The Franklin repository. (Chambersburg, Pa.) 1863-1931, April 26, 1865, Image 1

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TERNS 41:1F PUBLICATION. I'
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-THE FRANICLEG REPOSITORY is published
very Wednesday morning by "THE REPOSITORY
oisociA'rioN," at 82 50 per fp:llmM, IN ADVANCE, or
IL not paid within the year. All subscription =-
aurae NEST be called annually. No paper will be sent
.at of the State unless paid for in advance, and all such
obscriptions will invariably be.discontincted at the expi.
,tine of the time for which they are Paid;
ADVERTISEMENTS are inserted at FIFTEEN CENTS
line for first insertion, and TEN CENTS per line for anis
equent insertions. Aliberal discount is matte to persons
leertising by the quarter, half year or year. Special no
t.te-4 charged ime.half more than regular advertisements.
ill resolutionyof - Aasociations ; commimicationsTl y limited
ir individual interest, and notices of Marriages m 4 Deaths
-xceeding live lines,- are charged fifteen cents per line.
ill Legal Notices of every kind, and all Orphans'
.;curt and oat? 'Judicial Saks, are required by lam - Wo be
zdrertised in the Rerosrronr—it having the LARGEST - CM.
:CLATION of any paper published in the county of Franklin.
JOB ?RINI . ma of every kind in Plain and Fancy col
ors,_done with neatness anddispatoh. Hand-bills, Blanks,
Cards,-Pamphlets, of every railer? and style, printed
nt th'e shortest notice. The REPOSTTOBY OFFICE has just
herale.fitted with Steam Power and three Presses, and
etiF4-thing in the Printing line can be executed in the
moseartistle manner and at the lowest rates. TERMS IN
VARIABLY CASH.
r,.4 - 31r. John A. Shryock is our authorized A gem Of
receive Subscriptions and Advertisenients, and receipt for
thezame. AR letters should be addressed to .-,--
, M'CLITRE & STONER, Publishers
&al, Lumber, &c.
CARPENTERS AND BU ILDERS !
ATTENTION' ,
The undersigned have ton. on hand, at their
-PLANING AND FLOORLNG MILL.
a large supply of Sash; Shutters, Doors and Blinds for sale,
or made to order.
Mouldings of all qescriptions, from half inch to S inches,
on hand.
Plain and Ornamental Scroll Sfaing neatly executed.
Also—Wood Turning in all its branches. Newel Pats,
Banisters,Bed Posts, &c., on hand.
A large supply of Dressed Flooring for sale.
Also—Window anti Door Frames on hand or made- at
Short notice.- HAZELET, VERNON & CO..
febi tf Harrison Avenue. Charnbersburg, Pa.
NOTICE TO FARMERS
- 100 TON'S OP TIMOTHY HAY 4,
_ i"r4iPted by GEO:A. DEII7.
200 WALNUT LOGS
Wanted by GEo. A. penz.
100 ASH LOGS
Wanted by GEO. A. DETTz.
100 LARGE CHERRY LOGS
Wanted by GEO. A. DETrz.
• WHEAT, RYE, CORN, OATS,
and all kinds !of Produce bought by GEO. A. DEnziat
his Wbrehouse,aboce the Railroad Depot
STOVE AND I•I➢MF COAL
<, for 'vile cbesp, by the ton or half ton.
OAK AND HICKORY WOOD
by the cord or half cord.
OAK AM) HICKORY WOOD
sawed and split for stove we, by the cord or half cord
WDZDOW AND DOOR SILLS
of Oak, Walnut and Pine, ahvayi'on
WINDOW - AND DOOR-FRAME STUFF',
and all kinds of UMBER; Stich as Oak and Than Plank;
Oak; Walnut, Pine and Hemlock Boards ; Flooring Beards,
Joists, Scantling, Shingles, Paling, Laths, Zee.
BEST OF ROOFING SLATE
always on band• and roofs put on by the best Slattrs. who
have dawn medals for thek superior worimanship.
CALL AT DEITZ'S WAREHOUSE
above the Railroad Depot, and kily cheap. Idec2l
LEONARD EBERT SON,
COAL AND LUMBER MERCHANTS.
•
We have on hand all Rinds of Coal and.Lun&r. and
are prepared to furnish Bill Lupyber to order at short no
tice, all at the most reasonable %rum • Our stock of Low
bet consists of
White Pine 2 inch Plank,
" lb " select Plank.
" " " Plank.
" " 1 select and Culling Boards,
" 3 " Boards,
" " S " Siding (6 ineh,)
" " Best River Shingles,
- " " Worked. Floring,
- "
Joist and Scantling,,all sizes,
Hemlock Rant and Scantling,
" . Boards, ,"
Yelhist Fine Boards,Joist and Scantling,
Palling and Plasterhig Laths.
We have also always on hand a rid supply of all
kinds of Coal fur stoves and lime-burning. Also a nape
riqr article of Broadtop Coal for blacksmiths. The pub
lic are invited to give us a call, as we will endeavor to
give satisfaction to all that call.
Coal and Lumber furnished on the cars to any station
oil the Franklin Railroad.
1,&"-Dflice on Second St, In the rear of the Jail Yard,
Cliambersburg, Pa. LEO. ERERT & SON.
- 27
july-tf: •
SMALL, BENDER & CO.,
York arid Golarborough Pa.,
LUMBER. DEALERS
AND btANUFACTIMERS CIF
SASH, DOORS, SHUTTERS, BL,RCDS,
DOOR AND WINDOW FRAMES, 4c.,
Keep constantly on hand a well selected stock of seas
onable Lumber, viz :—Joist and Scantling. Weatherboard
ing, dressed Flooring, Siding, Laths, Shingles, Palings and
Fencing.
White Pine arm Oak Bills, sawed to order at the
4hortest-rLotice. AU communications should bet addressed
to YORK, PA. [sep2S-ly
C 1 TEAM SAW MILL.--The undersign-
Li ml hare erected and in operation a Steam Saw Mill
pt the South Mountain, near Graffenburg Springs, and are
prepared to saw to order Bills,-of WHITE OAK. PENH,
LOCK or any kind of timbUr desired, at the short
...oil notice and at low rates. One of the firm will be at the
Hofel of Sarni Greenawalt, in Chambersburg. on Satur
day the filth inst. and on each alternate Saturday thereaf
ter for the purpose of contracting for the deliver-c of lum
ber. LUMBER DELIVERED at any point at the LOW
EST RATES. All letters should be addressed to them at
Greffenbung P. 0., Adams co., Pa.
deel4-tf - MILTENBERGER & BRADY,
BUILDING LUMBER.—The under
signed is prepared to UM all kinds of Building Loin.
ber at the lowest market price. R. A. RENFREW,
GREENWOOD MIU.t, Fayetteville P. 0. dect-b'm
- /Legal -,,flares.
A NISTRATOR'S NOTICE:-No
ticee Is hereby given that Letters of Administration
• xith the wilt annexed on the Estate of Jacob Wolff, late
,Jf Washington township. dee'd, have been granted to the
'undersigned.
All persons knowing themselves indebted to said Estate
will please make immediate payment ; and those having
• •taims present them properly authenticated for settlement.
• mareb22 • JOSEPH DOCELAS, Adm'r.
A DMINISTRATOR:S NOTICE.-No
tice is hereby given that Letters of Administration
m the Estate of Jacob Kaufman. late of Letterkenny town
-thip, deed bare been granted to the undersigned.
All persons }molting themselves indebted to said Estate
rill please make immediate payment; and those having
;alms present them pfaperty athenneated for settlement.
JOI{N B. 'CAVEMAN.
Atlm•ra
marcids JACOB N. KAUFMAN,
A DMINISTRATORIS_NOTICE.—No
n„ tiee is hereby given that Letters of Administration
the Estate of Sarah Stiontia - ugh, latent Antrim town,
hip. dee'd, base been graded to the undersigned. '
All persons knowing themselves indebted tosald Estate
please make imnedotto payment; rand those having
wims present them properly authentic aced (or settlement,.
mareliZ WM. S'fpIBACOH, 0 , 4,1rdr
LIXECUTOItS' NOTIC E.—Notice is
11 hereby given that Letters Testamentary to the Do
de of Wm. Van Dyke Into of Montgomery township,
oe'd, have been granted to the undersigned.
