Daily patriot and union. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1858-1868, September 09, 1863, Image 1

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    RATES OF ADVERTISING.
Four lines or less eonatitnte half a square. Bight nun
or more than four, constitute a square.
Half sq., one day.— $0 36 Ono
a eq., one day.— $0 60
4 on et.. 1 44 one week.... 200
44 one month.. 300 one Y 645410 4. • 00
tbreemonths 800 4, three monthslo 00
" six months.. 800 st sixinonths.. 15 00
one yea r ._„l2 00 ‘, one year ••••.• 20 00
mr Business hatless inserted in the Lons3 clornmx,
sr before marriages and O aths, Tall 011 " 0112 f "
ash nisercien. Te nenthants and others advertising
Wee year, avers[[ warms lout be oared.
a." a. ne watuuer or inserileas mut be designated on
'aimairernemm sa t.
m arr iages d Deaths willhe inserted at the same
fa
Ta t m m n ow advertisements.
Busineski tarbo.
ROBERT SNODGRASS,
ATTORNEY AP LAW,
Office North Third street, third door above Mar
ket, Harrisburg, Pa.
N. 8.-14nadon, Bounty and Military dolma of all
kinds prosocand and cant46d.
Refer to How. Jahn O. Ranlial, David Mumma,
Sad IL A. Latoberton_ myltd&w6m
WM. H. MILLER,
R. E. FERGUSON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
OFFICE IN
SHOEMAKER'S BUILDINGS
SECOND SIrR HE IT,
BETWEEN WALNUT and MARKET SQUARE,
sp.SSlrr&d Nearly opposite the Buehler House.
THOS. C. MeoDOWELL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MILITARY CLAIM AND PATENT AGENT.
Office ia the Exchange, Walnut A, (Up Stairs.)
Having formed a connection with parties in Wash
ington City, wno are reliable business men, any twi
nes, connected with any of the 'Departments will meet
with immediate and careful attention. me-y
DR. C. WEICHEL,
SURGEON AND OCULIST,
BEHIDDNON THIRD NAAR NORTH STRUT.
He is now fn y pews& to attend promptly to UR
du*" of profession In all lts branches.
AMONG AIM VINT 11117001BEIVOL MEDICAL 121911.1:111101
juii*eo Lim in promising fall end ample satisfaction to
'an irtinmayfavor Marva& a call, be thediseame Ohronio
or any ether nature. nlB-d.kwlr
MILITARY CLAIMS AND PEN
SIONS.
The undersigned have entered into an association for
the collection of Military Claims and the securing of
Pensions for wounded and disabled soldiers.
Mlleter-in and Master-out Rolla, officers' Pay Rolls,
(Muslim and Clothing returns, and all papers pertain
ing to the military service will be made out properly
and expeditiously.
Office in the Exchange Buildings, Walnut between
Second and Third streets, near Omit's Hotel, Harris
burg, Pa. THOS. O. MAODOWELIA,
1e25-dif THOMAS A. MAGUIRB.
SILAS WARD.
HO. 11, NORTH THIRD ST.,.HARRISBURII.
STEINWAY-IS PIANOS,
MELODEONS, VIOLINS, GUITARS,
Banjos, Flutes, Fifes, Drums, ilccordeons,
STRINGS, SHEET AND NOOK MUSIC, &G.,,
PHOTOGRAPH FRAMES, ALBUMS,
Large Pier and Mantle Mirrors, Square and Oval "'Tama
ofeverydescriptionmade to order. Riguilding done.
Agency far Howe's Sewing Machines.
Er Sheet Music sent by Mail. ootl-1
JOHN W. GLOVER,
J MERCHANT TAILOR
Has just received from New York, an assort
ment of
SEASONABLE GOODS,
which he offers to his customers and the public at
nov22) MODERATE PRICES. de.
T COOK, Merchant Tailor]
. 27 DRUMM ST., between Second and front,
Ras just returned from the city aith an assortment of
CLOTHS, CASSIMERES AND TESTINGS,
Which will be sold at moderate prices and made up to
order; and, ab3o, an assortment of READY MADE
Clothing and Gentlemen's Furnishing Geode.
novtl-lyd
DENTISTRY.
1), ffi. 6 PEA, P. D. S.,
a N 0 . 119 MARKET STREET,
RBY & KUNKRL'S BUILDING, UP STAIRS.
janB-tf
RELIGIOUS BOOK STORE,
TRACT AND SUNDAY scspoz. D.E.POS/TORY,
E. S. GERMAN,
ST SOUTH SZCOND STREIT, ABOVZ OH/ISNIIT,
.11.8.211113117111, PA.
Depot to:them& of IttereosoopeeAtereeetoptellewi,
Dude sod Musical Instruments. Also, sabeatiptiosui
taken for religions publications. noBo4y
JOHN G. W. MARTIN,
FASHIONABLE
CARD W.RITER,
11MIR'S HOTEL, lIARRISBI7IIO, PA.
AlManner of VISITING, WED.D.LN&AItIDB lISI.
