Harrisburg telegraph. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1879-1948, June 28, 1919, Image 1

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Wilson Leases Paris For Brest After Peace. Terms Are Signed; Seals For Home on! Sunday
IXXXVIII NO. 150 16 PAGES uSfe o^'^hS^'" 4 HARRISBURG, PA SATURDAY EVENING, JUNE 28, 1919. . °"K£KS22 £TSSViKfiSr M HOME EDITION
WORLD WAR FORMALLY ENDS WITH GERMANS
AND ALLIED POWERS SIGNING PEACE PACI
GERMAN DELEGA TES FIRST
TO SIGN DOCUMENT TO DA Y
AMERICANS FOLLOW HUNS
Mueller and Bell Affix Names at 3.12
and 3.13; Wilson at 3.14, With Other
Envoys of United States in Order
CHINA REFUSES TO SIGN AND GENERAL
SMUTS PUTS NAME TO PACT RESERVEDLY
By Associated Press.
Versailles, June 28.—The World War was formally ended to-day by
the signing of the Peace Treaty with Germany.
The epochal meeting in the Hall of Mirrors began at 3.10 o'clock and
the German delegates, the first to sign, affixed their signatures, Dr. Herman Mueller
■at 3.12 o'clock and Dr. Johannes Bell at 3.13 o'clock. They were followed by the
American delegates, headed by President Wilson, and then by the plenipotentiaries
of Great Britain, France, Italy and Japan.
The representatives of the minor powers signed in alphabetical order. China's
delegates did not attend the session, declining to sign the Treaty because they were
not permitted to make reservations.
Cannon Booms
At 3.44 o'clock cannon began to boom announcing the completion of the ceremony of sign
ing. The signatures had not. however, as a matter of fact, then been completed, for at that time
the smaller nations were still signing in alphabetical order. The proceedings were formally
closed at 3.49 o'clock.
The Peace Treaty was deposited on the table in the Hall of Mirrors at 2.10 o'clock by Wil
liam Martin, of the French Foreign Office. It was enclosed in a stamped leather case. Premier
Clemenceau entered the palace at 2.20 o'clock.
Calls Meeting to Order
Premier Clemenceau called the meeting to order at 3.10 o'cl
assembled for the purpose of signing the Treaty, the protocol an
German delegates, whose credentials had been approved during (
the morning, then were invited to sign all three documents after
Premier Clemenceau had put the direct question to them whether
they were willing to sign and loyally execute all the terms. The
other delegates did not arise when the Germans came into the
hall.
When the Germans had signed the Allies began signing, do
ing so by delegations. Thus all the Americans signed, followed by
the other delegations.
Premier Clemenceau in opening<
the session said:
"The session is open. The Allied
and associated powers on one side
and the German commission on the
other side, have come to an agree
ment on the conditions of peace. The
Treaty has been completed, draft
ed "and the president of the confer
ence has stated in writing that the
text that is about to be signed now
is identical with the 200 copies that
have been delivered to the German
delegation. The signatures will be
(riven now and they amount to a
solemn undertaking faithfully and
loyally to execute the conditions em
bodied by this Treaty of Peace. I
now invite the delegates of the Ger
man reich to sign the Treaty."
The protocol was signed by all
those who signed the Treaty. The
Bhine arrangement was signed by
the Germans. Americans. Belgians,
British and French plenipotentiaries.
The order of signing after President
Wilson was Lansing, White, House
and Bliss.
General Jan Christian Smuts, one
of the de'egates representing the
Vnion of South Africa. sign°d the
Treaty under protest. He objected
to certain territorial settlements,
making a lengthy statement. He
said the indemnities stipulated could
not be accepted without grave in
jries to the industrial revival of
Europe. He declared it would he to
the interests of the Allied powers to
render the stipulations more toler
able and moderate.
The stalwart American doughbovs.
French poiltis and Rritish Tommies
who attended the signing of the
treaty were present as the real
"artisans of the peace" which had
been slowly taking definite form dur
ing the long months of the Paris
Conference.
They stood within the enclosure
reserved for the plenipotentiaries
and high officials of the conference
as the visible sign of their role In
bringing into being a new Kurope.
A few fet from them sat their com
mandor-in-chief. Marshal Foch.
The students of Paris began to
form processions early to-day and
ehortlv after 3 o'clock were parad
[Con tin tied on Pace 2.]
THE WEATHER
Harrlshurg and Vicinity. Fair and
continued cool to-night nnd
Sunday. Lowest temperatnre to
night ohont OX degrees.
