The Pittsburgh post. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1859-1864, November 05, 1859, Image 2

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ENNIMEI
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MEM
EMESE
.y two
• •
. 1 ,:;,,/ a. party
•.e - .'‘ .fin its princi
• • with or
_ a...pace has come itself ,
, • ' doinineered over by
gar their laractices come to
72' ect, for constitutional rights ?
ifussion to lawxnay be infer*J. from
,-. 4 oCc' ones' which were exhibite4 l at the
giection polls in Baltimore, on Wednesday.
o e polls were early taken posssesssion of
by :'armed mob, the jud'ges of election,
inimical to these rowdies, were driven from
- 1- theit posts ; citizens, who had united under 1
.the Reform party to resist the 1
rule which the city, has been un
..‘-';.der'Sor'years, were beaten from the election
ground, and ,those who remained to vote I
did so at the risk of their lives. Nembers
of the voters are reported to be shbf and
others -severely injured. These are the
..,scenes enacted in an American city, under
the protection of the laws of the State and
the Constitution ; this is the manner in
. • which the right of. suffrage is exercised in
- BEdtirnore-----the mode -in which the mem
• ben of Congress, who are to legislate for all
the States of the Union, and the officers of
. -
the State who are to be invested with its
sovereignty, are chosen. A greater Outrage
against the rights of the people cannot be
_ -7 Conceived than an election Where violence
and, terror predominate, where brutal ruffi
-.'artism deprives citizens of their suffrages,
and by force and fraud, cheat them of their.
choice. Border ruffianism in Kansas is a
mild'form of lawlessnesscompared with the
, -- _ -- terroriSra and - rowdyism of Baltimore. Its
called,arebutsets of despotism.
""SuffrElie free for the exercise of those
( who haVeu right to it, and the govenment
-fOisted upon the people is authority usurped
:a.s - uraieht*sly es that establish s ed et the
of -tiny dictator with his armed co
-horts at his heels.
MEM
=EWE
=MI
• -.yam
, .
: • ~4
r to d F
t •
—:.-- 'a '
'• , ,
It seems incredible that any city boasting
• • 'the civilization, the law and the freedom,
C •• ••• zwhich are supposed to exist under republi
• . could be reduced to snob a ;miser
able condition as this ; that any municipal
ity of three hundred thousand citizens
could tamely submit to surrender their
rights in thi's cowardly and cont6mpti
-bie-manner. • If self-government was worth
- - it-seven-years` struggle to secure, it is surely
:Worth some nobler efforts to retain it than
people of Baltimore have yet shown
themselves capable or willing to make'. The
- lilt's , of violence, though the most brutal
s .-'and ruffianly, is also the most weal: and
•- • -
• •cowardly. - It needs but the co-operation of
`the relsOlute and intelligent portion a the
.. - Iteople of that city, to reduce these irowdy
clabs,•wfich now carry terror to the city, to
to the laws. If the city aurhor
--z-r(k ities sympathize with the ruffians to whom
they are - indebted for their disgraceful
vtutirni; the'executifeaf 'the State'should be
for the necessary authority to act
figatitst the Outlaws. The power to check
such ruffianism resides somewhere in the
• , --.i..State, and evert official connivance' with
; ,,-...rawdyism could not resist the strong send
:,;_Mentwhichmust prevail in.favor of law and
order,' and•the exercise of the constitution
al riegt3 of the people; when backed by the
..,.tinthority 'of the State. As for the eleCtions
bald in Baltimore on Wednes
ti.W.lhotiltl be set aside as an usurpa
-,-, •tfort farid an outrage. The -members of
who would have the assurance to
c i4iultit,sqats in the nattonalinals_upon certifi
cates granted,upcm the returns of such Taxi
? election i .shonld have permission to, got back
as
• to r.heir - eopstituenti, -and see • whether, un
der a ar and honorable test, at the polls,
,thev Were the choice of the mukjority, and
= , ;'" , l - tAtitied to represent` the people of Balti
more. The freedom as well as the purity of
eleection.s must be preserve& or republican
govilinment - carinot etist:. Our Presidential
elections have become close contests of. tate
years', and a Single State sometimes 4eter
.. mines the chtrice of - oiti•governmerk4ents.
election,carried by the vote of
Mandan&anSLby such violence and intim&
- qiiitiod'aS the "Plug-Ugly,"," Itip-Rap and,
_cans _of Baltimore employ,
t'-'""'fristtld convulse this nation from one end to
thix other
." • '
The =counts given of the election by the
)tillanieris papers are most - fearful. 'The
Vititb l e cityjvasAM-rendered to the clubs and
thal,dieformers = withdrew from the polls.
'l'he efrert_of-this state of things it is need
-Use to deseribe. A whole city has literally
bendigfranehise4, defied and laid helpless,
and 'piistrate at the feet of violent teen.
An orgtMilation, di)riainAnt byvlolence alone
of all consequences, because they have "one
tb'Tear Anina - the putfiC iniiiiintons of the
ut
country into . a - iiiocheiy'alid 'clet.gioni Is
banetiful example
Wilt,..Spread_t_ltmob law is not cruslaid in
.:91altiliOce, i iiillnut mob laW become the in
of the designs of bad men else
Certainly there is a power som e _
that is strong' enough to reach and
hnish,,and,prevent such bold destruction of
e sights of the people. The elective fran
ro:ia: Must. not be coriteseeclat the mouth
bf the' pistol, in fear of the bludgeon and
the h - noel:oer. These bold optlaws.must be
pi iiikied by the law, or the descent people
It ;taGe, the matter into their owrr hands,
work of it. , lribbegiselv-
such outrages as have been commftted at
tearful, and therosults which
w .:5111497 thena will be still more fearful:,
There is azovereign power in every State
which musi &Arid and defend the rights
'of -ihe - pe4l‘i, or,governinent is . but an idle
~,pz _word. •
fL He investigation ordered_ by the Legislature
• jriAoston, respecting the BpttoiLiqnor Agency
haa disansed the fact that the - ti.dentl' irpirits
' theligeney hava liaen considers='
r ieitrly:deteriorated quality: Brandy was sent
from the Agency to a liquorfirm,who mired
it with a larger- quantity of inferior spirits,
.... 2 / , thus,..dirahlishing its value -about otdi-half.
InYeatigation is still prnceeditig.T
riftsetr hundred hthiankhays, been built in
-Tenn, this : !OAß nostnw r
000. '• • • r.
•: • 4 finding coal in
,
- boring was carried
• v., and ninety feet farther,
the salt bearing strata, the
, )Ising to the top, of the boring, and
at the'rats of from eight hundred
thousand gallons per hour.