NESS CARDS executed in the most artistic styles and
most reasonable tarots. deolt-dtf
UNION HOTEL,
Ndge benne, corner of Broad street,
HARRLSBIIRG, PA.
Thkundersigned informs the public that he has re
eently-nenevated and refitted his well-known " Union
RCM" too Ridge avenue, BOIT the Round ROAM end is
prepared to accommodate citizens, strangers and travel
ers in the best style, at moderate rates.
His table will be supplied with the best the maskets
afford, and at his bar will be found superior brands of
liquors and malt beverages. The very best accommo
dations for railroaders employed at the shops in this
rad dtfr MINIM BOSTGEN.
FRANKLIN HOUSE,
BALTIMORI, MD.
This pleasant and commodious Hotel has Imes tho
renerly re-fitted and re-furnished_ It is plangently
situated on North-West corner of Howard and Franklin
atreeta, a few doors west of the Northern Central Rail
way Depot. Byery attention paid to the comfort of his
Wiest& G. IaNHIENRING, Proprietor,
5a12-tr (Late of Selina Graras
TREO. F. SCHEFFEIt,
BOOK, CARD AND JOB PRINTER,
NO. 18 SWARM ST VIIT, HARRISBURG.
V" Pardo/lar Iftintion paid to printing, ruling and
Baihnsol Blanks, Manifests, Insuitinealboll
des,oaks, Bill-Rsana, ice.
Wedding, 'Visiting and Business Cards prlntedat very
tow prices and in the bast style. jan2l
TAILORING.
C:P -EL . "CT lar .
The imbecrilber Is ready at NO. 94, DUNK= ST.,
four doors below fourth street, to make
MEN'S AND BOY'S CLOUD:Ng.
in any desired style, in& with AM end Promptness.
POlllOllB wishing cutting done oan hose it done at the
shortest notice. ap27-d
CHARLES F. VOLLMER,
UPHOLSTERER,
Chestnut street, four doors above Second,
(orrowys wAsawmom Hose House,)
Is prepared to fnrnishto order, in the very beat style of
workinansidp,Springand Hair Mattresses, Window QUI'
tabu!, Lounges, and all other artitlas of Ihitaitare In his
line, on short notice and moderate terms. Having el
perience in the business, he feels warranted in asking a
share of public patronage, oonlident of his abilityto give
satisfaction, lanll-dit
SKY -LIGHT G ALLE R Y.—The rooms
as the corner of Market Wiese. and Market street,
.PPludte the Jones House, occupied ass Gallery for
aguerreotype, Photograph and Ambrotype purposes,
are POll MINT from the eth of September next.
Appl y to JOHN WTETH.
arts-diew3lr
WEBSTEWS ARMY AND NAVY
oa T t Pteethed OC
aid
KET DICTIONAIVi r .
fer est
actaninova 800 mow,.
NEW ORLEANS SUGAR I-FIRST IN
Nasise I—Mor age by
ri/2 U. BOOK is., do 00.
T_ -- - ,- 1 .-- -77_1 ._
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~',;y- r. Alia - : , : - : -. 57--:, --_.- ‘ -,-- • 1
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VOL, 6.-NQ. 7.
AlebtEd.
-V- AV- -*
DR. SWEET'S
INFALLIBLE LINIMENT,
E13:1
GREAT EXTERYA.L REMEDY,
FOR RHEUMATISM, GOUT, NEURALGIA,
LUMBAGO, STIFF NECK AND JOINTS,
SPRAINS, BRUISES, CUTS A WOUNDS,
PILES, HEADACHE, and ALL RHEU
MATIC and NERVOUS DISORDERS.
Dr. Stephen Sweet, of Connecticut,
The great Natural Bone Better.
Dr. Stephen Sweet, of Connecticut,
Ia known all over the United States.
Dr. Stephen Sweet, of Connecticut,
Ie the author of ,4 Dr_ Sweet's Infallible Liniment."
Dr. Sweetie Infallible Liniment
Cures Rheumatism and never fails.
Dr.. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
. la a certain cure for Neuralgia.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Cures Burns and Scalds immediately.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Is the best known remedy for Sprains and Bruises.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Cures Headache immediately and was never known
to fail.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Affords immediate relief for Piles, and seldom fails
to care.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Oates if ottatte In one tkiitmte,
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Cures Outs and Wounds immediately and leaves no
scar.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Is the beet remedy for Bores in the known world.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Has been used by more than a million people, and all
praise it.
Dr. Sweet'S Infallible Liniment
Is truly a " friend in need? and every faVy should
have it at hand.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Is for sale by all Druggists, Price 25 cents.
RIONADDSON & Co.,
Sole Proprietors, Norwich, Ct.
For sale by all Dealers. ap2o eow.d&w
Elveing.
ALL WORK PROMISED IN
ONE WEEK]
1 CI .
PENNSYLVANIA
sTEAM MEMO. EstAbListiMENT,
104 lIARKIT STRAIT,
BETWEEN 70 UR H AND FIFTH,
HABBISBIIB4 PA.,
Where every deeeription of Ladles , and Gentlemen',
ffrarmants, Flees floods, ite. 4 are Dyed, Gleaned, and
lashed in the bait manner and at the shorted notise.
noll-d&wly DODGB & CO.. Proprietors.
