Daily patriot and union. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1858-1868, July 23, 1863, Image 1

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    RATES OF ADVERTISING.
Roar linos or loin onatittia half a avalua. Yea limps
more than [oar, oonatillaeo a square.
Eq., One daY•••e•- 5430 Oaa mu, oast day...... 20 60
oasweek..... 170 1 op* week.... 200
one mouth.. 300 " one month.. 600
three mouths 600 ~ three monthelo 00
" at m intim.. 800 " six months.. 11140
& ono year— —l2 00 " on• OW 20,00
Er Maness notices inserted in the LOCAL MUMS,
or 444...-• marriages and deaths, TIS MUSTS PIM LISa for
a imorrtion. To merchants and others advertising
y the year, liberal terms will be offered_
E5 l . The number of insertions moat be designated oa
Die ativerti.einent.
UT - Marriages and Deaths will bpi:warted st the emus
4,4ue as regular adrertiaementa. .
Busincos /garbs.
S ILAS WARD.
NO. 11, NORTH THIRD IT., HARRISBURG.
STEINWAY'S PIANOS,
MELODEONS ; VIOLINS, OITITALBS,
Banjos, Mutes, fifes,
STRINGS, SENST AND BOOR undid, die., ite.,
PHOTOGRAPH FRAMES. ALBVMS,
Large Pier and Mantle Mirror., Square and Oval Prams*
of every deseripuoa made to order. Regnilding done.
Agency for Howe's Sewing Machines.
" Sheet Magic sent by Mail. oetl-1
JOHN. W. GLOVER,
1111 E RUM 4NT TAILOR .
Has just received from New Park, an assort
• meat of -
SEASONABLE GOODS,
'which he offers to his customers and the public a
nov=l MODERATE. PRICE'S. atf
• HARRY WILLIA
JeLarM'T'Z'
. .
402 WALNUT STRA'S.O,
PECTLILDELPFIIA.
General Claims for Soldiers promptly ooVecteo, State
Claims adjusted, &c. mir2o-dlm
---
& EWIN - G,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
THIRD STREET, Harritiburg,
Practice in the several Courts or Dauphin county. Col
lections made promptly. A. O. SMITH,
J. B. DIVING.
T cooK,,Merchant Tailor,
. 47 enzaaTur ST., between Soma and Pont,
Has just returned from the city with an assortment of
CLOTHS,. CASSIMERSS AND VESTINGS,
Which will be sold at moderate prides and made up to
order; and, also, an assortment of READY MADE
Clothing and Gentlemen's Furnishing, Goods.
oosm-trii
BENTIST*RI.
B: N. GILDIA, D. D. li n
1Y 0.
119 MARKET STREET,
& KUNKEL'S BUILDING, UP STATEN
janli-ti
R ELIGIOUS BOOK STORE,
TRACT AND SUNDAY SCHOOL DEPOSITORY,
E. S. GERMAN,
El SMITE SECOND STEW, ABOVE OHEBNITT,
aukoziostros, P.
Depot forthe sae of atereozoopeoAtereomploViewp,
Ehudo and Ebasical instruments. Also, erabearliMons
listen for religions intlalea.tivut_ noSO.dy
JOHN G. W. MARTIN,
FASHIONABLE
CARD WRITER,
112.111V8 HOTEL, HARRISBURG, PA.
Al/msnner of VISITING, WEDDING AND BUSI.
Ness CARDS executed in the most artistic stylea and
most reasonable terms. deuld-dtf
UNION HOTEL,.
Ridge Avenue, corner of Broad street,
HARRISBURG, PA.
The unlersigned informs the public that he has re
tautly truest-al end rrfitrea hie ..-11.1-known " Union
Motel" oa avenue, nadir the Round 110111.10, and is
prepared to eczema notate eltrzens, st -angora and travel
ere in the heat style, at moderate r tee
The tattle will be impale.) w.th the beet the markets
afford, and at his bar wi 1 be found superior brands of
lignars and mart beverages. The eery beet anccroma.
detione for railroaders empaayed at the plop-, in this
laid dui EBNRY BOSTri•EN.
