Bradford Republican. (Towanda, Pa.) 1875-1892, May 27, 1882, Image 1

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    NEI
BOLCOM' & TRACT, Published's.
iVOL. VII.,
--THE
Biadford Ilepublican
IS Published Every Thursday,
TT •
'AT TOWANDA. PA., BY
HOLCOMB & TRAOY4
sl:so_Per. ,Atanum, in .ideance
Adverthiliig Bates--81x cents a line for first : 5 .
ingertion. an i ffv9 cents per line for all subso
(pleat insertions. Beading notice adverthing
ten cents pqr line. Eight lines constitute a
square, and twelve lines an inch. Ailltl'oes
r nottces $2.50. Administrator's and EZOCUICIT'S
notices 82. 0 0. 'Yearly advertising sito.oo per
column. 1 -
Ts's lizsmiLican is published in the 1 f ley,
Moore and;NObles Block, at the corner of Main
and Pine streets, over J. F. Corser's Boot and
shoestore. Its circulation is over 2000. As as
".• 1 414 114 004.111,114 ualmwcat in
.Its
median IeIC • —••-, -
Tcwarila Business Direci:ry
tidTTOR
CLEVELAND & MCGOVERN, (E. J. Cireffand
Win. McGorern). Canton. Bradford County,
Pa. All business entrusted to their care in
Welt tern Bradford trill receive prompt attention.
2t.)apri2-ly
- Attorneys•st-Law; Otno
MITH A: HILLIS,
0 over Powell 5: Co
ALI.FF, J. N., Ordco in Wood's Block', south
C
First National Bank, up stairs..:june 12;48
FL 4 /BREE k SON (N C Ets:twee and Rltbree.)
% Office in Mercur Block, Park may] 4,58
PECK k OVERTON (fienj M Peek and D A O r r-
OM. Oflice over Hill's Market 49'79
-
OVERTON & SANDERSON (E Overkill and Jr4ns
FSanderson.) Office in Adams Block.julys'7B
MAXWELL, WM. Office over Dayto n sprit 11t.7's Sore
• 6
NTILT, J. ANDREW. Dilice in Ileon's Block
V• .1 apr-14.76
TNAVIES, CARNOCHAN & BALL. (W T Darter.
W// Carneetan.L al Hall.) plice ;in rear
et Ward (louse. Entrance on Poplar St. ae12.75
MER'CLin, RODNEY A. Solicitor of Patents.
Particular attention paid to business in
Orphans' Court and to the settlement of estates.
°thee in Montanye's Block a 9.79
p,PHERSON 3 YOUNG, (I. McPherson and
AN.A. • .I. Young.) Office south side orMe
feb r uc s r's
1,7
WILLIAms. ANGLE k..BUFFIN (I TON. (II N
Williams, E J Angle and E 1) Buffington).
Office west side of Main Street, two doors north
of Argus office. AU business. entrusted to their
care will receive prompt attention. oct 26,77
. •
TAMES 11. AND JOHN W. GOODING, Attor
t) ueys and Counaellore.st•Law. ()Mee to the .
Mercer mock. over C. T. Eirby's Drug Store.
July3,'SO tf.
"rilr EENEY, J. P. Atternej-ailtaw. Office in
Mental:lye!' Block, Mein street,
Sept. :5, 'el-if.
rriIIOMPSON, W. 11. and E. A., Attorneys-at
Law, Towanda, Pa. Office lereur Block,
over C. T. Kirby's Deng Store, entrance oullaiu
street. first stairway north of Post-office. All
business promptly attended to. Special atten
tion given to claims against the United States
or Perisim..a. - Bounties. patents. etc., and to
ollections and settlement of decedent's estates.
April 21. ly
•
HENRY B. Iii'KEANI
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Solicitor of Patent!. Government claims a
tended to. 116febe2
plirsicA:ivs AND SURGEONS
JOHNSON. T. 8., M.D. Office over Dr. H. C
Porters'e Drug Store. fob 12;78
M EWTON.Dre. D. 21. kF. (1. Office at Dwelling
. 1 . 74 on River Street, corner Weston St. feb 12,77
L'". C. K., M.D. Oillosilst door above old
bank building, on Main street. Special at
tention given to diseases 'of • the throat and
lungs.
.ju1y19.78
-
WOODBURN, 8.3 f., 31. D. Office and rest
denee..l4laln street, north ot 31.E.Chttrelt.
- -
Medical Examiner for Pension Dr•vartment.
lab 22.78
. PAYNE, ,E. D.. 31;P. Office over Idlntanye's
a• Store'. Office hours from 10 to 'II a. m. and
\ from 2 to 4 P. K.. Special attention given to
, Diseases of the Eye, .and Diseases of. the Ear.
oct 20.77
TowNER. H. L., aI:D..
ficiismoraTnic PLITHICIAN ZC 8171/01:011.
Residenco and office just north of Dr. Corbon's
Main attest, Athens. Pa. -;
HOTELS
HESRY HOUSE Main it., next corner south
J- 1 . of Bridge street. New house and new.
furniture. throughout. The proprietor has
spared neither pains or expense in making his
hotel tint-class and respectfully solicits a share
of public patronage. Meals at all hours. Terms
reasonable. Large Stable attached.
mar ti i WM. HENRY.
SECRET SOCIETIES
WATKINS POST, NO. 68, G. A. B. Meets
every Saturday evening. at Military Hall.
GEO. N. MYER, Commander.
J. R. Eirrainor., Adjutant. feb 7. 79
GvAsarAL LODGE, NO. 57. Meets at K. of P
Hall every Monday evening at 7:30: In
surance $2,000: Benefits $3.00 per week. Aver
ago annual cost, 5 years experience. $ll.
J. A. KiTTRIDGE, Reporter,
JESSE WARDELL, JR., Dictator. fob 22.78
BRADFORD LODGE . N 0.167, I. 0. 0. F. Meet
in Odd Fellow's Han, every Monday evening
at 7 o'clock. W i taurs Htu., Noble Grand.
Juno 12,75
.110US)C;AND SIG.V PAINTING,
POST, F. F. No. 32 Second street All orders
will receive prompt attention. June 12,75
EDUCATIONAL
SIISQUEIILNNA COLLEGIATE INSTrictit
The SPELNG TERM will begin Monday
April 3, 1882., For catalogue or other Infor
nation, address or call on the PrincipaLl
EDWIN E. QUINLAN, A. IL
July 19,78 . Towanda, Pa.
PLUMBER AND GAS FITTER
SiciILLIAMS, EDWARD. Practical Plumber
-and Gas Fitter. Place of business in Mar
..' air -Block next door to Journal office opposite
Public Square. Plumbing, Gas Fitting, -Repair
-.ng Pumps of all kinds, and all kinds of Gearing
romptly attended to. All wanting work in his
'lie should give him s call. .inly 27,77
INSURANCE
RUSSELL, 0. 8, General Insurance Agency,
Towanda, Pa. Mike in Whitcomb's Souk
Store. July 12.76
BLANK BOOK MANUFACTURER
BOOK BINDER,
PAPER RIMER. Sze
Alfred J. Purvis
No. 131 Genessee street,
UTICA, N. Y
All work m his line done well and promptly at
Ipwcat price. •
Parties having volumes incomplete will be fur ,
niched with any raising numbers et cost price.