A' persons indebted to said Estate are requested to
!lake immediate payment, and•thoso haying claims atlt
please present them properly authenticated for settlement
-
E
PATTERSON, .
x rs.
mar 2 2 WILLIA3I BOYD, •
,LIXECUT()H'S NOTICE.--Notice is,
Uj hereby given that Letters Testamentary to the Es
-te HOOry 31 Stoner, late of Antrim township.- deo'd,
,s
e been granted to the undersigned.
.; All persona knowing themselves Indebted to said Estate
plemenialre immediate payment; and those having
Anima present them properly authenticated for settlement.
• mar -2 DAVID 31. STONER, Ear.
pXECTJTOR'S N 0 T I C E.—Notice ' is
LA hereby given, tluit. Letters Testamentary to the Es
tate of Andrew Gift, late of Peters township, deed, have
been granted to the undersigned.
All person. knowing tlfemselves ltdebted to said Estate
will please make immediate payment, and those having
claimspresent them properly authenticated for settlement.
march.V • JOHN MULLEN. Ex'r.
DISSOLUTION ' OF C 0-PARTNER
-BHTP.—Notice is hereby given that the co.partner
heretorons existing under the style of Sbaffer &
itaart, in the Grocery business, was dissolved by mutual
•onsent on the Ist instant. The business will be carried
on by Mr. JACOB SHAFFER, In whose bands the books
nave been placed for collection. JACOB SHAFFER,
zearc ro.2.6t IQUN B. STUART.
STRAY.—Caine to the residence of the
E
undersigned, in Guilford township, about two miles
--,opth of Chambersburg, about the 3d of March last, a
LIMY COLT, stout two years old, with a white bald, and
ring•boned In front loot, having a leather halter on. The
ewer Is hereby notified to call and prove property and
ay charges or the colt wql be diAposed of according to
law. InprilrAtj WM. VONDEROW
11111 ROPOSALS.--Sealed proposals will be
received until the sth day df Nay next, at the Nation
-1 Bank of Chatnbarsburtr, for the erection of a NEW
BANKING HOUSE on the site of the old Bank, in ae.
sordance with ',lnuit and speciflertfions, note in the hands
of the CI - L.4lller.
aprill9-3t G. H.,-,BIESSERSISUTH, Cashier.
BY M'CLURE & STONER.
4 Ortricat.
BALTNIORE LOCK HOSPITAL.—Dr.
JoxsiiTON, the founder of this Celebrated Institu.
Thai offers the host certain, speedy, and only effectual
reredy in thei world for Meets, Structures, Seminal
Wpaksiess, Pain in tic Loins, Consitutional Debility.
Impotence, Weakness of the Back and Limbs, Affections
of the Kidneys, Palpitation of the Heart, Dyspepsia, Ner
vous Irritability, Diseases of the Head. Thmst. rote or
akin; and all those serious and melanctoly disorders aris
ing from the destructive habits of Youth, which destroy
both body and mind. These secret mil solitary practices
are snore fatal to their victims than the song of the Syrens
to the mariner Ulyssus, blifhtjlsg their most brilliant,
hopes or anticipations, renderinlinamag-e. &a, impossible.
•
'yOUNG-.MIEN!
Young Men 4pecially;welaci have become the victims of
Solitary Vice, that dreadfuTand destructive habit whiehani
annually sweeps to an untimery grave thousands of_young •
Men of the moot exalted talent and brilliant who
might otherwise have entranced listening Senates with the
thnridens of eloquence, or'waked toecswy the living lyre;
may call with full confidence,
MARRIAGE!
Married persons, or you — n — g men conterriphitinv marriage
being aware of physical weaknus,orgthic debility, defor.
mities, Sc., should - immediately . consul* Dr. Johnston.
He who places blmsPlf under the-mate of Dr. Johnston
may religiously confide in his honor as a gentleman, and
confidently rely upon his skill as a physician.
ORGANIC WEAKNESS IMMEDIATELY CURED
AND' rum, VIGOR RESTORED. ,
This disease is the penalty most frequently paidity those
who have become the victims of improper, indulgences.
Young persons eire too apt to commit excesekss- from not
being aware of the dreadful consequences that may ensue.
isiow,.who that understands the subject will pretend to deny
that the power of Procreation is lost sooner by those falling
into improper habit than by the prudent. Besidesbeing de
prived of the pleasure of healthy offspring, and the most
serious and destructive sympathy to mind and body arise.
The system becomes deranged. the physical anti mental
powers weakened, nervous debility, dyspepsia, palpitation
of the heart, indigestion, a wasting of the frame, cough,
symtoms of consumption.
Office No. 7, &kith Frederick Street,
seven doors from Baltimore street, East side, up the steps.
Be partienlar in observing the name and number, or yruir
will mistake the place. t,
A CIIRE WARRANTED IN TWO DAYS
No Mercury or Nauseous Drugs.
.DR. JOHNSTON, Member of the Royal College of
Surgeons, London. graduate from one of the most eminent
Colleges of the Untied States, and the greater part of
whose life has been spent in the hospitals of London,
Paris, Philadelphia andel - sem - here, has effected some of
the most astonishing cures that were ever known. Many
troabliwith ringing in the head and ears when asleep,
great nervousness, being alarmed at sudden sounds, and
bashfulness, with frequent blushing, attended sometimes
with derangement of mind, were cured immediately.
A CERTAIN DISEASE!.
- - - - - - - -
When the misguided and imprudent votary of pleasure
find he has imbibed the seed of this painful disease, it too of
ten happensthat an ill-timed sense of shame, or dread df dis
covery, deters him from applying to`shose who from edutu.
tion and respectabilitycart alone befriend him, delayingtill
the constitutional symptom's of this horrid disease make their
appearance, such as ulcerated core throat, diseased nose,
nocturnal pains in the head and limbs. dimness of eight,
deafness, nobs on the chin, bones and arms, blotches on the
head, face rind extremities, progressing with frightful m
pidity: till at last the palate of themouth or the bones of
the' nose fall in and the victim of this awful disease be
comes a horrid object of cummissemtion, till death puts a
period to his dreadful sufferings, by sending him to that
bourne from whence no traveller returns." To such. there
fore, Dr. Johnston pledges hfinselfro preserve the most
Inviolable secrecy; and from his extensive practice in the
first Hospitals of Europe and •America he can confidently
recommend a safe, and speedy cure to the - unfortunate vic
tim of this horrid di.ease.
It is a melancholy fact that thousands fall victims to
this horrid disease owing to the unskillfulness of ignorant
pretenders nho by use of that dreadful poison, .Nlercury,
ruin the, constitution, and either send the unfortunate to
an untimely grave. or make the rysidue of lite miserable.
TAKE PARTIeFIiAIt NOTICE!
Dr, J. addresses those n Ito have injured themselves by
private and improper indulgeoves.
TliVse are some of the sad and melancholy effects pro
dm:ed.-by early habits of yZiuth t iz...—Weakness of the
Book and Limbs. Tins in the Head. Dimness of Sight,
Loss of Muscular Power- Palpaunon of the Heart. Dys
pepsia. Nervous irrifahtlity, Derangement of the Dire,
tire Functions, General Debility, Symptoms of Consunip- ,
•
&c.
MENTALLY. the fearful effects on the mind match to's
be dreaded. loss of Memory, confusion of Ideas Depres
sion of Spirts. Evil Forel . ..thugs. Aversion to Suciety,
Self-Distrust. Love of Solitude, 'nodally. dc., are some
`of the evil effet ts. •
Thottbands of persons of all ages eon now judge what
is the cause of their declining health. hosing their vigor,
becoming weak, pale. have singular appearance about the
apes, cough. and kemptoms of Consumption.
Dr. JOHNSTON $ INVIGORATING REMEDY
FOR ORGANIC WEAKNESS
.
By this great and important remedy, Weaktane, of the
°mane in tpeetttly eared. andlttll yip, restored.
