDSON, Dentist.
Butler, Penn'a.
Artificial Teeth Inserted on the latest ltr k
jroved plan. Gold Filling a specialty. Office*
orer Schaul'x Clotblag Store.
C. F. L. McQulstion.
CIVIL ENGINEER AND SURVEYOR.
Office near Court House Butler Pa.
DR. J. E. FAULK.
Dentist.
Offioe—ln Gilkey building opposite P. 0.
Dr. N. M. HOOVER,
137 E. Wayne,Bt..foffic« hours. 10 to is M. an
10 3 P. M.
G. \5. ZIMMERMAN.
PHYSICIAN AND~SVM»O€\
Office at No. 45, s. Main street, '»er tit
harmacy,butler, Pa,
L. BLACK, *
PHYSICIAN AND SUKOKON.
New Troutniau BuUdiug, Butler, f».
SAMUEL M. BIPPUS.
Physician and Surgeon.
SOO West Cunningham St.
W. H. BROWN,
Homoeopathic Physician and
Surgeon.
Offc« 126 8. Main St., over Bickel's shoe
store.
Residence 315 N. McKeanJSt.
A. M. CHRSITLEY,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office second floor, Anderson Block, Malu St.
ueat Court House. Butler. Pa."
Valuable Farm for Sale.
A valuable farm, located in Donegal
twp. and comprising about 175 acres, 120
of which are cleared and the rest covered
with white-oak and chestnut timber; well
watered and having two orchards with
plenty of peaches and grapes; good build
ings, consisting of a two-story, frame
dwelling house, large barn, granery,
spring-house, and all other necessary
outbuildings; two miles from »ailroad
station and six miles from county seat;
convenient to schools and churches, will
be sold cheap, one half the purchase
money to be paid down and the balance
in two payments within two years.
The farm isl eased until April of 1897,
but has no other encumbrances. For
farther particular* inquire at this office
BUTLER COUNTY
Mutual [Fire Insurance Company,
Office Cor.Main &. Cunningham
ALT. WIC*. Prw.
eto. K.KTTBBKB. Tl« Pre..
L. 8. McJCSKIK. Uec |
DIRECTORS
Alrred Wick. Hendenoii Oltver,
' r. W. Irrln. tames ytei/Lvu^u
*. W. Blactonore, IN. Weitaef.
F. Bowman. H. J. Kllugier
ilea Ketteror, Chaa. Hcbhan.
t-ec. Benno. I Jolut Koeuiu*
Y A 1 S. Me JUNK IN. Agent
Christmas
PRESENT
Christmas time is now here and
Heineman & Son have as usual a
very fine line of Christmas Presents
to suit every person.
Tbe Line Consists of
Dressing Cases
Cuff and Collar Boxes
Travelling Sets
Shaving Sets
Mirrors
Cut Glass
Picture frames
Christmas Cards
Gold Pens
Fine Stationery
Albums
Bibles
Poems
All the Popular Books
Leather Goods
AT
Heineman & Son's
Scribners'
for Christmas
Frank R. Stockton has a Christmas love story, which bears
a characteristic title, —"The Staying Power of Sir Rohan.
Its illustrations are quaint and exactly suitable.
A thrilling Detective story by C. E. Carryll, entitled "The
River Ryndicate," perhaps equalling Sherlock Holmes best
work. Illustrated.
Joel Chandler Harris' characteristic tale of a faithfnl slave
"The Colonel's Nigger-Dog." _
Other Christmas stories are "A White Blot," by Henry \an
Dyke, a poetic and imaginative tale of a picture (illustrated);
"Heroism of Landers," by A. S. Pier (illustrated); and "Hop
per's Old Man," by R. C. V. Meyers.
Sentimental Tommy
By J. M. Barrie.
Those who have read (and who has not?) "The Little Min
ster" and "A Window in Thrums" can anticipate what Mr.
Barrie's "Sentimental Tommy" will be.
It is to be the chief serial in SCRIBNER'S for 1896, begin
ning in the J a nuary number.