FRANKLIN HOUSE,
-
BALT/310,147 1 D •
This pleasant and commodious Hotel has been itio
roughly re-litted and re-furnished. It ,is, pleaesatly
citnatedron North-West corner of Howard and 'Franklin
streets, a few doom west of the Northern Central Rail
way Depot. Ivory attenittou paid to the comfort of his
guests. G. LBIEISNRING, Proprietor,
3612-tr /Late of Mine Grove. Pa.)
HEO. F. SCHEFFER, -
.
SOUL CARD AND JOB PRINTER
NO. 18 MaRIEBT SPURR?, HARRISBURG.
itr' Particular attentio.. paid to printing, ruling and
I lof Railroad Blanks, Manifests,lnsuranee Poli
otlCYreclps, Bill-Heads, .he.
Wedding, Visiting and Business Cards printedst very
low prices and in the beat style. - jan2l
ROBERT BNODGII,ABB,'
ATTORNEY A LAW,
Office .North Third street, thud door above ;Mar
ket, Harrisburg, Pa.
N. B.—Pension, Bounty and Military claim* of all
Minds proste , ent d and collected-
Refer to Bona John C. Kunkel, David MILTOMS, jr"
and IL A. Laraberton.. toyll-datw6m
WM. H. MILLER,
AND
R. E. 1 1 E103-UBON,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW.
OFFICE IN
SHOEMAKER'S BUILDINGS
SECOND STBEET,
BETWEEN WALNUT and MARKET SQUARE,
ap-29w.ttl Nearly opposite the Buehler Rouse,
T HOS.
C. MACDOWELL,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
MILITARY CLAIM AND PATENT 4OENT,
Office in the Exchange, Walnut at., (Up Stairs.)
Baying formed a connection with parties in Wash
ington City, WOO are reliable business men. any busi
ness connected with any of the departments will meet
with immediate and careful attention. . ma-y
D R. 0.
autte - EciN AND OCVLIST,
RESIDINCR THIRD NEAR NORTH IiTRAIIT.
He is now fully prepared to attend promptly to tki
Ma'am of profession in oil its branches.
A LONG AND SIMS saOO2BBIPOL ILIIDICIAL Anynninnto
justlies him in promising full and ample satisfaction tr
all who mayfavor witb a eall, be the disease Obronl•
of env other nature. -
TAILORING.
M CO. AS.. 3EL IA 1er.33 .
The snliseriber -is reads at P.O. 91, MARKET ST.,
four doom below fourth street, to make
MFIST . S - AND BOY'S CLOTHING
In any desired style, and with skill and promptne ßs .
Persons wishing cutting done can have it done at the
short': notice - ap27-sly
CHARLES F. VOLLMER,
UPHOLSTERER,
Chestnut street four doors above Second,
(Omani WASHINGTON ROSS HOUSE.)
Ls prepared to furnieh to order, in the very best style 01
workmanship. laprineand Hair Mattresses, Window Car
tame, Lounges, and all other articles of Furniture In hi.
on short Dome snd moderate terms. Having ea
perishes in the tinniness, he feels warranted estd..it
alone of public patronage, confident of his ability to give
satisfaction. janl7-41tr
MILITARY CLA MS AND PEN
SIONS
The undweigeed have entered into an avollation for
the collection of 11111:farv" Cl hoe Ad the securing of
Pelican @ for iiinitedlrl and fthlibißS @OVUM'S.
Master-oat float. eillearml Pay Rale,
Oracanc•- and fllothine returns, and all °Mewm perta n
ine to th-• 111 WWI aerelee will be made oat properly
sad •xpeditionsly -
Moe in the exchange Beilding■: Walled between
Scee-d and Third strata, near 4.1 , . IV. Hoz.l. Barris
be r. Pa•
.THOS 0 Wat•DOW- Ley
Jett dtf THOMAS-A,MAGUARII.
