Daily patriot and union. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1858-1868, September 21, 1863, Image 1

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    RATES 01? ADVERTISING.
Four lines or kW oonstitatelsalls square. Eight /inn
• or more than four, constitats a square.
Halflsq., one de1...--$O 9O One sq., one day.— 90 40
1 one week.... 120 *. one week.... SOO
It one mon th. $OO u one mouth.. 800
gi weemonta; 800 " threemonths 10 00
" aim months.. II eo " six months.. 15 00
I 0ney55r......12 00 " "rn year ••••-• 90 00
yrs igaghtiesnolicesimerted in the Loan 00i10111,
or before marriages and deaths, ran oilers sus LUX for
ash omertten. Ts merchant' and others advertising
we" sear, no-Ala serene will he offered.
b.l s ti....casuer or insertions mane designated on
a anserusement.
lir. Marriages and Deaths walleinserted at the earns
rates es regular advertisement'.
Business Cub's.
R OBERV SNODGRASS,
ATTORNEY Al' LAW,
We Nora Third street, third door above Mar
ket, Harrisbur g , Pa.
N. B.—Pension, Bounty and Military claims of all
kinds prosecuted and collected_
Refer to Hon_ John 0. Kunkel, David Mumma, Jr.,
_4401.11.. A..Lamberton.
WM. H. MILLER;
•11. E. E A Rga lj SON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
OIFFICE
IN -
SHOEMAKER'S BUILDINGS
SECOND STREET,
BETWEEN WALNUT and MARKET SQUARE,
spo w acd Nearly opposite the Buehler House.
C. MAcDOWELL,
Q
• ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MILITARY CLAIM AND PATENT AGENT.
Office in the Exchange, Wainut st., (Up Stairs.)
Haring formed a ommeOtiOn with Parties In Wash
ington City, wno are reliable boldness men,
any bud
-nets connected with any of the Departments will meet
with immediate and careful attention. Why
C. WEICHEL,
SURGNON AND OCULIST,
REIHDENON THIRD NAAR NORTH OTENRIE.
Hs is now folly prepared to attend promptly to UK
duties of profession in all its branches.
A LONG AND TINT BDOONEB7DL XIDIOAL INPNALINON
Adidas him in promising fall and ample satisfaction to
-ell who mayhoror hisawitak a ei11,14 thedlesaie Ohtani*
or any other roams.
MILITARY CLAIMS AND PEN
SIONS.
The undersigned have entered into an sesonintion
the collection of Military Claims and the mewing of
Pensions for wounded and disabled soldiers.
Muster-in and Muster-out Rolls, officers , Pay Rolls,
'Ordnance and Clothing returns. and all papers pertain
to the military serviee will be made out properly
And
expeditiously_
Office in the Sachange Buildings, Welsffit between
Second and Third streets, near Omit's Hotel. Harris
'burg. Pa. "THOS 0 MAODOWSLL,
je2s-dtf THOMAS A. MAGUIRE.
SILAS WARD.
NO. 11, NORTH THIRD ST., HARRISBURG.
STE.INW.AYP.S PIANOS,
KELODIONB, TIOLINH. 11111TAIV31
Banjo*, Flutes, Fifes, Drums, accorilecrns,
STRINGS, SUET AND NOOK 10311110,
PHOTOGRAPH FRAMES. ALBUM,
Lane Pier aid Montle Mirrors, Square and Oval Framer
of every description made to crier. liegaildingtioas.
Agency far Hawe's Swabs' Machines.
V' Sheet Music sent by Mail. oetl-1
TORN W. GLOVER,
DIERCIIAINT TAILOR.:
Has just'reeeived from New York, an assort.
meat of
SEASONABLE GOODS,
-which lie otters to bin customers cud the public at
nov - M) MODERATE ARMES. dtt
JCOOK, Merchant Tailor,
. - OHBBNUT EtT., betwitts boon." and Prowl,
Has just returned from - the city - with an assortment of
CLOTHS, CASSIMERES AND VESTING'S,
Which will be gold it moderate prices and made up to
order ; and, also, an assortment of ILWADY NADI
•Clethfug said Gentlemen?' FUruidihilig Goods.
uoi2l-Iyd
DENTISTRY.
B. R. MU, D. D. L,
N 0 . 119 MARKET STREET,
'o44^
SBY & Surnrams BUILDING, VP MUM
janB4f
RELIGIOUS BOOK STORE,
TRACT AND SUNDAY SCHOOL DEPOSITORY,
E.-S. GERMAN,
27 SOUTH 8122)ND MUT, MOOTS 0/1111BNIIT,
zassiesolo, PA.
Depot for the We of Stemoseopeefitereoseopielliews,
Redo and Musics! Instruments. Also, eubeeriptdoss
takes for religious publications- 1100-d7
JOHN G. W. MARTIN)
FASHIONABLE
OAR]) WRITER,
BMWS aotIit L ITARMODURQ, PA.
Allmanner of VISITING - , wEDDilve .AND Briar-
NESS CARDS executed in the most artistic styles and
most reasonable terms. dealt-dtf
UNION HOTEL,
Ridge Avenue, corner of Broad street,
HARRISBURG, PA.
