Daily patriot and union. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1858-1868, August 14, 1863, Image 1

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    RATES OF ADVERTISING.
nor linos or less constitute half a quire. Ten Uwe
noes than four, COOltitate a square.
eq.,one day.-- S 0 90 OEE sq., one day...». $0 00
one week. • 120 one week.... 2 00
• 4 one month.. 800 " ono month.. 800
. thre e 'aerat es 500 " three months 10 00
‘.eixmonths.. 880 " lax months.. 1b 00
4 one year.--12 00 one year 20 00
e:r DuoineEl notices inserted in the Leg Ar. eemeant,
De bet; ie marriages and deaths, Vie CUPS PER tans far
eh imortion. To merchants and others adeerthdhil
the year, liberal terms will be offered.
fa" The number of insertions must be designated on
he advertisement.
Marriages and Deaths will be inserted at the saute
iltea u regular advertisements.
Bustneos cfarbs.
ROBERT SNODGRASS,
ATTORNEY Ar LAW,
Oftce .North Third street, thrrd door above Mar
ket, Harrisburg, Pa.
N. B.—Penson. Bounty and Military claims of all
kinds prosecut, d collected.
New rio.a John Cl_ Kunkel, David Mumma, sr.,
and Lumberton_ lay-U-41mM
WIVI. MILLER,
AND
IL E. FERGUSON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
OFFICE DI
SIIGEMiLKEB'S BUILDINGS
sEcoND STREET,
BETWEEN WiLNIIr and MARKET SQUARE,
ap-29wkd Nearly opposite the Buehler House
THOS.
MAcDOWELL,
AA - TORNey AT LAW,
MILITARY CLAIM AND PATENT AGENT.
Office in the Exchange, Walnut st., (Up Stairs.)
Having formed a connection with parties in Wash
ington ORA wno are reliable business men, any busi
ness connected. with any of the Departments will meet
with immediate and careful attention.
DB.. C. WE_ICHEL,
SURGEON AND OCULIST,
RESIDENCE THIRD NEAR NORTH STREET.
ifels now faNy preprzexi to attend promptly to the
duties of prOrelsOon in all its branches.
A 1.020 LID TIIT ESUOUNBBIIIb
jostiles him in promising full and sur.ple satisfootlon U
all who may favor bimwith s aall,be the disease Obsords
or any ether nature. inIS-d&Arly
MILITARY CLAIMS AND PEN—
SIONS.
The undersigned hare entered into an association for
tho eolleetion of Military Claims and the Occorbig of
Pensions for wounded and disabled soldiers.
Master-in and Muster-out Bolls, officers , Pay Bolls,
Ordnance and Clothing returns, and all papers pertain
ing to the military service will be made out properly
and expeditiously
Office in the Exchange Buildings, Walnut between
Sadond and Third streets, near Oruit'e Hotel, Hands
burg, Pa. THOS C MACDOWY.LL,
je2s dtf THOMAS A. MAGI:CMS.
SILAS WARD.
NO- li t NORTH THUD BT., IbUtETSP I TAG.
STEINWAY'S PIANOS,
MELODEONS, VIOLINS, eIIITABS,
Banjos, Flutes, Fifes, Drums, Accordeous,
arstias, =s m. AND NOOK NEMO, &C., &e.,
PHOTOOILAPII FRAMES, ALBUMS,
Large Pier sad Mantle Mirrors, Soarer awl Ovid Priuslw
ofeverylleseripties made Winder. Reguildiagdoss
Agency for liewe's Sewing Machines.
Er Sheet Mule sent by Mail. octi-1
JOHN W. GLOVER,
MERCHANT TAILOR
Has just received from New York, an assort
ment of
SEASONABLE GOODS,
which us otters to hie Gatemen and the pntrlio at
nov22) MODERATE PRICES- dif
SMITH& EWING,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
THIRD STREET, Harrisburg,
rrimtio.,:r. the aessest Cearta of Dauphin county. Col
lections made promptly. A. C. 81111 - Tll,
B. WINE/.
COOK, Merchant Tailor,
, 27 CHESNUT ST., between Second and Front,
Has just returned from the city with an assortment of
CLOTHS, CASSTMEDES AND YESTINCIS,
Which will be sold at moderate prices and made up to
order; and, also, an assortment of READY MADE
Clothing and Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods.
no•21-1yd
ENTISTR Y.
B. N. GILDEA, D. D. E.,
=N 0 . 119 MARKET STREET,
RBY Bc . KONIEBLV BUILDING, UP BPAIBIL
fans-tf
RELIGIOUS BOOK STORE,
?RACY AND SUNDAY SCHOOL DEPOSITORY,
E. S. GERMAN.
IT 8013111 ENCIOND STRIZT, ABM OHNSNIIT,
Depot Tor tke solo of InoreodOpeilAterseasePlaVlows.
Nude and Musical Instruments. AlsO, subscriptions
taken for religions publications. no3O-dy
JOHN G. W. MARTIN,
FASHIONABLE
CARD'WRITER,
HERR'S HOTEL; HABRIBBURA*, Pd.