ENE
George Law, of New York, now owns nine
tenths of, the Righth avenue Railroad in that
city, which alone is an income of a prince, and
growing more Valuable every day. He also
owns nearly all the stock of the Ninth avenue,
which, when 'completed, will run from the
battery through Greenwich street to the Ninth
avenue, and thence to Harlem river—a nine
mileconcern. Half the Ferries belong to Law.
He owns the, Dry Dock . Bank, and the bank
owns about forty acres of docks, houses and
land, almost in the heart, of the city. Law
owns the Staten Island Ferry boats, and two
miles' of water front nearest Now York, - that
in a few
. years will be worth for docks, ten
millions. He really owns the Flushing Rail
road, and heaven knows how much more he
owns.
Ez-President Martin Van Buren is said to
bo engaged. on an important and elaborate
work, which shall embrace a political history
of the country down . to the close,of his admin
istration.
The .New York Cattle Markets continue
greatly overstocked, and the loss to drovers is
large.
The coronation of George IV cost $1.190,000
his dress'alone cost $120,000.
Duelling came into general practice in set
tling points ofhonor in 1616. It is prohibited
by lacc'in thelErnited States Army and Navy-
The New York Tribune having denied that
Gerrit Smith, who is implicated in the Har
per's Ferry conspiracy, was a Republican, the
Netv York Express turns to the Tribune Al
manac of 1857, in which that print classes Mr.
Smith as a Republican Member of Congros:,
in, its political tables for that year_ The 'Pr/•
bane will have to give it up, or be involved in
a controversy with its editor, Mr. Greeley.
THE DOOM OF BROWN
John Brown has made his last speec h,
a citizen, before the court which tried him.
He iscivilly dead, having passed from the
court room to a cell where he is to prepare to
meet his final doom, on the second of next
month. The close of his career as a citizen,
was; on the whole, calm and dignified. In
the face of the law, to which his life teas
justly forfeited, he frankly admitted that he
had had a fair and impartial trial—a confes
sion which will confound those who hoped
that he would not have such a trial. \\lien
asked to give any reasons which he might
have why the sentence of the law should
not be passed upon him, he appealed to the
Scriptures for a justification, and Might
have apPealed - to Wendell Philips . or Ward
'Beecher 'for an interpretation, Contirmine
his reasons.. He hes been an unfortunate,
misguided man, and his curses will justly rest
upon the party whose teachings have brought
himto his ignominons doom.. In the judg
ment of the laW,ho is a tint rd erer and a trn to r.
Whatever'. may be his „fate, his conviction
and sentence- is a lesson to all good citizens
to guard against those political teachings
which lead to such results. We pity him.
but those who'have made him what he is•
and brought him to his present ignominious
position, are ten-fold more guilty than he
Jefferson Territory.
A convention to form a provisional govern
ment rant at Denver City, in the Pike's Peak
region, on the 10th ult.—R. W. Steele presi
ding. After a long acussion relatiie to the
propriety of forming a - provisional govern
ment, the convention resolved itself into com
mittee of the whole "on the state of the organic
act," and reported constitution similar in its
purport to the Ono adopted - (and voted down by
the people) at the constitutional convention
held. in August last. The organic act being
gt. 150,., late
candi~ato for 'eongie, was nominated for
Governor. Xr. Bliss, - ; orDolden City, for Sec
ofSiiitii; Mr. C4V ,- , of Auraria, for
Treasurer, 'and other officers of minor impor
tance;autking a Complete set of lnvctnment
officials. .This,government- is only to exist un
til Congress shall give the people a Territorial
organization, when, by the orgamc act estab
lished by the convention, it ceases. '7
.
Southern Pacific Railroad.
It will not biz many years before median be
able it t o rido frq.l34 shores the Atlantic, to
those of the Pacific by rail. The Southern
Pacific .ttailroad seems in 'a fair way to be
completed at an early period. Dr. ?mikes, of
Memphis, Tennessee, who has been very active
in . behalf of the road, says that the difficulties
with other companies and with the State of
Texas have been adjusted. The Company
entirely out of debt. Works have been resum
ed on the road, and the stock liability amounts
to two millions eighty-eight thousand dollars.
The capital is fixed at seven hundred thousand
r‘hares, of one hundred: dollars each, making a
nominal stock of seventy millions. A, part of
the stock being disposed of, the remaining two
hundred andeight-y two thousand four hundred
shares are to be gold under an order of the
Board of Directors, to purchase negroes for
the construction of the road. . Tho capital stdck
b'sing.thus disposed of; the remainder is to be
distributed among the frststockholders in the
*everia Btaia Untier the management of
Mr. Thompson of this State, the newly elec
ted President, there , is no dotzbt that the South-
Urn . Priciiin Railroad will Boon realize the hopes
which its friends hoe fornied of its speedy
completion. • ' •
Not Bad.
Any one who has lived in Cincinnati for ten
or fifteen yews will remember the tailor,
one of the oldest iind best of his craft, as well
as ono' of the j itl‘ways as ready to take a
joke as to give one. It used to be considered
the "fair thing" among " select ,party" to
send,persona to his store. for articles at variance
with what usually constituteSkthestecit ttlaiS:l
of members 9f his' profess - 4mi: - happened
„one thod'...ao7 On et 'or the "party above mautioned„
was Amending th,o steps of the Burnett Hdusd,
hel'erieeinter i ed'a'skieeinsen' or Itentiicky, Who ,
h4hifeiPotlii*Where ho could purchase a
jetiatiiitC!`Otneitrsoshe was direCted to E—'s
strirer as: l the establishment where they heielf
the. largest assortment at the most reasonable
'proceeded it once to the
place iudicatetiould:fouad..2:--- (who by the
way, was troubled with an impediment of
speech,l waiting on a - cuStother, and, after
aniline& wants, wail ''politely requested to
"tvt_vaitir. few lAA-mo-meats ..'.. Afterdispato
ing his business with the iefeitisikicl - Mistor
he - gravelY•ap reached Kentucky, with
of gtiossi4 r •
- _ _
mild tone, "W-a ehall h-have
mnm-mannnetsperiTheriwponq - • , _ ' hix
the atrelaketfato' 'onitt, ..er:s«.-; 4 110.10 0 `• , ' 4 "V •At,
1115 , GOUrftenanCe..t6 Z 4ffe r rar
• - ib. *- •
ii c
:.'stretch, ,, t:.'stretch, ,, and, with a fad iri• • vea
Aioat seriOnanhtf; vinatked • .