Drums, .4ccarderrue!
. .
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277:
flteMc&.
4 1 0-4-4*
.DR. SWEET'S
INFALLIBLE LINIMENT,
EMI
GREAT. EXTERNAL REMEDY,
FOR RHEUMATISM, GOUT, NEURALGIA,
LUMBAGO, STIFF NECK AND JOINFS,
SPRAINS, BRUISES, - CUTS do WOUNDS,
FILES, fIEAD.WHE, and ALL RHEU
bIATIC•wad NERVOUS DIAORDERS,
Dr. 'Stephen Svieeit, of Connecticut,
The great Natural Bone Setter
Dr. Stephen Swe&, of Connecticut,
Is known all over the United States.
Dr. Stephen Sweet, of Connecticut,
Is the author of " Dr. Sweetie Infallible Liniment."
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Lbsintent
Cures Rheumatism and never fails.
Dr.. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Is a certain cure for Neuralgia.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Cares Burns and Scalds immediately.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Is the best known remedy for Sprains and Bruises.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Cures Headache immediately and was never known
to tail. . ,
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Affords immediate relitf for Piles, and seldom fails
to care.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Cures Toothache is one minute,
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Cures Cuts and Wounds immediately and leaves no
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Is the best remedy for Bores in the known world.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible LiniMent
Use been need by more than a million people, and all
pre l lee it,
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Is trn'y a E 4 friend In need,'' and every family should
hays it at head.
Dr. Sweet's Infallible Liniment
Is for sale by all Druggists. Price 25 cents.
BIONANDSON & Co.,
Bole Proprietors, Norwich, et.
Por sale by all Dealers. 400 eow-d5. w
Tape - tug.
11 3 LL WORK PROMISED I!,
,
ONE WEEK!
3. 0 916 •
PENNSYLVANIA
STEAM DYEING ESTABLISHMENT,
104 AIABICAT ST BAR 2,
ETWEEN FO URTH dINO PIPTE,
HARRISDIIDG PA.
Where every description 'of Ladies' aneGentlemen's
ferments, Piece Goods, &c., are Dyed, Cleansed, and
Wished in the bat manner and at the shortest notice
nolt-d&wly nronriptors
T . F. 'WATSON,
MASTIC WORKER
AND
PRACTICAL CEMENTER,
is prepared to Cement the exterior of Buildings with
he New York Improved
Water-Proof Mastic 'Cement.
This Material is different Uotn stl other Cements.
It forms a solid, thimble adhesiveness to any surhice.
imperishable by the action of water or frost. Every
good building should be coated with this Cement; it is
a perfect prow ver to - ths walls, and makes a beautiful,
flue finish, equal to Eastern brown sandstone, or any
eo‘or desired.
Among others for wlionx I have applied the Mastic
Oement, I refer to the fondle , ng gentlemen: .
Bipsel4 resideneth Penn street, Pittsburg, finished
flee •ears.
J. H. tilhoenberger, residence, Lawrenceville, finished
five yearn.
James htlCandlass, residence, Allegheny City,finiahed
five years.
Calvin Adams, residence, Third it set, finished four
years. •
A. Hoeveler, residence, Lawrenceville, finished four
. years.
T. D. M'Cord, Penn striii4, finished four ram. '
Hon. Thomas Irwin, Di-wnonli street . , funahni four
years_
St Charles Hotel acd [}hard Boole, finished S►e
para.
_Kittanning Court !louse and Bank„for Barr & Moser,
Architactq, Pi rtsbu g, finishi-d five rim.
Orders received at tliti Nice of it M'kidowney, Paint
Shop, 20 Seventh street, or please address
mayl6-tt
P. 0. Box 13 B. Pittabarg, Pa
MESSRS. OHICKERING & CO.