Allmanner of VISITING, WEDDING' AND BUSI
NESS CARDS executed in the most artistic styles and
most reasonable terms_ decl4-dtf
- UNION HOTEL,
Ridge Avenue, corner of Broad street,
HARRISBURG, PA.
The undersigned informs the public that he has re
cently reaoVated and refitted his well-known " Union
Hotel" on Ridge avenue, near the hound Muse, and le
prepared to accommodate citizen', strangers and travel
era in the best style, at moderate rites.
His table will be supplied with the best the muskets
afford, and at his bar will be found superior brands of
liquors and matt beverages. The very best accommo
dations, fer railroaders employed at the shops in this
vitataty.. dtf] ILVIRY BOBTEFEN.
FRANKLIN HOUSE,
BALTIMOR.II, MD.
This pleasant, and COMMOIIIOII6 Hotel ham been no
roughly re-fitted and re-furnished. It is pleasantly
sirsatea an North-Wcat itoritai. of Howard and Franklin
Arcata, a few doors west of the Northern Central HMl
way Depot. livery attention paid to the comfort of his
imam. G. LICHUINBING, Proprietor,
isl 2-11 (Late of Saline Grove, Pa.)
THEO. F. BOHEFFER,
BOOK, CARD AND JOB PRINTER,
NO 18 DIARHIST STREET, HARRISBURG.
Partioniar attention paid to printing, /tiling and
binding of Railroad Blanks, Manifests, Insurance Poll
dee, Ohecka z... Bill-Heada, Er.c.
Wedding, YlBl l 4 ll ll and garElaprinted et Tell
low prim and in the teat style. jan2
TAILORING.
Oar g. SLZT Og. -
The subscriber le ready at NO. 94, inkRIENT ST.,
four doors below Poet % tittOt, to make
MEN'S AND BOY'S CLOTHING
In soy desired style, and with skill and promptness.
Persons wishing cutting done can have it done at the
shortest notice. ap27-any
CHARLES F. VOLLMER,
UPHOLSTERER,
Chestnut street. four doors above Second,
(Orem= Wasnurorost Hosi Hoen e )
le prepared to farninhto order, in the very best style of
warlueanddo. Opringiind Hair liiettressee, Window Onk
Woe, Lowness, and aid other articlea of Pbrilitilre in Ids
line, on short notice end moderate terms. Having ez•
. penenee in the business, he feels warranted in asldng a
alum ofolio patronage, eenidentof his ability to give
as p
on. janl7-dtf
SYNT-ITGHT GA.LLERY--The rooms
ea the corner of Market square sad Market street,
°Waits the Jones House, occupied as a Gallery for
"" r reotYla, Photograph and Ambrotype purposes,
see POE mom from the 9th of Beptembermeat.
APPI3 , to JOHN WYETH
jylB-dlawBw
*. .
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VOL. 6.--NO. 295.
iliebical.
12E301
DR. SWEET'S
INFALLIBLE LINIMENT
110
GREAT EXTERNAL REMEDY,
FOR RHEUMATISM, GOUT, NEURALGIA,
LUMBAGO, STIFF NECK AND JOINTS,
SPRAINS, 'BRUISES, curs & WOUNDS,
PILES, HEADACHE, and ALL RHEU
MATIC and NERVOUS DISORDERS.
For all of which it is a speedy and certain remedy,
and never fails. This Liniment is prepared from the
recipe of Dr Stephen Sweet, of Connecticut, the fa
mous bone setter, and has been used in his practice for
more than twenty years with the most astonishing Emc
ee/IL
AS AN ALLEVIATOR OF PAIR; it is unrivaled
by any preparation before the public, of which the most
skeptical may be convinced by a single trial.
This Liniment will cure rapidlyand radically, RHEU
MATIC DISORDERS of every hind, and in thousands
of cases where it has been used it has never been known
SO fail,
FOR 11 - EURALGIA, it will %and lintheAlAta relief
in every case, however distressing.
It will relieve the worst cues of HEADACHE in
three minutes and is warranted to do it.
TOOTHACHE saw will it cure instantly.
FOR NERVOUS DEBILITY AND GENERAL
LASSITUDE, arising from imprudence or excess, this
Liniment is a most happy and unfailing remedy. Act
ing dirgolly upon the nervous tissues, it strengthens
revivifies the system, and restores it to elasticity aid
vigor.
FOR PILES.—As an external remedy, we claim that
it is the best known, and we challenge the world to pro
duce an equal. Every victim of this distressing com
plaint should give it a trial, for it will not fail to afford
immediate relief, and in a majority of cases will effect
a radical care.
QUINSY awl SORE THROAT are sometitalle ex
tremely malignant and dangerous, but a timely applica
tion of this Liniment will never fail to cure.
SPRAINS are sometimes very obstinate, and enlarge
ment of the joints is liable to occur if neglected. The
worst case may be conquered by this Liniment in two or
three day-s.
DRui - ..s . ES. CUM WOUNDS, SORBS. VLOSRS,
BURNS and SCALDS, yield readily to the wonderfu l
healing properties of DR. SWEET'S INFALLIBLE
LINIMENT when used according to directions. Also,
CHILBLAINS. FROSTED FEET, and INSECT
BITES and STINGS.