•
• .
• • .
' ;-no house is a well-spring of
• - the houses of our ambitious
.ge must be well watered, for such a
•
babies as we show this season has
y been exhibited since Barnum's famous
-.arvest, a few years since. Indeed, our ex- .
cessive efforts and improvements in this di
rection, led one amateur judge:to observe, in
the classic language of Young America, that
"if we were a one-lwrse, we were certainly not
a one-baby concern."
Our district has ever been celebrated for its
choice fIoWO - rg and elegant boquets. Several
gentlemen have,proved•that Our blackberries
and pears are likely to became airenowned
our time-honored pippin, and now we may
add with truth, that our babies are as "plenty
as blackberries," and quite as worthy 'of no
tice. We have large babies and small babies
light babies and dark babies; quiet babies and
.noisy babies ; boy babies and girl babies—all
sorts of babies, except ugly babies and cross
babies—fortunately all our babies are good
and handsome!
, ; -
A shaft,
one`- hundred
As wo poor childless wives meekly go from
house to; house, we learn that each new baby
that is presented for,our inspection is heavier,_
prettier, more forward and more excellent
than any other mother's baby. "Mrs Slouch's
baby is a nice little creature, but so small
"Airs. Slim's baby is a cunning fellow, but -
what a head I The Tumble: Bug's babies
are always dumpy, and the new one. has, such
story, (not starry) eyes." Mrs. rlinder's
baby is a darling little girl; but did you see
its nose?" Whereas this baby—that is, the
baby we are bolding in our awkward, unac
customed arms—is Just .the dearest, 'evilest,
,ctinningest little creature that-ever was born
'We stifle down a .rebellious sigh as we think
of our own quiet home, ..where cradle cares
and cradle joys never intrude ; :where no gen
tle baby breathings ever freight the air with
sweet anxieties; where no baby's soft murmur
of satisfied content or helpless complaining
is ever to break the unnatural still of childless
home. We look on this mother's baby, and
our yearning - becomes is prayer of faith to
know that ".God ddeti . all things well !"
- What a tine thing. it is ;that each mother
thinks so well of her baby. We cannot help
smiling at this over admiration which sees no
defect inthe little soft bundle of pink flesh "
and white cambric. We listen, as the pretty
lady, duly arrayed.in an elegant dishabille, re
counts the peculiar excellencies of her new
treasure, and we can see nothing moro beau
tiful and interesting than a happy smile of
perfect content, with which, as the nurse
hands out the baby, the convalescent Jurns
back the blanket, and discloses the little face
and tiny arms. What if the mother's eyes
were not so enchanted : what. would become
of all the unlovely babies ? what would be the
fate of •those unsightly little monsters that
are born in this troublons world? It is a de
lightful weakness, this inordinate affectien—,
we will not degrade it by the name of instinct,
but, allow it the' -noble one of affectionate
judgment. The generality of mankind may
take comfort in the thought that, however
unloved and unappreciated they may have
been, each of was fur a time, at least, and
to one person, the, must attractive. the most
interesting and, the risost initiertant of the
human race. Beautiful manifestation of a
glorious nature is this iris:tinct of watesoul
love ! From the highest to the lowest. ardor
f creates, ferAvully.lll.3V Giid fur
,uch tran. , ,evutlei.t • gift.. No elevation of
rank, uo detsredittion of sun, c,.n extitiguish
the Spark : and,' thom_th it be poi-tested or Cl—
agg(rated, still there is ever in its tiartiality.
patience, sc,lf-denial and : self-furgctfulness. a
holy beauty that must compel respect.
terra F. Navigation.
Prof. 'l'. S. C.. Lowe, the :cronaut, who pro
poses to take a voyapi,tet Europe in his balloon,
the City or "New 1 ork,, has published a card,
giving 1112 purpmes and de:-Ires in undertaking
a transatlantic air voyage. We copy n portion
of the Card . •
"Some peoplo may think I em insane, rash
or a seeker after fame. but this is not the case.
1 have for two y44tr:s coolly considered the sub
ject, and have provided formyery contingency.
interia4d - tO inakJi'my first trip across the
ocean entirely a private' undertaking ; but
finding that the amount: of 4,'Cpenic to be in
curred would °venal( :ay pinNnil means, I
hove been compelled to announce a public ex
hibition, whit. - preparing for the voyage. 1
am confident of fillece: , s i Jr various reasons
First—T ha , ,e :a large balloon, which has a
cal'ar'itY of 725,010 cubic feet: therefore should
the envelope be no more perfect than-, those
which are usually constructed, it wilrretain
its power for s-longer period
Seeend-1. have devised mechanical applian
ces fur' raising and lowering the balloon while
fnthc Mr.-with:tint expenditure of the lilting
power.
'Third—l hate invented an apparatus for in
dicating the different currents, should I find
Myself going too far - north or south. Should
any accident occur, and shouldthe balloon and
•
machinery fail to accomplish its work, theme
tame which will be 'suspended below
the car, is rigged with trails. and • 1%111 prove
sutlicientl2, - strong' to endure any sea.
It is true I would have preferred another sits.
aon 'of the year for undertaking .this first great
experiment of transatlantic navigation, but
should this first attempt at an exploring expe
dition, as I term it, not prove entircly'success
fill, I shall not. Uu di - iCouraged nor debarred
from histitafarik'eiPiirimerits with a view thus
pertaining the cause of- failure and the remedy
therefor..l 'shall be supplied with all the
philosophical it r pparatu: neco,i.iary to take me.
terological observations, navigation
is ever perfected, it- will be • accomplished be
1 perseverance, CVOn in the midst of .opposition
and 'detraction. lam willing to take the risk,
s;ridif I can do anything to add, in how , ver
small a measure, to the store of scientific know
ledge, I shall feel amply repaid. •
Mr. Seward and the Harper's Ferry un
.rivicy•
We quote from the Detroit Free PreAs :
" Some of air: Black Republican journals
are seeking to relieve Mr. Seward of the guilt
of having failed to denounce to the authorities
the Brown conspirators when he had been ful
ly advised of their conspiracy, by saying that
the Secretary of War was also a d v i se d of it
and failed to take steps to arrest it... The dif
ference between Mr. Seward and the Secretary
of War in this respect Is this, and it is as wide
as it could possibly he. Mr. Seward wasau
thoritatively advice(' of the conspiracy by one
of the aid conspirators in person,aud had no
reason to 'doubt, and did not doubt, thO exis
tence of it. The Secretary was 'advised of it,
through an it.,
letter, written by a per-
R.Oll .:who professed.to know but little about it,
and whose information was so vague as to load
the 'Secretary' to suppose that he was sought
to be made the victim of a hoax, or that his
informant was crack-brained. Had Mr. Se
ward disclosetl to the Secretary all that he
know about the conspiracy, the Secretary would
undoubtedly hove acted upon the information ;
and the conspiracy wouid have been nipped in.'
the bud, and the lives of Brown'and his fol
lowers have been saved: And it was Mr. Se
ward's moral, and religions, and political duty
to advise the Secretary of Whr'ot the conspir
acy. It' was his dirty ns a Senator of the Dili-.
test States,' sworn to support the Constitution,
to advise him of it,. failedin this duty,
Does it not follow that the,event of the con
spiracy is upon his head,'and the blOod of
Brown and his companions upon his hands
Is not this the logical consequence of Mr. Se
ward!siallure to do his duty ' To be sure, Mr.