AU orders given: to J. J. Scanlan. Agent for
Bradford County wil be promptly executed ;a
cording to directions. _ sep9.4l
DR. JONFS• CREAM CAMPHOR, IS TOE
NAME of the popular Linemen' that cures
litteuznetistei. Neuralgia, Swollen Or Stiffened
Joints, Preis" Bite*. Pain in the Pace, Head or
Spine, Chopped Haudi.Mrnises, Sprains, Burns,
Mosquito Bites. Sting or Hite of an insect.
Poison Vines. etc.. ' for Man • or Boast
Always' reliable, and almost instantan;
eons in its relief. Haring an agreeable odor it
Is pleasant to apply.. sold by all druggists.
Prim 2$ ets.
M;MiiM;CMI
9. 1 t JONES, Prop% 319 N. 3d 81. Phila.. Pa.
Jen. 13. O-m.
ETTER . HEADS, , BILL HEADS,
.da NOTE HEADS, kc. printed in the beat style
the art at the Rasysiaoas office.
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....:
:.
' . 1. . .. i ':. tittlthhhauenosenliteil7tiri!aulitr;libliCliis:mooO. of
l . n -i vo inbe'G b lj e y o urtiv n t : ise , b ::: r, ....,:: . . , '' 7 ' :' 4 ; ' s t; "l : r .' , :' tioa f' es ''i : (3 : t i i . t : ' rge l! - i lista : lll : ll : l3ii .. .. l l t i w r' :on :n.po : l'..l .
. .: , iiy_ • all the - pe0rdn...:,..,,::,.: . #-,' .famili ar .
' . with the lanr.: audits,._ ;'' , . et. the ex !
. : ! ceptions: point :to
. .. L. .., -:occasions
. 1 'whe n it is desirabin h:F . .,.,-.); : . '..... - ,t4p .. ,1aw,
. . 1 and •to prepare ae..,..
,:"' -, , t'• for .that
' I change.
_The. co. : : .:, ',,... . law of
Pennsylvania fizeltthii . ::' ,, , , "l her'of Sena
.i
tora and Representoti.. -. :„., •'.."451 ! mazi•
' ' .', canto which the . , plat(
;, 'reset:vas . in
the seeetion of Del ',. e. ;. • Altura State
'• Conventions, but ik - -,, , s t ,i,estae . time I
• wisely 'protects tiiii . ; , ;: , ic 3 . rig h ts of
each Republican v0tttit,,,; ( ,;,..*0 d!clara - I
'Lion . that delegates si .: _ , ',l-_,,
_ . :4islented as
iiii3uators and Iteprei -- , :' , „ i, , , srenelect7
ed. ;Tbis is '.i' . .,., L :-,...:Al''''Jl,;o l, - '.f.:;- -.414) ,
iiiarivigkirr':',''' - ', ''....•-•-. c - .) .'. '''r - rr r - -7
BARCLAY R. R. TIME-TABLE.
TRAINS , , :TRAIN'S
NORTH. i SOtTII.
10
;STATIONS.
3 9
Nay Ace I lAce IRO
WI. Von ti°l l .l Mali
20 0.201 Ar. ... Towanda I.:. Dep.' 8.171
.03 9.oslDep t .... Monroe Ar. 8.35
.02 Dep., 8.111
.68'8.591 " Masontown " ! 8.47
.53 8.54, " .. Greenwood .. " 8.52,
.46 8.46: " ....Weston' 1 7.001
.39 *8.381 Summit.... " 1 41 7.111
...35 *8.351
." Lasnoka.... " ,0 7.151
531 8.311 •• LongValleyJuna " 7.19 1
5.20 B.lslDep. . Foot of Plane . As. 7.371
• Indicates that trains do not stop. •
F F. LYON,
Supt snd Eng . r. 3ardny,Pa.
2mrB2
I_ A ENIGN VALLEY 4 PENNA. AND
NEW YORK RAILROADS.
ARRANGEMENT OP PAM3k2iGES TRAINS.
To film minor JAN. let, woo. -
~ -- : . i• - ' '....., ' '..,., 1 -' ' - .i1:1 - 1 , ' 1 ,!,.. ..• : -V..., .. 4, , # : „_„. ~,,
EASTWARD. •. - ..
- .
4 TATIOMI. IIS i 9 117
I 3
.....-..
P.M.,A.MA.M.IP.M.
Niagara Falls 2.051 7.201.... 7.15
Buffalo •
. • 2.50; 8.25 9.20
Bochaster l 05 1
5.15,4, i..........•
Lyons .' • . . 6.40 11.051 ..... .....
Geneva 1 6.545:11.30i.
Ithaca . 8.33 1 1.00 1 ..... . ...
Auburn -5.1311. w. .....
Owego -
Elmira ... 9.10 / .1.4 9.00 3.45
Waverly a.so i l I.s ‘p 0
9.45 2.101 9.40 415
Sayre 10.10 2.30 0 0.00 4.30
Athena 10.15 2.34,10.05 4.34
Milan • i 0.15
meter i '10.25 •
Towanda " 110 46 3.0.011Q43 SO5
Wysanking '''s •• I 110.54 5.13
,
Standing Stone 13103
Etummerlield" I 11110 - 5.20
Prenchtown ....._ 11:19 .._. ..
Wyalusing i 3.36,11.30 5.43
Laceyville 11.42' 3.57111.50 6.03
Skinner's Eddy ........ .... ... . 111.53 G. 07
ldeshoppen 4.12,12.10 6.23
ileboopany 1''''.112.16 6.25 1
It nkhannock .. 12.23. 4.35 1.00 7.10
LaGrange • 1.10 7.20
Falls • 1 • 1.24 7.35
t. St B Juncuon .. . . ".
.. 1.05 1 ! 5.101 1.45 8.05
Wilk .a.Barre..... ....... 1.351 5.30, 2.20 8.35
%fatten Chunk 3.451 7.351 4.5011.00
Allentown • ' 4.44! 8.29 5.53 12.00
Bethlehem.
... 5.00! 8.451 6.0512.1
Easton 5.30, 9.001 6.40 12.55
Philadelphia 6.5510.40! 8.40 2. i
New York 8.05 ! 1 - 9.15 3.35
AZI. P.M.P.M . P.M,
WESTWARD. .
. .
.i , •
STATIONS.: 1 00l 2! o
~
P.I , h.IiI.IA -
:low Y0rk............ „ i ....
Philadelphia ...
Easton , .., It
Bethlehem ,I C
Allentown ~.. ........... .. ii . 0
Mauch Chunk.... - . . .. ..,: , I.
Wilkes-Barre. ial 't.
1, k B Junction • IV ..