The undersigned informs the public that he has re
cently renovated and refitted his well-known u Union
Heal" on Ridge avenue, near the Round House, and is
prepared to accommodate citizens, strangera and travel
are in the best style, at moderate rates.
His table will be supplied with the best the muskets
Wool, and at his bar will be found superior brands of
/lowa ap4 malt beverages. The very best accommo
dations for railroaders employed at the shops in this
vicinity. fan dtf] HENRY BOSTSBN.
FRANKLIN HOUSE,
EA.LTIMORI 4 ND.
Tssia pleasant and corainadions Hotel has been tie
conglaly re-fitted and re-banished. It is pleasantly
attnated on North-West corner of Howard anti Franklin
streets, a few doors west of the-Northern Central Rail.
wwy Pepot. Bver7 attention dto the comfort of his
ests. e. LAI Proprietot,
v
Jel2-tf Mate of Banns Grove. Pa.)
THEO. F. SCHEFFEE.,
BOOK, CARD AND JOB PRINTER,
No 18 MARKET STRIUIT, HABKIB3I7/14.
El" Particular attention paid to printing, ruling and
binding of Railroad Blanks, Manifesto, Insorance Rolf.
oleo, Cheeks, Bin:R ea d s &
W4dalog, Vizithig and litadueso Clordipiftted at vary
tow feces and in the beef oftYlo, • Jame
TAILORING.
V,. is co. .a.. icr , a r 33E.
The intheeriber is ready at 80. 94, MARKET ST.,
four doors below Fourth street, to make
MEN'S AND BOY'S CLOTHING
runny desired style, and with skill and promptness.
p erms milking cutting done can have it g m the
shortest petite. ap27-d
CHARLES F. VOLLMEB,
UPHOLSTERER,
Cheanut street, four doors above Second,
(Omani WAsEnforiox Rosh Houss,)
Is prepared to furnish to ordir, in the very beet etre of
wortmr.awatia. Spring and Hair Mattresses, Window Cur
tains, Lounges, and all other *Meet' of Furniture in his
Ilse, on short notice end moderate terms.. flaring en
perience in the businesa, he feels warranted in asking a
share of public patronage, confident of hisability to give
satisfaction. janl7-dtf
VO OPE WS GiPALATINE.--The beat
article in the market, jut received and for ssle bl
leisrl4-tf WM. Dom( hi
MOTIONS.--Qiiite a variety of useful
IA sad entertaining aztlelee—chaap—at
SOICKIIIKR 7 B BOOVITOII3.
WEBSTER'S ARMY AND NAVY
PoCREti , DICTIONARY.
atareoeivad and for Bak at
8011NPJF,BRINI 800 RSTORN_
NEW ORLEANS OMAR / ..- B I D/ST Ix
rElk Mawr !--ror pale by
3712 U. DOCK Js., & 00.
. .
• • • . ..
.._ .___,__. - - •- . • ....
. - .-4 IL - • . '. , ~,,,
_ --• •' ~ - - -7.4c..,w 1 1 1 , ~ .. ..,z , .
.. _ _
;.:,.:. ! ; (; . : .1.. - _::. - *.... i.. :
..._ .
... 11r14
1 i_
, ~, . . i o nliiio ,
_____.
VOL. 6.-NO. 17
intZtical.
**-4 1 -
DR. SWEET'S
INFALLIBLE LINIMENT,
EM
EITEttWAL REMEDY,
FOR RHEUMATISM, GOUT, NEURALGIA,
LUMBAGO, STIFF NECK AND JOINTS,
SPRAINS, BRUISES, CUTS k WOUNDS,
PILES, HEADACHE, and ALL RHEU
MATIC and NERVOUS DISORDERS.
Dr. Stephen Sweet, of Connentiont,
The great Natural Bonn s e tt er .
Dr. Stepnen Sweet, of Connecticut,
.1a known all over the United States
Dr. Stephen Sweet, of Connecticut,
Is the author of Dr. Sweet's Tufallihle Liniment."
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Cures Rheumatism and never fails.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Li 6 tertebi Care fer Normalgpk._
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Cures Burns and Scalds immediately.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
In the best known remedy for Sprains and Bruises.
Dr. sweet's infallible Liniment
Cures Headache immediately and was never known
to fail.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible 'Liniment
Affords immediate relief for riles, and seldom fails
10 care.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Gores Toothache iu one minute.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Owns Outs end Wounds itumodistoly and leaves no
anat.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Is the best remedy for Sores in the known world.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Haa been used by more than a saiiiian people, and all
praise it.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Is truly a " friend in need," and every family should
have it at hand.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Is for sale by all Druggists. Pries 25 cents.
RICHARDSON & Co.,
Sole Proprietors, Norwich, et.
For sale by all Dealers. ap2il eow-d&w
iiJjeii .
ALL WORK PROMISED 1Y
O.NE WEEK!
o:".ag
PENNSYLVAITIII I =' •
&TEAM DYEING ESTABLISHMENT,
104 KARICIIT 813111T §
BETWEEN FOIT.R2H AND 1 7 11TH
HARRIBBtiIt_ G
_, PA.