Eastern Pennsylvania i Fair, con
tinued cool to-night nnd Sun
day. Fresh northeast winds.
RlTer. The main river will rise
this afternoon and to-night and
remnln nearly stationary Sun
day. The lower west branch will
rise this afternoon and begin to
fall to-night. The lower north
branch will rise slightly to
night nod begin to foil
Sandfly. All other streams
of the system will fall to-night
and Sunday. A stage of shoot
(Ml feet is Indicated for Hurris
*"*rg Sunday morning.
HARRISBURG Wmgsm TELEGRAPH
91 |t otar-3nfc|>cn&citt.
SURGING CROWDS
ACCLAIM LEADERS
IN WORLD PEACE
By Associated Press.
Versailles, June 28. —As Prem- ■
ier Clemenceau, President Wil- ;
son and Premier Lloyd George 1
emerged from the peace palace
at the conclusion of the cere- j
rnony, the great crowd gathered
outside swept aside the cordon of
troops, cheering tmadly.
The three statesmen were
swept along by the surging thou- i
sands. Many soldiers broke j
ranks and joined in the demon- I
stration, while guns boomed and
low-flying airplanes seemed to
fill the air.
Premiers Clemenceau and
Lloyd George and President
Wilson were photographed to- !
gether on the terrace. After the
demonstration, the three Allied i
leaders left Versailles in the j
same automobile, the crowds fol- :
lowing and cheering.
L - 1 ;
WILSON PLEADS
FOR NEW WORLD
CHARTER TODAY
Sends Message to American
People on Signing of the
Treaty at Versailles
By Associated Press.
Washington, June 28.—Presi
dent Wilson and his party will
leave Paris at 9.30 to-night for
Brest, to sail for home. Secre
tary Tumulty was notified to
day. Tlie cable from President
Wil-on said: "All well."
President Wilson lias consent
ed to an unofficial reception for
him on his arrival in New York.
A committee of citizens through
Secretary Tumulty had asked
they lie allowed to prepare an
unofficial greeting. This is the
lirst intimation of where the
President would land.
Washington. June 28. Presi
dent Wilson in an address to the
American people on the occasion of
the signing of the peace treaty, made'
treaty and the covenant of the'
a plea for the acceptance of thej
League of Nations, without change:
(Continued on Pace 2,j 1
lock. He said the delegates had
id the Rhine arrangement. The
WHISTLES AND
BELLS TELL OF
PEACE TREATY
Signing of Famous Document
Announced in City by
Great Din
Shrieking whistles and the ringing
of bells announced to Harrisburg
I the signing of the Peace Treaty by
j Germany.
i Arrangements for the demonstra
tion were made by Mayor Keister
and as soon as he received word
from the Telegraph that the Treaty
was signed, manufacturing plants
and fire companies of the city were
notified. Shortly after 11 o'clock
the noise started and for more than
j a quarter of an hour every whistle
lrl j city that was in working
1 ® er was blown and every city
| nre_ company bell was rung.
No other celebration was planned
in the city except the big bon
fire to be held to-night by the Boy
Scouts. For weeks the members o>
the various city troops have been
j collecting all kinds of inflammable
refuse and to-day it was piled high
in the Capitol Park extension area
| near Fourth and State streets.
It is planned to set fire to the pile •
! about 8 o'clock this evening. Mem
| hers of the various Scout troops in
; the city will assemble shortly after
I 7 o'clock at Third and State streets
! parade for the troops only,
j At 7.30 the parade will start going
| to North, to Sixth, to Forster, to
I Second, to Market, to Fourth, to
State street.
Arrangements have been made to
I keep back the crowds at the bon
j fire so that no one will be injured.
! several pieces of city fire ap-
T\ paratns will be stationed nearby to
j be called in case of emergency.
Republicans Eat Snappers
1 and Chickens on Outing
Four hundred pounds of snappers
and dozens of fried chickens disap
peared during the day at the Beach
nut Qlub, near New Cumberland,
j where hundreds of members of the
Harrisburg Republican Club, with
their friends held an outling to-day.
No program was arranged, the mem
bers arriving during the day as
soon as they could leave the city.
On Monday evening three barrels
of crabs will be served at the club's
city headquarters at a big crab sup
per.
One June Bride Changes
Her Mind at Last Minute
"It's all right to give it hack if
i you don't use It, Isn't it?" Edward
Willingham, colored, asked the
marriage license clerk when he
e brought hack the certificate which
f was ipsticd a few days ago when he
e iand Abbie Smith applied for a li
cense.
c ' The clerk replied that he could
e j return it, and Willingham turned
el over the license and walked out.
ißoth he and the Smith woman re-
Bide at 18 Cowden street.
