The daily collegian. (University Park, Pa.) 1940-current, December 10, 2010, Image 5

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    The Daily Collegian
Fans remember former Beatle
By Hannah Rishel
COLLEGIAN STAFF WRITER
Thirty years ago today, a
memorial service for John
Lennon was held in the
Eisenhower Chapel to celebrate
the life of the man who helped
define the Baby Boomer genera
tion.
On Dec. 8, 1980, Lennon was
assassinated in front of his apart
ment building in New York City.
The next day, thousands of people
gathered to mourn him outside of
the building in the area of Central
Park now known as Strawberry
Fields.
“Because the Beatles' music
has impacted so many of us so
deeply, we feel as though, some
how, we knew John Lennon
through his songs, which makes
the sense of loss all the more
poignant, " Beatles expert and
Penn State Altoona professor Ken
Womack wrote in an e-mail.
One individual who was affect
ed by Lennon's untimely death
was Jon Peterson, a Penn State
senior at the time.
“I don't consider myself a super
fan," Peterson. Class of 1981. said.
“But John Lennon had a voice
that just resonated with me. I just
felt like he was a friend more so
than I was a fan."
Peterson recounts hearing the
news of Lennon's death on
Choir group to bring ‘gift in song’
By Hannah Rishel
COL; EG.AN S:'A
Essence of Joy wants to bring
the Christmas spirit to Penn State
and then spread it to Africa.
The choral group will perform
its “Our Gift in Song" at 8 tonight
in Esber Recital Hall in Music-
Building I. Tickets are S 3 for Penn
State students and $5 for non-
Penn State students. A portion of
the proceeds raised will be donat
ed to an orphanage in Africa.
The choral ensemble performs
sacred and secular music from
the African and Airican-Amenean
traditions. "Our Gift in Song" is
Essence of Joy's annual winter
concert, where they perform a
variety of music.
Maurece Lewis, a tenor for
Essence of .Joy. said his favorite
song is 'lnstrument of Pink
Strings." a composition created
for the choral group.
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“Monday Night Football” 30 years
ago.
"I couldn’t even process that,”
he said. “It just didn’t make sense
to me. I couldn’t imagine living in
a world where John wasn’t liv
ing."
Peterson said he then bought a
quart of beer and walked over to
Penn State’s golf course where he
drank, wandered and thought.
The next day, Peterson was
working at The Daily Collegian
when a phone call came in from
Rev. Ned Weller, who wanted to do
something in memory of Lennon
at the Eisenhower Chapel.
Because Peterson was a music
reporter and a known fan of
Lennon's, he was asked to help
organize the event.
On the night of the memorial
service, Peterson recalled taking
the crucifix down off the wall of
the chapel because he wanted the
service to be nondenominational,
the way Lennon lived his life.
Weller gave a eulogy for the
deceased musical icon to a
packed room.
T can t remember everything
he said." Peterson said. "But it
was totally cool and spiritual, and
he totally got it."
After the service. Peterson
recalled feeling "very fulfilled."
The group went outside, not
sure what to do next, so it wan
dered down the Mall to the Allen
I like it because it’s not like
any other song we're singing this
semester." Lewis (sophomore
crime. law and justice i said.
Essence of Joy President
Rachel Dungan, an alto in the
choir, said her favorite song of the
performance is "Let Everything
that Hath Breath," the ending
song of the concert.
"I can identify' with it. It s kind
of our signature style," Dungan
csenior-biobehavioral health and
music composition) said
Treasurer Meredythe Kimmel,
a soprano in the group, said her
favorite song to sing is "For Unto
us a Child is Born." a more tradi
tional Christmas song.
"The style of music changes
through the piece.” Kimmel (sen
ior math) said.
One of Lewis' favorite parts of
the performance is the range of
songs the group is singing in gen
eral. which Dungan echoed.
Street gates and members start
ed singing “Give Peace a
Chance.”
Peterson said that people need
ed to process what they were feel
ing, whether they were in New
York or in Happy Valley.
“For many, it was the extin
guishing of the dream of the
Beatles that was so painful,”
Womack wrote.