Two Years for $4.50
SCRIBNE,R'S MAGAZINE costs $3.00 a year, but new sub
scribers can have all the numbers for 1895 and a years subscrip
tion for 1896 for $4.50.
SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE is going to be better next year than
ever. It is going to have new features. Its publishers are not
satisfied with past successes. It purposes to more thoroughly
deserve the confidence of the reading public.
The History Serial—"Last Quarter Century in the United
States"—will be continued. Just now it is approaching a
period of absorbing interest to the present generation —the
cj.uinistration o: rresiaent Cleveland.
SCRIBNER'S MAGAZINE ought to get careful consideration
as a Christmas gift. The $4.50 offer ought to get double con
sideration.
CHARLES SCRIBNER'S SONS, 153 Fifth Avenue, N. Y.
o The Philadelphia Press °j
® For 1896. 3
o o<
i° Pennsylvania's greatest Republican family
Inewspaper, The Philadelphia Press, will enter 2
1 0 upon the new year under the most favorable ©<
10 conditions of its history. °\
0 A powerful agent In the national com- ®\
i° munity, it is now more than ever a leader in
1 news and able comment.
Its various departments have during the 3
past year been greatly strengthened. o<
o Pennsylvania is covered county by county,
city by city, town by town. No other news
-0 paper covers the State so well, 2
1° The Woman's Page of The Press has be
-1 come one of its most prominent features and gj
' 0 is eagerly sought by ladies. o<
| o In the matter of Amateur Sports The Presj
o is also far in the lead and publishes mor«
1 10 news on that subject than any other paper in
10 the country. ® Tl
j The subscription price of The Press, per
year, is: Daily, six dollars; Daily and Sun- cJ
*5 day, eight dollars; Weekly, one dollar. , cx
o The Press is the greatest want medium in °\
Philadelphia and gives the lowest rates on
, 0 that class of advertising.
ULOJUJUUUUUUUUUUUULOJ^^
Seanor & Nace's
Livery, Feed and Sale Stable,
Rear of Wick House, Butler, Pa
The bejt of horses and rirst clasß
rigß always 011 hand and for hire.
Best accommodations in town for
permanent boarding and transient
trade. Special care guaratteed.
Stable room for sixty-five horeee.
A good class of horses, both driv
ers and draft horses always on hand
and for sale under a fall guarantee;
and horses bonght upon proper noti
fication by SEANOR & NACE.
All kinds ot live stock bought and
•old.
_ Telephone at Wick House.
SPECIAL Ge »«?.? in DRY GOODSI
FIVE DAYS ONLY--Commencing
TUESDAY,Jan. 14 SATURDAY,Jan. 18
H X
A Monster Clearance Sale on a Scale Never Before Attempted in Butler.
We Have Some Surprises in Store for You in the Way of Prices.
Note a Few of Theru-"And There Are Others!"— These
Prices Good for the FIVE DAYS ONLY!
I—rge spc ols Knitting Silk, all colors 5c / NOTE THESK I RICES Ox DRESS Goons.
Ladies' Good Fast Black Hose' worth ior, at... sc\
Ladies' Fine Seamiest Fast Black Hose, worth 15c, % Ouc lot 15-cent Dress Goods, light shades, at 7c
at 9c; 3 for 25c V One lot 15-cent Fancy Dress Goods, good shades, at...ioc
Extra Fine Imported Hose, worth 25c, at 17c; 3 for 50c J 25-ecnt Plain and Novelty Goods at 15c
Ladies' 50c Silk Trimmed Vnderwear at 35 c S 40-cent Novelty Dress Goods at 25c
Children's Natural Grey Underwear. ioc~up J 50-cent Plain and Novelty Goods at 39c
Ladies' and Children's Mittens from 10c upN |i.oo Silk Finish Henrietta at 59c
. § and many other Dress G.'od< Imrifr.ins. Coins- and
All l nderwear and Hosiery at astonish-ng prices. f inspect them.