And Thus Endeth the Story
PEUTSCH LAND \ ÜBE.R,/AUES ' /
flHHßoEß^3B3|PStnMß^ mmmc.^ NM& t^mmr
GREAT CIRCUIT
CARRIES FLASH j
OF WORLD NEWS
Long Undersea Line Direct
From Versailles to State
Department
By Associated Press.
Washington, June 28. The
State Department issued this offi
cial statement on the special ar
rangements made for sending the
news of the signing of the peace
treaty to Washington:
"The first news of the signing of
the greatest of all peace pacts was
flashed to the United States to-day
over a special government circuit
between Versailles and Washington.
Over this wire of approximately 3,-
000 miles of ocean cable and land
telegraph, set up for almost in
stantaneous transmission, came to
the department this first outline of
the proceedings of the day with
London, New Koundland and New
York the only points on the long
stretch of line.
"This special service direct to the
department from the rhachu at
Versailles was arranged at the in-
I stance of the American mission to
jthe Peace Conference and carried
I out under the direction of the act
i ing secretary of state, Mr. Frank
!L. Polk, who has just been con-
I Armed as the under secretary of
! state."
I
Meanest Thief Steals
War Relics From Window
Four revolvers, relics of the
World War, were stolen from the
show window of the drugstore of
C. M. Forney, 31 North Second I
street, early this morning. A value '
: of S6O is placed on them.
Kntrance to the store was gained 1
by breaking the large plate glass!
window in the store front with a!
large stone, which was found laying |
in the window. One of the revol
vers taken was a 44-oaliber Belgian
affair, another a 45-caliber French
revolver and the others 22 and 32-
caliber of the all-blue steel type.
! SIGN THE TREATY
WITH QUILL PENS
By Associated Press,
Versailles,"June 28.—A box of
old-fashioned goose quills,
sharpened by the expert pen
I pointer of the French Foreign
! Office, was placed on each of
the three tables for the use of
j those plenipotentiaries who de
sired to observe the traditional
> formalities.
Two large chairs of honor
were placed in the Hall of Mir
rors for the Presidents of the
French Senate and Chamber of
Deputies. Additional rows of
benches, covered with tapestry,
were arranged for the marshals
and generals of the Allied
armies, guests of honor at the
signing.
i
New Week Is to Have
Cool Start Under Fair
Skies; Warmer at End
By Associated Press.
Washington, June 28.—Weather
predictions for the week beginning
Monday issued by the Weather Bu
reau to-day are:
North and Middle Atlantic States:
Generally fair. Temperature below
, normal early in week, nearly normal
thereafter.
Pennsylvania Pairs
Cross Md. Line to Wed
Hagcrstown, Md.. June 28.—Mar
' riage licenses were Issued here to
these Pennsylvanians:
George Pensinger, Harrisburg, and
Elizabeth Louise Arnold, Dillsburg;
George D. Wolfe and Vera E. Speese,
Suntmry: Elmer E. Strohm, Lingles
town, and Catherine Bretz, Harris
burg: Harry Nelson Libhart and
Martha Elizabeth Snyder, Bain
bridge.
Harry C. Walker, Piladelphia, and
, Ruth C. Glacie, Harrisburg; Carl G.
i Shrctner and Myrtle M. Murphy,
i Harrisburg; Harry R. Herman, Me
icantcsburg, and Malley E. Wiley,
i Dillsburg; John E. Stall and Ruth E.
I Beck, Harrisburg: John D. Rartlett,
I Barre, Vt„ and Margaret H. Les
singer, Lewlstown; Samuel B. Bol
ton, Schuylkill Haven, and Louella
Rebecca Trump, Harrisburg; Leslie
Ray Keller and Carrie Marie Myers,
Chambersburg. ,
WILHELM FEELS
! SAFE FROM FOE
IN INTERNMENT
i Former Emperor Confident
j Holland Cannot Give Him
Up to Allied Court
By Associated Press.
Amorongen, June 28. Former
i Emperor William and his advisers
'apparently are fully confident The
! Netherlands government will be un
j able to consent to the entente's
forthcoming demand for his extra
dition.
Several members of the entourage
are away from Amerongen, engag
ed in inspecting houses with a view
to the purchase of Count Hohen-
I zollern's future residence. Indica
tions point to his removal within a
short period from his present place
. of exile.
