Penn State collegian. (State College, Pa.) 1911-1940, September 26, 1912, Image 2

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    Penn StateQllegian
Published on Thursday of each week during the
college year by the students of Tne Pennsylvania
State College in the interest of the Students, Fac
ulty. Alumni and Friends of the college.
Entered at the Postoffice, State College, Pa , as
second class matter
Editor in Chief
R. M. EVANS, ’l3
Assistant Editor
M. A. KRIMMEL, ’l3
Associate Editors
G. A. BARKER, ’l3
J. D. HOGARTH, ’l4
F. C. DOSE, ’l4
D. HESS, ’l4
J. R. MATHERS, ’l5
W. S. PARKINSON, Jr., ’l5
Business Manager
M. M. GRUBBS, 'l3
Assistant Manager
B. R. HENDERSON, ’l3
• SUBSCRIPTION.
*1.30 per year or *1.25 If paid within 30 dan after
date of aubicription.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 26, 1912
1916 College exercise for the
year of 1912-13 opened
Wednesday morning by the usual
chapel exercises. As a definite
sign of the growth of Penn State,
President Sparks confirmed the
registration of 705 freshmen and
about 50 men entering from other
colleges. In comparison to the
497 freshmen who entered just a
year ago, which was then the larg
est class ever registered, the much
larger number of new men in the
class of 1916 shows that the steady
growth of recent years has been
even surpassed this fall.
To the new men, the Penn State
Collegian, as an organ of the stud
ent body, offers a most hearty wel-
feel that now they are a part of the
student body which has worked and
will continue to do all in its power
to advance the good name that our
institution now bears. We wish
you, 1916, just as strong a finish as
a beginning.
In order to complete
Business the staff, two new men
Managers will be added to the busi
ness staff of the paper
this fall. Applicants Tare eligible
from the present junior class, and
should hand their names at once
to the business manager.
Freshman In another column of
Schedule, this paper will be seen
the football schedule
for the 1916 class. The scheduling
of games for our freshmen is an en
tirely new experiment at Penn State
and an athletic move in the right
direction. Such a move allows us
to demand more recognition from
other colleges and universities; it
helps to stimulate interest in out
door sports among the first year
men; and it certainly is a means of
finding good material to strengthen
our varsity teams.
The result of these freshmen
schedules will eventually be the for
bidding of all freshmen from par
ticipation in our varsity athletics.
Our present one year eligibility rule
is either misunderstood or wrong
ly interpreted by a large num
ber of the students; it simply for
bids men entering Penn State from
other colleges to participate in any
varsity athletics providing such men
make sophomore standing. If these
men referred to have a preparation
sufficient only to allow them to be
registered as freshmen, they are
considered as entering this college
from prep schools and may join the
varsity ranks if they have sufficient
athletic ability.
The good that will result from
these freshmen games is foreseen
and the scheduling of games for the
first year teams should be en
couraged.
The Coming A very wise pre-
Scrap caution which was
started last spring
was that of physically examining
every contestant of the two classes
concerned before the day of the
scrap. The plan was to protect all
men from infectious skin diseases.
Surely no wiser means could be em
ployed in the coming scraps to
eliminate the trouble that was caus-
I ed last year than by having this ex
amination carried out and rigidly
enforced.
The “Collegian”will
Economical be sent to every man
in college for two
months. The subscription price, if
paid during the first month, will be
$l. 25. The paper will not be sent
to men this year who do not pay
for it. We are trying to better the
paper. Help us by paying your
subscription.
We Can An obvious sign of the
Help the interest being taken in our
Coaches football team is the large
attendance at practice on
Old Beaver. The coaches have a
large squad of men to handle and
need every inch of room on the
field. Let us follow out the custom
than the cinder track. Do not
make the coaches lose valuable
time in keeping the field clear.
Notes From the School of Mines.
Recent letters from Dr. Crane,
who is on a leave of absence in Alas
ka, tell of many interesting exper
iences and profitable time spent in
the Bering River and Matinaska
Coal fields. He expects to spend
the winter and next summer in con
tinuing his study of the Alaskan
Coal fields.
Dr. E. S. Moore, Acting Dean,
spent the summer in charge of an
exploring party of the Canadian
Geological Survey in Eastern Mani
toba.
C.E. McQuigg succeeds Professor
C. P. Linville as Asst. Professor in
Metallurgy. Professor Linville,who
has been with the School of Mines
since 1903, goes into practical work,
as superintendent of the J. D.
Thropp blast furnaces at Everett,
Pa.
Varsity Cross Country.
Captain Keyser has made the call
for “All Men Out.” This is not on
ly for underclass men but for
juniors and seniors as well. It is
the purpose to make this a standing
minor sport, in which contests will
be held with other colleges. Come
along and see the country with the
squad. Daily trips will be taken at
five p. m„ starting at New Beaver
field, under Coach Wright. Any
one who desires to try for the team
please give his name to the captain
or anyone on the track team.
The Secretary Returns,
Mr. F. N. D. Buckman, Secretary
of the Y. M. C. A., returned last
week from Europe where he spent
a very pleasant summer. Mr. Buck
man is being assisted this year in
the work of the association by
"Joe” Platt, Penn State 1910, who
has come back to us from Lehigh,
where he was engaged in similar
work.