Where every description of L a dies' and ' Elentlemen , s
iszaments, Pleas Goods, he., are Dyed, Oleaused, and
Seising in thilmit manner and at the shortest notits.
so0.1&:#1, DODGI h. 00.. Proprietors.
T
F. WATSON,
.
MASTIC WORKER
IKE
PRACTICAL CEMENTER,
Is prepared to Cement the exterior of Buildings with
he New York improved
Water-Proof Mastic Cement.
This Material is different from all other. Cements.
It forms a solid, datable adhesiveness" to any surface,
imperishable by the action of water or frost. Every
good building should be coated with this Clement ; it is
a perfect preserver to the walls, and makes a beautiful,
fine finish, equal to Eastern brown sanditone, or any
color desired.
Among others for whom I have applied the Mastic
Cement, I refer to the following gentlemen:
L. Bissell, residence, Penn street, Pittsburg, finished
five yeast,.
I. H. Shoenberger, residence, Lawrenceville, flubbed
five years.
James WCandlass, residence, Allegheny City,flnished
Five years.
Calvin Adams, residence, Third st•eet, finished four
years.
A. Hoeveler, residence, Lawrenceville, finished four
years.
3. D. M'Cord, Penn street, finished four years.
Hon. Thomas Irwin, Diamond street, finished four
years_
St Charles Hotel and girsql House ; finished live
years.
Kittanning Court House and Bank, for Barr & Moser,
Architects, Pittsburg, finished five years.
Orders received at the office of It Wieldowney, Paint
Shop, 20 Seventh street, or please address
T. F. WATSON,
maylo-ti r, Q. Box UAL Pittsburg, Pa.
HAMS!!II
20,000,1b5. Composed of the following Brands
just remised!
NEWBOLD'S—Celebrated.
NEW JERSEY—SeIect.
EVANS A SWlFT'S—Superior.
MICRINER'S EXCELSlOR—Canvassed.
MICRINER'S EXCELSIOR—Not canvassed.
IRON ClTY—Canvassed.
IRON CITY—Not canvassed.
_ PLAIN RAMS—Strictly prime.
ORDINARY HAMS—Very pod,
ljj'' Every Ram sold. tall be guaranteed as represen
ted. WM. DOCK. jr., &. 00.
RUPERIOR STOCK OF _LIQUORS.-
1...)
WM- DOCK, & 00: are now able to offer to
their customors and the public at large, a stook of the
purest liquors ever imported into tbla market, compri
sing in part the following varieties :
WHISK x SCOTCH,OLD BOURBON.
WME—PORT tSLIZABI, OLD MADEIRA.
(WARD, DUPEY &. CO. PALE BRANDY.
JAMICA SPIRITS.
•
PRIME NEW ENGLAND RUM.
DRAKE'S PLANTATION BITTERS.
Then liquors can all be warranted; and in addition to
these, Nen & Co. have on hand a large variety of
Winos, Whisky and Brandy, to which they invite the
partionlar, attention of the public. .
ESSBS. OHICKERING & 00.
HAYS AGAIN OBTAINED THE
GOLD MEDAL!
AT TELI
MECHANICS' FAIR, BOSTON,
1 1" l 0 VER 8717rc77pai o Rs!
Wareroom for the CHIONEBING l'l4llloB, at Harris.
b e r Mia 92 1141k" gyp, itNOOHWS 111111110 STORI,
WAR ! WAR —BRADY, No. 62
Market street, below Third, haw received a large
assorbient of SWORDS, Sums and MILTS, whlok he
11 sell were low ant.o dtl
EXCELSIOIt I ! 1--STTGAB. CURED
HAMS !—A Ddicious Ham, cored expresaY for
family ill& They acoespettor to - any mow In the mar
het. PAOLI WM. D OS, & 00'.
EtARNIRBITEG, PA:, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1863*.
T H E
Weekly "Patriot & . Union,"
THE CHEAPEST PAPER PUBLISHED IN
FNNIYSYLVANI.A.
AND
,
THX 0;flif,DF)10C1INTIO WWI PRBI4I3I29fkAT
1'431441.1i1' o..tioyujlNßlTsr,!
FORTY-FOUR COLUMN'S OF READING MAT-
TER EACH WEEK?
AT THE LOW PRIOR OF ONE DOLLAR
AND .FIFTY CENTS I
SUBSCRIBED FOR IN 'CLUBS OF NOT LESS
THAN TEN COPIES TO ONE ADDRESS!
