Daily patriot and union. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1858-1868, August 22, 1863, Image 1

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    - RATES OF ADVERTISING.
roar lines or lees constitute half a square. Ten lines
more than four s nenfititlite a square.
1 0
~ one day..— $0 80 One eq. OD@
wee......eq0 40
one week.... 190 "..
one 2 00
one month.. 300 " one month.: 600
three months 500 " three monthslo 00
" six lanai's.. 800 cc six months.. 16 00
• oneyear. --12 00 " one year.— 0000
ticr Murillo/3n notices laserted in the - LOCAL 00L31114
sr int ze marriages and deaths, rill 0E423 pn MI foil
eh Lusertion. To merchants and others advertising
y the year, liberal terms will be offered.
/Er The number of insertions must be designated on
ke advertisement.
Ur Marlines and Deaths will he inserted at the same
s Do as regular advertissments.
Business dubs.
R OBERT SNODGRASS,
ATTORNEY Ar LAW,
Ofee North Third street, third door above Mar
ket, Harrisburg, Pa.
N. B. Pension, Bounty and Military claims of all
kinds prosecuttd and collected.
Refer to Hons. John 0. Kunkel, David Mumma, 3r.,
and R. A. Lamberton. myll-d&wfim
WM. H. MILLER,
AND
R. E. FERGUSON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
OFFICE IN
SHOEMAKER'S BUILDINGS
SECOND STREET,
BETWtEN aud MARKET SQUARE,
ap•Z9wdtd Nearly appetite tee Buehler Beam
THOS. C. MAaDOW,ELL,
11
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MILITARY CLAIM AND PATENT AUENT.
Office in the Exchange, Walnut at., (Up Btaira.)
Haring formed a connection with parties in Wash
ington City, wno are reliable business men, any busi
ness connected'with any of the Departments will meet
with immediate and careful attention. m6-y
DR. C. WEICHEL,
SURGEON AND OCULIST,
ILVESIDENCE THIRD NEAR NORTH STRUT.
He la now fully prepared to attend promptly to the
duties .f profession in all its brandies.
A Loma Aim VAR? SIIOOIIIIB/DL 1111DIC1L WVIIIIOI
justifies him in promising full and ample satdsfa4tiOn to
all who may favor Umtata a °all, be thediseme Ohrorda
or any ether nature. inlii.d&trly
MILITARY CLAIMS AND PEN
SIONS.
The undersigned have entered into an association for
the collection of Military Claims and the securing of
Pcusiona for wounded and ambits! Mad/M.
Muster-in and Muster-out Bolls, officers' Pay Bolls
Ordnance and Clothing returns, and all papers pertain
ing to the military.seryice will be made out properly
and expeditiously.
Office in the Exchange Buildings, Walnut between
Second and Third streets, near Omit's Hotel, Harris
bnirr, Pa_ THOS 0 MAODOWILL I
ie2s dtf THOMAS A. MAGUIRE.
SILAS WARD.
NO, 11, NORTH THIRD ST-, HAIGBISHITHG-
STEINWAY'S PIANOS),
MELODEONS, VIOLINS, OIIITABS,
Banjos, Flutes, Fifes, Drums, accordeons,
STRINGS, SKEIN AND 300! NEDIO44 &13. 2 &0.,
PHOTOGRAPH FRAMES. ALBUMS,
Large Pier and Mantle Mirror., poplars and Oval 7/111111111
of every description - made to order. Iteguildingdony
Agency for ilewe's Sewing Machines.
ID' Sheet Music sent by Mail. octi-1
JOHN W. GLOVER,
MERCHANT TAILOR
Has just received from New York, an assort.
ment of
SEASONABLE GOODS,
whieh he offers to his customers and the piddle ai
isaVA) MODERATE _PRICES_ dtf
SMITH & E
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
THIRD STREW, Harr - mug,
Practice in the several Courts of Dauphin county. Col
lections mule promptly. A. C. SMITH,
J. B. EWING.
T COOK, Merchant Tailor,
CIiESNUT 3T., between Second and !rout,
$lB jUgi retuned from the city with au assortment of
CLOTHS, CASSIME.R.V4 AND rEsrnves,
Which will be sold at moderate prices and made up to
order; and, alto, an assortment of BEADY MADE
Clothing, and Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods.
nov2:l-Iyd
DENTISTRY.
•
B. L GILDEA, D. D. S.,
N 0 . 119 MARKET STREET,
EBY & KUNKEL'S BUILDING-, 1:11' STATES.
janB-tf
RELIGIOUS BOOK STORE,
MACS' AND SUNDAY SCHOOL REPOSITORY,
E. S. GERMAN,
17 SOUTH SECOND STREET, ABODE OHISNUT,
IIIISISEMIG Pt.