F. 'WATSON,
MASTIC WORKER
AND
PRACTICAL CEMENTER,
le prepared to Cement the enterionoi Betiding* with
he New York Improved
Water-Proof Mastic Cement.
This Material hi different from all other Cements.
It forms a solid, durible adhesiveness to any surface,
imperishable by the action of water or frost. Every
good building should be Coated with this Cement ; it is
a perfect preserver to the walls, and makes a beautiful,
fine finish, equal to Eastern brown sandstone, or any
color desired.
Among others for wham I have applied the Mastic
Cement I refer to the following gentlemen :
3. thee% residence, Penn street, Pittsburg, finished
five years.
J. H. Bhoenberger, residence, Lawrenceville, finished
five years.
James M'Oandlass, residence, Allegheny City,finished
five years.
Calvin Adams, residence, Third street, finished four
years.
A. Hoeveler, residence, Lawrenceville, finished four
years.
J. D. M'Cord, Penn street, finished four years.
Hon. Thomas Irwin, Diamond street, finished four
yes.
fit Charles Hotel and (Ward House, finished five
years.
Kittanning Court House and Bank, for Barr & Moser,
Architects, Pittsburg, finished five years.
Orders received at the office of WEidowney, Paint
shop, 2.9 Seventh street, or please address
T. F. WATBON,
mayl6-tf p. 0. Box 1316. Pittsburg, Pa.
ADIES I YOU KNOW WERE YO'
an get tine Note Pape!,
_Pnvelore,
_Visiting at
Wedding vase T EIGNNPINitt BOONOTONE,
RUPERIOR STOCK OF LIQUORS.—
WM. DOCK, Ja., & CO., are now able to offer to
their mamma and the public at large, a stook of the
punt limn ever imputed irate ale market, amid
ling in part the following varieties :
WHISKY—IRISH, SCOTCH,OLD BOURBON.
WINE—PORT, SHERRY, OLD MADEIRA:
OTARD, DUPE!' & CO. PALE BRANDY.
JAMICA SPIRITS.
PAMN W Eltatian Rm.
DRAKE'S PLANTATION BITTERS.
These liquors can all be warranted ; and in addition to
these, Dock & Co. hare on hand a large variety of
Wines, Whisky and Brandy, to which they invite the
N 0 TICE!,
THE DRAFT IN THE 15TH AND ADJOIN
INQ- DISTRICTS.
NATIONAL SUBSTITUTE AGENCY.
A. R. gwrgam & CO., having opened an office in
Carlislead the Government isseseoes otilee t in Rheem'e
Hall, are now prepared to furnish substitutes at fair
prices.
Substitutes supplied from this once will be ably bod
ied Aliens, not subject to .draft. AU drafted persons
served tal are guarantied a release from the draft.
Apply at once, in person or by letter, at the "Na
tional Substitute Agency,” Rheem's Mil, Carlisle.
Rafaranaes---4. Di. weskley, Joseph Ritner. jr. J.
Mewl. A. R. IngliKßE & CO.
- August 4-dtt
WAR 1 WART-BRADY, No. .62
Market litres% below Third, has repeived s large
assortment of SWORDS, gums and Boas, which he
ill at.ll 4 00 dtt
TxcELsrag I 1 I--BIICIAB CURED
Hems !—A Delicious Ham, eared esat' 1 0 '
family us& They are !superior to any now in the mar.
kat. rte] WM. DOOK, & 00
LOOKING GLASSES.—A Splendid
.LA Assortment of New Looking Glasses, Jost received,
at W. KNOCHE'S Music Store, 93 Market street, where
they will be sold cheap. Call and examine. mrl3
HARRISBURG, PA;, WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 9, 1863
ti ank Noticts.
NOTICE.—Notioe - is hereby given that
application will be made at the next annual ses
sion of the Legislature of Pennsylvania, for a, renewal
of the charter of the West Branch Bank, of Williams
port, Pa., with its present name and style, location,
privileges and capital of $lOO,OOO. -
By order of the Board of Directors.
• $. JONIB, Cashier_
June nth. 1863-jy4-tml '
LEGISLATIVE BANK NOTICE.-
JJ Notice is hereby given that application will be
made to the legislative authority of Pennsylvania. at
the next session of the General Assembly thereof, com
mencing the first Tuesday of January, A. D, 1864, for
the incorporation of a Bank having. banking and dis
counting privileges, with a capital of One Million Dol
lars, by the name and style of 4 L The Oil City Bank,"
and to be located at Oil City, Venango county, Penn
eylvomie. O. Y. OULVER.
Judo 29th i 3.8411-Gua
NOTlCE.—Notice is hereby given that
"The Commercial Bank of Pennsylvania," intend
to apply to the Legislature ef Pennsylvania aftheir nez
session, for a renewal of their eharter. Said bank is lo
cated in the city of Philadelphia, with an authorized
capital of one million of dollars, a renewal of which
will be asked for, with the usual banking privileges.—
By order ef the Board. B. 0. PALDIRR, Cashier.