We have been compelled to ram the club titibioriptlon
price to one dollar and fifty cents in order to save our
selves from actual lois. Paper has risen; including
taxes, about twenty-five per sent., and IS still rising;
and when we tell our Democratic friends, eandid/y, that
we can no longer afford to sell the Weekly Perrier AID
Dirosr. at' one dollar a year. and must add fifty cents or
stop the publication, we trust they will appreciate our
posttipn, and, instead of withdrawing their subscrip
identygo to work Ali a. will to increase our list in every
county in the State. We have endeavored, and shall
continue our efforts, to make the paper useful as a party
organ, and welcome as a news messenger to every fam
ily. We flatter ourselves that it has not been without
some influence in producing the glorious revolution in
the politics of the State achieved at the late election;
and if fearlessness in the discharge of duty, fidelity to
the principles of the party, and in anxious desire to pro
inote its interests, with some experience and a moderate
degree of ability, can be made serviceable hereaftdr, the
Weekly Parstor AND Union win not be less useful to
the party or less welcome to the family circle in the fu
ture than it has been in the past. We confidently look
fur inCressod anciuragement in this great enterprise,
and appeal to every influential Democrat in the State to
lend us his aid in running our sapecription list up to
twenty or thirty thousand. The expense to each indi
vidual is trifling, the benefit to the party . may be great.
Believing that the Democracy of the State feel the ne
cessity of sustaining a fearless central organ, we make
this appeal to them for assistance with the fullest confi
dence of success.
The same reasons which induce us to raise the price
of the Weekly, operate in regard to the Daily papet, the
price of which lb also increased... The additional cost to
each subscriber will be but trifling; and, while we can
not persuade ourselves that the change necessarily made
will mann in any diminution of our daily circulation,
yet, were we certain that such would be the cones
quenee, we shifuld still be. compelled to make it, or suf
fer a ruinous loss. 'Under these circumstances we must
thaw ourselves upon the generosity, or, rotbv, the
justice of the public, and abide their verdict, whatever
it may' be.
The period for which many of our subscribers have
paid for their paper being on the eve of expiring, we
take the liberty of issuing this notice, reminding them
of the same, in order that they may
RENEW THEIR CLUES
We shell also take it as an especial favor if our present
eubseribers will urge upon their neighbors the fact that
the PATRIOT .AND 'UNION is the only Democratic paper
printed in Harrisburg, and considering the large amount
of reading matter, embracing all the current news of
the day, and
TELEGMAPHIODXRPATPAX!iff.' , .
/Nom everywhere tip to the moment the paper reed
press, political, iniscellaneorus, general and local news
Ilarket reports, is decidedly the
CHEAPEST NEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN
THE STATE!
There is scarcely a village or .town in the State in
which a club cannot be raised if the proper exertion be
made, and rarely there are few places in which one or
more energetic men cannot be found who are in favor of
the dissemination of sound Democratic doctrines, who
would be willing to make the effort to raise a club.
DEMOCRATS OF THE INTERIOR
Let Ms hear fitan yon. The existing war, and the sp.
prOsehint sessions of Congress and the state Legisla
ture, are invested with minimal interest, and every man
stiOnl4 have the news.
T 8&& •
DAILY PATRIOT AND UNION.
Engle copy TO one year; in advance.... • • $6 00
Single copy during the session of the Legislature.. 2 00
City subscribers ten cents per week.
Copies supplied to agents at the rate of $l6O per hun.
dred.
WIONELT PATRIOT AND UNION,
Published every Thursday.
Single copy one year, in advance s 2 00
Ten copies to one address 15 00
Bubtleciptleas may commence at any time, PAY AL
WAYS IN ADVAIP OH. We are obliged to make this
impefative. In every instance cask most accompany
subscription. Any person sending ns a club of twenty
eubecribere to the Weekly will be entitled to a copy for
his services. The prise., even at the advanced rate is
so kw that we cannot offer greater inducements than
this. Additions maybe made at any time to a club of
subscribers by remitting one dollar and fifty cents
for each additional name_ It is not necessary to egad
ets the names of those constituting a club, as we cannot
undertake to address each paper to club subscribers
separately. Specimen espies of the Weekly will be pent
to all who desire it. - •
0. BARRETT g Q 0 .7 Harriaburg, Pa
N. B.—The following law, pained by Congress in 1860,
defines the duty of Postmasters In relation to the de
livery of neweiapere to club Fmbsoribere :
(SO Ltitiej Nf
ge etr4
88, ch CrOt's r
18 edition
1, SU M If.the
1 y ams of 1880,
paapte%
“Provided, however, that where packages of new pa
pers or periodicabi are received at any post office directed
to one address, and the names of the'club subscribers to
Which '.hey belong, with the postage for a quarter in ad
vance, shall be handed to the postmaster, he slug/ de.
liver the same to their respective owners.”
To enable the Postmaster to comply with this regula
tion, it will be necessary that he be furnished with the
lint of mama earepeolog the club, and paid quarter's
(or year's) postage in advance. The uniform courtesy,
of Postmasters, affords the assurance that tivsy will
ohedkfuliyaccommoaate club subscribers; and the latter
should take oare that the postage, which is but a trifle
sash Mae, be paid in advance, fiend on the Chad
INDEPENDENCE ISLAND.
Messrs. BECKEIt, Propriefors, announce to
the citizens of Harrisburg that this cool and delightful
Rummel. retreat is now open for visitors. Accommoda
tions will be furnished to parties and pip-nice at reason
able terms, a dancing platform having been erected ff , r
their special use. Beason tickets for families, good for
out year, fi• 00
No improper characters admitted, and DO lutatienteci
person will be permitted to visit the Island.
A Ferry Boat plies constantly between the Island and
the foot of Broad street, West Harrisburg. jela-3m
BASKETS!