Depot for the sale of Stereosocipes,Stereoneoptelfiewi,
Engle and Musical Inatruanente. Also, eabsortptiona
tiDen fee Miens& pOsliaattatut_ nedidady
JOHN G. W. MARTIN,
FASHIONABLE
CARD WRITER,
Kenn ROTEL, IThIatIBBITRC-,
manner of VISITING, WEDDING AND BUSI
NESS CARDS executed in the moat artistic styles and
moat reasonable terms. decl4-dtt
UNION HOTEL,
Vkidge Avenue , corner of Broad street,
HARRISBURG, PA.
The undersigned informs the public that he has re
cently renovatbd and refitted his well-known " Union
Rotri" on Ridge avenue, near the Round House, and is
prepared to accommodate citizens, strangers and travel
ars in the best style, at moderate rates.
Hie table will ba supplied with the best the =whets
afford s and at Me bar - will be lowa supeaCe U9lllO of
liquors and mitt beverages. The very best accommo
dations for railroaders employed at the shops in this
vicinity. [314 dtq HENRY BOSTGEN.
FRANKLIN HOUSE,
BALTIMORI, M.
This pleasant and commodious Hotel has been the
roughly re-fitted and re.furnished. It IS pleasantly
situated on North-West corner of Howard and Franklin
streets, a few doors west of the Northern Central Rail
way Depot. /very attentionlaid to the comfort of his
et 4o "- Proprietet,
jai.2.lf (Late of Baline Grove. Pa.)
T HE O. F. SCIIEFFER,
BOOK, CARD AND JOB PRINTER ,
NO.IB isuauczp STREET, HaBRISBUBG.
PareleaLar tettentiew paid to priotto , 4 11, 15 a nd
binding of Railroad Blanks, iteoufests, Ininnanoe Poli
cies, Checks, Bill-Heads, &c.
Wedding, Visiting and Business Cards printed at very
low prices and in the best style. jean
TAILORING.
GI - 3M Cf. -A.. .
The subscriber is ready at NO. 94, MARKET ST.,
four doors below Fourth street, to make
MEN'S AND BOY'S CLOTHING
In any &stied style, and with skill and promptness.
Penang wishing nutting dons win have it done at the
aborteet notice. ap27-4:117
CHARLES F. VOLLMEB,
UPHOLSTERER,
Chestnut street. four doors above Second,
(OTTOSITI WASHINGTON HOSE W01N32,)
Plepared to farnishto order, in the very best style of
tl l l un _ansikiP. Spring and Hair Mattresses, Window Oar
-"• 1 ' , Dundee, and all other articles of Pnriatnre in his
liae T on Short notice and =tolerate MM. 11.11 , 19 g ea
penance in the business, he feels warranted in as a
saute of Dublinpatronage, eonlident of hisability to give
eatishatioa. j'anl7-dtf
SKY LIGHT GALLERY.—The rooms
1311 us. smog of Market salt, and Mork et Meet,
"km lowa Howe, oanpled ma s eatery for
Thiguerreot7Pe. Photograph uml Arnbrotype purpolell,
are YOE MT from tlre gth of doPtinith er " It
Al* to - /OEN WIENTH.
jyllkilawaw
`!III' _
ritiv --.
_
°
atriol
3 PIE
VOL. 5.-NO. 302.
itiebicai. -
4-**
DR. SWEET'S
INFALLIBLE LINIMENT,
MEI
GREAT EXTERNAL REMEDY,
FOR RHEUMATISM, GOUT, NEURALGIA,
LUMBAGO, STIFF NECK AND JOINTS,
SPRAINS, BRUISES, CUTS dc WOUNDS,
PILES, HEADACHE, and ALL RHEU
MATIC and NERVOUS DISORDERS.
Dr. Stephen Sweet, 'of Connecticut,
The great Natural Bone setter.
Dr. Stephen Sweet, of Connecticut,
Is known all over the United States.
Dr. Stephen Sweet, of Connecticut,
Id the slither of ti Dr_ Sweet's Infallille Liniment. l7
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Cures Rheumatism and never fails.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible 'ointment
Is a certain cure for Neuralgia.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Cures Burns and Scalds immediately.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Ze the beet known remedy for Sprains and Bruises.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Cures Headache immediately and was never known
to fail.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Affords immediate relief for Piles, and seldom fails
to cure.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible. Liniment
Cures Toothache in one minute.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Cures Outs and Wounds immediately and leaves no
Sear-
Dr. sweet's Infallible Liniment
Is the beet remedy for Sores In the known world.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible. Liniment
Has been used by more thou le million people, end ell
praise it.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Is truly a " friend in need," and every family should
have it at hand.
Dr. - Sweet's Infallible Liniment
for sale by all Druggists. Pries 25 cents.
RICHARDSON A. CO.,
Sole Proprietors, Norwich, Ct.
For sale by all Dealers. ap2O eow•ddcw
Elnting.
ALL WORK PROMISED IN
ONE WEEK.I
1. CP 91
PENNSYLVANIA
STEAM DYEING ESTABLISHMENT,
104 MARKIT STRUT,
BETWEA'N SOVRTH AND FIFTE,
. .