HAVE AGAIN OBTAINED THE
Gr* 0 L D
AT Tin
MECHANICS' FAIR. BOSTON,
HELD THE PZEOIDING Witi,
OVER SIM COMPETITORS%
Wareroom for the 0/1101EIRIN4 PIANO% at Mamie
burg at 92 Market street;
meia.tf MUST(I FITORAIL
I ADLN3B !. YOU KNOW WERE YOU
can get floe Note Paper, JO Viei•ing and
Wedding Cards ? At oCH*IItVErt , S ROON,ATORE
ioIUYNIIIOR STOCK Ot' .I.IQU' /lid.-
1.. J WM. DOCIIC, Ja:, & CO.. are now able to over to
their eneto..era and toe public at l.rge, a 'Welt of the
purest liquors ever impirted into this market, eompri•
slog in part ihe followinv varieties :
W RISK t —IRISH, SCOTCH:OLD BOURBON.
• WINE—PORT, SHERRY; OLD 'MADEIRA..
OTARD, DUPEY & CO. PALE BRANDY.
• JA MICA SPIRITS.
PRIME NEW ENGLAND . RUM.
DRAKE'S PLANTATION BITTERS
Th en Manors y am a n tim vnarnuatedi and in Addition to
these, Dnck & CO. have on hand a large variety of
Wines, whisky and Brandy, to which they invite the
particular attention of the public •
WEtiSlEtt'S ARMIr i ,,AND NAVY
PACKET DICTIONARY.
het received awl for sale at
8 JRNITIGB'B 110018 Tom
N
,
OTIONS.--Quite & .va ri ety of useful
and entertaining ar
n ti c e w le it er w h ic eltr B il ioi toggwrows.
LACKING 1 !_mAsores “ollAuaNal
6LAOXiimi_3l-100 Goss. iiiistortad ids*, bait t.
etiv*Vand fit sale. sekelastat and Moil.
4.4 "W K. POOH. Ja„
TITENDOW SHADES of linen, gilt
v v bordered; sad PAPER BLINDS of An , endless
misty ort .dedgne, sod ornaments; :eLe, .01711TAIN
IFIITTMAR sat Th4BBllLB a' very krw prieM ciall at
gekefferls Bookstore.
T- F WILTSON.
NI E D A L!
FiAtikl . SP ! Mit4, PA., TiIUESDAY, JULY 23. 1n,63.
T II B
Weekly "Patriot Sr, Union,"
THE: CHEAPEST PAPER PUBLISHED IN
'PENNSYLVANIA!
AND
Till ONLY DEMOCRATIC PAPER PUBLISHED AT
'TEE BEAT oy'GoyERNMENT !
FORTY-FOUR COLUMNS OF READING
TER EACH WEEK I -
AT THE LOW PRICE OF ONE DOLLAR
AND FIFTY CENTS!
' WHEN
SUBSCRLRED FOR IN CLUBS OF NO.T LESS
THAN TEN .COPIES 20 ONE ADDRESS!
We have been compelled to raise the club subscription
price to Ode della! and fifty cents in order to save our.
selves from actual loss. • Paper has risen, including
taxes, about twenty-five per cent., and is still rising;
and when watell our Democratic friends, eandidly, that
we can no longer afford to sell the Weekly PATRIOT AND
UNION at one dollar a year. and must add fifty cents or
stop the publication, we trust they will appreciate our
position, and, Instead of withdrawing their aubecrip
tiona, go to work with a will to increase our list in every
county in the State. We have endeavored. and shall
continue our efforts; to Make the paper useful as a party
organ, and welcoMe as a news messenger to every fam
ily. We flatter ourelvea 'that it has not been without
some influence in pralucing the glorious revolntion in
the polities of the State achieved at the lets election;
and if fearlessness in the dis Charge of duty, fidepty to
the prinCiples of the , party, and an anxiousdesire to pro
mote its interests, with .orad experience and a moderate
degree of ability, can be made serviceable hereafter, the
Weekly PATRIOT . AND ANION inu not be less useful to
the party or leas Welcome to the family circle in the fu
ture than it has been In the past. We COnfidently look
for increased encouragement in ihis great enterprise,
and appeal to every influential Democrat in the State to
lend as his aid in running our enpecription list up to
twenty or thirty thousand. The .es.penee to , each indi
vidual is trifling, the benefit to the party may be great.