PHILADELPHIA, Tune 29.18133-6 m
NOTlCE.—Notice is hereby given that
application will be made to the Legislature of
Pennsylvania at their next session, for a renewal of the
charter of The Farmers ) Bank of Schuylkill County,
located in Pottsville, in•the county of Schuylkill, with
the present capital of one hundred thousand dollars,
and with the usual banking privileges.
T. W. CASE, Cashier.
June 16,1863.-7 m
BANK NOTlCE.—Notice is hereby
given that the undersigned have formed an associa
tion and prepared a certificate for the purpose of estab
lishing a Bank of Inns, Diseonnt and Deposit, wider
the provisions of the act entitled "A supplement to an
act to establish a system of Free Banking in Pennsyl
vania, and to secure the public against loss from Insol
vent Banks," approved the first day of May Anno Domini
eighteen hundred and sixty-one. The said Bank.to be
called THN FAMINES' BANK OF MOUNT JOY, to
be located in the borough of Want :oh to conniat of a
capital stock of One Hundred Thousand Dollars, in
shares of Fifty Dollars each, with the privilege of in
creasing the same to any amount not exceeding Three
Hundred Thousand Dollars in all.
J. Hoffman Hershey, John M. Hershey,
Martin B. Peirce, Jaceb M. Stanifor,
Reuben Gerber, John M. Bear.
jan2B-demoaw*
NOTlCE.—Notice is hereby given of an
Intention to establish a Bank of Discount, Deposit
and Circulation, under the provisions of an act, entitled
"An ACt to establish a system of free banking in Penn
sylvania," &c., and the supplement thereto ; said Bank
to be called THE MANUFACTURERS' BANK," to
be located in the borough of Columbia, Lancaster
county, Pa., with a capital of One Hundred Thonsand
Dante, to be divided into two thousand shared of Fifty
Dollars each. deed-Mud
ALLENTOWN BANK. '
ALTAINTOWN BANE, June 20, 1883.
Notice is hereby given, that application will be made
to the Legislature of Pennsylvania, at its next session,
for an increase of the capital of said Bank to the amount
of $200,000 in addition td'that authOrized by the present
Charter • and also for an extension of the Charter of
said Bank for twenty years from the expiration of the
present Charter.
By order of the Board of Directors.
je2o-dtml CHARLES W. COOPER, Cashier.
BBA NOMA Stockholders
of the PABDIEBS' AND DROVEBB' BANK OF
WAYNESBURG-, in. Green county , Pa., will apply to
the next Legislature of the State, for an extension of
charter, for the term of fifteen years from the expire
tion of its present term. The location, corporate name
and privileges, and amount of capital stock, to wit:
one hundred and fifty thousand dollars, to be the same
as under its present charter.
By order of the Board. J. LAMB, Cashier.
Waynesburg, green co., Pa-, June lb, 18113—je20-dtral
KTOTICE.—Notice is hereby given, in
cenforinity with the act of Assembly, that the
stockholders of the Bank of Montgomery County will
make an application to the next Legislature of Penn
sylvania for a renewal of the Charter of said Bank, with
the same amount of capital (Four Hundred Thousand
Dollars) as under the present Charter, to continue its
present name and location.
By order of the Board of Directors.
W. H. BLINGLIIPT, Cashier.
NonMown, Pa,, June 20,1503.-4 m
NOTICE.—The, Miners' Bank of Potts
silk, in the county of Schuylkill, hereby give
notice that they intend to apply to the Legislature of
Pennsylvania at their next !Onion fors renewal of their
charter. Said Bank is located In the borough of Potts
ville, in the county of Schuylkill, with an authorized
capital of Five Hundred Thousand Dollars—a renewal of
which will be asked without any extension of privileges.
By order of the Board.'
LOESER, Cashier.
Pottsville, June 20, 18438.-6md
KTOTICE is hereby given; that applica
tion will be made at the next annual session of the
Legislature of Pennsylvania. for a renewal of the charter
of the HARRISBURG BAHR, with its present name and
style, lec Alen, privileges,and capital of Three Hundred
Thousand Dollars . By orer of the Board of Direotora.
J. W. WEIR. -
Je3o.4ltml. Cashier.
TRADESMEN'S BANK,
PHILADELFHIAI June 24,1863,
Notice is hereby given. in conformity with the laws
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, that the Trades
men's Bank, of Philadelphia, located in the city of
Philadelphia created with banking and discounting
privileges, with a capital of One Hundred and Fifty
Thousand Dollars, that application will be made by the
said Bank to the next Legislature for authority to in
crease the capital One Hundred and Fifty Thousand
Dollars.
By order of the Board of Directors.
JOHN CAS fNER,
Sy6-tml cashier
INDEPENDENCE ISLAND..