Falls ......t ..
=I
Tunkhannock
Maio opany....
Meehoppen
Skinner's Eddy.
Laceyville
Wyalneing
Frenchtown
Rummerileld
Standing Stone—
Wyeanklug
Fowanda
Mater
51ilan
Athena
iay re .. ......
Wave ......
Elmira . •
Owego
Auburn
TOYANDA,
AND
Mel
Railroad Vine-Tables.
TAKES EFFECT JAN. 1, 1882.
Ithaca
Geneva
Lyons .
Rochester ...
Buffalo
Blsgara Falls
No. 'B2 lep.ves Wyalusing at 6:00, A. M., French-
Own 6.l44Rummerfteld 6.23, Standing Stone 6.31
Wvsauking 6.40. TOWSWIIO. 6.53, Ulster 7.06-,
Milan 7:16, Athens 7:25, Sayre 7:40, Waver
ly 7:55, arriving at Elmira 8:50.. A. 31.
N 0.31 leaves Elmira 5:15 P. It., Waverly 6:00,
Sayre-6:15, Athens 6:20, Milan 8:30. Ulster 6:40,
Towanda 6:55, Wysauling 7:05. Standing Stone
7.14, Rummerileld 7:22, Frenchttnin -7:3% arriv
ing at Wyainsing at 7:45., P. M.
Trains 8 and 15 run daily. Sleeping cars on
trains 8 and 15 between Niagara Falls and Phila
delphia and between Lyons and New York with
out changes. Parlor cars on Trains 2 - and 9
between Niagara Falls and` hiladelphis
with
out change, and through coach to ; andfrom
Roches teuvia Lyons.
Wit. STEVENSON, Supt.
SATRE, Pa., Jan. 2. 1882. Pa. k N.Y. R.ll.
Lafayette House,
Corner Beeond and B stieetS Northwest,
near Pennsylvania Avenue.
WASHINGTON,D.C.
Within a square of the Capitol. Street ears pass
near the door to all parts of the city. Conven
ient to the depots. This is just the hotel for
POIIIIIIIyIVIIMIXIII visiting the National Capital.
Rooms well furnished:wad the dewiest and
beet beds in the city. Table first class.
, .
'Rooms and board from r to $3 per dap. Reduced rates by thoLiveei t or month.
WILLIAM ',SANDERSON,
. 1 • Proprietor
Late of the Congressional Hotel, Capitol Hill.
, Jan 11-tf ' '
'1" EL F.
Towanda 5 ct. Store
1%1 A.IN STREET,
(NEXT DOOll TO FMCS & CO
s prepared to‘=offer a complete assort
ment of
DRY AND FANCY ooqs,
Cr9ckery, Glassware,
WHITE and DECORATED CHINA;
Latest designs and patterns of
MAJOLICA WARE,
BIRD CAGES,
SATCHELS, &C
For the coming Spring Trade, we
adhere as heretofore to our establAed
principle—that a quick sale with a small
profit is better than a slow one with a
large profit—and therefore our prices
in any line of . goods will compare
favorable with the prices of any other
house.
iWo endeavor to sell the best
article for the leait possible money.
mo.ti
LOEWUS £ FREIMUTH.
=y .iL N. NELSON
DEALER Di
WATCHES'
COP • ("wen, -!
FINE GOLD Alp PLATED
JEWELER
of every twist:l/And EPoelbeles• airParucul
/Motion paid to topoithi&_._ShoPin Dean' •
Voughtl moans atm. main Sway% T=
Pane. 4
Litholigneous Adirerthements.
AGRICULTURAL
MACIKMY
R. M. WELLES,
W-
SPICING TOOTH - HARROWS,
Unexcelled andinsequaled for thorough_prepara
tion of aUplowsdwroUnd TNT' win
seseclnionifgrn.ells_ 1401111g41.111111SHIS •
irUl put it in, and emit goixedit the ruin drIU
in preparation of the soil. It should be used, by
all means, upon fall plowed ground. They are
remarkably adapted to polish and stony, u well
as for smooth soils. Send for Circulars. Town
ship agpntoi wanted. •
WI/MD CHILLED PLOWS.
Those are the very best chilled plows in the
market for general purposes, and upon an kinds
of ground.
1 ask for fair and thorough test trials for
these plows in competition with the other lead
chilledplows. The Wiard Plows are warranted
to be decidedly the belt, and greatly superior to
all other plows for hard and stony ground. I
believe nearly every farms wilt buy these plows
when he becomes acqunirited with their real
merits. .
Farniers' Thvorite. Champion., and other
Grain Drills. If you want the best and cheapest
Drill. give me a chance;,'_'
AUBURN FARM AND LUM-
With either thimble skeins and woodnxles, or
beat whole-piece •• Anchor . Brand" Iran axles.
well proportioned, well finished and painted,
wily running, best is quality, cheapest good
wagons in the market, best brake, and warranted
in every respect. Call and see them.
Enterpriaa Adjustable 'Nick and Other
If you wants first-class Churn Poweradapted to
your wants I can supply it. • Powers delivered at
any railroad station.
INPROVED TOMPKINS COUNTY
CULTIVATORS.
These cultivators are unrivaled for conven
ience and utility. Are of my manufacture. For
sale & wholesale and retail. Buy the Best."
"The Best is the Cheapest•"
Thomas Eigioothiog Harrows. Aehme
6.30, -.:1.40,
8.00: ....I 9.00!
9.26: ....110.151
9.501
30,65 i -.10.541
!11.05: „,.111.55
1.08: 7.301 2.031
1,351 8:11,1' 2.251
.1. 8:27!
2415' M. 55! 3.01
9.201 ....1
.1 9.
...27 ; 3.271
3.02; 9.501 3.461
.110.14; 4.03;
;'10.271
. 10.37;
110.44: ....
Melo are valnahlo implements and cheep
XX Star Hydraulic Ceram:it,
By the barrel or carload. Good and cheap.
Imported Imperhil Portland Cement
This m stronger than the best Americsn ce
ments by three to eight times. For We in any
desired quantity.
Side-hill and Improved Reversible
Plows, Clipper Chilled, West On
eonta, and other first-class
c , Reversible Plows.
CHAMPION BARBED FENCE
WIRE.
Ell
3.. 59, 11. 11051 4
.55 43;
The attentlon of farmers is called to •tbis
superior Barbed Wire. It is efficient,. yet not
dangerous. It recommends itself at sight. Send
for specimens and pricer.
BEST PLATFORM WAGONS. OPEN and TOP
- BUGGIES, of bestistyles and make. All
• warranted.. t-
4.30 11.3y5.10
4.40;11.41, 5.20
4.45111.50; 5.30
5.25 1 12:40 6.15
s'3 ' l l il 6.25
8.30 1 9.35
6.10 1 .-1 0.40
7.411 .... 8.14
8.401 ....1 8.50
.9,50' o.loj 9.4 Q
11.40 1 , 8.10 12.05
1.031 9.251 1.06
P.M. P.M. A.M.