It will pay you to come many miles to take advan- J
tage ot these prices. C WE OPEN YOUR EYES WITH OVR PRICES OX CORSETS
I DI RING THIS SALE:
Heavy Bleached Crash, worth 6c, at 3'icC
Large Bleached Towels, worth 15c, at 9c: 3 for 25c f One lot 50-cent Corsi-ts, si/.es 25 to 30 only, at 25c
Heavy I'nbleached Muslin, worth Sc. at scr All our 75-cent Corsets at 49c
Good Bleached Muslin at 5c J Dr. Warner's Coralline Corsets, regular price Ji, at 75c
Fruit of the Loom Muslin at 8c f Dr. Warner's Health Corset, regular price 51.25. at 9SC
Lonsdale Muslin at 8c 1 Dr. Warner's Nursing Corset, " " $1.35, at. ..51.15
All-Wool Country Flannel at i;cC Dr. Warner's Abdominal s>-75. at. ..51.25
12% cent Satines at 8c S A full line of the celebrated Thompson's Glove Fitting
All Best Calicoes, none reserved, at scy Corsets, best fitting Corsets made, at fi.oo, <1,25, Jr. so and
Lancaster Ginghams at sc\ #1.75; also the P. N. Corsets and the Jackson Corset Waists.
CLOAK Prices Slaughtered! RLAXKET Prices Tumbled and Tossed to Ridiculously Lois Prices!
*1 FAIL 11. ATTEND te GREATEST EVENT in i IIMUHT |DUT GOODS MS 4Mm
HUNDREDS OF BARGAINS ALL THROUGH THE STOCK.
t Remember J C „»*/><•**, s™ o ' l /
? the dates 5 C _ „ w - T ) \
E',"H L. STEIN & SON, fe-S
J elusive. V ' s tltcd. V
No. 108 N. Main St., BUTLER, PENN'A.
DIPHTHERIA.
By all means use at once, soon
as soreness is felt in the throat,
something that will act direct
ly on the throat, counteract
disease and effect a cure, for
common sore throat, sore
throat with scarlet fever, and
every throat affection. The
most successful and thorough
ly tested remedy, is ARM
STRONG'S DIPHTHERIA AND
QUINSY DROPS. Praised and
recommended by all that
know them, l>ecause they
positively will cure sore throat.
A special and a success— SOLD
BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE.
A NICE BLOTTER
is wrapped aronnd every bot
tle of MORRISON AND BROS
COUGH SYRUP. The best
cough Syrup you ever used,
small doses, grand results, ask
your Druggist.
M. A, HERKIMER,
Funeral Director
37 S. Main«St Butler Pl
y 9 I
WALK
*
is cheap. Anyone can make assertions. Not everyone can prove
them. The First Quality Four Stay Felt Boot, with a good one
buckle, solid heel and tap over is the best combination ever offered
for $1.75, and cannot be duplicated. We will sell you the same boot
with candee overs to fit them as low as $1.25, the kind for which
others ask $1.50 and sl-75, but you will want the kind which we
sell at $1.75. This is Felt Hoot weather, so don't delay.
AL. RDFF & SON.
|campbdT& TempletoiTs|
? Clearance Sale \
1 1 •stucctiOCO**** \
5 Cane=Seated Chairs /
§s 9 8 cts, |
er price $1.50.
J" st ie f or a RED-ROOM.
1\ ome °f them nice enough for any kind
Q a room.
H :o-o: S
® &
Parlor Chairs $lO,
f Mahogany Finished Back and Arms,seat J/Xjj
£ covered with fine bilk
C Some of them were J
HJ :o-o: r
6 /
Rocking Chairs $5.00, ?
"itFC 10.00, #6.50 and #7.00. >
Z :o-o: |
W BEST AI«L-WOOL EX-SUPLR
§INGRAIN CARPET,
* 4i —. «■*- 65 ccnt goods *wmmi &
Q* 5, 8, 10, 12, 16 and 20 yards Or} \ &
C in each piece. /
|C AMPBELL $ T EMPLETON
I BUTLER, PA. 1
HOMES-FURNISHGP-COiVIPLETE |