&TEAT IXORSE OWNER
should have this remedy at hand, for its timely use at
the first appearance of Lameness will effectually pre
vent those formidable diseases to which all horses are
liable and which render so many otherwise valuable
horses nearly worthless.
Over four hundred voluntary testimonials to the won
derful curative properties of this Liniment have been
received within the Wit two mire. and many of them
from persona in the highest ranks of mu.
CAUTION.
To avoid impositon, observe the Signature and Like
ness of Dr. gtekhen Sweet on every label, and also
" Stephen Sweet's Infallible Liniment ) 1 blown in the
glass of each bottle, without which none are genuine.
ItICHkRDSON &
Pole Proprielore, Norwich, Ct,
For sale by all dealers. aplleow-d&w
Elpeiß.
ALL WORK PROMISED it
ONE WEEK!
•‘ - fcr -7 . I' 4; :ej
4 tit!: S' ' 1 14) 1 1..A : All• ''-' ' '' ' '' ; , ol . e *
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----.....p...20-
1 a .46 .
I'ENNBYLVANIA
EtTE.A,M DYEING ESTABLISEIbIENT,
104 BEARZNT 5T8,3317,
BETWEEN FOURTH AND FIFTH,
HAP.BISBURG PA.,
Where every defiaription of Ladies , and Gentlemen's
lament!, Piece Goode, &0., are Dyed, ()leaned, and
Intahed in the bast wanner and at the ahorteet notice.
non-a&wly DOBGIII Zr. 00.. Proprietors.
T F. WATSON,
MASTIC WORKER
AND
PRACTICAL CEMENTER,
Is prepared to Cement the exterior of Buildings with
he New York Improved
Water-Proof Mastic Cement.
This Material is different from all other Cements.
It forms a solid, durable adhesiveness to any surface,
imperishable by the action of water or frost. Even ,
good building should be coated with this Cement ; it is
a perfect preserver to the walls, and makes a beautiful,
line finish, equal to Eastern brown sandstone, or any
color desired.
Among others for whom I have applied the Mastic
Cement, I refer to the following gentlemen
J. Ilienel4 a-Wilda**, Penn street, Pittsburg, finished
live years.
J. H. Shoenberger 2 residence Lawrenceville, finished
five years.
James 31 , 0andlass, residence, Allegheny City,finished
five years.
Calvin Adams, residence, Third st . eet, finished four
years.
A. Hoevelei, reeldence i Lawrenceville, finished four
years.
L. D. M'Oord, Penn street, finished four years.
Hon. Thomas Irwin, Diamond street, finished four
years.
St Charles Hotel and Girard House, finished fire
years.
Elnan,:dog Court House and Bank, for Barr ac Moser,
Architects, Pittsburg, finished five years.
Orders received at the Vffize of B M'Eldowney, Paint
Shop, 20 Seventh street, or please address
T. F. WATSON,
maylft-tf P. 0. Box 1216. Pittsburg, Pa.
MESSRS. OHIOKERIN4 & 00.
RAM AGAIN OBTAINED THE
GOLD . MEDAL!
AT THE
MECHANICS' PAIR, BOSTON,
VELD THE PIEUBDIVIiI
OVER SIXTY COMPETITORS!
Wareroom for the CHICKENING PIANOS, at Harris
burg, at 82 Market street,
oc2B-tf W. KNOCHE'S MUSIC! STORM.
I AWES 1 YOU KNOW WEEZ lOU
can get fine Note Paper, Envelopes, Visiting and
Wedding Cards ? At SCREPPER , S BOOKSTORE.
SUPERIOR STOCK OF LIQUORS.—
mud. DOCK, in., k co.. are now able to offer to
WV customers and the public at large, a stock of the
purest liquors ever imported into this market, compri
sing in part the following varieties :
WHISKX SCOTCH,OLD BOURBON.
WINE—PORT, SHERRY, OLD MADEIRA.
OTARD, DUPEY & CO. PALE BRANDY.
JAMICA SPIRITS.
PRIME NEW ENGLAND RUM.
DRAKE'S PLANTATION PATTERS.
These liquors can all be warranted; and in addition to
these, Dock & Co. have on hand a large variety of
Wines, Whisky and Brandy, to which they invite the
particular attention of the public.
WEBSTER'S ARMY AND NAVY
POCKET DICTIONARY.
lust received and for Bale at
senzionsals BOOKEITORI.
MEW ORLEANS SUGAR I—Finsr m
mt. XIIIKR.!--Peor Ml 4 '
lass WM. no ok Ja., & 00.
FOR SALE.-A TWO-STORY FRAM
HOl7Oll In Short West. Inquire of
sepBoll W. K. V. 111311001.
HAktiOSBUItG, PA., FRIDA Y. AUGUST it, Isti3.
THE
Weekly "Patriot & Union,"
THE CHEAPEST PAPER PUBLISHED IN
PENNSYLVANIA!
AND
THE ONLY DEMOCRATIC PAPER PUBLISHED AT
TDB SEAT OF GOVERNMENT !