Thousands of the most nervous ami debilliated, who
.had log all hope. hate-been immediately mitered. All
impediments to Marriage, Physieta/ or Mental Diqualll3-
cation, Nelsons Irtnabilitr. Trembling, Weakness or Ex.
111111.5161)11 of triii - m7f fearful Veld. speedily,enved by Er..
Johnston.
YOUN 0 - bIEN,
who have injured themselves by a certain practice, indul
ged in when alone—a habit frequently learned from evii
'companions, or at school, the effects are nightly felt, even
when asleep, and If not cnred,render marriage impossible,
and destroys both mind and boly,Lhould apply immediately
What a pity that a young man. the hope of his country,
the darling of his parents, should be snatched from all
prospects and enjoyments rof life. by the consequence of
deviating from the path of nature, and indulging in a cer
tain secret habit. Suchpersons, before contemplating
MAR,R-lAGE
should reflect that a sound mind and bodyare the most ne
cessary requisites to promote connubial happiness, Indeed,
without these, the journey through life becomes a weary
pilgrimage, the prospect hourly darkens to the view ; the
mind becomes shadowed with despair, and filled with the
melancholy reflection, that the happiness of another be
comes blighted with our own.
OFFICE NO. 7 SOUTH. FREDERICK STREET
BAll.77.ltoicE.
TO STRANGERS.—The many thousands cured at ads
Institution in the last fifteen years; and the numerous im
portant surgical Operations performed by Dr. J.. witnessed
by the reporters of the papers, and many other , _ persons,
notices of which have appeared again and again before
the public, is a arzfflcient guarantee to the affltcted.
N. 8. - There are so many ignorant and worthless quacks
advertising themselves as Physicians, ruining the health
of the already afflicted, Dr. Johnston deems it necessary
ito say to those unacquainted with his reputation, that Ins
Diplomas bang in his office.
la , TAKE liCrricti.—All letters must be Foist paid, and
contain a - postage stamp for the reply, or no answer will
be'sent. imar Ittiv
atternem at 11.aly.
G• M. • & W S. STENGER, ATTOR
• !LA NEYS AT LAW.—W. S. STENGER. District At.
torney and Agent..for procuring Pensions, Bounty Money
and arrears of pay.
Office In James Dnifield's dwelling, on the West side of
Second Street, bets en Queen and Washingtsph Streets.
aar24
QTUMBAUGH GEHR. ATTORNEYS
JAT LAW.—Office oppaiite the Post Office. Will at
tend promptly to all business entrusted to their care.
P. S.—Authorized Agents fur the collection of Pensions,
Bounty, Back Pay and all other claims against the govern
ment. se 14
S E;VEREII'. Attorney at Law.
• Office on Market Street, opposite the "Court
House. formttif occupied by Jer. Cook, Esq. All legal
busineass ear-meted to hie care will receive prompt Wien.
lion. s sep74l.
JOHN STEWART, ATTORNEY AT LAW
Office ,on Second Street. a few doors South of the
Market 1-fritue. PENSIONS, BOUNTY and othecelaitna
P romptly collected. [aug3l
TJ. SILL, ATTORNEY AT LAW. a
flee ut hit rewlence on Second ktreet. ortßi
B. KENNEDY, ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Of on Market street • ocO9
_ . firr43roof *atm
LILL PE S' PATENT
WROUGHT AND CHILLED IRON
FIRE AND BURGLAR-PROOF SAFES
VAULT DOORS, AND LOCKS.
Every safe of this manufacture is front one inch to fro
Inches thick (according to size.) of solid iron, chilled by
tasting on to a network of Wrought iron bars, and is fas
tened by billies' Combination Lock, which has no Key nor
Key hole thus rendering it (rear° against burglars, and
inside of-this Iron wall is attached the best 11re.prvot iilhng
known. The great thickness of iron its these safes renders
them secure in a fire from- being warped or drawn out of
shape by heat. or from being crashed by the fall of wails
ur timbers or its own fall. The Vault boors are a inches
thick and 2 inches thick of chilledand Wrought Iron and
are fastened by Lilhes' celebrated Lock. Send for circu
lars or price lists to the subscriber. who is sole agent for
central Permsyhania. 0E0.• W. PARSONS.
mardalim 110 Market St, Ilarnsburg, Pa.
LEWIII COOPER I H. GRAFF. W. M. TRNIS
COOPER dr: GRF, A F
STOCK COMMISSION BROKERS.
NO. 11 ME4CIILNTS EkCIIANGE,
PHILADELPHIA', PA
EMZEI
J. McDowell Sharpe, Esq.,
W. 3feLellart, Esq.,
G. IL Messersmitb, Esq
MI LL ER, HAMILTON . & CO.,
Havejast received aline assortment or STOVES,
TIN, JAPANNED AND OTHER WARE. They are
determined to sell lorverthen anybody else. '
They put on TIN ROOFING, let quality material far 18
cents per square foot; I'd quality 16 mats; 3d quality 14
Cents.
Tbey do SPOUTING cheaply. 'well and promptly.
They use best Iron fbr Stow Pipes, and charge but 18
cents per lb.
Come and see if you cannot do 'better with them than
with any other establishment
Prices reduced to snit the times.
&<2S ley- TERMS CASH.
OR-SALE.—A full course Scholarship
F
in the Quaker City 13minese College of Philadelphia.
Apply, at this offlee. _ laep7-
Sinantial.
IT •
S
U,
By authority of the "Secretary of the Treasury, the tin
dersigned has assumed the General Subscription Agency
-4 the sale of United State Treasury• 'Notes, bearing sev
h and three tenths per cent. interest, per annum, known
IMIZI
SEVEN-THIRTY LOAN.
Three Notes are issued under "date of June 15th, 1865,
and are payable three years from that time, in currency
or ate.convertible at the option of the holder into
U. S. 5-INI SIX PER CENT
GOLD-BEARING 'BONDS
These bonda are worth a preminiti, ranch, increases
the actual profit on the 7-30 loan, r and its exemption
from State and Trait:pal taxation, which adds from one
a three per cent. more, according to the rate levied on oth
er property. The interest is payable semi-annually by
coupons' attached to each note, which may be cut oft and
sold to any bank or banker.
1
,- The interest amounts to
ONE CENT PER DAY ON A $3O NOTE.
Two cE.vrs " " 8100 "
" " " " 8390 "
20 " " 81000 "__
81 " " " 83000 "
Notes JAW' the denominations named will be promptly
furnished upon receipt of subscriptions, and the notes for
warded at once. The interest to 11th June next will be
paid in advance. This is
TIM ONLY LOAN IN MARKET
now offered by the Government, and it to confidently ex
peeled that its superior advantages will make it the
GREAT POPULAR LOAN OF THE PEOPLE.
Less than $300,000 of the Loan authorized by the last
Congress are now on the market. This amount, at the
rate at which it is being absorbed, will all be subscribed
for within four months, when the notes Will undoubtedly
command a premium, as has uniformly been the case on
closing the subscriptions to other Loans.
In order that citizens of every town and section of the
country may be afforded facilities for taking the loan, the
National Busks, State Banks.and Private Bankers thtough.
out the country have generally agreed to receive sub.
Acriptions at-par • Subscribers will selecftheir own agents,
in whom they have confidence, andwhoonly are to be lee.
possible for the delivery of the notes fpr which they rs'.
ceive orders. • JAY COOKE,
Subscription Agent, Philadelphia.:
Subscriptions will be received by the Natkmal Bank of
Chtunitersburg. aprllMm
NOTICE TO THE TAXPAYERS 0 F
FRANKLIN COUNTY.—The Taxpayers of
Franklin county gill please take notice, that I will meet
them at the following places for the purpose of receiving
th e :awe. county and Military Taxer for the year 1865,
QUIN C Y.,4t.31t. Alto ut the House of Andrew Shank,
on 314 onthly the Ist zlay .1 May, and at the Haase of H.
M. Juice. In Qnioi•y, ofil'ue,day. the 2d day of May.
WA Slll NUTo3l.—Wayttesboni. at the House former•
1 ,„ o!tenpied by F. Bowden, on Wednesday and 'l:hars.4
v: the 3,1 and 4tll days of slay.