. -
Messrs. BECKER & F &LK, Proprietors, announce to
the citizens of Harrisburg that this cool and delightful
Bummer retreat is now open for visitors. Accommoda
(ll
Nona will be furnished to parties and pic- nice at reason
able
terms, &dancing platform having been erected fir
heir.special use. Beason tickets for families, good for
) ne year, }Leo
an No improper characters admitted, and no intoxicated
• person will be permitted to limit the Island.
A Ferry Boat plies constantly between the plandand
the foot of Broad street, West Harrisburg. jel3-3m
A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT
V'
•
LITHOGRAPHS,
Formerly retailed at from $3 to $5, ere now offered at
60 and 75 cents, and $1 and slso—Published by the Ar
Union, and formerly retailed by them.
Splendid Photographic Album Pictures of all Mein.
platted men and generale of the army t% eg o 10 eta.
For sale at SUREFFEWS
18 Market street. Harrisburg.
BASKETSI
LADIES TRAVELING,
MARKET,
ABHOOL,
PAPER,
KNIFE,
CLOTHES,
ROUND,
CHILDREN'S,
CAKE,
For sale low ; by
jel2
WRITE BRANDY 1:!---Fou PRESERV
o PUIPOBIIB.-A. very superior article, (strictly
gory) Just received cad for ode by •
julyl WM. DOOM, Jr., & 00.
MESSRS. CHICKERING & 00.
HAVE AGAIN OBTAINED THE
GOLD MEDAL!
AT THE
MECHANICS' FAIR, BOSTON,
OVER 1717/ 11 471,1171 2 , ORS!
Wareroom for the OHIONZBING PUNO9, at Harris
burg,at 92 Market street
° W. .INOOMWS MUSIC STORM.
WINDOW SHADES of linen, gilt
bordered; and TAPIR BLINDS of an endless
warieV of designe and ornaments ; also, CURTAIN
I'IXTUBIS and TAMPA at very low prices. Call at
Scheffees Bookstore.
WM. DOCK, Jr., & Co
tot atrigt `T,I
WEDNESDAY MORNING, SEPT. 9, 1863.
Prom The Crisis
ABRAHAM AND THE DEVIL.
Satan's Visit to Abraham and Tod, seen after
the Vallandigham Convention of June 11th,
1563.
'Twee night. Old Abe sat iu hie arm-chair
Most horribly loud did he more;
When awaking and gazing around him he spied
Old Satan peeping in at the door.
"Good evening, dear Devil ! How are you?" he cried,
"I am right glad to see you," quoth he ;
"Bit down, faithful servant," old Satan replied,
"As I prefer standing, you see.
"I have important business," old Satan then said,
"So I thought to call up to see you,
To see if you know what in now going on,
And what course you've resolved to pursue."
"W Mini happened, dear Devil ! What's happened, pray
tell ?"
(And Old Abe turned pale as a ghost,)
"oh say have you yet a sly corner in h-11
That's empty? If not lam lost!"
"Oh don't get excited—pray Abraham don't;
An depends on your courage and strength.
You must turn out Old Burnside, of that I'm quite sure,
As I fear he has gone his full length.
The people have called a convention, you see ;
Per Vallandigham loudly they cheer;
If allowed to go on in their now present course,
They'll make him a Governor, I fear."
"Oh Bevil, dear Devil! Oh what shall I do?
If State Rights are established I'm lost;
knit advise me, kind parent, what course to pursue,
And do it, let what may be the cost.
I have spilled the best blood of the nation, I know;
Widows and orphans I've made by the score;
But what matters that? I can just order a draft,
And bring hundreds and thousands more."
"Do it—do it !"—crled Satan; "just make up a yarn
That the rebels are close at your door;
Then send Provost Marshals by hordes and great
swarms,
And you'll soon have an army." "I snore,"
Cried Old Abe; "a capital plan;
I'll do it as sure as I stand,
I'll soon have an army of blacks, too, you know.
To squelch rebels by sea and by land."
Then Satan turned around with a dignified air
And picked up his pitchfork and rod,
Bid Old Abe "good evening," and passed out the door,
To call on Old Renegade TOIL
He found Old Backbone in a terrible stew,
Hot tears coursed hie beautiful cheeks ;
When Satan inquired for his health, he replied
He was sick—that he felt very weak.
"Weak in what," cried the Devil, "in body , or mind?"
"Weak in both " mid poor Ted, with a sigh;
"Since the two last conventions Jive failed very fast,
And I feel tbat my end draweth nigh.
They have broken my backbone and cast me aside,
My own party have sent me adrift,
And Vallandigham men will coon put on the gloss—r
Devil, dear! can't you give sae a lift ?"
"Give a lift? to be sure ; and tell you how— •
I'll take this long pitchfork and rod,
O'er the high walls of brimstone, deep down into h—li,
I'll boost you, Old Renegade Tod.
I have built a new one--my old one is ftal—
Its wails are of brimstone quite high—
When you've boiled long enough in the bottomless pit,
You'll be placed on its griddle to fry.