Seward shares this di - eadfu). responsibility with
others, but is his guilt any'less than though he
did - not share - it with anybody ? Mr. Seward
does not appear to have expressed regret that
this conspiracy had been hatched, Ho does
not appear 'to have condemned the conspiracy
by a Ford A -file only enreSsesLregret that, in
his position, - haliud been toldanything about it!
His iittittnie . toward thh'eerlepirators seems - to
..11five. <bop : ahead. ,with your cpnapira-
VyP, lief - 1611 hie anything libeutvit ;-
7/I . y positfan it will' not answer for me to know
anything. - ettit.'i If this was not winking at
treason—if it vtas not' encouraging sedition
--What-was it ,
speech at R
tie 'much'
trine2-
BABIES
ESS 110TIIER
W 4 .was, Done.
'qcl -1- of SeWard's
Insi year, .in which'
.`- , tile conflict"' dec
..'
4 t Sinith for
irg ; Rut the
:flint the
• an ab-
Ans,l.
RAILWAY SLAVGIITER AT WATERTOWN.
FULL PARTICULARS OF THE DISASTER
OMPLETE LIST OF KILLED AND IVOUNDED-.
Several of the passengers on board the ill
fated excursion train front Oshkosh have ar-:
rived in Chicago, brining full particulars of
the sorrowful disaster. Among them are Mr.
A. A. Hobart, conductor of the train, who
has two ribs broken, and a third severely in
jured by compression.
The train left Oshkosh about 7 o'ctuck a. on.,
with twelve passenger cars, nearly all full. It
reached Watertown a little before 11 o'clock,
where a' considerable accession was made to
the number of passengers. Upon leaving
Watertown, the train proceeded at about the
rate of 15 miles an hour until about four miles
this side of that place, when the disaster oc
curred. The railway at that place—and in
deed for the greater portion of the whom route
is not fenced on either side. A herd of cattle
was seen feeding on one side of the track, some
hundred rods in advance of the engine, while
on the other side was a bull, grazing between
the track and a ditch partly filled with water.
The ditch where the bull was standing was
not wide; nor was the water deep ; the animal
could have easily jumped across it, as, the engi
neer' supposed he would do, to get outof the
way of the approaching train. But, instead of
this, he waited until the engine was within fif
teen feet of the spot, when he started to cross
thetrick in front of it, to join the herd. The
engine was too near to be stopped, and under
too slow headway to throw, the animal out of
its way. The pilot struck him and bore him
onward to the'culvert, the top of which is com
posed simply of timber stringers to support the
ties. The animarslegs caught in the tics,
'and throw the locomotive into the ditch. The
tender, baggage, car and live passenger cars
followed'it, one Or two of them into the ditch,
crashing into and upon each other in a fright
ful ruin. It is a wonder, indeed, how any
person': in . either of these cars escaped death.
So complete was the wreck that scarcely a seat
in either of the live cars remained broken.
The passengers, having b - ad not a moment's
time in which to Make any effort to•escape,
were thrown in aliceP among the ruins. : Heads,
liMbs and bodieS were crushed and mangled in
a manner too horrible to imagine.
The rear cars were not injured, and many of
the passengers in them were not aware of the
disaster until they came out to learn the cause
Of the sudden stoppage.
The floor of the foremost pa,senger car ran
on that of the baggage, while the roof of the
Luggage car was thrown into the former.
Every seal in the co,. was sinasl,6l piecee.
The forward end of the car seas let down in
the mud and water, end many were injured by
being caught mid jammed between the beams.
A young man who was sitting upon the scat
behind r. 'Edmonds, who makes this state
merit, talking with his sister, was killed, but his
sister escaped.
The tender was badly suiesited up, but was
comparatively uninjured. The sixth car was
jammed into the fifth, and badly broken up,
The engine, tender, baggage and first passen
ger ears were thrown from the track entirely,
but the others remained on.
The engineer, Geo. Mel , : atnire, remained nt
his poet., and emaped uninjured. The fireman.
MUCabe, was slightly injured.
The conductor's account of the disatter
su It thintially the Fame 43 that given by °there.
TUE Dti-tD AND 'WOUNDED
In addition to the number of dead given in
our former account, the following have since
4.4.1 of their wounds : 15. It. Sickles, of Fond
du Lac; Peterailia, of Vihkodi. and Eliphe-
Mt Sherwood, clerl of the Wolf river steam
boat 0'
Mr. E. It. Baldwin, of oshkosh. )and for
merly clerk of Winnebago county.) had both
legs broken, and is not expected to survive
Telegraph ystertlay had it Mrs. Baldwin,
which was a mistake.
Mrs. Bedford, of Fond do AA , . was not u
badly injured as was at first reported `he is
doing
Mrs. R. Mt Lewis, who bus friends in
Chicago, is doing well. Ono of her limbs ie
broken.
Mr. E. P. Bixby, brother-in-law. to M r
liiaell of the Matte.son House. is doing well .
nut so badly injured as was at iirA report
ed. He is at the house of .1. M. - Taylor, in
Fond du Lac. -Two of Id-. rib): are brUken. ,
V. 13.-Sinced, CS7I., editor of the Fin do Lae
freers, WAS still alive when Mr. Drury left
Watertown,
.yesterday foremam : but not
etts-cted to recover.
The complete list of kill el and wounded, es
far as reported. is as follows :
Killed—M..l. Thomas, U. S. Marshal, Jer
ome Masten, telegraph operator. Fond lit I.;e:
.1. Snow, J. Boardman, .1. D. Gillett. do :.John
Lunt, 0. F. Emerson, C. Peter. and E. 11.