FORTY-FOUR COLUMNS OF READING MAT
TER EACH WEEK 1
'DOLLAR
AND
THE LOW PRICE OF ONE 'DOLLAR
AND FIFTY CENTS I
WHEN
SUBSCRIBED .FYI3R IN CLUBS OF NOT LESS
THAN TEN COPIES 20 ONE ADDRESS!
We have been compelled to raise the club subscription
price to one dollar and fifty cents in order to Rave ens-
Reyes from actual loss. Paper has risen, including
taxes, about twenty-five per cent., and is still rising;
and when we tell our Democratic friends, candidly, that
we can no longer afford to sell the Weekly PATRIOT AND
ulna at oge sonar a year. and must add fifty cents or
stop the publication, we trust they will appreciate our
position, and, instead of withdrawing their subscrip
tions, go to work with a will to increase our list in every
county in the State. We have endeavored, and shall
continue our efforts, to make the paper useful as a party
organ, and welcome as a news Diettlafigol" to every fam
ily. We flatter ourselves that it has not been without
some influence in producing the glorious revolution in
the politics of the State achieved at the late election;
and if fearlessness in the discharge of duty, fidelity to
the principles of the party, and an anxious desire to pro
mote its interests, with some experience and a moderate
degree of ability, can be made serviceable hereafter, the
Weekly PATRIOT AND UNION 11 , 111 not be less useful to
the party or leas welcome to the family circle in the fu
ture than it has been in the past. We confidently look
for Increased encouragement in this great enterprise,
and appeal to every influential Democrat in the State to
lend us his aid in running our Supecription list Up IQ
twenty or thirty thousand. Vie expense to each indi
vidual is trifling, the benefit to the party may be great.
Believing that the Democracy of the State feel the ne
cessity of sustaining a fearless central organ, we make
this appeal to them for assistance with the fullest confi
dence of =MISS.
Tim same reasons which induce us to raise the price
of the Weekly, operate in regard to the Daily paper, the
price of which is also increased. The additional cost to
each subscriber will bo but trifling; and, while we can
not persuade ourselves that the change nocosenVlV roads
will result in any diminution of our daily circulation,
yet, were we certain that such would be the conse
quence, we should still be compelled to make it, or suf
fer a rainous loss. Under these circumstances we must
throw ourselves upon the generosity, or, rather, the
justice o f th e p u klie, and abide their verdict ; whatever
it may be.
The period for which many of our subscribers have
paid for their paper being on the eve of expiring, we
take the liberty of issuing this notice, reminding them
of the same, in order that they may
RENEW THEIR CLUBS.
We shall also take it as an especial favor if our present
subscribers will urge upon their neighbors the fact that
the PATRIOT AND UNION is the only Democratic paper
printed in Harrisburg, and considering the large amount
of reading zooetet, embracing all the current news of
the day, and
* TELEGRAPHIC DISPATCHES
from everywhere up to the moment the paper goes 'to
press, political, miscellaneous, general and local news.
market reports, is decidedly the
CHEA.P.EST N_E` TIS:PA_P_E:R P UBLISHED IN
GPIrMM
There is scarcely a village. or town in the State in
which a club cannot be raided if the proper exertion:be
made, and surely there are few places in which one or
mere energetic men cannot be found who are in favor of
the dissemination of sound Democratic dootrinoo, Who
would be willing to make the effort to raise a club.
DEMOCRATS OE, THE INTERIOR
Let ns hear from you. ,The existing war, and the ap•
prosehing sessions of Congress and the state Legisia
tore, are Invested with unnenal interest, and every man
should have the news.
TERMS.
DAILY PATRIOT AND UNION.
Single copy for one year, in advance. ... . ........$5 00
single oopyduring the session of the Legislature.. 2 00
City subscribers ten cents per week.
Copies supplied to agents at the rate of $1 50 per hnn
drat
WEINIT PATRIOT AND UNION*
Published every Thursday.
Dingle copy one year, in advance 5200
Ten copies to one address 15 00
Bubscriptionsmay commence at any time. PAY AL.
WAYS IN ADVANCE. We are obliged to make this
Nagsgstive, .Ta sump ixstaace cash must accompany
subscription. Any person sending us a club of twenty
subscribers to the Weekly will be entitled to a copy for
his services. The price, even at the advanced rate is
so kw that we cannot offer greater inducements than
this. Additions maybe made 14 any time to a club of
subscribers by remitting one dollar and fifty cots
for each additional name. It is not neceeeary to send
us the names of those constituting a club, as we cannot
undertake to address each paper to club subscriber.
separately. Specimen copious of the Weekly will be sent
to all who desire it.
0. BARRETT dr. 00., Harrisburg, Pa
N. B.—The following law, wiled by Congress in 1860,
defines the duty of postmaster', in relation to the de
livery of newspapers to club eubseriberi:
(See Little, Brown 4. Co.'s edition of the Lowe of 1860,
pare 88, chapter 181, sectionl.)