Wife Deeply Saddened
The former monarch was himself
outwardly quite calm after the first
shock of hearing Germany had de
, cided to sign the Treaty without
I reservations.
Two More Fined For
I! Making Unnecessary Noise
Two more persons, charged with
" | making excessive noises in the city
| streets were fined in police court
I yesterday afternoon In the cam
; palgn to break up the annoyances
• against which there has been con
siderable complaint within the past
j several weeks.
Morris Brady, a driver for L. G.
Clancy, was fined $5 for operating an
automobile truck with the muffler
open. George Waller, 653 Camp
street, was fined $5 for furnishing
railroad caps to he placed on trol
ley tracks in North Seventh street.
NEWSPAPERMAN HERE
James M. Place, former owner of
the Harrisburg Sunday Telegram,
was in Harrisburg to-day. Mr. Place
was on his way to Washington, D. C.
, He stopped off here to shake bands
A with his friends. t
FORTY BUILDING
PERMITS ISSUED
DURING MONTH
Construction of Many New
Dwellings Begun by
Contractors
TOTAL FOR JUNE $476,850
Largest Work Is That of an I
Apartment House, to
Cost $120,000
Forty building permits have been
issued during June at the office of
Building Inspector James H. Grove,
for construction and remodeling
work, which will cost $476,850 to
complete, according to the estimates!
which were furnished.
I.ast year in June only 21 permits!
wore issued for work costing $28,800,]
due largely to war conditions, which
existed at that time, making the
price of labor and materials so un
certain.
The record for the present month,
according to builders, is an indica
tion of the increasing activity in the
construction of new properties and
remodeling and improving old ones.
The largest permit for the month
was issued to C. L. Long, who has
men at work on the excavations for
a five-story brick apartment to cost
$120,000. Another large amount of
new work is being started along
Taylor boulevard near Reservoir
Park, where 14 houses are to be
erected at a cost of $50,000.
W. J. Sohland took out during the
month permits for building 32
brick houses, ten at Green and
[Continued on Page 7.]
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| I> i RIGIBLE R-3* DUE JULY SOR 6 J
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trocps to 6tp£ the drilling of wells in tjifc properties pi X
A 4®
soldiers of the Carranza government stopped the work of J *
I* two American companies, adviees received here state. • ►
* TEXAS RATIFIES SUFFRAGE J [
4! ratified the J f
t MARRIAGE LICENSES I
4* Ronald K. Hctitr anil Klalc n. Dsvtk, Harrlshorki Emory MrK,
X Coras, Wnxhinirton, D. C'., r.nd T*lf Jones, Strrltn| Chirlm E. lr /
T Kohler and Mary Shrltrl, Harrlsburßi Ralph C. Krataer, Harrlsbnm, ™
<4 and Mary M. Mlnnlch, l.ykonsi fieorsrc R. Wlngard and Z.rlla F. Cook, £)
X MlllrmbiirKi John W. Strota, Mlddletown, R. IJ. 2, and Mary J. Gar
{ man, I'almyrai Mlkr Radanovlrb and Roal Mnlarlc, Steeltont Jamfa 9
1 E. Powfr*. Grrrntnan, R. D„ and l.nlu 1,. Lome)', Harrlabnrffi • ,
j.. Cbarlea E. Hook, Colombia, and Fannie E. (irons, Mlddletown.
*f* a
SALOONS TO KEEP
BEER ON DRAUGHT
AFTER JULY IST ,
Sale of Alleged Nonintoxicant
to Continue Until Court
Decision
! POLICE AWAIT RULING
l Expected Rush For Liquors
Fails to Materialize in
Wholesale Houses
Saloons throughout the city were
preparing to-day for a drinking orgy
to-night and at the same time the
police were getting ready to prevent
j disturbances.
Following the announcement to
| day by United States District Attor
; ney Kane in Philadelphia that he
| would take no action next week
against hotel owners who continue
the sale of what the brewers are
pleased to call "non-intoxicating
near-beer," (containing two and
three-quarter per cent, alcohol it
became evident that many of the
barrooms here will be opened Tues
day morning as usual.
Mayor Keister to-day said that
the police department will take a
I neutral course where beer is sold
[Continued on Page 7.]
CAT KILLS 1033 RATS
London, June 28. —In the seven
years just ended a cat has killed
1033 rats at the establishment of
Robey & Co., engineers, at Lincoln.
The feline was trained, while young,
to bring her catches to a certain
place in the office, where a careful
record is kept.