HARRISBURG PA.,
Where every description of Ladies' and Gentlemen's
iarmente, Piece Goode, &a., are Dyed, Cleansed, and
lashed in the bast manner and at the shortest notice.
no9-d&wl7 DODGR k 00.. Proprietors.
F. WATSON,
MASTIC WORKER
AND .
PRACTICAL CEMENTER,
Ie prepared to Cement the exterior of Buildings with
he New York Improved
Water-Proof Mastic Cement.
This Material is different from all other Cements.
It forms a solid, durable adhesiveness to any surface,
imperishable by the action of water or frost. Every
good building should be coated with this Cement i it is
a perfect preserver to the walls, and makes a beautiful,
fine finish, equal to Eastern brown sandstone, or any
color desired.
Among others for wbom I have applied the Mastic
Cement, I refer to the following gentlemen :
T. Bissell, residence, Penn street, Pittsburg, finished
flue years.
J. H. Shoenberger, residence, Lawrenceville, finished
five years.
James Iff'ljandlass, residence, Allegheny City,finished
five years.
Calvin Adams, residence, Third at set, finished four
years.
A. Roeveler, residence, Lawrenceville, finished four
years
T. D. Word, Penn street, finished four years.
Hon. Themes Irwin, Diamond street, finished four
years.
St Charles Hotel and Girard House, finished five
years.
Kittanning Court House and Bank, for Barr & Moser,
Architects, Pittsburg, finished five years.
Orders received at the office of R. M'Xldowney, Paint
Shop, 20 Seventh street, or plena, eddreme
T. Y. WATSON,
mayl6-tt P. 0. DOI 13.6. Pittsburg, Pa.
MESSRS. CHICKERING CO.
HAVE AUAIN ONTAIIVEP THE
GOLD MEDAL!
AT TEO
MECHANICS' FAIR, BOSTON,
MILD TIM PILIONDIEIa
OVER SIXTY COMPETITORS]
Wareroom for the OHICKEEINO PIANOS, Anomie
burg, at 92 Market street, •
oe2B-tt W. KNOCHE'S MUSIC STORE.
f ADINIS I YOU KNOW WERE YOU
../1 can get fine Note Paper, Envelopes, Theism and
Wedding Castle EPHIPPERIE.BOONSTORE_
RIIPERIOR STOCK OF LIQUORS.--
IJ DOCK, Js., & CO.. are now able to offer to
their customers and the public at large, a stook of the
purest liquors ever imported into this market, compri
sing in part the folloinne varieties ;
Wilisiry. —IRISH, SCOTOR,OLD BOURBON.
WINE—PORT, SHERRY, OLD MADEIRA.
OTARD, DUPEY Sr, CO. PALE BRANDY.
JAMICA SPIRITS.
PRIME NEW ENGLAND RUM.
DRAKE'S PLANTATION BITTERS.
These liquors can all be warranteiii and in addition to
these, Dock & Co. have on hand.* large variety of
Wines, Whisky and Brandy, to which they invite the
particular attention of the public.
WEBSTERis Amy A,ND NAVY
POCKET DICTIO.IIIART:
Just received and for isle st
80HEMR'S 800 &ESTORIL
NgeEW ORLEANS SUGAR j-ntsur uv
mos Ulliti !—Dat fi ft h by
17311 WK. DOGS Jln & 00.
F °RSALL
=A TWO-STORY FRAME
HOllBl in ithort'etroot. Inquire of
ro pes{ • : W- S. VISBNXII.
EXCELSIOR 1.1 1-"-SIJOAR CURED
NAM !:—A Deiieiseu Ham, cured appressly for
family UM They are superior to an now in the met.
Mt. Ny24 J WH. DOCE, Js., & CO.
HARRISBURG, PA:, SATURDAY, AUGUST 22, 1863.
T H E
Weekly "Patriot & Union )
TEIN CHEAPEST PAPER PUBLISHER IN
PENNSYLVANIA I
AND
THE ONLY DEMOCRATIC PAPER PUBLISHED AT
THE SEAT OP GOVERNMENT!
FORTY-FOUR COLUMNS. OF EWING MAT-
TER EACH WEEK!
AT THE LOW PRICE OF ONE DOLLAR
AND FIFTY CENTS 1
WHEN
SUBSCRIBED FOR IN CLUBS OF . NOT LESS
THAN TEN COPIES 70 ONE ADDRESS!