ANTltlsl.—Greeneastle, ttt th 6 House formerly kept
by Foreman & titld• an Friday and Saturday, the sth end
Ith dap, of May.
31ORTG0511:RY.—ItTelili nun, at the name oYJaeob
Elhort, on Monday. the eth day of May, and-et the novae
of Tiaanas M'Attv, in Hereersbarg on Tuesday, the 9th
day of Mal,
-WARREN—J. Zimmerman's Store, on Wednesday,
the lOth day of May, audet P. Cook's Tannery, on Thurs
day., the 11th day of May.
FETERS.—Loudon, at the House at James Mallen, on
Friday. the P2lll day of May, audit James D. Scott's
Store. Ilridireport, ott Saturday. the r.ith day of Bay.
FANNE I'l"—Antber.on't. Valley, at thellouse of B.S.
Cullteruun. on Monday the rah at the Heise of A. B.
Swhor Com ura ou "fuentlny. the 16th dad of May, and
at the lion, formerly kept by Benj. Crosse. at Dry Run,
on NVeduesday, the 17th day of Alay.
- METAL.—Fannettsburir. at the Hooseof "Mrs. Adiline
Ramsey on Thursday and Friday, 'the ISth sad 19th
days of Mae.
Ll:ADAK—Roxbury, at the bonne of David KA=H
ier, on Monday and Tuesday, the •wid and 9.3 d days of
May.
LETTERKENZiY.—Strasburg, at the House of J. B.
Welk un Wednesday and Thursday, the 24th and 25th
days of May. • '
ST. THOMAS—At the Store of Dixon & Elder, in St.
Thomas; on Friday and Saturday, the 26th and 27th days
of May.
<GREEN—Fayetlecille at the House of John 8.-Brown,
on Monday, the `"2sth dal of Stay, and at the House of
C. C. Folti, in Greenvillage, on Tuesday, 30th - day of
May.
SOUTHAMPTON—Mt. Rock School House. on Wed
nesday, the 31st day of May, aturat the House, of John
Rymer; in Orrstown. on Thursday, the Ist day of June.
GUILFORD—Marion. at the House of Jeremiah Burk,
on Friday, the lid day of June, and at the: House of Mrs.
H'Snider, in New Franklin, on Saturday, the 3d day of
June.
EIAMILTOI , Z—At theilituse of John Gordon,
on Mon
day and Tuesday. the sth and 6th days of June.
CHAMBERSBURG—At the Treasurer's Of❑e, on
Wednesday and Thursday, the 7th and Fib days of June.
None but Pennsylvania or Government funds re-
.IM=MIS
- LICENSES.—AII persons who are subject to pay a
Meramtile or Manntlicturers License, will please take up
raid License-at the above named places, as lam compell
ed by law to bring sub on all unpaid License by the 10th
day of July next. JAMES G. ELDER,
march 29 - County Treasurer.
EY NV ANTE D.—BRAND 6c.
M= FLACK respectfully request all persons knowing
themselves indebted to them by notes or book amounts to
call and make immediate settlement. The necessity of
this notice is apparent to every one, and we hope those in
debted will report at mine. aug244
•Qrattlibates'
COUNTY TREASURER.-111A.L . JOHN
HASSLER, offers himself as a candidate for the office
of County Treasurer, !Ned to the decision of the Union
Nominating Convention.
- Bt. TIIO,ILUL March 2:1865.
COUNTY TREASURER.—At the solie
itatbm of a number of my friends, I announce my
self ataindidate for the Office of County Treasurer, sub
ject the derision of the Union Nominating County
Convention [Qt MCI', March 22,] W 3. FLAGLE.
TREASURER.—SamueI F. Greenawalt
oilers himself as a Candidate for the office of County
Treasurer, subject to the derision of the Union Nomiva•
tick Convention. CHAIIIIERSBUIW, March 15.
QHERI FFALTY.—At the solicitation
of a number of my friendr. 4 offer myself as a Can
didate for thq office of Sheriff of Franklin County, suhject
to the decision of the Union Nominating Convention.
Ct uroiti. TOWNSHIP, Morel, '29" - F. W. DOSH.
HERIF F ALT I.—Encouraged 1. - )y a
IJ number of in fnends It'ofTsr nly self lts a Candidate
tor the ottu e of Sheriff, eubject to the decision of the Chun
Nonunatinz County Convention. DAVID EBY. •
HAMILTI T 016,111 1 ,, ..;itareh 22.
.Q II E I FFAL TY. offer myself as - a,
lor the offloo o? of F'ronklin muuty.
4objeLt h. the tteeetion of the Union Nomlnating•Coneen
non. THOMAS WAF'EE.
MEM 1,/1 , 111111:, MarCh2.... 1865'
H ERIFFALT Y.—Encouraged by a
►J tounber of not fnentlg, I offer myself no a coutlidate for
the ofllee of Sheriff, subjeet to the decision of the Union
Nontiunting Coituty Cooventlou. LELSHER.
(' HAMM'ILNtettG. Mart+ 15.
QIIERIFFAITY.—Capt. JNO. INEBLER,
L.) of Chumberdalrg, will he a candidate for the eke of
Sheriff, subject to the decision of the Union Nominating
County Convention, - marchla
STEAM TO - AND FROM THE OLD
COUNTRY.—The well known fuvotite Clyde• Built
Iron Steamers of the ANCHOR LINE of Steamships,
"HIBERNIA." '•CALEDONIA," "BRITANNIA" and
"UNITpD KINGDOM,' • are intended to sail fortnightly
between New York and Glasgow.
'These Steamers were built specially for the Atlantic
trade, are divided Into water and air tight compartments,
and are fitted up in every respect to insure the safety,
comfort and convenience of passengers. An experience!
Surgeon accompanies each ship. The provisions 1:11 be
properly cooked, and served in unlimited quantities.]
RATES OF PASSAGE.
To and from Liverpool, Glasgow, Dublin, •Belfast, Lon-.
donderry, :
Cabins, $45 and $5O ; Intermediate, $35 ; Steerage, $25
Payable in gold or its equivalent.
feblrOm
Those who wish to Send for their friends ean buy tick
ets ut these rates from the Agents.
FRANCIS MACDONALD & CO..
nprill!•4t _ 6 Bowling Green, New York
FOR SALEf—A good STEAM ENGINE,
six bone power, In good condition. Can be, seen by
calling at I'. B. Wood's Foundry.
setl•tt JACOB GARVER.
CENTS!—Best quality KEROSENE
2..m fi
only 20 cents per quart, at the cheap Family Gro
eery, either of Mule and Washington Streets.
D. D. REID
JOB PRINTING in every style done at
the cage of the FRANALLN HEM/TOBY.
CHAUERSBURG, PA., WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26, 1.865
7-,30 L 0 A N!
- , Liquoto.
~
IMP ~
ORTE S
OF
WLNES AND LIQUORS:
LAIIMAN, SALL,AD.F. do CO.,
NO. BOUTLI NE'ali
Between Cheserent and Walnut Strom, Philadelphia'
GEO. N. LAVMAN,
A. M. SALLAPE,
J. a'Brrma,
RIVESE, GARDRAT S: CO.'S
SUPERIOR COGNAC BRANDY,
VINTAGE OF ISLS,
Each bottle sealed isith-green . war milli, the initials of the
tmfoirrED BY
LAUMAN, BALLADE& CO
SUPERIOR OLD MAbEIRA WINE
ME SHERRY, CLARET AND
- HOCK. WINEF
AND AN ASSORTILM OF
FIND BRANDS OF CHAMPAGNE.
OSBORNE & CO:8
OFORTO.
YSRY PLIE AA') DELrATE
OLD PO-E T . WINE,
Each bottle sealed with yellow warwith the initials of the
Firm. •
LAUMAN, BALLADE &CO.,
No. DS South Ninth Street, Phikukipkia
OLD RYE WHISKEY,
OLD WHEAT WHISKEY, ,
WARRANTED.
G-SERHOLTZ WHISKEY,
FOUST WHISKEY,
iVERRT'S WHISKEY,
TAFFEY'S WHISKEY,
AND
READING WINES.