LAMES TP,AVELING, -
MARKET,
ERHOOL,
PAPER,
SHUT,
CLOTHES,
ROUND,
CHILDRE' A S
te,
C,
For sale low, by
jel2
MACKEREL! ,
BLLONBRIL, Nos. 1,2 ands; in all eised . Panes—
nen, and sack parings warranted. Inn received, and
for isle low by WM. DOOM ar., & 00. '
BLACKING I I--MASON'S "CHALLIANGE
BLAOICING."-100 Gone& assorted mho , jot r•
calved
e nd for sale, wko/ssais and retail
leo saw. 'BOWL Ja.. Br. co.
PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS.—A large
awl beautiful assortment of Photograph Albums
just received sndlor sale cheap, at KNOORB I B,
33 , 9
93 Market tartlet
•
WM. DOCK, Jr., do Co
• a • i 17 Mit •
t our borders, or pollute with his tread the
t t 11111 atrial ix enum4 sanctity c h t o itLo s f , homes.o o u u r r
insteadi n o v f a b s e i
ionngth
palsied,r aten
as they were under m i liti a, Cirtin by contradictory
. .
orders, or dragged sway as -.a body guard for
the trembling imbeciles at Washington, wilt
look to their lawful and chosen chief for the
word of command, and march' With cheerful
hearts and a'united front to hurl back the in
vader.
MONDAY MORNING, SEPT. 21, 1863.
itEMARK.,B
o V
JAMES F. SHUNK, ESQ.,
Or YORK )
At the 'monster Mace Meeting in Independence
Square, Philadelphia, on the 17th of 'Septem
ber.
hlr. Stunk said that it was eminently proper
that the Democracy of Pennsylvania should
assemble at this time bud on this spot. The
time was the anniversary of the adoption of
the : Constitution of the United States ; the spot
was the birthplace of that great law. Here,
if anywhere, in these days of disaster and op
-pression, when the charter of our liberties has
been supplanted by a "higher law," interpre
ted and discerned by Abolition seers—when
the mere will of the President avails to strip
the citizen of the securities for which his fa
thers paid the best blood of the world—here is
the place, ehis is the day is which to assert One°
nlore the ancient liberties of this Republic.
The Democratic party have always been the
party of the Constitution and the Union. They
have held fast to them in season and out of
season.—in time of war as well as in time of
peace. Through all the long period in which
they held control of this government, and were
the masters of its power and patronage, the
rights of no State were invaded—the liberty
Of no citizen was abridged—the press and the
rostrum were free—th e forts which frown along
our coast were a terror to every foreign foe,
but not prisons for the free born citizens of our
own land. In those days of peace and pros
perity the people were taught by our leaders
thatthis government was founded upon con
cession and compromise—that by the matchless
wisdom of the great men who framed our Con
etitetion, Separate and. .eovereign political coin.
munities, scattered over half a continent, dif
fering not more widely in climate than in
institutions, laws and habits of thought—were
united under one Government—a Government
holding only a few great powers, and having
relation to only a few large objects—but strong
enough. to maintain our honor and dignity
abroad and peace at home—potent to assert
the'rights of all these States, without infring
ing :upon the liberties of any one of them. As
long as the teachings of our statesmen were
respected, as long as the corneas of the Con
°Mutton were honored, as loaf as State kept
faith with State, we continued to-grow great,
and three years ago we stood, if not foremost,
side by side with the master Powers of the
world. We have now been taught by the sad
dest experience through which any nation evet
-peeled, theivisdom of that policy which kept
s together so long. The lessons which, in
bur madness, we refused to listen to from the
tOttellee Of grave and reverend statesmen, we
read now in letters of blood. They are burned
into our souls by 'the fire of gunpowder,
sounded in our ears by the roar of artillery.
We feel now what: in better days we scorned fo
fear. The industry of the land, instead of be
logremployed in the cultivation of the soil and
in those peaceful arts which contributed to the
wealth and comfort of the whole nation, is now
diverted to the manufacture of tools for slaugh
ter—Ao the forging of bayonets afid the mould
ing of guns—to the invention of new and Sa
tanic methods' by which brother may shed
brother's blood. The fields which in Demo
cratic days were yellow with harvests,are, in
this Abolition millenium, red and soaked with
the blood of the reapers. The policy of our
party saved the Union while it lasted—that
policy only can restore it. We were called
"Union Savers," and sneered at by the wretch
es who now hold power, because we sought to
maintain the integrity of the Republic. We
I are called "Copperheads" and "traitors" by
the same people now, because we are bending
our might to restore it.
Mr. Shunk then adverted to the base slanders
of the Abolitionists .concerning the character
and opinions of Judge Woodward. " They tell
us," said he " that he is th secessionist—that
in case of 'his election he will carry Pennsyl
vania into the Southern Confederacy." Fellow
citizens, the man' who - makes 'this assertion is
either a consummate knave or an incorrigible
ass—he is moreover a traitor, giving to the en
emythe very aid and comfort which he wants. If
Judge Woodward, aeon of Pennsylvanitti-born
upon our soil, and habituated to its honors—
the chosen chief of a, great party—without an
acre of land or a drop of kindred blood within
the whole area of the South—is bent upon ally
ing this Commonwealth with the Southern Con
federacy, and the leaders of the rebellion nan
be made to believe it, will it not' put fresh
strength into their armies'? Will it not nerve
them fora longer struggle and for battles more
desperate than any which they have yet fought? ,
They believe no such thing—they know
better but this is not the fault of the Aboli
tionists.. They have steadily represented since
the beginning of this war that .the Democratic
party was in alliance with the rebel States.