Sickles, Fond du Lae; L. Sherwood. Oshkosh;
Dr. S. Miner,Watertowll
clerk of the steamer Pearl-
I Wounded—V. It. Smead, editor of the Pre,.;,
lon du Lac, 5.ku1l very badly fractured, not
expected to recover; A. D. Bone-tell, Ford du
Lac, one leg broken : Mr , J. Radford, Fond du
Lac : Mrs. R. M. Lewis, Food du 1.. c, one
leg broken ; E. R. Baldwin, Gslikosb, both
legs broken : V rs. .lame: Kinney, Fond du
Lae. one leg broken : ArnoS Page, Fond du
Lae, injured in leg , and shoulders ; A. A. Ho
bart. conductor, ribs broken and head injured ;
James Page, baggage master, badly Mat: .1.
t,l. Griffiths, Food du Lae : E. P. Bixby, two
ribs broken: T. F. Craig, Chicago, badly hurt
in the groin. The following fire more or less
injured: Siics Foreman, Mhi Jenkins.. MN.
Page. Mrs. Cartwright. Mrs. A. I'. Knapp,
Colea Bashford, P. Sawyer, Mrs. P. Saw
yer. Jai. Patridge,C. C. 1,. (loulit Mrs .1 ewell.
Tho track rtn the Sunbury and Erie railroad
from Erie eaet, hag been ti iintied within twen
ty•two miles of 'Warren. The track been
laid weet from Lock Haven tc. far ne Sinuoma
honing.
What Hollariderei Think of licerhate's 1101-
land Bi t ters.
d. (jt i Tas , E. of the Sbebovgati Nie , <,,6-
btnie, ins letter dated Septenibere. ttinv rernarkii
You will.observe that 1 have Itubli , hed several certiti
rates latery. These are not tiara " puff.," but literally
true. and should you Qouttntle atherti-ing with ue, you
nosy expect to PCIII/re large orders front every llelland
settlement to the United States."
. .
. This Is en nit rset from one the 'Willy letters re,eiv;
ed from the Holland settlements. surety when Holland ,
ere recommend Me Holland Bitters no eltrrnly. Ameri•
u4ms rrety /let hetetute in testing its virtues for iilelll
-
Real flrrefug.- , -The Genuine tilt,thlr Con,nntrateit
Ilt.nrhave'm nolland Bittern i+ put up in fl If pint bottles
only, and retailed at one dollar per bottle. The great
demand for thin truly celebrated iki,licine hair induced
litany imitationg. which the public should guard itFalunt
purchasing. Beware of unramition t Sec that cur name
i. ou ilia label of every bottle you buy.
BENJAMIN PAGE, Js.. A 1..0..,,501e Propriotorn, No,
17
Word, lintwnen First and Second - 81J,, Pitt.--burgh.
gew advertisements.
SELOS AND GAITEIc
The Cheapest in the City,
AN 'IMMENSE ASSORTKENI
W. E. SCHMERTZ CO.'S,
STEPHEN A. DODGE,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
AND .
MIFNT POE CLAIMS
• •
warsolgton. D. C.
Kir - A large experience in the adjustment of ironer
.tant claims, especially for Pensions and lands, has pre
psred.hirn to prosecute such claims: with the best pro s
pects of snecass. , ; not
T HIRD A V A ri 017
:wpm GOODS,
• BRAIN'S ROUTE BOOR.
THE UNDERSIGNED Cakes ;method
Inforrning the politic, that he his
,now in prey:,
a work entitled the “Pittsboth and Chicago Route
Book." 109 my intention to ismo ten thousand Copies,
"which will be circulatlad all along the Pittaburgli, Fort.
Wayne and Chicago•Raroad, and will be sold in every
'Sewn and on every train. It - will be presented to the
abOut theTE.NTH of 3 , IOI.MAIBER. • All letteri
'ad advertisements 'addressed to-J. C. BRAIN, career.
Morning Post,will secure prompt attention.
INVITATION—To all Societies, Associations,
!I-4V- Lodges and Military Companies, and the public
ha ge,vieral. to join our procession-on the 10th inst.. the
date of the Centennial Anniversary of the Birth-Day of
that glorious Poet. VON SCHILLER. Societies wish
ing-to pa.rticipate,vnll signify their intention to Rev..
N:strava, President of the Schillerbund. The proces
sion'will start from Masonic Halt, Fifth street, at 10
o'cloek, A. H. For the Committee.
FRED. HAUPT.
JOS. SIEBENICE,
A. OETTINO,
ALARGE LOT, situated in South Pitts
burgh, near the Monongahela Bridge, :and for
merly occupied by the late THOMAS BLAORMORE.
Being near the city, and fronting on the ricer, it would
be a desirable location for either a lumber or pig metal
yard. Apply to JAS. BLACKMORE,
Executor of Thomas Blaekmore,
No.lo Smithfield street.
WATCHES, JEWELRY, ETC.,
Until Tuesday, November Bth, and at
Tuesday Morning Nov. Bth, at 10 o'clock,
ALE PUSITINE, WITHOUT RESERVE.
13y order 14f Tru,tee
uur,:at
W. W. WILSON, A
A.RHIVAL OF-,
rpwENTi-FIFTH List of 'Applications
1. fur Se Liquor,. tiled in the Clerk's Office up to
November 2d, 13..9-.
Campbell John. eating house, Call ward, Pittoburgh.
FanMaher E. F. A., tavern. Sth ward, Allegheny.
finustetter A.. other goods, sth ward; Pittsburgh.
Joiiepli. tavern, I st do.. • do. • •
Story. oating house. Ist In, do.
liorwig Daniel, tab do.. • do.
Jost Jac 01., ith other goods, 24 do. Allegheny-
Miles , R. E. J. L. J. S. Mattlt other goods. 3d w'd, Pitt'gli.
lister JaMe9,other grioda. 2.4.1 ward. Al legkagity.
Olin 51. J. tavern. 4th do. Pittsbtrrgh.
Reinemati E., eating house, 3d do. ilo: -
Sehissel C., do. do.. sth do. do. •
Weber Adam, tavern, 3d do. 'do. .
'IIIOSIAS A. ROWLEY,,CIer'o.
(AM, Nor. 3.1, 1555.
.1105:2t
THIRD ARRIVAL OF
I=lEl
HIRSHPELD & SON
nn lend. tit I no_t elegant 11,9,.rttntiat
,AICI-OTHS;
rastanere tir,t Phish Vestint, that has ear been
is:sight to eta , market, which they wl,ll make to order,
it, le t manner, at v,:ry rtrroonaLli, prices. '
T II,IRD A lIRIV A L OF
GENTS' R ISHI NG GOODS.