LALIMAN, BALLADE 'Fr. CO,
e No. 18 South Ninth Street, Philadelphia.
SE•abtlerg aii*lgaineoo.
SADDLERY! REMOVAL!!-
JEREMIAH OYSTER respectfully returns his
thanks to his patrons for the liberal encouragement recei•
ved from them heretofore., and he would invite them and
the community . generally, who may need any thing in his
line, to give him a call at his new stand, on Main Street,
on the same site occupied by him previous to the lire, where
he keeps constantly on hand every variety of SADDLE
RY AND HARNESS of his own manufacture, and he
Is prepared to sell the some on terms that defy competi.
Lien. Every article altered for sale Is warrented to be
made of the best. material and by competent workman,
which will be fully demonstrated on an examination there
of.
TRUNKS AND VALISES.—He would also call the
attention of persons wanting a good. neat and cheap and
substantial Trunk or Valise to his assortment.
H. GORDON KEEPS ON HAND
N.../ •" a large assortment, of Saddles, Harness, Collars,
Blind Bridles,; Riding Bridles. Halters, Girthing. Aieigh
and Stage LtiAlles, Lead Reins, Halter and Hitching
Straps Wagon Lines, -Wooden Stirrups, covered or on
covered.
CARTRIDGE BOXES J-I. Goit-
DoN bas a supply of Cartridge Boxes that null hold
forty-five of Henry's Repeating Ride Cartridge, Call
and see one and all.
TO PERSONS WHO OWN HORSES.—
..a_ Horo to rare Corn and Oats.—Buy yourself a good
EOM Blanket at C. IL GORDON'S and keep yonr
Horses warm.
CH. GORDON'S PLACE OF BUST
.'ness is on South Main street, one door South of Dr.
.1: L. Snesserott's office. Term, CAlin.
*erbo.
NEW GARDEN SEEDS.-1 am now
able to supply those who delight in gartleiiing, with
several new vanetles of Lettuce, Cabtiege, Melons, &c
All other Garden Seeds in large quantities on hand.
NIXON.
PERSONS FROM A DISTANCE send
lag for the new seeds will enclose ptampa for ret • •
postage. Try the new Cabbage. - NIXON.
•
MELONS.—The Orange Melia parts
from the rind just Mr an Orange doey'
The Ice Cream Melon ban a remarkably , thin rind.•
NIXON.
THE EARLIEST CUCUMBER EX
TANT.—Purchase your seeds from Nizeit These
seeds produce cucumbers ten days in advance of any other
variety. NIXON.
SEEDS NEATLY PUT UP FOR MAlL
tug to any part of the county. Send for new varlet*
NLXON.
Vaal Ostate *alto.
A F - I R S T
MIL-I. 'PROPERTY
FOR SAI;E,
Situate near Burnt Cabins, Fulton County, Pennsylvania.
This Mill has done-a large amount of business for along
time, and is in a rich settlement of country. It was built
in 1844, and has recently been fully repaired. Also, a
large
FRAME DWELLING ROUSE.
A S A NW , MILL, together with a
SMAL,.L F A It 91
of 90 ACRES, en which the is erected a small Barn and
Tenant /Rinse. There are Wm on the premises on Orch
ard of some two hundred tine Fruit Trees, good Water,
Sc. This property is on the route of the lute surveys of
an expected Railroad, which doubtless willpass through
the neighborhood in a short time.
Terms will be made known by the subeeriber, residing
on the premiers. ljangA43motti F. DC138:4.
A DMINISTRATOR'S SALE,_--Bv vir
tue
of au order of the Orphans' CoArt of Franklin
comity, Pa., I will expose to Publle Sale, on the proinb
nes, on Saturday, thu s lath day of May, 1.e63, at 1 o'clock,
P. M., the following descnbed Real Estate, situate m
Peters township, in said county, belonging to Samuel
Dada, deed, to wit: a Tract of alisint SEVEN ACRES
or LIMESTONE LAND, adjoining lands of Thus. B.
Kennedy, Joseph Shatzer, George Glapeaddle And others.
bariag thereon erected a bl story LOG DWELLING
110UsE, Log Stable and other necessary out4iitildings.
- Also, n thdving Young Orchard.
Terms made known on day of sale,
april 19.3 t WM. STITZEL, Aduer.
Aouoes.
WUNDERLICH & MEAD
Fon.WAutNc. AND COSIMIMION lism.eas.\ - rs
North Second Street. opposite the Cumberland Valk.
Railroad Depot, Chambersburg, Pa.
Cars run regularly to and frnm Philadelphia and Balti
more.
AGENTS.--Peacock, Zell & Blechman, No. EON Mar
ket St., Philadelphia.
Lyiens Valley, Broken Egg and Nutt COAL, (dneet
from the mines), Wilkeslntrre and Pine Grove FOUNDRY
COAL, LUMBER, SHINGLES, SALT, PLASTER and
Hancock CEMENT, kept constantly on hand. FLOUR,
GRAIN and PRODUCE of ell bads purchased at the
highest cash prices.
Bept9, t. WUNDERLICH & MEAD.
THOS. L. GILLESPLE. -JACOB ZELLER.
GILLESPIE, ZELLER & CO.,
PRODUCE AND PROVISION MERCHANTS,
AND WHOLESALE GROCERS,
North•Weet corner of Sixth and market Streets, Philo
delphia. [nold,63•t£
.IVO s poiciano.
3. C. RlClliatlB, M. in ' ISO. MONTGOMERY, M. U.
D ICUARDS .34 MONTGOMERY have
associated themselves in the Practice of Meditior,
and have opened an office in Dr. Richards' new building.
on Main street,* few doom South of the - Diamond.
All persons indebted to eitherof the above, will please
make early settlement of the same. (ang244l_
DR. J. S.: MAURER, OFFERS HIS
services as a Physician and Surgam to the citizens
of St. Thomas - ands iclnity. Promptness at alt Maus.
,Residence opposite the Past Office. aprill9.6m
DR. W. H. BOYLE will attend prompt
ly to all professional exile. °Mee in the Vestibule
of the New Sehool House near the Jail. [auo.4.
tradliu 44toitan.4.
From the New York Tribune.
ABRAEIA3I
ASSASSMITED GOOD Falvey, 1865:
"Forgive them; for they know not what they do !,"
HE said, and so went shriven to.his tate—,
Unknowing went, that generous heart and true.
Even while he spoke the slayer lay in wait,
And when the morning opened Heaven's gate
There passed the whitest soul a nation knew.
Henceforth all thoughts orpardon axe too late ;
They, in whose cause that arm its weapon drew,
Have murdered 31EncY. Now alone shall stand
Blind JusTICE, with the sword unsheathed she wore.
Hark, froni - the eastern to the western strand,
The swelling thunder oFthe people's roar:
What words they murmur 7 FETTER NOT lIEE JLS2'D
SO LET IT SMITE, SIMI DEEDS SHALL BE NO MORE!
Aptills, 1893. ' ELMEND C. STEDNISN.
A COMPLETE AND MOST GRAPHIC ACCOUNT
• - OF THE
Movements 'of J. Wilkes Booth,
• IN THE -
ASSASSINATION
- OF ABRAHAM lAMB.
We extract the whole of the following'account
of the conduct of the assassin on the du.‘„preced-
Mg the night of the tragedy from the correspon
dence of•tlie-New York World, by Jerome B. Stin
son. Without any exception, it is the best and
most circumstantial account, if the -whole of it
be based upon fact, of any we have hitherto seen,
and, if we dare say so, is one of the most drama
tically detailed occounts of an appalling incident
in.national history which has ever been offered to
any nation.
Seine very deliberate, but not at all extraordi
nary movements were made by a handsome and
extremely-well dressed young man in the city of
Washington last Friday. At about o'clock,
A. M. this person, whose name is J. Wilkes
Booth, by profession an actor, and recently en
gaged in oil -speculations, sauntered into Ford's
Theatre, on Tenth, between E apd F streets, and
exchanged greetings with the man at the box of
fice. In the conversation which ensued the ticket
agent informed Booth that a box was taken for
Mr. Lincoln and Gen. Grant, who were expected
to visit the theatre, and contribute to the benefit
of Miss Laura Keene and satisfy the curiosity of
a•large audience. Mr. Booth went away with a
jest, and a lightly spoken " Good afternoon."