They have reiterated this miserable slander in
the face of the fact that a majority of our armies
are Democrats— that the greatest General the
war has produced—the idol of the people—the
beat beloved of the soldier—the hero of Antis
tam„ and the efielor of the. Capital—George D-
M'Clellan, is. a Democrat. [Loud and con
tinued cheers.] From such hardy falsifiers, it
would be too much to ask justice , for Wood
ward. Fellow-citizens, while there is .no dan—
ger that Judge . . Woodward contemplates any
such folly as his slanderers impute to liim,there
really is great danger that, under. the manage
ment of tiovernor Curtin, the lines of Jeff.
Davis will be extended over our borders. Twice
have rebel armies entered our State. The first
time Curtin politely allowed them to leave un
molested. The second .time he spent the pre
cious hours which .should have been given to
preparations for defence in begging and plead
ing with the powers at Washington for leave
to call out his own militia. Meantime, by the
blessing of God, there were two Governors, be
' longing to the despieed and dieloyel•" Copper
heads," who knew their rights—exercised
them without going on their knees to Mr.
Stanton for permission to act—and sent the
cohorts of Democratic New York and New Jer
'bey to defend the soil of Pennsylvania, while
her own imbecile and " loyal" Executive was
trembling .on his marrow-bones before the
throne at Washington. You could expect noth
ing better from him. The man iwho has suf
fered free citizens of Pennsylvania to be kid
napped by the Federal Government and carried
out of this Commonwealth is not the person to
keep, rebels from coming into it. A new day
'will dawn on Ws when Woodward faked
"his "seat. He helped to make our free Coned
tutienfor many years he has righteously ex
pounded our laws. He will take care when he
'comes to be our 'Governor that that Constitu
tion and those laws shall be , respected by ruf
fians high and low=-in office as well as out of
'office—by people in Washington as well as by
people everywhere else. No deputy kidnapper,
aratedwrith a diepateh from the War Ilepart•
meat—no rebel' general, armed With iristruc
lions from Jeff. Davis, will then dare to cross
PRICE WO CENTS
Mr. Shunk then expressed the most perfect
confidence in our success—a Confidence founded
on lettere and conversations with prominent
men in communication with the Central Com
mittee, from every section of the State. He
believed that every vote cast for the party at
the coming . election was a vote for the return
of peace and the re-establishment of the Union
under the Constitution, and of liberty within
the bounds of la*.
DEMOCR.4 Cr.
[Prom the Cleveland Plain Dealer.]
In contemplating the various phases of po
litical affairs and observing the rise and decay
of parties in this country, we are profoundly
impressed with the vitality of the old Demo
cratic organization. Scores of political asso
ciations have been formed, played their brief
but exciting part in the drama, and passed
away from the stage to give rise to new-experi
ments on the part of leading men and masses,
but throughout all these mutations, one party
alone has set time at defiance and preserved its
traditional natne and policy. There is a reason
for this. It lies down at the very bottom of
our political system. It is, in short, that the
Democracy has been, and is to day, the people's
party. On the solid foundation of the peciple's
love and confidence, it was first erected, and
•on that foundation it rests securely, when
other contrivances of men to obtain and pre
serve power in themselves have been shifting
forever and forever, like the sands of the sea.
When Mr. Jefferson, deeply impressed with the
abuses of consolidated powerin the old world,
had interwoven , with our system those muni
mente of personal liberty which are established
by the amendments tb the 'Federal Constitu
tion, he laid the foundation for a political order
whose chief mission should be to watch over
and secure from aggression these great rights,
and which should be constantly strengthened
by the masses in the • good work. The old
Whig organization was• illustrated by the lar
gest wealth, the highest, social, influence, and
a great share of the cultivated intellect if the
land. In spite of theSe signal advantages, it
gradually declined, and at last perished. It
was a most respectable, and it was also a na
tional, party, but it did •net expand with the,
widening area of the country nor with the new
issues that began to tax the thoughts and
labors of public mod' It gave way, therefore,
to other • political societies, but it was not
solely owing to a certain sluggish and con
tracted vision, that the Whig party ceased to
grow. A latent cause of this slow and certain
wasting "away of the body, was that it wanted,
in a measure, active sympathy with the great
mama. It prided itself upon its wealth, its
social caste, and its intellectual culture. It
was not a party , that ever taught indifference
to the laws, or treachery to their obligations
—in which respect it is in shining contrast
with the Republican organisation—out it was
apt to lean too strongly to the side of Govern
ment, and to turn the cold shoulder to the pop
ular wishes. Herein it totally failed, and
herein it , provided for its own speedy dissolu
tion.. The people outgrew it. It ceased to be
re-inforced and recruited. Sectional ideas
began to rally about them thousands of indis
creet or vicious adherents. The Whig party
was not strong enough to combat these new
dangers. its shield was too narrow, where
fore it ceased to be. Let it rest well in its
great tomb.. For all its shortcomings, it was a
noble party, and has left a high and compara
tively unblemished name.