We have been compelled to raise the club subscription
price to one dollar and fifty cents in order to save our
selves from actual lose. Paper has risen, including
taxes, about twenty-five per cent., and is still rising;
and when we tell our Democratic friends, candidly, that
we can no longer afford to sell the Weekly PATRIOT AND
UNION at one dollar a year. and must add fifty cents or
atop the publication, we trust they will appreciate our
position, and, instead of withdrawing their subscrip
tiotio, go to work with a will to increase our list in every
county in the State. We have endeavored. and shall
continue our efforts, to make the paper useful as a party
organ, and welcome as a news messenger to every fam
ily. We flatter ourselves that it has not been without
some influence in producing the glorious revolution in
the politics of the State achieved at the late election ;
and if fearlessness in the discharge of duty, fidelity to
the principles of the party, and an anxious desire to pro
mote its interests, with some experience and a moderate
degree of ability, Can be made Serviceable hereafter, the
Weekly PATRIOT AND UNION win not be less Useful to
the party or less welcome to the Emily circle in the fu
ture than it has been in the past. We confidently look
for increased encouragement in this great enterprise,
and appeal to every influential Democrat in the State to
loud tut hie aid in musing our oursoription Wit up to
twenty or thirty thousand. The expense to each indi
vidual is trifling, the benefit to the party may be great.
Believing that the Democracy of the State feel the ne
cessity of sustaining a fearless central organ, we make
this appeal to them for assistance with the fullest eon&
donee of enema.
The same reasons whic induce um to raise the price
of the Weekly, operate in egard to the Daily paper, the
price of which is also incr. med. The additional cost to
each subscriber will be bu trifling; and, while we can
not persuade ourselves tha the amigo necessarily made
will result in any diminut on, of our daily circulation,
yet, were we certain tha such would be the conse
quence, we should still be • mpelled to make it, or suf-
far a ruinous loss. Under hese circumstances we must
throw ourselves upon th generosity, or, rather, the
justice of the public, and ibide their verdict, whatever
it may be.
The period for which any of our subecribers have
paid for their paper beingl on the eve of expiring, we
take the liberty of issuingithis notice, reminding them
of the same, in order thatithey may '
RENEW THEIR CLUBS. ,
We shall also take it as an especial favor if our present
subscribers will urge upon their neighbors the fait that
the PATRIOT AND UNION 13 the only Democratic paper
printed in Harrisburg, and considering the large amount
of reocling matter, embraciing all the current news of
the dat, and
TELEGRAPHIC DISPATCHES
from everywhere tip tot hie moment the paper goes to
Preesilpsditioal, miscenanitous, general asid local news
wallet reports, le decidedly the
CHEAPEST NEWSAPER PUBLISHED IN
THE STATE!
Till or is scarcely a Till or town in the State in
which a dub cannot be r ed if the proper exertion be
made, and surely there ar few places in which one or
vam eatfritle men eannot be found who are in favor of
the dissemination of sound Democratic doctrines, who
would be willing to make the effort to raise a club..
DEMOCRATS OV,' THE INTERIOR !
Let ns hear from yon. The existing war, and the ap.
troaohing Sessions of 061greite and the State Logisla:
tine, are !tweeted with unusual , interest, and every man
Shout! have the news. •
TERMS.
DAILY PATRIOT AND UNION
Binh CM tQf ow yam', is advanill 26 00
ginole copy during the 3014410 n of the Legislature.. 2 00
City subscribers ten cents per week.
Copies supplied to agents at the rate of $1 60 per hun
dred.
WIIKIELY PATRIOT AND UNION,
Published every Thursday.
Single eoprone year, in advance $2 00
Ten eopies to one address _l5 00
Subscriptions may commence at any time. PAY' L.
WAYS IN ADVANCE. We are obliged to make this
imperative. In every instance east mast accompany
subscription. Any person sending no a club of twenty
subscribers to the Weekly will be entitled to a copy for
his services. The, price, even at the adoinced rate is
so kw that we mini& offer greater inducements than
this. Adilitions may be made at any time to a club of
subscribers by remitting one dollar and fifty cents
for each additional name: It is not necessary to send
OM the names of those constituting a club, as we cannot
undertake to address each paper to club subscribers
separately. Specimen copies of the Weekly will be sent
to all who desire it.
0. BARRETT It 00., Harrisburg, Pa
N. B.—The following law, panned by Congress in MD,
&dines the diity of Postmeaters in relation to the de
livery of newspapers to club subscribers :
(Ss. Lstds, Brown Co.'s edition of tits Laws of iB6O,
page 88, chapter 131, section 1.)
“Provided, however, that where packages of new pa
pers or periodicals are received at any post office directed
to one address, and the names of the club subscribers to
which hey belong, with the postage for n quarter in ad
vanes, shall be handed to the postmaster, he shall de•
liver the same to their respective owners.”
To enable the Postmaster to comply with this regula
tion, it will be necessary that be be furnished with the
list of names composing the club, and paid a quarter's
(or year's) postage in advance. The uniform courtesy
of POetlaeatere, affords the assurance that they will
cheerfully accommoaate club subscribers, and the latter
should take care that the, postage, which is but a trifle
each cane, be paid in advance. Send on the clubs
A SPLENDID ASSORTMENT
0 F
LITHOGRAPHS,
Formerly retailed at from $8 to $5, ere now offered at
50 and 75 cents, and $1 and slBo—published by the Ar
Union, and formerly retailed•by them.
Splendid rilPt•Ofiraphic Album Pictures or &p mein.
grimed men and Henerala of the army, at only 10 cts.