Strolling down to Pumphrey's stable, on C street,
in the rear of the National Hotel, he engaged a
saddle horse, a high string, fast, beautiful bay
mare, telling Mr._ Ptimphrey that he should call
for her iu the middle of the afternoon. •
From here he went to the Kirkwood Hotel, on
the covaer of Pennsylvania avenue• and Twelfth
street. e here, calling fine a card and sheet of note ,
paper, he sat down and wrote upon the first as'
tollowg:
For Mr. .4ndrczr Johnson.:
r don't wish to disturb you; are you at home?
J. W. BOTH.
To this message, wide!): was sent' tiP by the
obliging clerk, Mr. Johnson responded that be
as very busily engaged. Mr. Booth'siniled, and,
turning to his sheet of note-paper, write on it.
The fact, if fact it is, that he hadheen disappoint
ed in not obtaining an examination of ;the Vice
President's apartment and winowleilge of !the
Vice President's probable whereabouts the ensu
ing evening_in no way affected leis composure.
The note, th'e contents (if which are unknown,
was signed and seale,d within a feW minutes.,
liouth arose, bowed Wan aequaintalice, and pass
ed into the street. His elegant person was seen
on the avenue a fe / i'v minutes, and was withdrawn
into -The 3 . lkrofinlitan Hotel.
}Wu:4ll's tits STABLE.
At 4 P. 11. / fie again appeared at Pumphrey's
livery stablo; mounted the mare he had engaged,
role leisurely up F street, ttir6Lsl into- an alley
between/ Ninth and Tenth streets, and thence into
an alley re-leading to the rear of Ford's Theatre,
which/fronts on Tenth street between E and F
streffis. Here he alighted and deposited the mare
in,a small stable off the alley, which he had hired
.6me . before for the accommodation of a .
saddle-horse which he had. recently sold. Mr.
Booth soon afterward retired from the stable, and
is supposed to have refreshed himself at a neigh
boring bar-room.
THE SCENE AT THE 'THEATRE
At d o'clock the same evening, - President LM
coin and Speaker Colfax sat together in a private
room at the White House, pleasantly conversing.
Gee. Grant, with vvitora the President had en
gaged.to attend Ford's Theatre that evening, had
left with his wife for Burlington, New , Jersey,in
the six o'clock train. After this departure Mr.
Lincoln rather reluctantly determined to keep
1 ,:
his part of the en agement, rather than to disap
point his friends a the audience. Mrs. Lincoln.
entering the roo and turning tO Mr. Colfax,
said, in a half laug u
'rig, half serious way,.! , Well,
Mr. Lincoln, are you going to the theatre, with
me or not ?" " I suppose I shall have to go. Got
ha," said the President, and the Speaker took
his leave, in company with Maj. Rathbone, of the
Provost Marshal General's office, who escorted
Miss Harris, daughter of Senator Harris, of New
York. Mr. and. Mrs. Lincoln reached Ford's
Theatre at twenty minutes before 9 o'clock.
The house was filled in every part with a large
and brilliantly attired audience. As the Presi
dential party ascended the stairs, and passed be
hind the dress circle to the entrance of the pri
vate box reserved for them, the whole assemblage,
having in mind the recent Union victories, arose,
cheered, waving hats and handkerchiefs, and mani
festing every other accustomed sign of enthusi
asm: The President,, last to enter the box, turn
ed before doing so, and bowed a courteous ad
knowledgineut of his reception. At the moment
of the President's arrival, Mr. Hawks, one of the
actors, performing the well-knoWn part of Dun
dreary, had exclaimed: "This reminds me of a
story, as Mr. Lincoln says." The audience forc
ed him, after the interruption, to tell the story
over again. It evidently pleased Mr. Lincoln,
who turned laughingly to.his wife and made a re
mark which was not overheard.
RATE
The box in which the President sat consisted of
two boxes turned into one, the middle partition
firing removed, as on all occasions when it stain
party visited the theatre. The box was on a levy
el with the dress circle, about twelve feet above
the stage There were two entrances—the door
nearest to thew all having been elosed 7 and locked;
the door near4l 7 t4 the balustrades of the dress cir,
viand at tingles with it, being open - and
left open after the visitors had entered. The, in
was carpeted, lined with crimson papei,
and furnished with a soils covered with crimson
velvet, three-arm chairs similarly covered, - and
six canehottemed chairs. Festoons of flags hung
before the front of the box atainst a background
of lace.
' THE ARRANGEMENT OF THE PARTY.
President Lincoln took one of the armehaire
and seated himself in the front of the box, in the.
angle nearest theaudience,n. here, partially screen
ed from observation, he had the best view of what
was transpiring on the stage. Maj. Rathbone sat
just behind Mrs. Lincoln and Miss Harris.—
These four were the only persons n the box.
•
The play proceeded. The audience at Ford's,
including Mrs. Lincoln, seemed to, enjoy it very
much. The worthy wife of the President leaned
for Ward, her hand upon her husband's knee,
watching every scene in'the drama with amused
attention. Even acrois the PreElident's face at
intervals swept a smile; ; robbing it of its habitual
sadness.
THE AssAssites PRELOINARIES TO FLIGHT.
About the beginning of the second act, the mare.
standing in the stable in the rear of the theatre,
was disturbed in the midst of her meal by the en
trance of the young man who had quitted her in'
the afternoon: It is presumed that she was sad-'
died and bridled with exquisite care.
BOOTH ENTERS THE THEATRE
Having completed these preparations, Mr Booth
entered the theatre by the stage-door; summoned
one of the scent shifters, Mr. John Spangler.
emerged through the saele dbor with that indi
vidual leaving the door open, and left the mare
in his hands to be held until he (Booth) should
return. Booth, who was even more fashionably
and richly dressed than- usual, Walked thence
around to the front of the theatre and went in.
Amending to the dress circle, he stood fora little
time gazing around upon the audience, and occa
sionally upon the stage, in his usual graceful man
ner. He was subsequently observed by Mr Ford,
the proprietor of the theatre, to be slowly elbow-
VISITS SIR. JOHNSON
THE BOX
TIIE PLAY'
VOL, ILE NO. 3,703.
ing his way through I the c .wd that puked the
rear of the dress-circle, to rd the right side, at
the extremity of which s the box where Mr.
and Mrs. Lincoln an tl their =pardons were sea
ted. Mr. Ford cashally no iced this as a slightly
extraordinary sympton of i terest on the part of
an actor so familiar with routine of the thea- ,
tre and the play: I _ % -
.
The curtin had arisen on the third act, and
Mrs. Mountdic.F.sington and Asa Trenchard were
exchanging vivacious stupidities, . when a young:
man, precisely resembling the one described as.):
Wilkes Booth, appeared before the open door of
the President's box, and prepared to enter.
THE ASSASSIN AT THE BOX DOOR
The servant who attended Mr. Lincoln said po
litely: - "This is the President's box, sir; no one
is permitted to enter." "I am a Senator," res
ponded the person, "Mr. Lincoln has sent for me."
The attendant gave way, and the young man pas
sed into the box.
IN TILE BOX.
As be appeared at' the door, taking a quick,
comprehensive glance at the interior, M. Rath
hone arose. "Are you aware, sir," he said, cour
teously, "upon whom you are intruding? This is
the President's box, and no one is admitted."
The intruder answered not a word. Fastening
his eyes upon Mr. Lincoln, who had half turned
his head to ascertain what caused the disturbance,
he stepped quickly-back without the door.
THE SHOT
Drawing a - Derringer pistol, and taking, by
means of some almost miraculous calculation, a
deadly aim, he fired through the closed door, on
his right, the ball !passing through the door, and
entering the brain of the President.