"provided, however, that where packages of now im
pels or periodicals are received at any post office directed
to one address, and the names of the club subscribers to
which they belong, with the postage for a quarter in ad
vance, shall be handed to the postmaster, he shall de
liver the same to their respective owners."
To enable the Postmaster to comply with this regula
tion, it will Do necessary that be be furnished with the
Hit of names composing the club, and paid a quarter's
(or year's) postage in advance. The uniform courtesy
of Postmasters, affords the assurance that they will
eheerfullyaooommooate club subscribers, and the latter
alined take ears that the postage, which is but u VI"
ea oh case, be paid in advance. Send on the (Aube
A SPLENDID ASSORT M E N T
OF
LITHOGRAPHS, '
Formerly retailed at from $8 to $5, are now offered at
50 and 75 cents, and $1 and $1 50—gublished by the Ar
Union, and formerly retailed by them.
Splendid Photographic Album Pictures of all distin
guished men and Generals of the army, at only 10 eta.
For sale at SOFIEFFEIFS Bookstore,
18 NaViet street, Harrisburg.
BASKETS!
LADIEs TRAVELING,
MARKET.
SBHOOL,
PAPER,
KNIFE,
CLOTHES,
ROUND,
CHILDREN'S,
CAKE,
For a low, by
jel2
WHITE BRANDY I I I—Fog PnEssxv
tinperior aruate, (siricaY
pure } ) just received and for gale by
yulyl WI!. DOCK, Jr.. & Co.
MACKEREL!
HAMMEL, N 04.1, 3503, in sized packages—
ame, bad GSA, Wags searrasted. gust remand, mid
for male low by wm. Dom Jr.. & 00.
BLACKING ! !—MASON'S "CHALLasai
Bx.sonnsa."-100 altos& assorted /he just r#
naiTed and for sale, sitholoiale and retail.
WM. DOCK. In., a 00.
VrTDOW SHADES of linen, gilt
raerea; and PAPER BLINDS of in sallow
varlar of designs and ornaments ; also, CURTAIN
PIXTURES and PASSIM at Tory low prima. Call at
Sehefferft Bookstore.
WM. DOCK, Jr., Jk; Co
tiljt :latriot tt#
FRIDAY MQRNINQ, AVOV#ST 14, 1868.
TRIAL OF ABRAHAM LINCOLNBY TILE
GREAT STATESMEN OF THE REPUB
LIC.
A council of the poet on the Tyranny of
the PreBent.
The Spirit of the Constitution on the Bench—
Abraham Lincoln Prisoner at the Bar—His
o wn Counsel.
Iteported Expressly for the Metropolitan Record
.It Wag reported 50fhe weeks since that the
present unworthy successor of Washington,
(the Abolition President, Abraham Lincoln)
had become a convert to spiritualism, and that
he had recently held a conversation in the
White House with the departed spirits of cer
tain great Men of the Raeelation, with whose
opinions upon the ultimate issue of the war he
desired to make himself acquainted. The par
ticulars of that spiritualistic confab have not
been published, nor have we been informed of
the result of its deliberations. We hope, how
ever, that the great rail splitter was satisfied
with the interview.
Since then it• was the good fortune of the
editor of the Record to have been present at a
most remarkable trial that took place not many
nights ago in the principal apartment of the
p r oidentialmansion at Washington. It is un
necessaty that we should explain to our read
ers how we managed to be present on that oc
casion. It is sufficient to 'mow that we were
there,. and that while there we were witness to
a scene that will remain indellibly impressed
upon our memory. The spacious apartment
had been converted into a grand court room,
and preparations were being made for a trial
of more than ordinary importance.
On looking around the court we beheld a
number of distinguished historical characters
—men whose faces - were rendeled familiar
from the portraits which we has: seen in books
and elsewhere. Prominent among them was
one countenance which no man having ones
seen could ever forget. It was that. of George
Washington, the Father of the. American
Union, who was surrounded by the
. great
statesmen of the Revolution, and by others of
still later date. Never before in the history of
the world had such an august council ever as
sembled. What could have brought them to
gether at each time and in such a place ?
They had assembled for the trial of the present
incumbent of the Presidential chair on charges
of the gravest and most serious character.—
These charges were numerous and were brought
out in the course of the examination, which
Was conducted before the spirit of the Consti
tution, who occupied the Bench of Justice.—
Immediately confronting the august assemblage
was the figure of a man whose lineaments have
become painfully familiar to the people. This
figure was the representation of Abraham Lin
coln, and from the expression Of conscious guilt,
visible upon his countenance it was evident
that he occupied the position of the criminal
at the bar. He was allowed the services of a
counsel to conduct his defence, but on intima
ting his desire to act as his own counsel he was
granted that privilege.
The spirit of the Constitution announced
that the trial of the culprit would now proceed,
whereupon the venerable form of the Father of
his Country arose in the midst of the spirits of
the great men lhy whom he was surrounded,
and proceeded to read the following indictment
against his last and most unworthy successor.
Abraham Lincoln is herein charged with
treasonable intent, purposes and designs, in
having committed the following unconstitution
al acts in the course of his administration.