For ease at BOHEFFER'S Bookstore,
18: Market street, Harrisburg.
BASKETS!
LADIE, TRAVELING,
MARKET,
BBHOUL,
PAPER,
KNIFE,
CLOTHES,
ROUND,
CHILDREN'S,
CAKE,
gaga 14er, by
Jel2
WHITE BRANDY ! !—FoR PRESERV
IIKG Puarossa.—d very superior article, (strictly
pun ) just received bud for sale by
jukyl WM. DOOM, Jr.. h Co,
MACKEREL!
M 4 911111121 L, Nor. 1, 2 and 3, in all sized packages—
new, and each package warranted. Twit received, and
for sale low by WM. DOCK Jr.. & an.
RLACKINGI 7 I 1--MABors "CHALLixos
BLAcmet.”—loo Gwyn. amlorua eke , just t#
calved and for We, wketass& and retail.
deal WM. DOOK, Jo.. & 00.
WINDOW SHMIES of linen, gilt
'Maned; sad PATEN BLUM of an iwiliat
variety_ of designs sad ataaaneata -CURTAIN
SIXTUS= and NAMIBIA at all ler r
, low prices. Cat
Scheirer's. Bookstoe.
WM. DOCK, A-, Co
CO atriot tbin,
SATURDAY MORNING, AUGUST 22, 1862.
EON. GEOGE W WOODWARD
Testimony of u upitiuguished Opponent
The following sketch of the Democratic can
didate for Governor is from the pea of David
Paul Brown, Esq , the great Philadelphia law
yer. We copy from a work of his entitled
The Forum., published in 185 G Mr. Brown is
an Abolitionist of the strictest sect and there
fore his testimony in behalf of the ability and
great moral worth of Judge Woodward wilt not
be doubted by the opposition to the Democ
racy
We shall for the present draw no compati
sons ; but regulating our acticipations by our
experience, there would be little hazard in
saying, that in all qualifications of the judicial
character, extensive legal learning, sound mo
rality, and meat urbane and agreeable man
ners, there have been but few judges in the
State, perhaps in the country, who, at his age,
have given promise of greater excellence or
eminence, than the Hon. Geo. W. Woodward.
Let it not be said our praise is too general in
regard to the members of this court to be ac
ceptable or valuable. This is nothing to us.
If there be general merit, there should be gen
eral arproval. We borrow no man's opinions,
and ask no man to adopt ours. Truth is more
desirable and more valuable and more lasting
than popularity. We do not mean to say that
all or any of these judges are without faults ;
but we leave it to others to find them out; and
trust we 81$11 never manifest that very ques
tionable virtue, of seeking for vice or blem
ishes where they do not betray themselves.
Judge Woodward is now about forty-seven
years of age, of an agreeable face and graceful
potable. He lb upwards of six feet high, well
propoi tioned, always appropriately apparelled,
and ever kind, attentive, and dignified in his
deportment. Calm, patient and meditative,
he closely marks the progress of a cause and
the course of the argument; exhibits no het
fulness, rarely interrupts counsel, never jumps
to conclusions, but always bides his time. In
his charges at Niei Prins, and in his opinions
at bane, no man can fail to perceive the lofty
legal and moral tone of his mind. In his per
son, as we have elsewhere said, he strongly
resembles Chief justice Gibson at his age; but
there is very little resemblance in the structure
of their minds Judge Gibson's attainments
were more comprehensive and diversified, but
less concentrated' and available ; his mental
grasp was stronger, but it was not so steady.
Judge Gibson struck a harder blow, but did
not always plant it or follow it up so judi
ciously. Judge Gibson st,metimes rase abov r e
expectation, Judge Woodward never falls be
low it. Judge Qib.lores industry uniformly
equaled his talents, Judge Woodward's talents
are, if possible surpassed by his industry.—
Judge Gibson was, pirllaps, the greater man,
Judge Woodward the safer a 'odge.
' When it is remembered that this comparison
is made not between men of an equal age—for
Chief Justice Gibson was more than twenty
years the senior of Judge Woodward—we must
in our computation, upon the one side, throw
into the scale the experience which a score of
yearn will t?rels ttly produce; while on the
other, we must make allowance for the infirm
ity and defects, which are almost invariably
attendant upon a life perplexed with accumu
lated caers, and protracted beyond the Gospel
allowance of three score years and ten. It is,
indeed, much to be doubted, whether a man
ever improves intellectually, after he is sixty.
He may still continue to acquire knowledge,
but he also gradually loses much that he had
previously gained. The impressions made
upon the mind of the aged, as compared with
the impressions upon youth, are like the writ
ing in sand, compared with the inscription
upon the retentive rock.