•
"You'll not want for companions—Stanton, Seward and
Chase,
The whole phalanx of Abraham's crew,
And Old Horace Greeley, the vilest of all,
I intend shall help season the stew."
Tod fainted. Old Nick gave a horrible grin
As Old Renegade lay pale and still;
Clrubliting, he said to himself as he went.
"Don't you wish you had stard at Briar Hilt !”
STATE RIGHTS AND STATE REMEDIES—No. 10.
To His Excellency A. G. Curtin, Governor of
Pennsylvania
RESPECTED Sin :—I have heard lawyers say,
in court, when about to introduce testimony,
that they would explain, or state the substance
of it. I will follow this practice with respect
to introducing the evidence of John Henry,
believing it of importance, , so that his testi
mony may be understood. On the 9th March,
Isl 2, President Madison sent a menage to the
Senate and -House of Representatives of the
United States, laying before them " copies of
certain documents which remain in the De
partment of State," from which the following
is an extract :
" Through its [the British Government's]
public Minister here, a secret agent of that
Government was employed in certain States,
more especially at the seat of government in
Massachusetts, in fomenting disaffection to the
constituted authorities of the nation, and in
intrigues with the disaffected for the purpose
of bringing about resistance to the laws, and
eventually, in concert with a British force, of
destroying the Union and forming the eastern
part thereof into a political connection with Great
Britain." •
Those documents and tort etipendenee are too
voluminous to be inserted at length in these
numbers. The inquiring reader will find them
in full in the 3d volume of the "American Re
view" and in the "4th volume . Abridgement of
the Debates of Congress—by John C. Rives."
I shall only refer to dates, and a few extracts
taken from the correspondence, so that the
evident° of Mr. Henry may be understood.
The first is a letter.from " Mr. Ryland, Secre-.
tart' to Sir James Craig, late Governor Gene
ral of the British Provinces in North America,
to. Mr. Henry, applying to him to undertake
the mission to the United States, dated at Que
bec, January 26, 1809," and marked ("most
secret and confidential.") No. 2 is " General
Instructions from Sir J. H. Craig to Mr. Henry,
respecting his secret mission, dated Quebec,
February 6, 1809," ("Nose secret and confiden
tial,") in whioh, among other things, he says:
"The Federalists, as I understand, have at all
times discovered a leaning to this disposition,
(dissolution of this Union,) and their being
under its particular fnfluengf at this moment, ie
the more to be expected, from their having no
ill-founded ground for their hopes of being
nearer the attamment of their object than they
have been for some years past. * * * It
has been supposed that, if the Federalists of
the Eastern States should be successful in ob
taining that decided influence which may ena
ble them to direct the public opinion, it is not
improbable that, rather than submit to a con
tinuance of the difficulties and distress to which
they are now subject, they will exert that in
fluence to bring about a separation from the gen
eral Union. The earliest information on this
subject may be of great consequence to our
Government, as it may also be that it should be
informed how far, in such an event, they would
look up to England for assistance, or be dis
posed to enter into a connection with us.. * *
In passing through the State of Vermont you
will, of course, exert your endeavors to pro
cure all the information that the. short stay
you will probably make there will admit of.
You will use your own discretion as to delay
ing your journey," &c.
Mr. Henry accepts of the mittsion, and, 021
the 10th of February,lBo9, acknowledges "the
receipt of tile Governor General's letter of in
structions, the letter pf credence, and the ci
pher for carrying on my correspondence."
The first letter that Mr. Henry writes to Sir
J. H. Craig, after his arrival in the United
PRICE TWO CENTS.
States, is dated "Burlington, (Vt.,) Feb. 14th,
1809" :
"Sin—l have been here two days in order
to ascertain the progress of the arranyement
heretofore made for organizing an efficient oppo
sition to the general government, &c. * * *
I lcarn that the Governor of this State is now
visiting the towns in the northern section of
it, and makes no secret of his determination,
as Commander-in-Chief of the Militia, to re;
fuse obedienee to any Command from the gen
eral government which can tend to interrupt
the good understanding that pi avails between
the citizens of Vermont and His Mojecrtyla auldecie
in Canada. * * I need not add that if
these resolutions are carried into effect, the
State of Vermont may be considered as an ALLY
OF GREAT BRITAIN. * * * I only say with
certainty that the leading men of the Fedora
party act in concert, and therefore infer that
a common sentiment pervades the whole body
throughout New England. * * * Every
thing tends to encourage the belief that the
dissolution of the Confederacy will be accele
rated by the spirit which now actuates both
political parties."
The next letter is dated at "Windsor, (Vt.,)
February 19, 1809," from which a few extracts
are made :
"Therefore, since my departure from Bur
lington, I have sought every favorable occasion
of conversing with the Democrats on the pro
bable results of the policy adopted by the gen
eral government, r l'he difference of opinion
is thus expressed : The Federal party declare
that, in the event of a war, the State of Vermont
will treat separately for itself with Great Britain,
and support, to the utmeSt, the stipulations
into which it may enter, without any regard to
the Policy of the general government. The
Democrats, on the other hand, assert * * *
at all events (they) would risk everything in
preference to a coalition with Great Britain."