Wt./t ANI , MERIN()
-AIIRTS AND DRAWER ~
ID.,+IERY AND GLOyE,I.
SILK AND WOOL SCARF;.
FANCY FII.K TIES,
Ile, Sr, AN,
AL n:.hu•Ekl
L. ITIRSIIFELD & SON,
Nu. 83 WOOL) STREET.
CIIEAY H AfN .AND CLOTHING.
• • •
.
G MA N
I 1 ellill,ll' Ile}V ALltifiltrA t»•suttfui &ruck ju.t, received
THIRD ARRIVAL (,)}.‘
ARTWRIGHT YOUNG,
C
1'41 . 0,1111a fittention paid to PUTTING UP LIGHT
nob.
8 t . , , T s
Seßing al VERY I,OW PRICES, at the Cheap Cash
:4toro
T.PIN E FURNITURE. --:This Afternoon,
.12 SATIMPAT, ;November sth, at 2 o'clock. Will be
split at the Auction thisma, 64 Fifth street. a small stuck
of sitprrior Furniture, well kept; eomprisingone hih ,
pu , t Walnut IleaOtead. Cherry Maine Table, Spring .
Coat Lounge, Extenahm Tables. large Gilt Frame Look
list Rack: Dressing Bureau, largo Rook Case
and Drawers. loa.pot Bedsteads, Carpets, Ao. Also,
narrow slat Veuithim Blinds, entirely. new.
•
•
DAVIS. Auctioneer.
TIIIRD ARRIVAL OF
BRITISH lb. papers, for
S. JOHNSTON, Retail . 1) rUggrst,.
110, cor. Struthhold and Fourth sts.
SPONGEL-Assorted, tor sale by
H. JOHNSTON..
DAY RUM.— Ext ra tine quality for sale by
uu:2 ' S. JOHNSTON.
MOSS.--20 barrels for sale by
B. A. FAHNESTOCE & CO.,
nos etussor Fitst..and Wood sta.
DLEACIIED IVINTE• 'HALE OIL.
1 , 0 tmrrels for salnby' ' . - • ' •
F. A. FALINESTOCK k CO.,
uos - • • • ..cor. First and Wood sts.
No t'd Fifth street
/FANNER'S OIL.-75 bbls. for sale by
B. A. FAHNESTOCK CO.,
nor, .cor. First and Wood sts
LADIES' WATER PROOF
• FRENCIIIC4LIF
THREE-SOLED BOOTS,
AT
. E. sciatiitinvz Co.'s,
- N-araii;tthf:treet
ST . CTDIES IN VELOCITY;Ty CZERNY,
. preoeeded by tune new exercises, and .eolkoluded
by n at , * study in octaves (composed for this edition,)
for the Piano, m 1 volume,
Do. iu 3 numbers, (type edition.) ..... • . ••••• 30 e•
Do. in 3 numbers, (plate edition.) 7 . 6 . e.'each• . :
For ante by - • •
no: JOHN H. DIELLOR siWaod street.
CHARLES. GlT'Ziftlr6
Na 78 lilarkOt street.
DISSOLUTION OF PARTNERSHIP.-
The firmottl'ENlGHT, VERNER 4i Co., engaged
in,tho business of running_ the Omnibus Lines,}r.nown
its . the EXCELSIOR CO..Wr.ANTII . haTtngt dis ',led of
thOY Omnibus stock, is dissolPed tar La=fatinsf44ld the
death or the late Meant° 4. Holmes, otwattto pastnets.
perrnns hating claims agairistdinsaind caroputymat
pre.eht them: trninitqfly t Junmverntr,-,foreettle
.
tw Adilertißententz.
TO DEIT.
BARGAINS!
AT PRIVATE SALE,
AUCTION SALE,
EMIDEEM
Continuing until the whole are cold
FALL AND WINTER DRY 'GOODS,
V. P. SMITH'S,
92 Market mt., between Fifth . and Dianiond.
FALL -iND.'WurrEn
SDI 1 T.ll'l,
No. 92 Market pti,et
Fashionable Merchant Tailors,
NO. 83 WOOD §TBEET
1•1.11. N ANU FANI' c.IB6IMERES
CU" AND EXAMINE ,UP STYLE'.
L. HIRSEIFIELD d.; SOS.
No. 8:1 s tree
Fall and Winter Dry Goods,
1. P.%3ll'l'll' A.
EM=EITI
flair Furnishing Department
I 11,1% kod ‘,lllt a ,Atlpletra.,,,,rtra,r,t of
FLEMING'S,
CHF lIIT3 AND CLOTHING
cIiEIP HATS ANI, cI.OTHEsaI
I=l
I , ‘ L F.: 741 N t; ,
l'6l'll, Wood :111d Stith btro3ta.
S L \' ER
DOG COLLARS,
}SOWN
Call and I%lliter Drs-
J. P. S MI 'V II • s
IMPORTING ANP MU NITACItRING CUTLERS
S T E S , and
'[lni3,
JOS. 11. 110P.LAND, ‘..)5t Market street
Second door from Fifth
FALL A_NT. , WINTER DRY QOO)D9.:A.
J P. SMITH'S,
A FICESH SUPPLY
NEW WINTER GOODS
THIRD ARRIVAL
LADIES' 1100I)S, MISSES' .1100 N,
Children's Hoods,
MARIPOSAS 'AND MMUS,
LAIDItS) ..LISLE -GLOVES/.
LADIES' UNION GLOVES AnO
LADIES' SILK GLOVES MD:GAUNTLETS,
LADIES' CLOTH GIAVIIi A GAUNTLETS
Fleecy Linea and Lined. •
GENTS' LISLE GLovgs 9NB
Ge ate ,
.Unlon Gloves Said Gloves;
C,ents)-Sllk Glirves and Gauntlets, 1'
nta' C1o4I: Ginvel and Gauntlets,
Gents , Kid GloveinPlash k Fleecy Liaed
A FULL'ASSORTMENT OF
CHILDREN'S HOSIERY,
Trimmings,
Ribbons,
. .
01) LADIES' MISSES •; , t.Nb' CHILDREN'S
- E 1 OOP IC I a T S,
Znistyntly on pand and sold abertp,*
SPECIAL -NOTICE.