1. In having declared war against inde
pendent and sovereign States under the pre
tence of repossessing himself of certain forts
and other property siezed and held by said
States.
2. In having arrested citizens of the United
et a tec, and incarcerated them in government
bastiles, without process of law.
8. In having suppressed the liberty of speech,
thereby denying to the citizen the constitu
tional right of criticising the acts of his ad
ministration.
4, In having prohibited and stopped the pub
lication of certain newspapers for the exercise
of the same right referred to in the preceding
charge.
5. In having placed the military above the
civil power, as shown in the establishment of
martial law over portions of the country
which were not embraced within the theatre of
war.
6. In overthrowing State sovereignty as in
the case of Virginia, the integrity of which
was violated by the erection of the so-called
State of Kanawha within its limits.
7. In having approved, endorsed and par
tially carried into execution the unconstitu
tional act of Congress known as the Confisca
tion bill.
8. In having approved of the infamous law
known as the Conscription act, which was not
only subversive of the Constitution,but violative
Live of State sovereignty.
9. In baying attempted to carry into execu
tion the Emancipation act, thereby violating
the most sacred guarantees of the C4nstita
two.
(The indictment embraced a great many
other charges, but these we have enumerated
were the most important.)
After the reading of the foregoing, the Spirit
of the Constitution, officiating as Supreme
Judge in the case, notified the prisoner that
the Court was prepared to hear' his defence,
whereupon the prisoner, Abraham Lincoln,
arose and addressed the court.
We should remark, however, that at various
points in the course of his defence he was fre
quently interrupted by some one of the many
great statesmen who had assembled to witness
and take part in the trial.
The following is a verbatim report of the
proceedingsi
Abraham Lincoln. I have been accused of
violating the Constitution ; but if I have done
so, it has been from the sole and earnest desire
to restore the Union.
Stephen A, Douglas. I don't understand
how a man can claim to be a friend of the
Union, and yet be in favor of making war upon
ten millions of people in the Union. You can
not lover it up much longer under the pretext
of love for the Union. War is disunion, cer
tain, inevitable, final, and irrepressible. Peace
is the only policy that can save the country. (1)
Abraham Lincoln. It was this desire to pre
serve the integrity of the Republic that ren
dered it a matter of absolute necessity to put
a stop to the assaults that were being made
upon the Government by certain parties whom
I regarded as friendly to the rebels.
Daniel Webster. Free speech is a home
bred right, a fireside privilege. It has ever
been enjoyed in evert house, cottage and cabin
in the nation. It is not to be drawn into con
troversy. It is as undoubted as the right of
breathing the air and walking on the earth. It
is a right to be maintained in peace and in war.
It is a right which cannot be invaded without
destroying constitutional liberty. Hence this
PRICE TWO CENTS.
right should be guarded and protected by the
freemen of this country with a jealous care,
unless they are prepared for chains 'and an
archy. (2)
Abraham Lincoln. The great cause of all
our trouble is slavery, and we can never ex
pect to have peace until that institution is
abolished.
Henry Clay. Abolitionism ! With Abolition
ists the rights of property are nothing ; the
deficiency of the powers of the general govern
ment is nothing; the acknowledged and ineozz
testible poirere of the States are uothing ; the
dissolution of the Union and the overthrow of
a government in which are concentrated the
hopes of the civilized world are nothing ; a sin
gle idea has taken possession of their minds.
and onward they pursue it, overlooking all
barriers, reckless and regardless of all conse
quences. (3)
Abraham Lincoln. If every man were al -
loz - ed to express his opinions the prosecution
of the war for the Union would be impossible.
The government is obliged to have recourse to
such measures if it would preserve fts own ex
istence.
John Hancock. It is to the last degree a
vicious and infamous attempt to support a gov
ernment which manifestly lends to render the
persons and property of the governed insecure.
Some boast of being friends to government;
I am a friend to rtghteous government, to a
government founded upon the principles of
reason and justice ; but I glory in publicly
avowing my eternal enmity to tyranny. (4)
Abraham Lincoln. I found it necessary to
suspend the operations of portions of the Con
stitution to better enable me to carry on the
war without embarrassment. I thought that
the people would be willing to relinquish some
of their constitutional rights for a time if their
liberties could thereby be preserved in the fu
ture.
Patrick Henry. Is the relinquishment of
the right of the trial by jury and the liberty of
the press necessary for your liberty ? Will
the abandonment of the most sacred rights
tend to the security of your liberty ? Liberty
the greatest of all earthly blessings! give us
that precious jewel, and you may takeevery
thing else. The first thing I have at heart is
American liberty ; the second thing is Ameri
can union. (5)
Abraham Lincoln. I endeavored to get
along in the prosecution of the war for the
Union, but finding-that the Constitution inter
fered with it,'l was obliged, as a military ne
cessity, to suspend its action.
Gouverneur Morris. I love the Constitu
tion and I love it because I consider it as the
bond of our Union; because in ray soul, I be
lieve that on it depends our harmony and our
peace; that without it .we should soon be
plunged in the horrors of civil war; that this
country would be deluged with the blood of
its inhabitants, and a brother's hand raised
against the bosom of a brother. (6)
Abraham Lincoln. What was Itodo in the
midst of a civil war ? I found my hands tied
by the checks of the Constitution, and I was
forced to disregard them. I could not rely
altogether upon the people.