Mr. Henry goes to Amherst, (N. H.,) where
he stays a few days, and then proceeds to Bos
ton, from whence, on "March 6th, 1809," he
Writes to Sir J. H. Craig, (in cipher,) from
which is taken the following extract :
"It does not yet appear necessary that I
should discover to any person the purpose of
my visit to Boston, nor is it probable that I
shall be compelled, for the Bake of gaining
more knowledge of the arrangements of the
Federal party in these States, to avow myself
as a regular authorized agent of the British
government, even to those individuals who
would ierl equally bound with myself to pre
aerie, with the utmost inscrutability, so im
portant a secret from the public eye. I have
sufficient means of information to enable me to
judge of flee proper period for offericg the co.
operation of Great Britain, and opening a cor
respondence between the Governor General of
British America and those individuals who,
from the part they take in the opposition to
the National Government, * should
be qualified to act in behalf of the Northern
States."
His next letter is dated "Boston, Marsh 7,
1809":
* * * " The Legislature of Mas
sachusetts will give the tone to the neighbor
ing States ; will declare itself permanent until
a new election of members ; invite a Congress,
to be composed of delegates from the Federal
States, and erect a separate government' for their
common defence and common interest: * *
They would, by such an act, be in a condition
to make or receive proposals from Great Brit
ain."
I will pass over his letter of the 9th. March,
1809, and insert an extract from his letter dated
" Boston, March 13, 1809."
" To bring about a separation of the States,
under distinct and independent governments.
&0., however desirable, cannot be effected
but by a series of acts and a long continued
policy tending to irritate the Southern and con.
ciliate the Northern people. The former are
agricultural, the latter a commercial people.
The mode of cherishing and depressing either
is too obvious to require illustration," &c.
In his letter dated Boston, March 29, 1809,
he says
" The Federal candidate in New Hampshire
is elected. In Connecticut no change is necessary,
and none is to be apprehended. In Massachu
setts it is certain that the Federal candidate
will succeed. * * * It should,
therefore, be the peculiar care of Great Britain
to foster divisions between the North and South."
In his letter dated Boston, A:pri126,1509, re
ferring to tho eleatioh in the New England
States, he says :
"In all these States, however, Governors
have been elected out of the Federal party.
* * * The correspondence between
Mr. Erakin and the SecretaTy of State at Wash
ington, you will have seen bifore this can reach
you ; it has given much satisfaction to the Fed
eral party here, because it promises an exemp
tion from the evil most feared, (a war with
England,) and justifies their partiality towards
Great Britain." .
I will pass over without notice several of Mr.
Henry's letters while in this country, and call
your attention to an extract from his letter to
Sir J. H. Craig, dated Montreal, June 12, 1809:
"The present hopes of the Federalists are
founded en the probability of a war with
France ; but, at all events, this party is strong
and well organized enought to prevent a war
with England. It would be now superfluous
to trouble your Excellency with an account of
the nature and extent of the arrangements of the
Federal party to resist any attempt of the gov
ernment unfavorable to Great Britain. They
are such as do great credit to their ability and
principles."
There are a number of other letters in this
correspondence that might be referred to ;, but
1 have quoted largely . enough to make Mr.
leury'e evidence intelligible.
The message and documents having been
read in Congress, Mr. Rhea made a motion to
print them. A discussion took place on this
motion, the Eastern members, generally, op
posing the printing. Bat a Mr. Fisk, a member
from Vermont, advocated the printing, and, in
hie remarks, introduced a new witness to the,
same fact. He says :
sir, oan gentlemen seriously, doubt
the truth of the facts stated by this Mr. Henry,
when they have it from the highest authority,
that the former British Minister,- Mr. &kin,
while here, at this very time, was in the 'garde
business this Mr. Henry was sent to perform?
In a letter written by that Minister to his gov
ernment, dated the 15th February, 1809, he
tells them, 'the ultimate consequences of such
differences and jealousies, arising between the
Eastern and Southern States,
would inevitably
tend to a dissolution of the Union, which has
been for some time talked of,. and has of late, as
I have heard, been seriously contemplated by
tunny of the leading people in the Eastern di
vision.' Now, sir, when the British Minister
was on this business, by order of his govern
ment, is it extraordinary or incredible that
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Connected with this establistunens n extensive
JOB OFBIOB, 'containing s;,,varieti of plain and fanny
civil unequalled by any establishment in the interior of
thit State, for whieh the patronage of the ‘pablt• in no
/kited.. • , •
this shonhtbe sent on the same errand
by Governor Craig 9'?
In this connect n, I might refer to the reso
lutions and proillidinge of the Legislatures of
Corinecticnt and Maesiichuigt at this time—to
the proceedings of the 'Hertford Convention
- from the 15th of Decemberi 1814, to the sth of
'January, 1815—to the oppoeitipm and , oonduat
of the New England States 40'41 the Mexican
war, and even up to the 12th ot:Peliaii,
when 'Senator Hale, of New taMpshire, pre
sented petitions in the Senate of the Vnited
States, "asking the peaceful dissolution of the
Union:" But, sir, look at the evidence of Wm.