Believing that the:Democracy of the State feel the ne
cessity of sustaining a fosr/oss eeatral ores, we make
this appeal to themfor assistance with the fullest confi
dence of memos.
The same reasons which Induce us to raise the price
of the Weekly, operate in regard to the Daily paper, the
price of,which is also increased, The additional cost to
each subscriber will be but trifling; and, while we can
-not perenade ourselves that the change necenearily made
will result in any diminntiop of our •daily circulation,
yet, were we certain that *tuck would be the cones.
quence, wishouldstill be compelled to make it, or suf
fer a.ruinous loss. tinder these circumstances we must
throw ourselves. upon the generosity, or, rather, the
justice of the public, and abide their verdict, whatever
it-may be.
The period hir which many of our subscribers have
paid for their paper being On the eve of expiring, we
take the liberty of leaning this notice, reminding them
of the same, in order that they may
RENEW ,THEIR •CLUBS
We shall also take it as an especial favor if our present
subecribers will urge upon their neighbors the fact that
the Paymor ; arm Limon is the only Democratic paper
printed in Harrisburg,emd considering the large amount
of reading Matter, embracing all the current news of.
the day, and
TELEGRAPHIC DISPATCHES
from everywhere up to the moment the paper goes to
press, political, miscellaneous, general and local news
market reports, is decidedly the
CHEAPEST IfEWSPAPER PUBLISHED IN
M=
There is scarcely a Tillage or town in the State in
which a club cannot be raised if the proper exertion be
made, and surely there are few ploces in which one or
more energetic men cannot be found who are in favor of
the dissemination of sound Democratic doctrines, who
would be willing to make the effort to raise a club.
DEMOCRATS OF THE INTERIOR 1
Let ue hear from you. The existing war, and the ap
proaching sessions of Congress and the State Legiela
turei, are invested with menenal interest, and every man
should have the news.
TERMS.
DAILY PATRIOT AND UNION.
Mingle copy for one yew, in advance2o 00
•
Bionic copy during theAession of the Legislature.. 2 00
City etibiieribera teit cents per week.
Copies supplied to agents at the rate of $1 60 per hun.
dred.
wzr.wr PATRIOT ANDIINION,
Puhtishdd every Thursday.
Single copy one year, in advance *2 00
Ten copies ro one address 15 00
Subscriptions may commence at any time. PAT AL
WAYS IN ADVANCE. We are obliged to mak) this
imperative. In Merry ia.V6IIICB cash must accompany
subscription. Any. perpon tending US 1!, club of twenty
subscribers to the Weekly will, be entitled to s, copy for
his services. The price, even at the advanced rate ie
so low that.we cannot offer greater inducements than
this. Additions may be made at any time.to a club of
subscribers by - remitting one dollar and fifty cents
for each additional name. xt is not necessary to send
the names of those constituting a club, as we cannot
undertake to, address each paper to club subscribers
separately.. specimen espies of the Weekly will be sent
to all *ILO 'desire it.
0. BARRETT & CO., Harrisburg,,a.
N. B.—The following law, passed by Congress in 1860,
dehnes the duty of Postmasters In relation to the de
livery of newspapers to club subscribers :
(Nes Little, Brown 4- Co . 5 s edition of the Lases of 1880,
raga 38: chapter 181, setlion. 1.)
"Provided, however, that where package* of new pa
persor periodicals are received at any post office directed
to one address, and the names of the club subscribers to
which ;hey belong, with the postage for a quarter in ad
vance, shall be handed to the postmaster, he shall de
liver the same to their respective owners."