In January, 1837,he becime a member of
the Convention for te amendment of the Con
stitution of 1790. This Convention was in
session from time to time from January, 1837,
until the 22d of . February, 1838. It consisted,
as is well known, of some of the ablest and
mcst distinguished men of the State. And
when it is remembered that Mr_ Woodward
was then under twenty-eight years of age, and,
had bean admitted to practice but about seven
years, the prominent and teffieient position
which he held in such a body was remarkable,
though not surprising to those who had been
familiar with his talents and his virtues: His
speech upon judicial tenures, a subject which
called forth all the energies and eloquence of
the Convention, was far beyond what could
justly have been expected from one of his
years, and, indeed, placed him in the ranks of
the best debitters in that body.
DUTY OF CONSERVATIVE REBUBLI-
rigro
The Journal of Commerce says :
It is a custom with the radical party to claim
that all who are in favor of sustaining the war
are in favor of their peculiar views of policy.
This is a gross error and misrepresentation—
so gross that it'is hardly worth contradicting.
Nevertheless, the atmosphere at Washington is
and has always been so thoroughly radical,
that it is difficult for the - President to see
through it and understand clearly the mind of
the people. It is on this account the duty of
conservative men on the Republican side to
make son a aroma endeavor just now to reach
the President with a true representation of the
public desire. Democrats ct,nnot be expected
to produce any impression. But we cannot fail
to see that conservative Republicans have been
lax in their duty in this respect heretofore, and
are likely to be so now. A east amount of the
failures of the war are chargeable on the apa
thy and neglect of conservative Republicans,
in allowing radicals to represent their party at
Washington, and to have the ear of the Ad
ministration. It has been the custom among
right-thinlAieg Reptibliganti to stand back until
radicals had, by pressure, compelled the adop
tion of their policy, and then fall into the ranl
and say, " Well we must sustain the Adminit
(ration."
It te all nonsense to talk about a no-party
ilithUhlbiniiloll. From the day it tittered office,
the administration has, by it thousand acts, re
pudiated any reputation of no-party-ism and
has been a pure Republican party adminis
tration. We need not argue this point.
Enough that it is impossible ter men not be-
longing to the Republican party to produce
any change in, or have any influence over, the
national policy. The responsibility of the
whole course is with the party which not only
elected this administration, but which has
labored steadfastly, aided by the administra
tion, to perpetuate its hold on power. One
officer dismissed the army for distributing
Democratic tickets in New Hampshire, whilst
a host of others are sustained in stumping the
state for the opposite tickets, scitlec definitely
this characteristic of the administration.
Therefore we beg conservative members of the
PRICE TWO CENTS.
Republican party to exert themselves in the
present emergency, make themselves heard,
and show that radicalism is confined to a very
small part of their large numbers.
It is not impossible, even at this late mo
ment, for the administration to regain a large
share of its lost reputation with the people,
and do much toward re-uniting the North and
the whole country. Let the policy of the
wiser, conservative men of the Rept:lblican
party be adopted, and the people will rally to
it, for the salvation of the Constitution. The
other policy is revolutionary, and will but in
crease opposition, and that opposition will be
stronger and stronger as the radical policy
progresses.
The Past is past. We cannot undo it. Expres
sing the sentiments of the thinking conserva
tive men of the country, as we know we do, and
of a large, a very large majority of the people of
the North, we can say that with all our sorrow
and regret over the errors made and wrongs
done to the Constitution and the principles of
liberty by this Administration, we are deter
mined to regard Mr. Lincoln as the President
of the United States till the 4th of March, 1565,
and if he will adopt a policy which is within
the Constitution and not revolutionary, we will
ensure him the support of nine- tenths of the
people in that policy. But it is as vain to at
tempt to bring the people to sustain any other
policy as it would be to lead the drops of wa
ter up Niagara.
We believe that Mr. Lincoln can now save
the Constitution and restore the, Union, if he
will abandon the advice of a class of men who,
seeking only to hold office and preserve party
power, are determined never to permit the
Southern people to be again voting citizens of
our Union. The war can be easily ended, and
peace restored. Time alone can heal the ter
rible wounds, and restore perfect amity. Poli
tical associations must aid in this. Union senti
ments' must be encouraged in the South. The
attempt to close the war by insisting on the
triumph of a sectional policy in a matter out
side the Constitutien, would only be a failure—
only prolong hatred, enmity and bloodshed.
KEEP 2W lY MIND.
The following admirable article should be
read and pondered by everybody. In travel
ing around it has lost its paternity, but ire
shall venture to attribute it to the Journal of
Commerce, a paper which is always conserva
tive, sensible and able :.
"Let us not for an instant forget that the
war in which we are engaged is not a war of
conquest, or of subjugation, or for the exter
mination of people or of institutions. 1.. is a
war to enforce the power of government, to
preserve the supremacy of the Constitution in
all parts of the Union. The war is not puni
tive. It is no part of its object to punish
traitors. Civil war is not the administration
of justice. It is the attempt to assert the
powers of the government, and the courts as
part of the government to administer justice.
It. is a great error made by some parsons, who
imagine that war is designed by government
for the purpose of punishment. This war has
an object which ought to be kept constantly
before us, and whenever designing men, poli
ticians, or one-idea men, seek to divert it from
that object, they should be met, resisted and
defeated.