HAVING REPLENISHED OUR STOCK,
-A-A- - with a CHOICE SELEMICK or
We are now enabled to offer to our customers and the
public in general, a most superb assoitinont of seesonk
FALL AND WINTER, SALES,
EmmucLio, is tur.4
Fine Bl'k and Col'if ClOths,
English Melton Coatings,
Business Coatings,
Plain and Fancy, French
and English Cassimeres,
SILK. PLUSH
,VESTINGS, ' •• -
SILK•IrELVEr VESTIISI.
SILK CASILIKERE VESTINGS,_;
a
Parlw. Plaid Cashmere 'Areting,'.
Esquimaux Beavers,
- :
Moscow Beavers, •
Clarendon - Heaven'. -- •
Portsmout4 Beay.ers,
Which we will MAKE UP - TOORDER mike latest and
most approved manner, at moderate prices.
SAIIIVEL GRIM 4 SON,
RARE CHANCES
INVESTMENT...
THE MOST. COMPLETE
SHINGLE MACHINE.,
DURABLE, PERFECT AND CHEAP.
r=3=22
STATE, 'TERlEtlnklitit,
COUNTY RIGHTS FOR SAT.
THE IRON CITY SHINGLE MACHINE,
. _ .
.PATENTED :BY "MR. S. :C.:- COFFIN;
Itrve.utor, of Fitiabirgh, Pa., June ith,lBb, le =vs
tut:minted to the public; and iionnitencla• itself* for the.
fallowing advantages :—lts limp ity,duraUlity', utility,
cheapness and excellence of work. , superb:int, to
other ialarl'iloe• consista,-- ". • -
Friar, Thai it is provided with an ippandi3 by which
the edging of the Shingle is performed by the saw which
cuts it, and - which la aSAVING OF FROM •
FORTY TO, FIFTY PER CENT. IN COST.
- .
• . . .
, .
Samara, By the means of two treadles;the block Whew
placed on the Bfaeldne is adjusted to any poSition'the
operator may desire; by'which theie is a'SAVING of
Twenty Per Cent. of Timber,.
THIRD,-IT WILL SAW AND EDGE
92 Market street
,SIX TY_ SIITNGL ES
The MachWie will also cut Veneering, Looking Glai4
Backs, Barrel Beads, eigar . 8 0 41 ,2 7 etc..
The ILron.Clty Machine
can ise•furinsbed complete for - 11150 i by the manntito•
turer in this cab 2dr. 4,8. FOWLER, and can be *seri
in Operation at the of
net. of Seventh and Grant streets: " .
%FOR -SALE.
Tho altrenor and patentee willseepoee of County, State
end ' territerY4!ittte Mr. the vile =4 use oftheMachim
on very iniderate terms. Persona cleatrotui of inveating,
cannot finclit betteLostpcotcraty than the present
.19` Call and 0.211/13h10 the. hterhine.. , Oet:28:1;tv •
XLSS DEVIIINIVRT
Aas t..,:ahmance, that her
EFT . •
,
And positivity her..LAS'rAPPEARAI/CE BUT oxr..
in the
APOLLO
RiD take . plane ion
FRIDAY EVENING, 14017. 4TB;
Oa whieh occasion aheCrill appear. ' pieces at
MRS Hitutit in the 9714.1iME8, '
And in a
POPULAR plitAitEit.
sa-VOX - V:oolCnovr o. .
. •
KREEIL4 BRO.'
I 1
4.. -
guttliwento.
J. BUSH'S,
FIFTY DOZEN
AND O.AUNT.LM
Flowers;
"Ituclies,
P..P.S 0?
NO. 21,Fittb streei.
NEW GooDa.
Piro: street.
F,O R
ESTAI
PE 1t
NCIN'tTTE I I , :;
Pal 3tlvertisenunts.
NO. 80 MARKET
SPLENDITI
ASSORTMENT OF
DAESS G001)S,
. - ,...,r
JOS.. W. SPENCER'S,
- SO "Market , St.
EDWD. - BUTLER
OsiminioN MERCHANT,
48 Pubic Lanciiiii,
CINCINNATI; 91110.
oct=',:6o%*
. . . _
Rua Miners Wanted.
160:
&OD. EXPEBIENCEDICAAL
'NEES wanted .. :N
by the orthern ; gas, Coal
,
kodon Co luny, of Lasalle, Illinois: 'Thotreln is six
feet thick. We pay GO cents per ten Tot'tttining. The
mine is perfectly dry and clear from water. , Lasalle is
4W:tided 100 rnilessontli of Chicago, on the Kock Island
and Illinois Central Railroad. 'Fare'from Chicago $2,50.
ogt3.slmS .EDOPIR LOOMIS. goperintendant.
OURNING 'd-OODS.
..BROOKS & COOPER,
'75 Market Street,'
HAVE JS.E. CEIVE
Velour Reps, Black Grose Glair , Bilks.
111w:1811ns ,PLaipes,
• Vouitientes,
" enehrOntes, " Gross crEcosse.
Mezinofs,- • Patent boiled. elks
'Satlridethines; , "
Irish Poplins,
" Bombazines, English Crepes,
Alpine Cloths; " Crape. Collars,
-..Mohair Lustxes. • ". • Bleetes,
Parmattas. •
Thibet long shawlii Gl'oves.
Url-MOURNING SHAWLS -AND DRESS GOODS.
- .411g011:-.ffalINSTO ,
r (SUCCESSOR TO L. VELCOEOS
RE TAI DR:I3 O'Gr S
.. . .
Cor. Smithfield and Fourth St.,
~. ...
. .
,teeops eerist4in4 - a- of hapd, choice aseortra_extt of ev
,erytturg.iniheDrog line of tasieees. 2 -
1.46 Partieularattention aiNon. to Ooroporeetcling Pre-
,MORE
_NEW CAIIPETS,
011 Cloths, Droggets, Mattint,
TIOOR MATS, RUGS, and a:general as
sortment, of • • - • • ,
,
HODSHORNISHING 'GOODS,'
Old Carpet Warerooms of
• - •/tre-W 1• 1'OP Kr
••••,•'• • 112 litariOi street, Pittsburgh, Pa.
th4gA : i. INDUCEMENTS , 1 . 11e..1911 POE
.:
a . • '‘
- , • -;
NEW . SCAE s
E'
PIANO: =FORTES.