Plumer, of President John Adams, of President
J. Q. Adams, and John Henry—who spoke
from their own knowledge of the faots at the
time—and you must admit their testimony is
clear, positive and truthful; and they prove
that, after Mr. Jefferson's election to the
Presidency, the Federal party of the New En
gland States had formed a conspiracy to dis
solve the union of these States—to establish a
separate government in New England, in alli
ance with• Great Britain.
Such were the acts and proceedings of the
New England States in their unjustifiable op
position to the regular and necessary measures
of the General Government—and this, too, at
a time when that Government was in the ex
tremest peril and embarrassment, in defending
our country from the seesulto of foreign ene
mies.
But the chief object of presenting these quo
tations is to show, that from 1803 to 1815, there
was a real conspiracy organized in the New
England States to sever the Union, and, in the
time of a foreign war, to commence a civil war,
deluge our country with the blood of brothers,
spilled by brothers' hands, spread desplation
over these States, and.blot out of existence the
only sanctuary of free principles in the civil
ized world. It was nothing more or less than
" moral treason." It is secession. er • a With
drawal from the Union by the aggrieved State.
But for a State to resort to secession, as a pri- 5
wary means of redressing a wrong done by th
usurpations of the Federal Government, not
only defeats its own object, but does injustice
to the other States. Moreover it ipso facto,
breaks the Union, and is therefore not within
the letter or spirit of the Virginia and Ken
tucky resolutions of '9B, as these resolutions
propose to preserve the Constitution, by an
nulling every act of the Federal Government
Which the Constitution does not authorise ;
they propose to preserve the Union, by abroga
ting all unconstitutional acts and usurpations,
which course would not withdraw the State from
the 'Union, nor embarrass the regular action of the
Government within the Constitution; secession,
on the contrary, withdraws the State out of
the reach . of the usurped powers, and, there
fore is not a means of resistance within those
resolutions or the, principles of State Rrights
and State Remedies.
GREAT DISCOVERIES MADE TOO
LATE.
Prom the New Hampshire Democrat
They tell' ne of a 'gold, a silver, an iron a
brazen and a dark age. The present. is the
age of discovery. That of Columbus was a
Calvin-Edsonized cypher in comparison with
it. Let us enumerate a little :
1. Greeley discovered that the South was a
bill 'of expense to the rest of the Union—the
sooner it left the better.
2. The Abolitionists generally, that the
south was a poor hodse and supported by the
North.
3. That the generality of the Southerners
could neither read, write, work or fight.
4. That we could neither kick the South into
a fight nor out of the Union.
- That'nobody but Keitk or at most South
Carolina,' would ineurrect. •
6. That, the paupers would sooner secede
from the iown'firm than the South attempt to
leave the Union.
7. That we could quell the South c , by dri
ving an old black cow down there."
8. That the slaves would do it in three
months.
9. That one Massaehneetts regiment would
do it.
10. That three Massachusetts regiments
could do it.
11. That 75,000--throe-months men would
do it.
12. That 400,000 would do it.
13. That 700,000 men were more than enough
to do it, so we must stop volunteering. [See
Henry Wilson.]
14. That 300,000 more three years' men
would finish it.
15. That 300,000 nine months' men would
finish it.
16_ That the Maine, New York, New Jersey
and Ohio militia would do it.
17. That 300,000 drafted men will do it.
18. That the whole North from 20 to 45 shall
do it.
19. That fIA Lincoln." is the sole and Ong
judge whether the country is invaded or in in
surrection or not.
20. That when he nays that is the fact; be
has the power to hang, roast, broil, banish or
stew every person in the United Statoll. ,P 414
Lincoln to Corning and others.]
21. That if State Governors and Levels
hires don't kilt him, the provost marshal
"will keep them in order." pee Nrw York
Times.
22. That by touching "a bell' Lincoln has
moie power than any one, aside from the Al
mighty, ever attempted to exercise on mirth—
ful(' that all hie pimps have just as much,
• [See Seward to Lyons and Burnside to the
Judge.]
23. That it .is. the duty of the white men to
marry sooty wenches. [See Eider Tilton.]
24. That all men ought to have nigger. marry
their daughters. pee Bishop Junking.]
25. -- That love for the male blacks consists in
putting them where David put Uriah. [See
Port Hudson and Morris Island.] •
26. That Hannibal was a ntqyer. Pee Solici
tor .Whiting.]
The eorrollary would seem to be that when
we die we should go to lampblack heaven.
DinuNG A MARRIAGE c'eItEXONT thi bride
was sobbing immoderately-while the knot Was
being tied. "What is the matter, my young
woman?" asked the official. "Oh, sir," replied
th e bride, "it's because Ws forever," "No,
n o," replied the Petton; "that's a Mitotakea
great mistake—it's not forever. Death puts an
end to the engagement." On hearing this the
bride dried her tears and was consoled.
LUTHER' MARTIN