TILE ASSASSCeS FLIGHT
The movements' of the assassin were from hence
forth quick as the lightning. Springing into the
box through the door of which he had just retreat
ed, he dropped his pistol, on the - floor, and draw
ing a bowie-knife, struck Major Rathbone, who
opposed him, ripping through his coat from the
shoulder down, and afflicting a severe flesh wound
in his arm. He leaped then upon the velvet-cov
ered balustrade at the front of the box, between
-Mrs. Lincoln and Miss Harris, and, parting with
both hands the flags that drooped on either side,
dropped_ to the stage beneath. Arising, and turn
ing full Upon-the audience, with the knife lifted
in his right hand above his bead, he shouted: "Sic
semper tyra avenged !" Another
instant and he had fled across the stage and be
hind the scenes. Colonel J. B. Steivart, the only
person in the audience who seemed to comprehend
the deed be had coniunitted, climbed from his seat
near the orchestra to the stage, and followed close
behind.' The assassin was too fleet and too des
perate. Meeting 151 r. Withers, the leader of the
orchestra, just,behind the scenes, he struck him
aside with a blow that fortunately was not a
wound ; overturning Miss Jenny Gonrlay, an ac
tress, who' came next in his he gained, with
out further hindrance, the . back door prevukaly
left open at the rear of the theatre ; rushed
through it; leaped upon'the horse held by Mr.
Spangler. and without vouchsafing that person a
word of information, rode out through the alley
leading, into I,' street; and thence rapidly away.
His horse's hoofs might almost have been heard
amid the silence that for a.few seconds dwelt in
-the interior of the theatre.
THE SCENE IN THE THEATRE
Then Mrs. Lincoln Screamed, Miss Harris cried
for water, and the • full ghastly truth broke upon
all—" The President is murdered I" The scene
that ensued was as tumultuouS and terrible as one
of Dante's pictures of hell. Some women tainted
others uttered piercing shrieks, and cries for ven
geanee and unmeaning shouts for help burst from
the mouths of men. Miss Laura Keene, the ac
tree, proved herself in this awful time as equal to"
sustain a part in real tragedy asp interpret that
of the stage. Pausing one moment before the
footlights to entreat the audience to be calm, she
ascended the stairs in the rear of Mr. Lincoln's
box, entered it, took the dying President's head
in her lap, bathed ikwith the water she had brought,
and endeavered to force some of the liquid through
the insensible lips. The locality of the wound
was at first supposed to be in the breast: It was
not until after the nhck and shoulders had been
bared arid no mark discovered, that• the dress of
Miss Keene, stained with blood, revealed where
the ball•had penetrated.
THE INSENSIBLE PRESIDENT CARRIED OUT.
As soon as the confusion and crowd were par
tially overcome. the form of the President was
conveyed from the theater to the residence of Mr.
Peterson, on the opposit' side of Tenth street.
Hefe upon a bed,' in a little hastily prepared cham
ber, it was laid and attended by Surgeon Barnes
anti other physicians, speedily summoned. -
THE EXCITE3IPST IN THE CAPITAL.
•
In the meanwhile the news spread through the
capital as if borne on tongues of flame. Senator
Sumner, hearing of the affair at his residence.
took a carriage and drove at a gallop to the White
House, where , he beard where it bad taken place,
to find Robert Lincoln and other members of the
household still unaware of it. Both drove to
Ford's Theater, and were soon at the President's
bedside. Secretary Stanton and the other rtke,to•
hers of the Cabinet were at hand almost as sObn,
A vast crowd, surging up Pennsylvania avenue to-
ward Willard'a Hotel, cried, " The President is
shot "President Lincoln is murdered." An
other crowd sweeping down the avenue met the
first with the tidings, " Secretary Seward has
been assassinated in bed." - Instantly a wild op !
prehension of an organized conspiracy and of oth
er murders took possession of the people. The
shoat " To arms !" was mingled with the expres
sions of sorrow and rage that everywhere filled
the air. " Where General Grant I" or
" Where is Secretary Stanton t" " Where are
the rest of the Cabinet 7" broke from thousands
of lips. A. conflagration of fire is`not half so ter
rible as was the conflagration of passion that roll
ed through the streets and houses of Washington
on that awful night.
THE ATTEMPT ON SECRETARY SEWARD'S LIFE.
The attempt on the life of Secretary Seward,
'vas, perhaps, as daring, if not so dramatic, as the
assassination of the President. At 9:20 o'clock a
men, tall, athletic, and dressed in light colored
clothes, alighted from a horse in front of Mr. Se.•
ward's residence, in Madison place,. where the
'Secretary was lying very feeble from his recent
injuries. The house, a solid three-story brick
building, was formerly the old Washington Club
- .House. Leaving his horse standing, the stranger
rang at the door, and informed the servant who
admitted him that he desired to see Mr. Seward.
The servant responded that Mr. Seward was very
ill, and that uo visitors were admitted. "But I
am a messenger from Dr. Verdi, Mr. Seward's
physician; I have a prescription that I must de
liver to hini myself. - The servant still demurring,
the stranger, without further parley, pushed him
aside and. ascended the stairs. Moving to the
right, he Proceeded towards Mr. Seward's room,
and was about to cuter it, when Mr. Frederick
Seward appeared from an opposite doorway and
demanded his business. He responded in the
same manner as to the servant below, but being
met Aiith a refusal, suddenly closed the contro
versy by striking Mr. Seward a severe and per
' imps mortal blow across the forehead with the
butt of &pistol. As the first victim tell, Major
Sewar4, another and younger spa of the Secre
tary, emerged from his father's room. Without
a word the man drew a knife and struck the Ma
jor several blows with it, rushing into the cham
ber as he did so; then, after dealing Mr. Hansell,
the nurse, a horrible wound across the bowels, he
sprung to the bed upon which the Secretary lay,
stabbing him two or three times in the face and
neck. Mr Seward arose convulsively and fell
from the bed to.the door. Turning and brandish
ing hi s s Lab ll,ne,w, the assassin fled from the room,
cleared the prostrate form of Frederick Seward
in the hail, descended the stairs in three leaps,
and wnout qf the door and upon his horse in an
instant. 'lt is stated by a person who saw him
mount, that althdUgh he leaped upon his horse
with most unseemly haste, he trotted away around
the corner of the block with circumspect debbc
intion.
THE GATHERING OF THE PEOPLE,
Around both the house on Tenth street and the
re,idence of Secretary Seward, as the fact of-both
tragedies beeame generally known, crowds soon
gathered so vast and, tumultuous that military
guards scarcely sufficed to keep them, from the
doors.
THE DEATH-CHAMBER OP THE YRE4DEST.
The room to which the President had been
conveyed is on the first flour, .at the end of the
hall. It is only-fifteen feet sore, with a Brus
sels carpet, papered with brown, and hung with a
lithograph of Rosa Bouheur's " Horse Fair," an
engraved copy of Herring's" Village Blacksmith,"„
and two smaller ones of " The Stablentud " The
Barn Yard," from the samir-artist. A table and
toucan, spread with cro¢her work eight choirs
and the bed, were 1111 the furniture. Upon this
bed, a low walnut four-poster, lay the dying Pres
ident, the blood oozing ti-em the frighttul wound
in its head and staining the pillow. All that the
AT . THE BEDSIDE. '
Secretary - Stanton, just arrived from the bed
sitte.of Mr. Seward, atked Surgeon 'Oen. flames
what WairMr.- Lincoln's condition. " I fear, Mr
Stanton that there's no hope." "Oh, no, General;
no, n 0.," and the man, of all others, apparently
strange to tears, sank down beside the bed, the
hot, ,bitter evidence of an awful sorrow trickling
through his fingers tit the floor. Senator Sumner
sat on the opposite sideof the bed holding one of
the President's bands in, his own, and sobbing
with kindred grief. Secretary Welles stood-at
the foot of the bed, his face hidden, his franle
shaken with emotion: _Gen. Hailed:, Attorney
General Speed, Postmaster Gen. Dennison. M. B
-.Meld, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, Judge
Otto, Gen. Meigs, andothers, visited the chamber
at times, and then retired. Mrs. Lincoln—but
there is no deed to speak of her. Mrs. Senator
Dixon soon arrived, and remained with, her ihro'
the night. All through the night, while the hor
ror-stricken crowds outside swept and gathered
along the streets, while the military and police
were patrolling and weaving a cordon around the
city, while men Were arming and asking each
other, " What victim next 1" while the telegraph
was sending the news from city to city over the
continent, and While the two assassins were speed
ing unharmed upon fleet horses: far away, his
chosen friends watched about the death-bed of
the highest of the nation. Occasionally Dr. Gur
ley, pastor of the church where Mr. Lincoln ha
bitually attended, knelt down in prayer. Occa
sionally Mrs. Lincoln" and her sons entered, to
find no hope and togo back to ceaseless weeping.