To enable the . Postroaster to oomply with this regula
tion, it will be necessary that be bs furnished with the
fiat of MIMS COPipodug the club, and paid a quarter's
(or year'ej postage in advance. The uniform Courtesy
of Postowters. affords the assurance that they will
eheerfullyaccommooatielub aabseribers, and the latter
should take care that the postage, which is but a trifle
ie each ease. be paid in advance. Send on the clubs
•
A SPLENDID A S'S OR TMEN T
OP
LITHOGRAPHS,
Formerly retailed at from $3 to $5. srr now rffred at
50 and 75 cents, and $1 and $1 50—published by the Ar
Union, and formerly retailed by them.
Splendid Photoeraphic Album Pictures of all diitin•
guiehed men and Generals of the army, at oozy 10 cts.
For sale at • Se El EFS' ER'S Roast:ye,
18 Market Street, Harrisburg.
BASKETS!
LAME, T•R AVELINO,
MARKET.
LiBROuL,
PAP RR,
KEDIV!,
CLOTHES,
ROUND,
CHILDREN'S;
CAKE,
For sale low, by
jel2
8,000 BrISHELS York State Potatoes,
of dillerent kinds,
1,400 Bushels York B*ata Apples,
A cbotee lot of York Atate Butter.
• Also. a superior lot of Catawba Grapes, and 80 bushels
Shellbarks 7 jaet received and for sale low by
H• W. BIBLE A CO,
. .
dad-at? No. 100 Market street.
WHITE BR ANDY!!!—Fos. PRISIMV -
Iwo PtlltPoBXß.-..A very superior article, (strictly
cured just received as& for sale by
iulyl WH DOCK, Jr:, & 00
0 EW ORLEANS SUGAR 1.-Flat3T Jx
ems Users: , !—Ncir sale by
JY/ 2 WM DOCK Is.. L on
ACKERELI
2.
111110EIREL, Ono. a,i d 2 &in al Woad package
now. and oath paaboya worrogOad• , JUat re 01 0 ,04
for wan low by WII. COOL & CO.
WM. D0C1{,.7.--, .16 CO
t;t',Patriot is Union.
TIIURSDAY• MORNING, JULY 23, 1863.
711 E BATTLE.
.11ELENA.
GBAriatc ArCOUNT OF THE BATTLE OF
THE 4111—THE WILD CHAR* , IS OF PAR
s ovs BRIGADE—WHAT GAITLS OF,IT—
OLH VICTORY—OUR LOSSES.
• •
Hari Ne, Apt., July . 8, 1863.—At last we
have been attacked by Missouri's favorite gen
eral, under the direction of the laggard
Holmes. At four o'clock a. m. ort the 4th day
.of July, the siege gun, which was to give the
signal of attack, loleheel forth its startling
alarm to the little garrison, and immediately
infantry, cavalry and artillery were in motion
t•o take up the various positions assigned them.
For two nights we had been under arms at two
o'clock a: m., and it was but a few momenta
work to place all in readiness.
TO give some idea of the position, let me sly
that Helena lies upon flat ground, upon the
western bank of the Mississippi river: About
a quarter of a mile from the river, end, run
ning parallel to it, high ridges command the
city and approaches, ravines, opening towards
the river, and raked by the gups of Fort Cur
tis, (which is lower than all the ridges, and
centrally located,) being between therm ridgee.
Before the departure of General Gorman, Fort
Curtis wal readily commanded froth all the .
ridges about the city. Generals Ross and
Salon*/ conceived the plan of placing strong
batteries upon these hills as an advanced line,
and connecting each battery by rifle-pits. This
plan was executed, by Lieutenent • James G.
Patton, of the Thirty-thied Missouri, and re
sults have demonstrated the correctness of his
judgment, and the wisdom of the general plan.
Making t he city our base, battery Ais upon
our right running on next to B, C end D.
(which le on the left.) Retweun two ridges
(above and below the town,) - and the river
there is low, flat ground. protected by rifle and
cavalry pits, and flanking
_batteries of ten
pounder Parrots and six and twelve pounder
brass pieces.