The Democracy was born to good look. It
was its rare fortune to have its. love for the
people, at the .outset.of our government, blend
ed with attachment for the Constitution of the
United States. As this instrument was so
shaped as to provide most admirably for the
liberties of the people, the• party which has
ever in view the constant preservation of the
One, has au equal interest *the preservation
of the other. If the constitution had been de
ficient in those careful provisions for the pop
ular safety, the Democracy would never have
had an affection for the instrument. If it had
not no wonderfully established the limits of
power vested in public agents, and so explicit
ly guarded the rights ' of the States and people
against aggression, the Democracy would have
obeyed the instrument, but they would never
have felt for it that burning and ardent attach
ment, which has made them its especial guar
diens and exponents daring our entire history
as a nation. Glorious privilege ! We are for
tified in our'regard for the brave masses who
have made this country "blossom as the rose,"
by the great public chdliter which first enabled
these masses as a united people to achieve such
wondrous results. Sol lt.'has happened, that
popular liberty and Constitutional law have
become watoh-words on our party banner,
blazoned ever on its ample folds. They have
become rallying notes in our public discussions,
the sign -boards, the beacon lights, the grand
land marks of our policy as an old, stable and
national party. This is the marvellous good
fortune of the Democracy. It can never per
ish so long as it clings so these landmarks,
nor can the laws and liberties of the. people
perish so long as 'they steadily re-inforce the
good old party on this.wise career.
The Democracy.! There is something elec
tric about 'that appellation. It is blended
with our greatest civil and military achieve
ments. It is blended with the 'eagle flight of
the young nation from one ocean to the other.
It is crowned with the memories of statesmen
and heroes. Under its auspices the country
steadily won a foremost place amolig the na
tions of the earth, and if ever this nation is
to survive the shocks of oivil convulsion, still
a free and nnitedpeople, it will be under the
fortunate star of the same old law-loving and
people-loving party. May it be perpetual!
THE SOL.DrEE VOTE.
On this subject," after some preliminary re
marks on the decision of the Supreme Court,
concurred in by Judge Reed, a very ardent
Republiana, the Clinton Democrat Bays :
The Democrats will go further than Bays
The
dare. They will give the soldiers
of the army the right to elect their own leader
—their own general in- chief. The Republican
administration at Washington denies to the
Army of the Potomac, one of the bravest and
best in the world, the privilege of .being"com
mended by the man they want, yet the Repub.
Loans have the effrontery to set themselves up
as Peculiarly the soldiers' friend
The truth is, the Republican/I, as a party
have. no true frendship for the soldiere as a
body. Lincoln sad'Curtin bOth literally sur
round them with robberbands; in the shape of
army contractors, Sutlers, &0., 'who plunder
and defraud them - at every opportunity. No
matter how much the thieves are exposed, the
dignitaries named.still keep them in position,
and thereby become as criminal as they—par
fit*s criminis, as thelawyers say.
iIIBLISHED EVERY MORNING
11XCIPTIID
BY 0. BARRETT t 'JO
Tam DAILY PierRIOT MID ULU Will be arra $I IV'
eariberaresidinglntheßoroughforrmutotiaVAtill WINE,
payable to the Carrier. Hail enbeeriberif, Pive'leLLl/11
PZIL etreux
Tim WDNILLT PATRIOT LID UNION is pi:bibbed same
I;aoLLAits run aning,invariably in advance. Ten
j copto
to ono addrees,fifleca 'Sonars
Connected with this establishment , n exteissiee
JOB 011/02 containing c_raristy of plain end bay
type, unequalled by any establishment in the interior of
thaßtate, for which .
the patrolman of the pnblie is so
unite
CI
Thipo7 of the Republicans in favor of sol
dier voting arises simply from the get that
they expect their' administrati G n to officer the
army with Republican generals, (as hue been
done-to a very great extent,) who will prohibit
thti dirmilalion'of - Temocratic newspapers and
documents within their .respective commands,
(as le now.generally ddne,) and admit Repub
lican and exclude fDernooratic orators from
their lines, so that the soldier may see only
the Republican side of the question. By this
means they hope to command hip vote, end it
is only for these reasons that. they desire to
give Lim such right.
If upon the approach of the election it may
be deemed safe arid practicable to permit every
Pennsylvania eoldier—we KIT every one, not
only Republicans but ALL—tO tOttlth to their
respective abodes to vote, we say let that be
done, It would, be a just compliment to the
manly soldier. nut, if any, let all come. To
pick out the Republicans to come home, and
require the Detnocrs.ts to remain in rank,
would be •it gross and indecent fraud. Let
everything be fairly done. Then the Demo
erste will not enmplain though every soldier
should vote against them.