PENNfSTATE COLLEGIAN
TheHigti Standard T diry
flWe make an honest efiort to give you the best to be had in our line. *JOur laundry
is modem in all departments. fl[We cater to those who desire high grade work at hon
est prices. flYou will appreciate the snappy appearance of our work,
H. E. Store ’l3 )
J. L. McCreary 'l2 [-STUDENT AGENTS
L. A. Dtvis ’l2 J
Now-a-days
I
COES & YOUNG’S
SHOES
G. F. Vosburg, Agent
Phi Sigma Kappa House
A Well Attended Session of Teach-
The third Summer Session enrol
led 394 teachers representing 57
out of the 67 counties in the state.
This makes an increased attendance
of 83 per cent, over that of the
previous year and more than twice
rhe same percentage over that of
the first Session.
The courses which showed the
greatest relative growth over pre
vious sessions were those in Agri
culture, Domestic Science, Public
School .Drawing and Manual Arts,
Education, Public School Music,
and Manual. Training.
Judging by the past, it is safe to
predict that the'-- next session will
easily reach ;he 500 mark. A table
of comparatve statistics concern
ing the three sessions will undoubt
edly be of interest to Penn State
students and faculty members. * ’
The following is a comparison of
statistics concerning the various
courses offeted during the three
sessions:
1910 1911 1912
Agr. 13 23 65
Bot. 18 11 20
Chem. 24 29 36
Dom. Sci. 18 33 96
Educ. 40 76 134
Eng. 53 70 73
11 14
39 35 45
Gr. 2 0
His. i 17 14 26
Ind. Art. . 22 20 127
Lat. ' 35 42 32
Lib. 34 41
Math. 23 31 42
Man. Tr. 5 9 55
Mech. Dr. 3 3 12
Mus. 8 59
Phy. 13 9 0
Pub. 17
Psy. 24
Span. 3
Zool. 14 9 23
337 469 946
The New Commandant.
Lieutenant Thomas H. Lowe, Ist.
Lieutenant in the 28th. U. S. In
fantry, has been appointed to suc
ceed Captain E. Fry as Command
ant of Cadets. Lieutenant Lowe
has assumed his new duties at Penn
State.
In a Week,
Within the next two days a se
lection of a track coach will be
made for our track team. The
next issue of the paper will contain
some interesting facts about our
athletics in general and about track
plans.
Basket Ball Manager.
At the mass meeting held last
Wednesday morning P. T. Bevan
was elected manager of varsity
basket ball for the season of 1912-
13. This action was recommended
by the executive committee of the
athletic association.
The Student's Laundry
We carry a
full line of
Students* Supplies
Bellefonte Central Railroad
F. H. THOMAS, General Manager
No. No
8. 1.
p. m ...
11.85 ...
a. m. ...
8.40 ...
8.00 ..
* 7* 15 .‘.’i
*8!l5
* V.ib
'■M&
6 85
6.88
6.48
6.46
6.50
6.55
7.00
7.12
7.25
7.27
7.81
7.85
a. m.
except
ion —V
t Sunday.
(With Pennsylvania R. R.
O. JR. SH A lA/
HARNESS MAKER
Agent for THE SOLITE SUITCASE
Can be kept clean by washing with soap and water
You can stand on it when empty. The best LOW
PRICE suitcase made
J. B. MINGLE, Shoemaker
Allen Street
J. C. MARKLE
All Kinds of Choice Meats
Fish in season
138 College Avenue
o^\\c\a\
' 'PViatogr&pYi&Y
and dealer in
OtvVa ujotV. done
Z\l sa&\ CoUeqt SVocnue
fc\a\e CoUtqe
Lock Haven Steam Laundry
OURvwwr'wiu-tJgSjN,
best work
LOWEST
1 pric:es
\\ yjra Your Patronage
Solicited
STUDENT AGENTS
A. L. Sherman ’l4 H.W. Stlner ’l3
awA 'PotDBT C,om\iaTv.tj
State CoVVeae^ewa'a
( E. T. Asplundh 'l2
STUDENT AGENTS -j B. M. Herman 'l2
( T. W. Harris ’l3
The Athletic Store
BELLEFONTE, PA.
Dec. 26. 1010
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OOLEVTLLE 7.
MORRIS
STEVENS
HUNTERS PARK
FILLMORE
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Ar KRUMRINE Lv
STATE OOLLEGE
STRUBLES ....
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PINE GROVE MILLS
The Potter-Hoy Hardware Go.
Everything in Hardware
Distributors for the
PENINSULAR PAINT and VARHISH CO’S
complete line
ASPHALT ROOFINGS
our specialty
BELLEFONTE, PA.
S. E. KIMPORT
Headquarters for
Choice Meats of All Kinds
Frazier Street Both phones
Both phones
G. E. .S'Ba.ey'
(Jerw'ef er eo2(H Optician
POST CARDS
COLLEGE JEWELRY
Have you tried
“Buffalo" Smoking Tobacco?
For Pipe or Cigarette
GEORGE B. JACKSON
ALLEN ST., STATE OOLLEQE, PA.
THE BELMONT STYLE IN FOUR HEIQHTS
GLASGOW 2K In. BELMONT Z)i In.
MEDORA VA In. CHESTER 2 In.
2 for 2B eta. CLUETT, PEABODY A CO„ Maker*