Alexander Hamilton. The confidence of the
people will easily be gained by a goad admini
stration. This is the true touchstone. (7)
Abraham Lincoln. I must insist, in my own
defence, that without force the Union cannot
be preserved. And every law such as the
conscription act and the emancipation measure
must be enforced.
John C. Calhoun. The law must be en
forced ! The imperial edict must be executed!
It is under such sophistry, couched in general
terms, without looking to the limitations which
must ever exist in the practical exercise of
power, that the most cruel and despotic acts
ever have been covered. It was such sophis
try as this that east Daniel into the lion's den,
and the three innocents into the fiery furnace.
Under the same sophistry the bloody edict Of
Nero and Caligula were executed. The law
must be enforced! Yes, the law imposing
tea tax must be executed." This was the'
very argument which impelled Lord North and
his administration to that mad career which
forever separated us frOm the British Crown.
In the same spirit we are told the Union must
be preserved, without regard to the means.
And how is it proposed to preserve the Union?
By force? Does any man in his senses believe
that this beautiful structure, this harmonious
aggregate of States, produced by the joint
Consent of ail, can be preserved by force ? Its
very introduction would be certain destruction
of this Federal Union. No, no ! You cannot
keep the States united in their constitutional
and Federal bonds by force. Force may in
deed hold the parte together, but such Union
would be the bond between a master and slave,
a Union of exaction on one side and of un
qualified obedience on the other. Disguise it
as you may, the contest is one between power
and liberty. * * Never was
there a controversy in which more important
consequences were involved, not excepting that
between Persia and Greece, decided by the bat
tles of Marathon, Platina and Salamis, which
gave ascendancy to the genius of Europe over
that of Asia and which in its consequences
has continued to affect the destiny of so large
a portion of tba world, even to this day. In
the great conflict between Greece and between
Persia, European and Asiatic polity and civili
zation, the very question between the federal
and consolidated forma of government was in
volved. The Asiatic governments from the
remotest time, with some exceptions on the
eastern shore of the Mediterranean, have been
based on the principle of consolidation, which
considers the whole community as but a unit,
and consolidates its powers in a central point.
The opposite principle has prevailed in Europe.
Greece throughout all her States was based on
a federal system—all were united in one com
mon but loose bond, and the governments of
the several States partook for the most part,
of a.complea organization which distributed
political power among different members of the
community. * * * Has reason
fled from our borders ? Have we ceased to
reflect? It is madness to suppose the Union
can be preserved by force. (8)
James Madison. The more I reflect on the
use of force, the more I doubt the practibility,
the justice, and the efficacy of it when applied
to a people collectively and not individually.
A union of the States, containing such an in
gredient, seems to provide for its own destruc
tion. The use of fosse against a State would
look more like a declaration of war than an
infliction of puniihment; and would probably
be considered by the party attacked as a disso
lution of all previous compacts by which it
might be bound. (9)
Abraham Lincoln. Without force it is im
possible to preserve the government. The
military when necessary must sustain the civil
power.
Alexander Hamilton. How can this force
be exerted on the States collectively ? It is
possible. It amounts to a war between the
parties. Foreign powers also will not be idle
spectators. They will interpose; the confusion
will increase, and a dissolution of the Union
will entitle. (10)
Colonel Mason. The moat jarring elements,
fire and water, are not more incompatible than
such a 'strange mixture of civil liberty and
military execution. Will the militia march
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from One State to another for the purpose of
coercion ? If they do, will not the citizens of
invaded States assist one another, until they
arise as one man, and shake off what they will
denounce as the hated Union altogether? If
you subjugate them, how are you to hold them
under a Constitution that is to be imposed to
insure domestic tranquility and promote the
general welfare ? (II)
Abraham Lincoln. Am I, then, to be irt
ve3ted with no power for the suppression of
rebellion ?
Ethridge Gerry. lam ageing letting loose
the myrmidons of the United States on a State
without its own consent.. (12)
Abraham Lincoln. There can be no Union
unless the State governments sustain the gen
eral government to the. fullest extent in putting
down disohedieat awl refractory States.
Elbrifge Gerry. Let us then at once de
stroy the State governments, have an executive
for life, Gr hereditary, and then there will be
some consistency in giving full powers to the
general government ; but, as the States must
not be abolished, I wonder at the attempts that
are made to give powers that are inconsistent
with their existence. I warn you against
pushing the experiment too far. Some people
Will support a plan of vigorous government at
every risk. Others, of a more democratic_
cast, will oppose it with equal determination,
and a civil war will he produced by the con
flint. (13)
Abraham Lincoln. In my endeavors to sus
tain the Constitution it is possible that I have
transcended the powers with which that instru
ment has invested me ; but I have done so to
maintain both the Union and the Constitution.