Members of. the 4kibinet, Senators, Representa
tives, Generals, and others, took turns at the
bedside. Chief Justice Chase remained until a
late hour, and returned in the morning. Secre
tary M'Culloh remained a constant watcher until
SA. M, Not a gleam of consciousness shone
across the visage of the President up to his death
,—a quiet, peaceful death at last—which came at
twenty-two minutes past seven A. M. Around
the bedside at this tithe were Secretaries Stan.
ton;Welles, Usher, Attorney Gen. Speed, Post
master General Dennison, 11l B. Meld, Aesistam
Secretary of the Treasury, Judge Otto, Assistant
Secretary of the Interior, Gen. Halleck, Gen.
'Meigs, Senator Sumner, F. B. Andrews, of New
York, Gen. Todd, of Dacotah, John Hay, private
secretary, Gov: Oglesby, of Illinois, Gen. -Farns
worth, Mrs. and Miss Kenny, Miss Harris, Capt.
Robert Lincoln, son of the President, and Drs. E.
ly Abbott, R. K. Stone,C. D. Gatch, Neal Hal
and Leiberman. Re'v. Dr. Gurley, after the even;
knelt with all around in prayer, and then enterim..
an adjoining room where were gathered Mrs
Lincoln, Capt. Robert Lincoln, Mr: - John Hay,
and others, prayed again. Soon after nine o'cloct
the remains were placed in a temporary cofi
and conveyed to the White House under a mail
escort.
SECRETARY SEWARD'S CHAMBER.
In Secretary Seward's chamber, a similar al
though not so solemn a seene prevailed ; betweeb
that chamber and the one occupied by Presider
Lincoln; visitors alternated to and fro through the
night. It bad been early ascertained that tie
wounds of the Secretary were hot likely to?prov,
mortal. A wire instrument drawn across tb,
sides of his head , and under his shoulders, to re
lieve the pain which he suffered from his previou
injuries, prevented the knife of the assassin from
striking too deep. The right cheek was laid opei,
to the hone, and a fearful gash inflicted in the
other. The neck was-pierced in two places, but
no arteries were severed. Mr. Frederick Sew
ard's injuries :were more serious. His loreheae
was striven in by the blow from the pistol, and up
to this hour he has , -.remained perfectly uncon
scious. The operation of trepanning the skull has
been performed, but little hope is had,of his re
covery. Major Seward will get well. Mr. Han- -
sell's condition is somewhat doubtful. -
MR. SEWARD INFORMED OF ‘ THE ACTS OF Till
ASSASSINS.
Secretary• Seward, who cannot speak, was not
informed-ot the assassination - of the President, and
the injury to his son, until yesterday. He had
been worrying as to why MiLincoln did not
him. "Why dosn't the. President" come 'to sei
mei" he asked with his pencil. "Where is Fred
erick, what is the matter with him?" Perceiving
the nervous excitement which-these doubts occa
sioned, a consultation was had, at which it was fi. -
natty determined that it would be best to let tin
Secretary know the worst. Secretary Stantm.
was chosen to tell him. Sitting down beside Mr
Seward's bed, yeatetday afternoon, he therefore
-related to him a full account of the whole affair
Mr. Seward was so surprised and shocked that he
raised one hand involuntarily, and groaned.
' WHAT TILE AS§ASSINS LEFT 11EHLND:
An old-fashioned Colt's revolver was found in
the hall of Mr. Seward's residence after the assas•
sin left. It is the weapon with which Mr. Fred
erick-Seward was felled. On the stage beneath
the .resident's lox a piece of , spur was found.
The gilt moulding around the front of the box was
cut, showing that the spur hit it and was broken as
the murderer of the President leaped from the
box. This with the pistol and hat left in the box,
show how swift and desperate were his move
ments. An experiment was made to-day which
proves conclusively that the pistol was -fired.
through the door of the box, as was stated., One
man
-sat in the position occupied by the President,
another, peeping through the hole made . through
the door by the bullet, found that -its 'direction
was straight to the back of the sitter's bend.
Itt. MORS
The above are all the main and important facts
connected with the assassinations. murder•
nhave, for a time, escaped, although there is
rumor of their having been captured and secret
ted on a gunboat. Your other correspondent;
will have given- you all necessary particulars beari,
ing upon their identity, their flight, and theaneas
urea taken to arrest them.
J. wirxrs BOOTH
, 'Thursday week the asSassin was in Boston, and
was moody and misanthrope. He made over all
his property to-his mother some two Weeks since.
and announced his intention of joining the Coated '
erate cause. Indeed, those who knew him best
feel confident that he has committed suicide. On,
of the most frequent quotations of J. Wilkes Booth
in conversation was the following from his favor
ite play of Richard III: "The daringyouth the
fired the Ephesian dome outlives in fame the pion
fool that reared it."
J. Wilkes Booth is a son of the celebrated En-,
glish actor, Lucius Junius Booth, and brother to
Juniud Brutus and Edwin Booth, the tragedians
He hi nself was an actor, but not of so great folio :
as his brothers. He was born near Baltimore—,
where his father finally took up his residence, - iii '
I'S3S, and is therefore now twenty-seven years of
age. He is described to be five feeelfine and
half inches in height, black hair and black eyes •
His face is smooth, with the exception of a mu:
tache of Moderate size.
The life and career of J Wilkes Booth, ,who is
now only twenty-six years old, have been market
by few memorable incidents. He adopted th,
stage as a profession in 1856, making his first op.
pearancein Philadelphia. Since then he has phi)
t 4 various "star" and "stock" engagements
mostly in Southern and Western cities, with con.
siderable success. His acting is said to have beet
mainly characterized by extreme impetuosity, vi
olence_imd extravagance, although not wanting at
fillies in the true and earnest feeling which is air
attribute of the whole family. He has once 0 1
twice appeared before New-York audiences, but
with only moderate success. It is stated that h,
has been personally very popularumong his coin
rades; a fact which his determined disunion sen
timents would not be likely to contradict, tilt
vast majority of actors in this country, North mu,
South, being either avowed or covert friends o
the Rebellion. His habits, we are told, were al
ways-extremely irregular, and his dcasipations.so
excessive as to interfere with his progress 'Mils
profession; which, indeed, he Virtually abandouen,
about a year ago, having since deioted himself fo
speculations in the oil stocks of Pennivivikda.
Wilkes Booth has always privately appeared
courteous, intelligent and decorous young man
reserved and sedate excepting when stituulateu
by intoxication or the clash of partisan controver
sy, at which time his violence passed all bounds.
We are assured that a rupture occurred not long
since between him and his brother Edwin, who
refused longer. to countenance Willtesifolly ano
madness, and peremptorily forbade his presence
at the family home.' -
WHAT IS )P WOMAN t --Victor Hugo, who
has been at immense expense to popularise him
self as a poet with the female sex, goes much far
ther, because he goes much deeper, than the
- most malignant saint in the calendar in his phy
siology of women. "A woman," observes' this
amiable heir of the Provencial bards, "a woman
is simply a highly improved style of demon," Al
eiander Damns, the younger, with whotirpnlmo.
nary consumption is the Daly female religion, has
uttered a great many outrageous impertinences
concerning women. "Heaven," he, exclaime,
"in its merciful providence, gave no lzeard to wo
men, because it knew that they could not bola
their tongues long enough to be shaved." " For,
the sake of women," observed the same individu
al, "men dishonor themselves—kill themselves;
and, in the midst of this universal carnage, the
creature who brings it to pass has only one thought
in her mind, which is to decide whether she shall
dress herself so as to look hie an umbrella or like
a dinneobell.