“It was the finality of the real
ization that they would never be
together again, that there would
be no reunion, which so many
fans had longed for."
While Meg Grippi wasn’t alive
in Lennon's lifetime to experience
the shock of his death, she still
considers herself a fan.
"I really don't think that it mat
ters that we were never alive
when he was." Grippi (senior-pub
lic relations) said. "He and the
Beatles created something really
amazing and original with their
music and that sort of thing never
dies."
She said the music will proba
bly still impact generations to
come.
And 30 years later. Peterson
said he is still dealing with the
emotions surrounding the death
of his hero.
"I never really got over it all.
he said.
To e-mail reporter: hmrso27@psu.edu
"Although it is a holiday con
cert, everyone is welcome to
come." Dungan said. "The people
planning to come should expect to
feel fulfilled and inspired. It's a
really powerful concert."
One of the things Kimmel likes
about the concert is that it bene
fits an orphanage in /Africa.
She said .Anthony Leach, the
director of Essence of Joy, trav
eled to .Africa with the alumni
choir and connected with the
oiphanage. prompting the "Our
Gift in Song" to donate to the
oiphanage for the past few years.
“It's a great idea because it gets
you in the holiday spirit,” Kimmel
said. "It really goes along with the
title of our show. We’re giving the
audience our gift in song, but
we're also giving a gift to the
orphans through the funds we
raise for them."
To e-mail reporter: hmrso27@psu.edu
(®>
FMENT
Pom star Katie Morgan answers questions from students.
For actress, pom
is ‘everyday job’
Porn star Katie Morgan spoke
about her experiences in the
adult film industry at a no-holds
barred Q&A session Thursday
sponsored by the College of
Liberal Arts.
Morgan said she started in the
porn industry when she was
arrested with 200 pounds of mar
ijuana in her car prior to passing
through the Mexican border.
Needing money for a lawyer,
Morgan said she went through
her friend and an attorney’s
client book before she found a
woman in the industry and called
her about getting a manager.
But Morgan said she’s more
normal than what people may
think.
"Porn is just my everyday job,"
she said. "After work you can
come find me and my husband
smoking weed and playing 'Rock
Band.' ”
Morgan said pornography is
Hollywood’s little brother.
"We still have to do auditions
and we still have awards shows
like movie stars do,” she said.
Morgan said what surprises
people is that she grew up as a
sheltered girl with a priest for a
father. After her father found out
about his daughter’s job in
pornography, Morgan said her
parents weren’t happy, but they
didn't condemn her.
“My parents support me, but
not my cause,” Morgan said.
Though she said she isn’t both
ered by reactions to her job, she
doesn’t appreciate how people
judge her without understanding
her motives.
“People think pom stars are
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Friday, Dec. 10,2010 I
stupid nymphos, but we aren’t
banging every guy, no matter
how much they want us to,” she
said.
Morgan’s husband Jim, who
would not give out his last name
for privacy reasons, said he knew
her as a person before as a pom
star. He said what made him fall
in love with Morgan was her
openness about her sexuality.
“She’s not the kind of girl who
goes to parties to hook up with
people,” he said. “In fact, the last
‘big’ party we went to was our
wedding.”
Morgan said she’s filmed more
than 400 films, but has only had
sex with about 100 men.
“I’m picky with who I work
with,” she said. “If I didn’t like you
or think you were good, I added
you to my ‘no’ list."
Morgan said her "yes” list was
shorter than the no’s.
Jared Kauffman (senior-psy
chology and philosophy) said it
was a fun experience seeing
someone from the industry
involved with an educational
community.
“Others would be in their man
sions having sex right now, but
she’s come to speak to us," he
said. “It makes her seem more
down-to-earth than what we
would think.”
Caitlin Embrey (senior-toxicol
ogy) said having a porn star
speak showed a different per
spective on the matter.
“She seemed to be a regular
person, doing her job like every
one else does everyday,” she said.
Morgan said though she’s been
retired from her seven-year-long
career for three years, she still
makes appearances and has a
contract with HBO until 2012.
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