CARRIAGE.. PLATFORM WAGON and BUG
GY TOM Good and very cheap. 1
CHAIN PUMPS. •
Good and chap. Easily , set. Send for prices.
MIXED PAINTS. First quality, cheap, war
ranted.
8.00
9.40
A.M
LUBRICATING OILS. NEAT'S MOT OILS, in
any quantity wholesale and retail, good and
cheap.
•
Pulliam's Wagon Bolster Springs
very desirable. -•
THRESHING. MACHINERY
Of best and leading/ kinds. Monitor Traction
Road Steamers, Millar'si New Model Vibrating
Threshers and Cleaneri, Harder's. ; Wheeler's
and Gray's Hone Powers, Thieshers and Clean
ers. I would can the attention of threshermen
to Gray's machines. r '
SULKY SPRING TOOTH HARROWS, LEATHER
and RUBBER •BELTING and HOSE, CORN
SHELLERS, FEED CUTTERS,
_LAWS MOWERS.
TOMPKINS COUNTY LEADER
WHEEL ..RARE, .-
For either one or two horses and interchange.
able. These rake' .have no ouperior, and are
adapted to a greater variety- of work than any
other. They are well made, durable, easily hand
led, and good in every particular. Warranted to
give satisfaction.
N. B.—Will deliver free of freight the most of
my goods at any railroad station. '
Call and eee my machinery, or send for circu
lars and prices. _
i
ILtsb2S.Cm
GEO.; L. ROSS . •
Now occupies the Corner Store aoppoaite 1)r; H.
C. Porter's Drug Store, Hain Stant,
with a large stock of
•
•
OF, THE BEST QUALITY.
•
•
Mr. Bess has AsommaSions os Ramos Smuurr .
J. L. Schoonover is clerk. The two stores are I
connected by 'Telephone. Mr. Moss can now feel
satisfied that he CID give, the ! ,
BEStiOODS won THE JNAST MONEY
. ,
Hie experience enables him to select the best
goods, - which he ikbound to sell et a WW PRICE.
You can always get a targain if yu
' •
, •
BUY YOUR GROCERIES 'AT ROSS'S.
Ali goods delivered in the Borough' P.
FARMERS will do well to all with their Produce
and get the CASH. , • 9da1014.17.
• ,
1,, '
OH BEST AND LEADING RINDS.
Wholesale and Retail Dean , .
TOWANDA, PA.
GRAIN DRILLS
BEN WAGONS,
Beet Churn Poweks.
Hariowa.
" R. M. WELLES.
Towands, March 22, 1882. .
And had One of Ms
HOTEL FOR SAT —l offer the
Anteridi¢ Hotel prtrperty for sale at a great
bargain. The Hotel may be seen on the conies
of Bridge and Witt? streets" Towandalloroagh.
It le on* of ne the beet and most good Dentral loestiona
in the pi. There is a butt maneeted
irith the property. The free bridge and new
depot seer to it lathe thm Hotel desirable lbw
any one wishing to engage In the bigness. A.
'good active roan with • mall eeptal can pay for
the property in a short time from the profits.
It was papered and painted new lest spring end
le now in escelbuit mutinies.
•
ice 'H Q. PATTON.
Towanda, Pe n Sept. 32. ithl-t[.'
'TOWANDA. BRApFORD CO
[Fat , nts Itmesinutit.) :
WIZAT'S IN A NAME
When death's derrware
O'er us ihall sweep..
Who
Who win remember us?
- Who for us weep?
Fame, *eilth and honor.
Richmond power.
WM they avail us ought
In that Rot hour
In the "Book of Ilamembranee,"
Kept by 'Gra'. love, •
Shall the names of the &RIM
Be eniolled above.
ll[max, Pa.
~--~
[Foe ses itzpvsucar.)
'46A.ry.
)11211. HENNAS TAX LOON.,
I wondet.aftep . all• the 'years -
Of fallute, of allitout • • e •
." 0) • 4 v irbonlallr/t these •• • ";-
Arise awl gird my lohMand dare,
0 trembling heart, 0 shrinking sonl.
Try once more for the longed-for goal 2
I had not thought over again '
would lift np coy weary hand.;
Engirt with caseleu• hopeless pain,
, henceforth life's feeble minds
Shall ebb onward all qn telly; -
Untillhey reach the •!I:nfathemed Ses. "
But day and night, and night and day.
I
Life . s myriad travellers pass along;
•
Sometimes I hear a saddened by,
Sometimes I hear exulient song;
But, sad or glad, each puier•by
Bu—" Onward—ho," for rallying cry.
0 trembling heart, 0 shrinking soul,
If we should fall if we should Lint;
If once again we miss the goal. -
With sandals•worn and garments rent;
If'fail we must, 0 heart, 0 soul,
'Twere best with face set towards the goal.
ADDRESS OF THE REPUBLICAN
STATE COMMITTEE.
Headquarters Republican State Connittee,
- St. ClowelHotel, Philadelphia, Nay 17, 1882.
To vas ntrautscase or PENNITTLVANIA:
The Republican State Conimittee
thus early announces the
the
of its
Headquarters, and asks the promPt co
open ation-of all active Republicans, to
the end that the details of what must
prove a great canvass may receive the
most cereful attention.
_ The Harrisburg Conveution has sub =
witted to the suffrages of the people a
great ticket and a glorious platform.
Tue ticket embo lies a group of names
' which for ability. fitness and representc
tive character it is impossible to excel. -
Gen'l Beaver is not only the type of our
soldiery—of that heat which counted iu
its - raults'nearly a quarter of a Wiltion of
Pennsylvatrians when the Union_of the
States - was imperilled—but his deeilw
and sufferings for the cause place him
in the front rank of the heroes of that
war. As Republicans we vowed in its
darker hours that political ingratitude
should never be shown to any of these
heioes. "all:other things being equ I." I
In thi, instance all u,.14.tr things are
more than equalled; they are excelled
in so far that our maimed soldier candi
date, for Ckeieruor embodies - all the
higher qualities of the - , statesman, • the
orator and 'the christtan. Senator
Davies fur Liettlenaut Governor, repre
mita the free, unshackled talent of the
section which gave us n Wilmot and 'a
Grow. • Wm. Henry Rawle, for the Su-',
preme Court, is the bed product of
Philadelphia's brilliant bar, and in the
world of legal letters bears a fame so
bright that our continent cannot bind
it. 'John M. Greer, for Secretary of
Internal Affairs, is as strong in polities
as in physique, and throughout a
_dis
tistinguished career in the State Senate
has been recognized as the champion of
the men who have developed our• rivers
of oil and made the world their channel.
Thomas M. Marshall, the meat inde
pendent of all independent thinkers in
our West, is the best example our State
affords of the citizen whose qualifitia
tions have compelled.the office to hunt
the man. He will aid in keeping intact
what in the nature of things must be a
very narroar Republican margin in the
lower House of Congress. :A •
The ticket thus fairly and ' l , fully rep'
resents every living element of 'Repllh
hamnism. Theplatform* , inore..prO
nouneed than any ever before adopted
in the State—pronounced 'iu seeking
every legitimate political advance touch
ing improvement of methods and -the
earliest passible triumph of principles.