Andrew Jackson. But the Constitution can
not be maintained nor the Union preserved in
opposition to the public feeling, by the mere
exertion of the coercive powers confided to the
general government ; the foundations must be
laid in the affections of the people, in the se
curity it gives to life, liberty, character and.
property in every quarter of the country, and
in the fraternal attachment which the citizens.
of the several States bear to one another, as.
members of one political family mutually con
tributing to promote the, happiness of each.
other. (14)
Abraham Lincoln. If the Union be the only
bond by which the sovereignty of the States
is to be preserved, then the States themselves
must abandon temporarily a portion of their
power—more than is granted even in the Call
stitntion—to attain so desirable an end as the
preservation of the republic.
Andrew Jackson. The legitimate authority
of the Government is abundantly sufficient for
all the purposes for which it was created and
its powers being expressly enumerated, tbere
can be no justification for claiming anything
beyond them. Every attempt to exercise power
beyond these limits should be promptly, and
firmly opposed ; for one evil example will lead
to other measures still more mischievous; and
if the principle of constructive powers, or sup
posed advantages, or temporary circumstances
shall ever be permitted to justify the assump
tion of a power not given by the Constitution,
the General Government will, before long, ab
sorb all the powers of legislation, and you will
have, in effect, but one consolidated Govern
ment. From the extent of our country, its di
versified interests, different pursuits, and dif
ferent habits, it is too obvious for argument
that a single consolidated Government would
be wholly inadequate to watch Over and protect
its interests ; and every friend of our free in
stitutions should always prepare to maintain
unimpaired and in full vigor, the rights and
sovereignty of the States. (15 )
(1.) Donlas' last speech in the U 8 Senate.
(124 Eireat oration of Daniel Webster ea free Beech
in 1814
(3.) Speech of Henry Clay against the insidious policy
of the Abolitionists.
(4.) From the speech of John Hancock, delivered at
Boston in 1774, on the occasion of the eels} ration of
the anniversary of the Boston massacre of 1770.
(5.) Speech of Patrick Henry on the Federal Consti
tution.
(6.) Speech of Governor Norris in the United States
Se,ate, on the 14th or January, 1802, on an act to pro
vide for the more convenient organization of the courts
of the United States.
(7.) Alexander Hamilton's speech in the New York
convention in 1788.
(8.) ;Speech of John 0. Calhoun in 1833 against the
Force 10.11.
- -
(9) Speech of Madison in the Federal convention
that framed the Constitution. 'See Madison papers,
vol. II
~ p. 761.
(10.) Speech of Hamilton in the same convention. See
Madison Papers, v'l. 1I , p 592.
(1 i ) Speech of Mr. Mason, of Virginia. in same con
vention. Madison Papers, vol. 11.,pp. 9.4-15.
1S (12) See Madison Papers, vol. 11., from pp. 1349 to
((113) see Madison Papers, vol. TIT., from pp,1102. to
1408.
(14 ) Jackson's Farewell Address, Washington, March
3, 1837.
(15 ) The sane.
THE g(RETALIATORr' Oia)ER.
From the Boston Courier
The War Department has issued a general
order, under the signature of the President,
directing "retaliation" upon Rebel soldiers for
certain acts specified in the order. It is re
markable that an order authorizing retaliation,
which is not understood to be conformable
either to Christianity or civilization, should
complain of the acts in question as "a relapse
into barbarism, and a crime against the civil
ization of the age." The inconsistency is the
more marked, that this retaliation is to take
effect, without regard to the individual com
plicity of those wi.o are to suffer the penalty.
So far as appears by the terms of the order,
any officer high or low, may direct soy rebel
soldier in his hands to be executed, or to be
placed at hard labor on the public works, as
the case may be, if, in any part of the seceded
territory, a negro is killed except in battle, or
is sold into slavery.
We need not say that all persons who have
any practical sense of the nature and spirit of
Christianity, or any just idea of the claims of
civilization, will be shocked at the promulga
tion of such an order as this. Whatever may
have been the offences against the negroes
committed by the Rebels, this is neither the
way to check them, nor to promote any of the
legitimate objects of the war. On the contra
ry, ho wever revolting to us may be the thought
that negroes, whom the Government of the
United States, in its weakness and wickedne66 s
has induced to engage personally in the war,
upon some chimerical notion of equalizing
them with white men, should be slaughtered if
found in arms, or e lse sold into slavery, the
idea that persons who have neither killed nor
enslaved them -should, for this cause, be, exe
cuted or subject to the penal labor imposed, is
far more shocking. In fact, if one is murder,
or a crime against justice and humanity, the
other is at least equally such; and the only
effect of it must be to set aside "the law of
nations anti the usages and customs of war, as
carried on by civilized powers," bringing about
an entire "relapse into barbarism." We need
scarcely suggest that the President has no lati=
fill authority to put forth such an order as this;
and that it is simply one more, and a most ag.
gravated, instance of that eiterOlgo of despotic
power to which the bad advisors about him
have too often been able to persuade him.
The kind of reasoning by which Mr. Lincoln
has been led to institute this horrible system
of retaliation, besides its total want of foresight
of the natural consequence° of it, is of the most
superficial and one-sided character. Mr. Lin
coln argues that negroes, being soldiers of the