"The enemy a4e in force on the old town
road," was the first- intimation of the plan of
attack. This was on the left of our line, and
a strong force of cavalry, with a brigade of
infantry, and four pieces of artillery, was
there. Next came word that the old St. Fran
cis road was occupied in force, and that an
assault was being attempted upon battery A.
Scarcely was this report in' when news came
that batteries C and D were annoyed by sharp
shooters, who were eUpported by heavy.col
-11111118, in which could be distinguished the
rumbling wheels, supposed to be artillery mov
ing into position. Cavalry could be seen in
front of battery B. So much for the disposi
tions of the enemy. They were planned and
timed by a master mind, the pickets being'
driven at all points at almost the same time.
On both flanks the enemy's artillery opened
with some spirit, but no effect, being replied
to rapidly and with good success. The ex
changes were principally at long rdnges for
light pieces, and the design was evidently to
'make a diversion simply, while the centre was
attacked in strong force, thus driving through
nee Tontline - of 'defences and falling , simul la
neously upon the rear Of both flanks. The
success of this plan would have given them
Fort Curtis and the wharf, entirely cutting oft'
our retreat by means of the transports. It
will be seen that their plan entirely ignored
the presence of the gunboat, which they were
not expecting to find at our landing. No bat
teries were opened upon our centre, as they fail
ed, on account of 'ravines, to obtain favorable
positions. Their infantry was relied upon fur
this work. ' Lieutenant General Holmes per
sonally directed the attack upon battery D,
which nes made by Fagan's Arkansas brigade,
while Major General Price directed that upon
battery C. At half pest four a. m. a regiment
moved from cover to attack D, adeancieg in
four ranks in a ridge perpendicular to the line
of that work and flanked by the. guns of C,
which opened upon them with shell as
,soon as
the full length of their line was exposed.
The guns of D opened upon them at the
same moment, the guns of both batteries hav
ing excellent range,. and _tweeting a panic
among the enemy, which was soon increased
to a rout, the regiment drawing off in great
disorder. At'once they were reinforced; the
sharp shooters pressing closer, annoying the.
gunners of C so much that the guns hud to be
turned upon them with canister. One gun of
this battery, however, was used' to assist D.
and again the enemy were checked, faking
cover in the ravines and fallen timber. At
this time a heavy fog fell upon the ridges and
batteries, lasting some three quarters, of an
hour, and causing a cessation of hostilities for
that time. When the fog raised, the force in
front of battery D appeared to have been weak
erted ; while, crossing low ridges between that
and battery C, appeared a brigade of three'
dtst loot regiments.
When di-covered, this brigade (Parson's) was
entirely concealed from the range of guts of
C, but exposed' to that of D, which accordingly
opened upon them with shells from leoth guns,
frequently breaking the column; but only to
see it'closed again and pressing torward The
first line of pits in front of C was flunked, and
the company compelled to ?omit upon tee
battery, where they again stood. In front and
upon boll flanks the enemy charged tills work,
not in regular lines, but, swarming upon our
gallant fellows like locusts. Tire companies
in the pits upon the left of the guns broke and
fled in the greatest confusion; two companies
with the guns and two in the pits to the right
of them, held their ground steadily, firing dou
ble charges of canister and pouring minie balls
into the assailants with the most terrible ef
fect.. They were over ma•ched, however, and
the guns could not be saved. The captain of
the battery spiked, one of his guns as the ene
my reached his parapet, and his gunners, with
rare presence of mind; secured ail the friction
primers, so rendering the battery utterly use
less to the enemy. Part of the stragglers ral
lied at the foot of the hill between batteries C
and D, and made a firm stand, where they were
promptly supported by parts of two regiments,
and the remainder retired to Fort. Curtis, to
act as sharp shooters in protecting the gun
ners.