Pennsylvania is now freer in her
forms of ;- Republica' primary.' action
than any . other State in the Union:
She inatigniaied district representation
in National Conventions, and now. more
fully enforCes •this policy than any of
her sisier States. 'The present platfortn
and the rules embodied therein secure
to primarYachon.for State Convention's
every tangible claim 40 inounsed libertY,
and these are political reforms of More
rapid groWth than any known - to 'oar
history. ,
As a role genii things in politatia
which come to stay, come step by Step.
the pace Increasing only as all become
more and more ready to receive. The pro
gresa of the Republican party forcibly
attests a fact which has Town into a
g ri c" - ;
Mali= In its infancy the party could
not annonnce its opposition . to the
farther ettensiv of; slavery. Extensidn
once forbidden, ita wisest ' champion
the martyred liincoln—patiently strug
gled in the earlier years of his first ad
ministration' for compensatedemend
'
patron.. _ His appeals were "
rejected by
the partial interested. War's grim ne
`comity einancipated, and than a went
struggle" 'followed for equality before
the law 7 Lfint another step. and ' , one
which looks timid now yet which •was
bold enotigh then. Civil , rights. accom
plished, Manhood onifirage came through
even more painful stages. ; To have de
manded the greater boon from the be
ginning--the final step which included
and outreached all the others—wonld
have led to a fatal slip. The m e n who
proved their prowess in these struggles
were thole who had the wisdom to guide
whit 'care and good cheer, and so to
`stand. with the people as ant to loose
'
1
their opportunities trominereasing use
fulaess. Of snob were Lincoln; Ste
i wen, Garfield. • -;`._.
And new the Republicans of our State.
•
having aided in securing limn rights
..am or Taz PEOPLE :
J. r,
You sok for my auto h
What's In a name?
Cane little paragraph-
Dial all the same.
°eel sovereign
giving. #,O
ii
whenever it shall be popuf or repre
sentative.- Either is a gr t advance,,
anti in the advance the p rty of the
State' has only refraiwed fra' i interfer- .
mice with the right of home rale in pri
mary details.
Look carefully at
,the platform, and
you will see not only: successive but
culminating steps to every remedy, and
steps pointing to every liberty which
wisdom can suggest. These are reforms
Of today. Only evenomed sophis
try can call them reforma,of to-morrow.
The ticket with high honor recognizes
ev,ery element of the party; 'platform
embodies every principle which the
knowledge of men in dispassionate con
ference, committee, or convention,
could suggest as abreast of the times.
The Republican 'party redeems its
pledges. It has never , forfeited its
'word, and neither misconstruction nor
taunt can shake its record or purpose in
this regard. Atcomplished reforms will
- 1? e maintained. promised reforms will
be realized, and that they may be main-
Wood _and realized the State committee
.asks all who lean toward Republicanism
to fail'into line ender the old standard,
that & victory sure to be won may be
doubly assured.
_
In a contest where nearly' all is c at
stake they do . .best who'are most willing
to sacrifice personal desires, individual
bhades of opinion, or pe.rsoisilambition
nd interest, fur the common Cause. In
such contests a shrewd and unscrupn-
lons enemy too often prompts the lift
ing of the red land of faction, so that
it way .Serve as a ”"will-o' the•wiep" to
lead the unwary aside and, into quag
mires,- where they must remain without
a flag, without a purpose, and without
a goal. •
There is but one 'enemy to fight. It
ii the old one, which in major part was
false to, the Union in its hours of dan
ger; which subsequently stood brit as
an obAructiou to the rights of man;
which, to-day redresents - a reaction op
posed to American labor. to our mater
ial advancemeo in mibidaOtures and
commerce, to the repemption of our na
-tion's pledges.' . With settled purpose
not to be diverted frem their object,
the Republicans of Pennsylvania will
face this common enemy, and, with it
alone decide the great issues of the
Bich °
And the better to do this let all Re.
publicans wbo have any suggestion to
make, correspond with their State and
County Committees, - 7 counsel with
their neighbors t —invite and encourage
the ever- sufficient aid of their local and
metropolitan Republican press—prompt
theoctive to, greater activity,—inspire
effort ip the new and , nutried,—hasteu
primary action where . haste can do pe
wrong,—anticipate in the earliest hours
of the canvass that machinery of the law
which requires early registries of voters
—andin all things get ready fora great
battle. Serve early and
, manly notice
upon' the enemy that every heno - reble
effort and.resource shall be employed
tolacbieve a victory which many regard
as vital to the great Republican party
and its principles.
By order of the Republican State Com
` mitt*. • Thos V. Coogan.
Chairman.
A Tragic Tale'.
All his life he had toiled and saved
and -sciaped, and pulled every string
tliat k icuta dater at the end of it. And.
nowill his hard-earned 'wealth was gone
and a great hateful interest-saihng mort-'
gage spread its black wings over - all that
he owued and loved on earth. He sank
into a chair, and, folding hia arms upon
the table before him. 'bow4 gray
bead upon them and grol6ed: great
groans. His,,beart seethedb i t-axing.
' you mortgage the fir ?` asked
his wife, anxiously, stealing , softly to
his side.
'Yes,' he i growled, 'both farms, and
sold the wood lot over on, Big Island.'
'And did-yon have to mortgage the
town house too ?' she asked, with
quivering lips and glistening eyes.
'Oh, yes,' said the man in hollow
tones. 421 h, yes, and sold all my stock
in the Northern, and hyphothecated
what I had in the Sixth street bridge.'
'And was it enough ?' she ashed, trem
bling with eagerness.: 'Was it enough 1'
*Not quite,' 'beg rowled, and then, as
he saw the ghastly pallor of deathly
IlisiPpointment spread, over her face he
added, 'but the milliner let me have it
on ninety days' time for the balance at
eight per cent.'
'And you've , brought My new hat
hems then,' she, caroled, joyously.
.014 Philip,, *on dear otd duck
'Well, no, not all of it,' he said. 'I
brought the'plautes and one of the bows
down with me in the Cipress a but the
bat itself is coming dein froniehicago
on a flat-cap.' _
. And' thezezt week alter thal, eleven,
dark-browed men.. who eat, behind
Philip's wile at the theatre. 'militia the
wretched man on his way home; hauled
him off down Valley street, rolled him
up into s wad. and !hipped up the
new sewer with him. -- [Burlington
Etawkeye?
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- '...1 - '' , ' FA SESO! NOTES.