"It is a melancholy fact that war, sad and
terrible as it is, becomes o ft entimes te tool of
evil-minded men to accomplish their ends.
The horrors of its continuance are nothing to
their view. The blood shed counts of no value
in their measurement. The mourning it pro
duces causes . no impression on their sensibili
ties. Such men lose all consciousness of per
sonal responsibility for the war, and only look
to selfish desires to be realized. What right
has any man, or any class of men, to use this
war for any purpose beyond its original ob
ject? If they indeed have diverted it from
that, if they have prolonged it one day, added
one drop of blood to its eacridoe by their
efforts to use it for other ends than its original
design, then they are responsible before God
and man for the blood and cost. There is so
evading that responsibility.
“Seme men say 'now that the war has com . -
menced.it must riot be stopped till slaveholding
is abolished.' Such men are neither more uer
less than murderers. The name seems severe.
It is nevertheless correct. Would it have been
justifiable for the Northern States to commence
a war on the Southern States for the sole pur
pose of abolishing elavel7 in them? No l -It
would have been murder to commence such a
war. By what reasoning, then, does it become
less murder to divert a war commenced for
other purposes to that object ? How can it be
any lees criminal to prolong a war commenced
for the assertion of government power, into a
war for the suppression of slavery, which it is
agreed would have been unjustifiable and sin
ful if begun for that purpose ? if there were
a possibility of peace and the restoration of
the power of the government, and instead of
making peace, men should say No, we will
have no peace till we have destroyed slavery,'
And should continue the war, the men thus do
ing would be precisely as guilj as if they had
commenced a war for that purpose only.
"We are not talking about the incidental
ef f ect of war on slaves or slavery. But we
speak of the proposal of some men to make
abolition a condition of peace. No right exists
to add one object to that for which the war
began, and the blood of our brave men who
should be sent into a war prolonged for such
new purposes would rest with fearful stain on
the men who prevented peace."
THE AMERICAN ILIAD IN A
. NIITSHELL —Thos.
Carlyle's estimate of our present civil war is
given in the following brief article in the Au
gust number of Macmillan's (London) Maga
zine. It is a true description of the contest as
the extreme radical factionists have sought to
make it :
ILIA (AMERICANA) IN NUCE
Pater. of Ms North (to Pata of tho South)—
"Paul, you unaccountable scoundrel, I find you
hire your sarvants for life, not by the month
or year, as I do! You are going straight to
hell, you !"
Pnim.—"Good words, Peter The risk is
my own ; lam willing to take the risk. Hire
you your servants by the month or day, and
get straight to heaven ; leave me to my own
method."
PETER.—"No I won't. I will beat your
brains out first:" (And is trying Ormitully
ever slime, hut cannot yet manage it.)
May, 1863. . T. C.
Ma. Cox, in his Cleveland speech, quoted the
foll Owing pertinent matter from Junius !
"Let me exhort you never to suffer an inva
sion of your political Constitution ;. however
minute the instance may appear to be, never
pass it by without a determined, persevering
resistance. One precedent creates another.—
They soon accumulate and constitute law.—
What yesterday was a fact, to-day by doctrine.
Examples are said' to justify the moat danger
ous measures, and where they do not suit ex.
$14 0,4 - 10e defeat in supplied by =taw : Be
a r a hoilphat the bier which protects us is OUP
civil rlglits grows. out of the Constitution, and
they ffourinh with it."'
,„V•
PUBLISHED EVERY MORNING.
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Tza DAILY PATIToT ♦aD UNION Will be 11181791 to sal•
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Connec i with this establishmem, n extensive
aOll 01, , containing a variety of plain and fancy
type, une q ailed by any establishment in the interior of
the State, for which the patronage of the public is so
licited.
. ANOTHER SUBSTITUTE 'MURDERED BY b MIL
TART UPSTART.—We learn from an individual
employed in the neighborhood of St. George's
look, on the Chesapeake and Delaware canal,
the following version of the shooting of James
Young, who left the city in company with a
detachramt of substitutes, during the week,
under the command of Major Sellers:
On Friday, between nine and ten o'clock,
while going through the lock,joung was seen
near the engine room, when Lieutenant Parker
asked him what he was doing there. and re
ceived for an answer that he came up to get
some fresh air. The Lieutenant threatened
that if he did not tell him how he got there he
would shoot him, th2re being a guard at the
hold.
The substitute became nervous at the pre
sentation of the pistol, and could not answer.
He pointed to the place from which he came.
This was a hole cut through the bulk head.
The Lieutenant shot him. At the same mo
ment the guard exclaimed, "Shoot the s—
b—," and he, it is said, also fired, the ball ta
king mortal effect. Young fell backward into
the engine-room—he was dead.
The lock tender and one of the soldiers
brought the body from the engine room and
searched the pockets. There was nothing
found therein beside the money that , the un
fortunate young man had received in pay for
becoming a substitute. His body was taken to
Chesapeake City, about nine miles distant,
when it was thrown ashore and there left.