The same paper contains the following:
A Sor.ntro's Voica.—A letter written to Mr.
henry Shaffer, of Sinnemaboning, by Mr.
Smith Beers, formerly a Republican, now in
the army as a soldier, has been forwarded to
us for publication. Its length and the crowded
state of our columns at the time of its recep
tion prevent this, but we make the following
emphatic extract from it, to wit;
" Brother Shaffer, exhort every Democrat to
go to the polls this fall and do his duty WITH
A WILL ; for on the exertions of the Democracy
depends the fate of our government, Alt.homh
we do not elect a President this fall, yet we
elect a Governor, who may hold old ABE and
his Cabinet in check until we can get a Demo
cratic Preeident reinstated, - Then we may
hope that the government will be resuscitated,
and the old Constitution will again be the
supreme Jaw of the land. May God bless the
Democrats, and give them good success, and
may they yet succeed in saving the govern
ment, is a sincere prayer of a soldier.
Noble words fitly spoken I
The most persistent and magnificent lying
of this whole war has been in connection with
the conduct of the negro troops at the siege of
Port Hudson. It was the first occasion in
which Vle negroes were engaged in the field,
and the Abolitionists seem to have he.d their
romances already to circulate as soon as the
fight was over. Even. General Banks lent his
name to will to the public delusion. We have
already given the official figures of the 'killed
and wounded on that occasion, which showed
very ordinary fighting, but the following ex
t-act from a letter written by the colonel of
the Fifty-Second Massachusetts Volunteers
settles the matter :
"The reports of the fighting of negro sol
diers at Port Hudson on the 27th of May,
which had gained currency throughout the
country—representing them, as having charged
over the enemy's parapets, leaped over their
siege guns, bayoneted the gunners, thrown
away their own guns and seized the toe with
their hands, tearing their flesh with their teeth,
and finally retreating, leaving six hundred of
their number, out of eight hundred, dead in the
trencheswere gross exaggerations. And I re
peat it here, they were gross• exaggerations ;
and every officer and private in the department
who understands the facts at all kncwi that they
were gross exaggerations. I furthermore said,
in the presence of gentlemen in Cairo, when
speaking of the comparative merits of white
soldiers and black, that I was of the. opinion
that there was no race of men existing which
made better soldiers than the genuine Anglo-
Saxon ; 'that the Anglo-Saxon, I wag satisfied,
made a better soldier than the African. I still
adhere to that opinion ; but I do not wish to be
understood by this as opposing the use of ne
gro soldiers. Far from it. lam decidedly in
favor, and have been from the commencement
of the war, of employing meets (and as many
of them as possible) to the best possible ad
vantage to the cause, as fast as they can be in
diiced to come within 'our lines. But whether
they can be made of better service to us as, sol
diers or as laborers—with guns in their hands
instead of spades and "curry combs"—is a
question ; but, at the same time, I recognize it
as being a question for the government to de
termine, and not for me. That negro soldiers
rendered moat signal service in the trenches be
fore Port Hudson, no one acquainted with the
facts will deny ; but that they there "fought
like devils," performing wonders, either with
the bayonet or with their "teeth;" is what I
have no reason to hence.
I am, respectfully yours,
H. S. GRBENLIKE,
CoL Com'g Fifty-Second Man.
BLOOD-LETTING CHANDLER.
This brandy-bibbing Abolitionist and trai
tor, who represents Michigan in the Senate of
the United States, made a speech at Cleveland
on the 15th, in which he said:
«I THANK GOD WE WERE DEFEATED
AT BULL RUN."
Upon this the Plain Dealer remarks : •
"Of course you thanked God too, no doubt,
when you came back from• the Peninsula
and defamed that true soldier, General M'-
You thanked God when you obtained hie
removal.
You thanked God when you 'invested in
the 7-20'8 and the 5-20's.'
"Will God 'forget' you for all this thankfulness?
No !in the language - of Wilkes to Lord Thor
low, as groat* knave as yourself, ',Forget you !
He will see you ckimned first."
THE PROSPECT IN PERRY.--If am be any
candidate defeated On the POM9oratic ticket in
this county it will be the fault of the Demo
crats themselves. There never was a victory
more certainly within their grasp. Nearly
every township is organiied, and the changes
are numerous in our favor. It is a rare aceur
rence to hear of a Democrat changing to an
Abolitionist. It is true, the opposition are
active and vigilant, and Will fight our candi
dates bitterly ; but if every Democrat'Stande
firmlylv to the work and oupporto.tbo, .whole
ticket, every nominee will be eleotthl by from
200 to 500 majority.—Perry County Democrat.
Tits people of Pennsylvania must siot over
look the important fact that Daniel Agnew, the
Abolition nominee for gupreine Judge, is'in fa
vor of negro suffrage in Pennsylvania. Whilst
a m ember of the Reform Convention, he persis
tently voted to confer that right upon. all color
ed men in the Commonwealth. He is the friend
of Andrew G. Curtin,. and running upon the
same ticket; their viefrs and opinions are iden
tical. Can the whitelreemen of Pennsylvania
onet.their.'voifs for the oandidhtte or shoddy'
and neva equality
"SMITE BEERS."
NEGRO SOLDIERS