: _
4111)101C701114141.W.::::.,
fjlEUOLiti BMW& 14PZELIL-:,,
Poilowhig is Geseral Beaver's wish
to the convention 'after his nomination:
Representatives n f the Republicans of
Pennsylvania: am here in obedienee
to yonrstraimons; in answer to your
Telma. -The committee of your body
who have conveied that request hive
also infoimed me of your action in
naming ,me as thicandidate of the - Re
publican party of Pennsylvania for the
suffrages of the people in the approach
ing election' of ,rs Chiet Magistrate of
our great CoMmonwealth. I am not
insensible to the distingnished honor
which yon have conferred upon me by
the voice of this great convention. The
man would be straneelilacking in the
feelings isbieh are common .to our hu
manity whose beset could fail to be
tarred- by • a pleasurable: emotion in
*lf offhis action. And yet you will
idit*lllifteri4ll4 4 ll**o` dos' bias.
thri isayinvihal this nomination
is an empty honor unless you fairly
represent in its bestowal the free will
and the untrammeled eh l oice of yoUr
great constitnency: Did - I not believe
this was The fact you could not prevail
upon me to stand as the repreientative
of the grand political party whose past
history is the best
,guarantee •of its
future policy. If you do not believe
this is the fact I pray you cancel this
nomination here and now and select
some, gentleman whom you and I can
.join in supporting as the true exponent
of the pure Republicanism and the nu
biased choice of a majority of the
Party-
ROT A POLITCIAN
lam not much of a Phlitician. I
have but little political expJrience, afml
consequently lay no claim to the
sagacity which large experience
brings, but I 'have laithtntlyi and ear
nestly endeavered to learn in the pre
liminary canvass which has resulted - in
his nomination what the wishes of the
masace of the Republican party were in
regaid to it. I have not airtight indi
vidual ''support nor bargained for politi
cal influence, but I have beekxolicitious
to know the popular viill.tl - ':',llelieving
that you have registered that will and
given utterance to the voice of the peo
ple, ,I accept this .nomination—not
boastfully, not unthinkingly, but.under
a kein sense of , the responsibilil
which popular 'confidence implies and
begets. I have carefully noted the in
structionn 'under which some of you
haie cast your votes to-day, and whilst
I -
lam painfully aware that , I fall very
far Shortcofi 'the picture of the man
whom you rere instructed to suppOrt
for this Elrlinatious I am, nevertheless .
impressed .with the fact that the Peo
ple in many parts of the Ccimmonsrealth
have set up a high ideal to which they
expect 'thnnominee of this
~c onvention
lir the office of Chief Magistrate to
attain. I cannot expect to reach the
full measure of their high standard, bat
I will come only so fur abort of it as the
ability which God has given me, backed
by an honest purpose and ran earnest
'pall, will enable me to reach.
PLEDGES AS TO THE FUTURE.
I have made no pledges to living man
as to• what my future course shall be.
I can make none, now or hereafter,
except this: . In the approaching ppliti
cal campaign the harinony and snecess
of the Republican party shall be the
one great object- of desire and effort on
my part, and if your action should be
ratified at the polls the welfare of the
whole people shall be the prime object
of my sojicitude, their will my inspira
tion and! my hightest aspiration to. obey
their commands as legally expressed.
You will pardon these personal remarks,
ordinarily out of place, but the circum
stances under which we meet, and the
evident misunderstanding.:of my posi
tion by many right-thinking People,
rends}}'' them' not only appropriate, but
necessary. And now, as to the princi
plea *lion you .have enunciated as ex
preadve of the sentiments of your con
stituency: They are not only correct
as principles, but they must bd faithfulljr
and honestly carried out' in practice.
They are not only beuutiful as senti
ments, but they must regulate.; and con
trol the life-of the party. The ques
tion for us is not, are therrigtit? They
are right, and therefore we can advocate
them, stand by them e uphold them and
insist upon their practical application
in party government and in the , legisla
tion Which will give them life and
efficiency. Public trust mean@ public
aervickii. He who accepts it- becomes
the servant of all and in administering
it he enjoys most who serves the ,
FOB THE WHOLE -PEOPLE.
- This is not the time nor is ibici the
Ore for the discussion of or the detail
of the , principles which you have an
nounced as the matured thought of the
party. If life and health are spared
,I
propose to carry the standar4 , upon
which they are inscribed into{ every
county of the commonweidth. and
"with thwaid those An belieVe with
me that theyare verities tci ' bring
them before every intelligent thinking
man in the State.' This standard which
you present is' the.tri-color of harmony,
of purity in the party government and
of the prosperity of the whole people.-
And 'now, as I take it from your hands,
I pledge you, and I pray yon to join in
the pledge, -that together we will carry
it to a glorious and triumphant-victory.
"I Conlihilt Come Home Any Earlier,
Dear," is the name of a new song yet
to be irritteil. It will be appropriate
for the early morning, to be warbled
by procrastinating husbands at about
the time the winged 'choristers begin
to chirp thekmatins.—Oil City Deriick.
"Lawrence, my dear," said his wife,
wreathed in smiles, "I wish you had
been to church this morning. Mr.
Jones • was very interesting, and when
prayed for the absent ones"—"Well,
that anoonsts for it, 'then. I haven't
caught such a string of fish for a - year
as I did this morning."—Detroil Free
Press. •
.444
WM
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GENERAL Oztosas. }Hum Teiarks De-
partment of Peon
, No. G. Sylvania, G. A. IL
Philadelphia, May 0,1882
Comrades :--Tneaday, May 301 b, will
be obseried u our. *anal Memorial
Day. when yon will go onkto the gravea
of our forty thousand felloweoldiere,
who silently bivouac Within the borders
of Pennsylvania and decorate them with
the fresh flowers of the spring time.
In more_ than a thousand burial
grounds in our State; in, the crowded
cemetery of the city, in the giaveyard
of the village, in the shade of the valley,
in the sunshine on the hillside, rest our
soldier dead, broight from the fields of
their glory where they fell in the bat
tle's itorm, or who, stricken with
wounds or wasted with disease, came
back from their, campaigns to tie
tare Cold:
t.
Naiad, the stilima of 'Sidi childhoOd.
among kindred and friends.
Remit entirely the cares and labors of .
Major the day, and devote it to our
beautiful and impressive commemorative
. I
ceremonieli
Diligently, seek out every comrade's
grave in our State, however humble,
however secluded; lay upon it the laurel
and rose; plant above it the flag for
whose honor ho died, now the Standard
of a
. Nation; united and prosperous. " It
is but a simple act, but the spirit that
prompts it is significant:
No' - claborate 'monument, no bronze
tablet records the heroio deeds,: the
patriotic services, ! the unselfish sicri-
Sees of those, ai whose graves we pay
our floral tribute. t But, comrades,j as
you steed beside ( these passionless
Mounds,, there will'arise vivid memories
of the ardent, brave. courageous, genial
and generous I ones who lie beneath,
them. • • _, •
To•them life was dear, the ties of
home sacred, the hopes of the future
bright, but moiled by the purest patri
°firm they voluntary relinquished all for
their country's cause, realizing well the
hardships to be endured.