Some of the inhabitants took charge of the re
mains and buried them. There was no inquest
held, nor was there any officer,municipal, State
or National, to take any legal notice of the af
fair. News of his death having been sent to
Philadelphia, a few of his friends proceeded to
Chesapeake City, brought the body to this city,
and it was decently buried yesterday.—Pitila
dtlpltia Sunday Transcript.
TILE WAY IT WORKS.—II is a curious circum
stance that the provost marshals in Massachu
setts discouraged the hiring of substitutes, and
used their influence with the conscripts to in
induce them to pay the $BOO exemption fee
instead. Thus in the Springfield district there
were less than a dozen substitutes procured
out of over a thousand conscripts drawn. In
deed, the board in that district forced the con
scripts to pay the money rather than procure
substitutes, as will be seen by the following
extract from a letter in the Republican :
" Theta are but very few substitutes reported
in the district, not a dozen out of a whole
thousand examined, and the reason ist that it
has been almost impossible to get the atten
tion of the board to their examination or ac
ceptance. At least twenty cases have come
under my knowledge where men have been
anxious to furnish substitutes, but when they
reported with them on the day assigned, they
were told that the board had no time to attend
to them, and they had better pay their $300."
It is somewhat strange that Mayor Opdyke
fears that there will ba too much money and
and to few men furnished by this city, while
the administration arranges everything here
so as to swell the number of substitutes and
conscripts who will be compelled to eo. Now
why this discrimination in favor of Democratic
soldiers on the one side and Republican money
on the other We are inclined to believe that
Mr. Lincoln thinits the Republicans vote better
than they fight, while the Democrats fight bet
ter than they vote.— World
PROSPERITY OF POQLS —Tijero is lop much
truth in qe fon)wing extract :
"I have always maintained that the one im
portant phenomena presented by modern soci
ety it—tbe enormous prosperity of fools. Show
me an individual fool, and I will show you an
aggregate society which give that highly fa
vored personage nine chances out of ten, and
grudges the 'tenth to the wisest man in exis:.
Lance. Look where you will, in every high
place there site an ass, settled beyond the reach
of the greatest intellects in the world to pull.
him down. Here is the perfect helpless booby
Frank ; he has never done anything id his life
to help himself, and as a necessary consequence
society is in a "conspiracy, to carry him to the
top of the tree. He has hardly had time to
throw away that chance you gave him, before
this letter comes and puts the ball at his foot
the second time. lay rioh cousin (who is in
tellectually fit to be at the tail of the family,
and who is, therefore, at the head of it,) has
been good enough to remember my existence ;
and has offered his influence to serve my eldest
boy. Read his letter, and then observe the
sequence of events. My rich cousin is a booby
who thrives on landed preperty ; he has done
something for another booby who thrives on
politim, who knows a third booby who thriv
on commerce, who can do something for a
fourth booby thriving at present on nothing,
whose name is Frank. So the mill goes. So
the cream of all human reward is supped by
fools Wilkie Collins.
MR. WHITING, the Solicitor -of the War De
part men t, in one of his recent public letters,
advocating radicalism in its wildest type, re
fers to Hannibal as a negro, styling him, be
sides, the " conqueror of Rome," and repre
sents the negroes of the South, under the
policy of the Idministration as "springing op
like dragon's teeth from the soil into which
they have been crushed." When we reflect that
the armed men who sprung up from the drag
on's teeth sowed by Cadmus incontinently slew
each other on the spot, that Hannibal, checked
in hie obstinate attempt to conquer Rome,Was
recalled to Carthage only to be defeated utterly
by the Roman Scipio, and that Hannibal, as
every school boy can tell, was no more a negro
than Cleopatra was a aeons or Dido a squaw,
the wit and acquirements of Mr. Whiting may
be estimated with tolerable accuracy. If he is
as great an ass and ignoramus in law as he is
in politics and literature, we think tha sooner
he is solicited to resign his Solicitorship the
better for the credit of the Department and of
the Government. Indeed, we think his resig
nation in any event, and still more his per
emptory dismissal, oould not fail to redound to
the welfare and honor of the public service in
all its branches. He is one of the vilest and
most shameless radicals of the time.---louieville
Journal.
EXCLUSION OF DEMOCRATIC PAPERS FROM THE
ARMY.—A lady who has just returned from
Memphis says that she has seen bat one Demo
erotic paper in the kat arts months_ They
seem to be carefully excluded from the army.
The soldier is riot to be trusted to read both
sides and make up his mind on the question's
at issue. He must believe all the Abolition
lies about Copperheads, for he never is per
mitted to see a contradiction of them. Oar
informant says a gentleman was reading a
Democratic paper on the passage up the river,
when a government official of some sort snitch
ed it from him and threw it into tbi river.--
Indianapolis Sentinel.
An insatiable lovir must have been Catallas,
a Roman poet, who was asked by Lesbla how
many of her kisses trould.satisfy him, and re
plied :
'As many as there are sands in the deserts,
or ere in in the heavens.'