• - -
PRE subscriber has now on hautti:a most
aplendid stock of .risaws,.. rig otegS and 1
Octaves, M. Peen and .Carynd Ceres qt rxecratelegent
descrp . tfon. from the, c elebrated Factetia Chiekerino
&Bons. The tustmtnentii art elFprOlndedleith them
Istestimprovements, steRnEnteIINGACIMIXI, DOIMM-DAN
ersh,-Far-Eatinand are,of their. -
;E~7T+ARGED -: NEyGQ `..' SG~IaLr;
•
• By illicit a tenchW.oi 50t:44144rd is Obtained, con
sequently the tone ie rendered - merypoitserfol;*et rat:da
ms its sweetann inuslcal . By the perfection of
the fiction,. the. performer enabled .to imiduce all
ese
'tie3 of tone front piimissiglo :fortisson" ,with the
Cionuzzcsu Plums are thb.6 spoken' iit by the
best arils* uncilTripcs in our:eoutttry:7-...
-TR arinflEGesys:-They are *loud ootopswisonth
bed I 'haVe ever.seert in the United States, and fill cam
pare iivotably with any t. piewever ..k#on•u..
••
GUSTAVE SATTER Suryi 22 “ Thir 'opiiiion'Which I ex
pressed threwyearealgo,•_hasbeen Mere thaii-Islaftrmed
tomes, by,the nontinped qse of.asegy ens. 'llhat for not
sem and putse`qoatieg,/f ruce9r pt . arficulation,
Int y are unequalled. • ' • ' :"
(lFronsibelistienallntelligenoerfWasbfett, on.)
Theysan safely _bear. cou . sparixon-witt ~ ments
frau any_ part' of the world, in psut of . ,l,case,..strength
semi Wasteity of tench? , - -
[From the New Orleans Picayune)
FoCeicellence of nmierial, , elegititheilf:l3ash, and
faithnolness of workmanship, and lboveAllios voltune
d -sweetness, mellow weetness, brilliancy and perma
nence of tone, they unequalled."
[Fawn the Family dtairmalli:
-Me Peculia mu4Calqualitienbelongingiakke Chick-
Orme, ingthaments,' are' 11111;11110,9109.4 neh, and pow
sea tone, 'free from any wooden i3O/9f,' 'kindness of
so, BO diaagreeithle :to - tbs.sensltive,'mnslcal ear.
'They have also an casy,, even and pleasant .touch, and
;will' keep in tune Vettei than any Pianos known.
The public' ere.irefftedi to M.ll 'and examine them.
.11ileriAidinstmmaitS,Mhich are sokLai,"'.
•
Ficiory Prlce anii*Warranted.
JOHY
BIELLON,
81 ,WO O D sTnEET.
_
ad2siw.~ -
'SiJBSCRIB.Zit
'3I..TSt . II.:gdEpPED from' •' - '
PUMPING: .:k];):1014;€,--
THE „•/WRD:ADD/TION ; TO.- FALL - 43TOCK
ot.;TErrit
tmuvAmxp -
• • -
Tosrhich he aski the-attention of :piirehasigrsiand the
_public golf •,: , • -,; ,
4O •th . Mr-AS.oft,
• - • 93,1VQ0D STREET
IaRIVATE'DISPARES.M.I3ItOWN,_
211/3DlCALstaad SURGICAL;:oftea I , MAo'B3ll7lE
bela.6tieet:-PittstarillnPin• ;;;.1.; •
Dr.
BROWN is an old:. chow. pLttel¢lgb„end has
been - in n Practice for the last waiter. Wis bum
nags laat heen 'confined trcPtitAte' end Surgical
• cirrizgris Azar,Bllle , ioVll
ln need of a Medical •friend;_should, not Teal to and ant
the sere plate nf '.7'helreclor len regttLit gredu
ste, tmck.bisstrftteaekr•e iA rtst - trelsterstogoid certain clue
or cliieatiesas a sere .getirselea t9l4fasa@VnalOntain”,
'peirtatunit - tellek" by - , the me onas repP,„ es an d
foUstriegblis advice; . ..e) • 21--,•••.:1, r
'• • r • Dg• i OWITSERwRDISZiI-7lt
never to sere a r ism* form of 1 iner. 44 /30 "` e4
cits_puritieit eisd'settfritotts - trpsetions: --
Owing Itotn , alhereditarg taint, vitildh itself
,eaths ( OM factetbsi and. forms
- Of akin"bliseases, the °rip; of which. the"atiSP is en"
• titebrigiteratit' TaTierstMs'sci'afilict4d, kltiniti offers
:tropes of.n.suremitspeni yeer
••• 7.•/•"1•1, 1a.4
" Dr. Prowles remedies .. fair-this alarming trouble
brough ton often by thfid,solitary. oL zonal grab
whlehs th&-ydang and " bdien give
may to. (to their aninfteatritientla4 t e ohly let
remedies knonn.• ii tbes.epuolorylAtrewnott safe, and
rnake'tt . speedy rviitoraticinAbealth... -
,3,`
• Dr4Browifis!'rersidies _never' DO C 64 cPrii (Mr
disease in fetore w il l vectiokt e also
treats Alia, Gleet, Gannorrhatsallre. •U
charges; Female Wetikurs, MonthlyStroxia:slob.s,
Des
: eased of the Joints; vistrue-us .10:121;1 4 rer - rots Affections,
Paine in the-Baeb.. and Kiripepe, Arruatlou,of ttte Bled
der; together Stith all disesees of eh (IT% °
A • letter describilir ftie nyniptanns,c tatting a e,
.directed telaft., BROW', UM:4RM staner, Pine
=gPa, will-be immediately, anctrered„,.
.ftleclicine
o ' ani ramifd4itis:;!aarli - Paarad), , P4ar,Frtoh .
ce. and , Pritste Sootes, - . , ge..4so itOszer4 store
AR RIAGES — AT- COSEL:—"Ehliv6 deter
vusivitotbrae ont:nry-tlargelvddninliarleeted
stook c. •
csaßric~;s AT COST
The stock . -compiiaeerwery:atild and variety. The
c 432 UngeacY ancl,.ePergeWara.,or.amino.44.Amportant.
( VI ot. .T d 4.9'4; __
• -Two • Mile Sara;-11eIrr Tvittereheenue:
!FRE-NEW:I - YORK -RIIIMBROMPANY
upiptitßoup Ronuar , mariscceruzsii,cwa new
I c tr„; 3 4 l / 2 " u s li Pe t r t i g . gre p orot=etrg : Co 4 Z uie ;
are also the exclusive
lo nsaut T acturers, (load
.ww4=.
,2 u? Y tliroat at all the
, • A oiasaV and Stares to cata,cgucs and
Yno/Lailsl(rrite ease anti) cara,ardikti,oll%,Plic-Ition
s l r 'bttertirtimPbrYou Rust= Comexaxl4
.& 7VPIXQ
7 4 7 4. 1 a 2 a. P v=r ,P•TP.,.-IP-