,the perils to
be encountered, the prospects of life
that would be blasted:- •
And yet these, whose graves we shall
decorate, are but a few of the mighty
hosts of the fallen. Legions rest upon
the - war fields of the South, in the
glades of the forest, by the streams
among which they fought, on the hills
on which they bled, and the sun of, our
Memorial Day will set upon their
graves, unwatchecl • and undecorated,
save by the wild lopd flower and the
untrained - vine.
Iu a million desolate homes, North
and South, there are grief and mourn
ing for the volunteer who came not
back from the.battle,, with the tattered
flag under whose folds he marched away
in the pride 'and strength of vigorous
and hopeful youth.
The services of Decoration Day are
not, then, for vain display, but have a
higher and nobler purpose, in remin
ing'us- of the priceless ransom paid for
the integrity of our Republic • and its
! institutions. x
May all our people participate in the
beautiful ceremonies. May the young,
especially, be impressed with their
Meaning and significance. May we,
moved by the sad memories awakened
return to our homes at the close of the
• )
day, thrilled with• a ,puter patriotism,
incited to a truer devotion to our coun
try, and with a firmer determination
that ours shall be the most !perfect
"government' of the people, by the
people," and that our dead
dual not have died in vain.
By command of
J. M. VANDEBSLICp,
-
Department Commander, ,
THOMAS J.aTEW t ART, 1
• Li
Assistant Adjutant General.
AMERICAN PURSE PRINCES.
The Grand Hotel here, in everything
grand but its politeness and its comforts
is in a sort of inikunation preparing the
entire first floor of bedrooms and at
tached sitting-rooms fot they Amsiican
purse prince, William Ef. Vanderbilt,
acd all his family, attendants and gen
eral impedimenta. The 'manager' of
this Grand Hotel, no time a Solomon,
la now stark, ataii l ng mad ovei such
distinguished guests. Next to hibi in
'the mad passion' are the London brio
u-brac dealers, who have endless articles
of vertu to sell to Mr. Vanderbilt fo
his new Illal/bioll. Men who' are the
special agents of Midas must pay for
their whistle in this identical region
where old Ben Franklin wrote his im
mortal fable. Some time ago Mr. J
Lord telegraphed to Venice thus: 'Pre
pare rooms for J. Lord and family.
In eager meta*, delight the Venetian
hotel-keeper prepared the most`gunipt
uotui suite of roams in the hotel. On
arriving Mr. Lord sas met at the por
tale of the hotel with an obsequiousness
and hosing down servile slavery of so
called politeness that he could not coal
prebend. The rooms were enfete with
flowers, the menu was, unique, the
orders were awaited and obeyed in a
manner most astounding by the vassals,
who at each sentence responded demur
ely and dutifully: 'Oni, mi Lord,'
Wh'en a moment's privacy was given
his! 'lordship' be turned to his better
half and said: . 'Look hare, My dear,
we'll have , to pay through the nose for
all this; these fools 'and flunkies think
I'm a nobleman, with the title of lord.
I'll stop it right off!' - Down to the offi
cial desk went this sensible Man and
looking the manager, full in the. foci) to
said:. 'My name_riotbing elsOl' The
manager be..stme livid and felj , on the
lounge. The unique menu was sup
plied by an ordinary bill of fare, the
flowers 'wilted at once, and the rooms
.occupied by this retired merchint were
Alp-two-pair back, and the Consequiinces
were his whistle cost eonsiberably less
than it Hie .lord's and was quite as
w holiaome.--Ballinore Sun a
Ttie old proverb, 'The better the day
the better the deed,' doesn't apply to
an instrument conveying real estate
drawn up on Snuday.—Boston Globe.
•
•
The VlenTie.sident is mentioned as
havink§ilen itresent on a certain meat
Bien* : 1 44shington: There is , no snob
abut to Milted States, nor has
there been , - any such officer: here since
Too Prolblent Artbartook the oath of
celoosit / I resident Of the..Unit'd States,
almost stirnonthi since. Further, it is
altogetkoit.i!obable that there will be
no in*Rroblent until the 4th of
Mattli s llM that is to say, until after
tawt*44lfthnationil election shall
have. •
,in*lieLland, decided, and a
Presidotikbe Ohosen, at the same time
oltd 6r;*lo:ine votes , tLat will belong
to tlitiatiiiiiiia'bistory of that election.
cf Illinois, is meant,
that riii4in is no more Vice Presi
daß:thiltaked stake than he as.
04411: Supreme Court of
tfid ll _ Vilkton. - is president of
- .
can be held onlrtoy . thembileof- the
Senate; and the Vies President of the
United States cannot he a member of
the United States Senate. Were the
office of President of the United States
to become vacant while Mr. Davis is
president.of the Senate he would, be
cause he is president of the Senate, act
as President of the United. States until
a President should have been chosen,
but he would not be President of the
United States. - -
This fact alone would suffice to show
that he is not Vice President,''for that
officer becomes President of the United
States on the death of the President
With whom he was serving. The lan
guage of the Constitution is airclear and
explicit on this point as language can
bo made. It is this: 'ln case 'of the
removal oT the President from office, or
of his death, resignation or inability to
discharge the powers and duties of the
said office, the same shall devolve on
the Vice President.' (Art. IL, Sec. 1.)
The practice under the Constitution
harmiinizei strictly with this provision.
Foar Presidents have died in office in
about forty years, and in each instance
tho Vice President choseh with the
Fresident i that , had departed suc
ceeded to' the Presidency. In no in
stance was lit Proposed that there should
be an election held to fill the vacandy.
There were mea who Raid that Mr. Tyler
was acting -President, but they never
said that an election should be held for
the choice of President.
Nem aa such an election would .be
held (provided there should be time in
which to hold it before' the occurrence
of the next regular election in -the event
of Mr. Davis (as President of the
Senate) becoming Acting President of
the United States, it follows that Mr.
Davis is no mai Vice President of the
United States then he is Speaker of thb
..United States House of . Repreientativeo.
Not being' Vice President, be should
not be spoken of as if he held the Vice
Presidency ! —Lßoston Traveller.
Women as Listeners.
Woman, is primarily a being who lis
tens. She has in these days lost much
olher original teachableness, but she
has not yet entirely discarled the . ap
pearance of being teachable. ' In her
capacity for hearing without obeying
lies her trSe power. As a talker, she
has her peers;'i .
as a listener, she', is im
equalled. , 'O ,
If, as a ,Prerteh writer says, the con
veiaation of women in society is like
the Straw in, which china is packed—
worthlesl in 'itself, but without .whieli
everything would be broken--the listen.
lag of women is what , saves us from a
Babel of tongues that would bring the
sky about our_ ears in no time. ' Not
that woman is always, or, as a rule, un
willing to use her tongue (there is no
need of being radical), but the listener
ivho encourages' you with eyes, end ex
prossion and appreciative laughter is 'a
woman.. She never lets her glance
wander in an absent- Manner, to be ,
brought back to meet yours at an ' im-,'
portant point with air effort of which
you are both keenly conscigus. To
whom are yon tom Wto rellaTi bits' of
curious peisonal eiperience, the suffer
ing caused by some random arrow of
outrageous fortune? the fancies suggest
el by some back;-- some view; l some
journey '.' To -a, clever, sympathetic
whose eyes brighten with interest •or
sadden with sympathy as ,ahe listeni,
who seems to anticipate yo 4 peat word
" with eager pleasure, and who, for some
reason or other, just then, while'you are
, in thiSiconfidential mood, has very feir
i esperiences or fancies of her , own to
communicate--only hints at them—
, last enough to keep you in countenance.
•
—[Lippincoti's Magazine.
, - 4 -__. • .
He lade the Wrong Far Fry.
A very excited colored brother hunt
ed up an,officer , patrolling Baxter street
yesterday and said that he had long
borne the abuse of a man of his color,
who was then in a house on the next
block, and added;
don' want to brok the law, b u t the
time has arroyo when I must. -crush dat
pusson to de dust.'
'lf I catch you fighting, -I shall .have
to take yon down,' replied the other: -
'I can't help it, sah--can't help it, no
how. If dat possum makes his disap.,
pearance on de street when fur arotrn
de far asa gwine to fly, it I die for it
He's slandered me an' lied about me,
an' Ize gwine to 4-stish .him same as
you would a tiger.
The officer passed on to the end of
his beat and returned to find the crush
er with his back to the fence and a
woman lending him a wet rag to bind
his head up.
• 'Let's seel Yon are the man •who
was going to crash some one?' °inert:
the. officer. • " •
'epees I are.' •
'Did he come oat?'
'I 'specs he did.'
'Did the fur fly?'
'Deed it did,"but - the'trouble was dat
it was de'wrong far.'
'Well, what are you going to do now?'
'lre mains to get hailed up en' lint
his brudder•in•lawl Pour on some mo'
water ! miaati, for die ole head begins
to swim again.'—Kasas City Times.
WEE
WIA
~Spanish Iwo holds its own with the
rival Scat..
White will bo mach worn for sum
mer home dresser.
All kinds of tupelo copy Oriental
designs and colors. , -
Neck ribbons are more frequently trod
on one - side than in front.
Little children will wear white for
dressy occasions this summer.
Low-necked, short-sleeved dreMes are
revived for small girls wider 9.
Chip:lists, particularly -black ones,
will be much wont as the sesson
vances.
White pique 'bonnets andlats foe lit
tle children are sold in large Bugaboo
to country Merchants. - -
Shirred yoke dream, with full skirts
and no widdbant or atheism, sms numb
worn by Isola gide.
, _
lititegirhi has a - high ;41'ormandy crows`
buttoned on to a deep poke brim. = -
Irish point collars and.cafts ~are- s old
in seta for children's wear. They make
the plainest kind of gingham frock
dressy. .
New table linen of the linest grades:
comes in tinted grounds, with damask
designs in white on one side, while on'
the other the order is reversed,
Baby dreEses without_ waists, the
skirts attanhed to the yokes or bands
around the shouldera, will be the popu
lar summer' garments for little girls
under 10.
The European fashion of - wearing no
jewels except in full Areas, for evening
entainment, is becoming the rule among
our best society people in New York.
Pretty damask towels, with. Mother
Goose's- melodies illustrated in the
colored borders at the ends,--are cut in
too to make fancy bibs for children.
The figures and the legend in verse are
both _put into the' designs. - -
A high-necked, long-sleeved; belted _
waist of mdslin or self-colored gingham
is worn under.low-necked, short-sleeved
die.eses by little girls, when the weather
or the occasion does not permit the low,
sleeveless garment. - -
The mull neck scarfs lately so popular
ale now utiliied as &tins tied or Iciosely
knotted on the bosom of the corsage,
while the neck ribbon .is placed above
them around the neck, inside the dress
collar, but outside the rache or linen ,
collar.
Lawn tennis suits have skirts of lawn
tennis stripes in bright and cesthetic
combinations, while the tunics and
blouse waists are of light- flannel serge
in bomplenientary colors to in the
snipes.: The cuffs, collars, reverse; and
bands are of the striped stuff.
What can be Sown In June.
Those who-have a time' of 'making'
in early spring, and doing up the -sow
ing all at once, do not get the - greatest
good from their gardens. There are
many vegetables of which the' season
can be greatly prolonged - by making
successive sowings. A striking eitin' *pie
of this, is _Sieet Corn, which, by
judicious sowings may be had every
day until frost stops' its growth; In
many localities, the most thoroughly
tropical plants, such as Lima Beans,
Okra, and the'Melons, do better if pat
in now than it sown earlier. 'For suc
cession, after the first sowing, put in
Bush-Beans.,Beets (allowing plenty to
be used as beet greets), Cucumbers,
and other pickle plants. garrote,
Kohl - Babi, and Salsify, are among those
that may still be sown and make a crop
before frost arrives.—American Agri
culturist for June.
She was Confused.
It was not in Monidden's drug store
that a young and sprightly school
teacher list week addressed the clerk:
'I would like at sponge bath.'
%h i oh, a.--will-_you please tepeat;
did not quite understand you!' stam-I
meted the clerk.
would lil.e a good sponge bath,'
again demanded the customer, while
pair of sharp gray eyes, beaming with
wonder and', impatience, nvule him
tremble. - •
More dead than alive he managed to
tell his fair visitor his inability to catch
her meaning.
*Well, I never i If this isn't queer
I think I speak intelligently enough. ' . ;l
—Want—you— to— give—mti=a=good'
—sponge—bath.'
•
At this moment the proprietor
petal: 'She wants a bath sponge.'
At the same moment she comprehend
ed the trouble and fled from the store.
before she, could be recsgnized by any
one, "but too late I A gentlenian raised
his hat to'ber, passed in and_ all was
discovered.--[Hackensack Republican .
A ""Contingent"
•
A citizen had hadoccasiOn to consult
a lawyer regarding a suit which he
. hed
contemplated instituting, but - of the de
finite outcome of which he was in
doubt. He did not wish to pa l a re
taining fee, because he was uncertain of
winning. The attorney said be would
accept a contingent fee. The party
met Mr. Barleigh • some time afterward
and asked hike definition of a con
tingent fee. - .
*4 contingent fee," jeeosely said Mr.
Burleigh, is this: 'lf a lawyer loses : the
case he gets nothing. If he - 104 you
get nothing.'
*dint,' said the perplexed pgirty,
scratching his head, can't say that I
exactly comprehend you.' -
thought I was quite clear,' aid Mr.
Burleigh, who repeated what he had
said. '
'But it seems that 3 don't get any
thing in either event,' said the man,
when his intellect had fully grasped the
situation.
'Well, that is shout the size of
contingent fee,' . replied Mr. - &Weigh,
terminating the conversation.--gletroit
Free Press. ;
SKINEY MEN.
"Wells' Health Renewer" restores besitib
and vigor, 'cares 'Dyspepsia, lospotenee,
Beittal Debility. $l.
iiiiiffill
taffi
PAM
ENE
El=