In poseeesion of Battery C, and flushed with
apparent certain victory, the enemy turned
the captpred guns upon our main fort and loa
ded them pith shell. Then gathering together
his scattered companies who were pillaging
the camp of the two companies: that garri
soned the battery, with one wild, self-confident
yell, be ebarged down the hill immediately in
flout of Fort Canis; charged, not in line or in
column, not with fixed bayonet, showing a
glittering line of polished steel, not as the. '.Old
Guard'? charged at Waterloo, but charged en
mesas, or worse yet; en mobbee. every man be
ing in himself a email host with a leader of its
Own.
The tweet of the hill was six hundred yards
from Port" Curtis, and the base five hundred.
Five 24-pounder siege guns, and one 32.poun
der columniad swept the entire surface of the
hill, from crest totem Although the enemy
- .PRICE TWO CENTS
ha'd loaded our captiired guns with shell , he
could not use them; there were no tilow match
es, to• friction tubes and the gnus were so much
ueeless brass. Without well. posted artillery,
ktow could they hops to • live upon the hill with
the light guns of . A, E and D playing upon
their fl inks arid rear, and the big guns playing
upon their front ?
Nothing but madness could have driven them
on ; nothing short of omnipotence could have
saved them froth destruction, Yet, with the
howl of demons, the last mad, defiant; impotent
howl of baffled but still determined traitors,
exposed to history, to nations and to tbeM
selves ; whipped, naked and hungry, on they
came, cursing, "firing, rushing, like the "Light
Brigade," " into . ' the jaws of death, into the
mouth of bell."
No hurrying, no excitement, and yet no
hesitation in the forts and 6atteriee, but stea
dily ibe Ma, case, grape and canister flew,
with the swiftness of lightning and•the preci
sion of fate, straight In the faces of the infu
riate mob. Hiilisi;lrunks and limbs, hurled
asunder by bursting iron, flew into the air,
nauseating .and.sickeoing all who must witness
the horrible sight No bcdy of men on myth
could long endure such a tornado of iron as
was burled upon them. Their abots all fell.
short, or passed harmlessly over the gunners
of the fort. —Not a man Was even wounded.
Slow to receive conviction, but at last satibfied
of the hopelessness of .their assault, the mob
terned•about, as if by- common consent, and
broke into mtrach3 - of twenty, ten, two, and at
last each man for himself, "and devil take the
hindmost." •
Grapeshot and canister, roundshot and shell
followed them MerCileesly, bore them down
and battered them to pieces. Still they had
not enough, but sought once more to approach
through a ravine, protected by flanking sides
from artillery fire. As they passed from the
battery to • this ravine, one point which the
line must cross was exposed to fire. The guns
succeeded shortly in getting such perfect range
of this point that nothing could pass it. The
resilient and more, that had passed into' the
ravine, could not return, the'brigade could not
pass in tolis support.. A Federal regiment of
infantry was so posted at the mouth of the ra
vine as to rake its length, another took Posi
tion on a ridge upon the enemy's right flank,
end•the two poured in their fire. Crdes fires
from the fort and batteries, aided by the win
boat, broke and scattered what of the brigade
remained upon the ridges, compelling them in
their precipitation to leave the guns they had
captured. uninjured, and the gallant regiment
that had led the second charge, with their
arms, officers and colors. prisoners of . war.'
Not less than three hundred killed and woun
ded, besides nearly four hundred prisobers,
were left by the enemy in the vicinity of this
battery.
Shortly after the attack was commenced
upon Battery C, a second and similar one was
made by Fegan's brigade, in strong force,
upon Battery D. As at the first battery, only
a portion of the brigade succeeded in passing
through our lines. The retnainder were driven
back by a murderous fire from the guns of the
work, and also from our sharpshooters, who
were in greater force than at C, and well pro
tected by rifle pits, which almost entirely con
cealed them from the enemy. Those who suc
ceeded in getting through .took position in a
ravine to the left of the battery, out of range
of its guns,- but raked from the mouth by part
of another battery and the reserve of an in
fantry regiment. They made a short fight,
when they threw down their arms and were
formally surrendered.
The enemy lost at this battery nearly two
hundred and fifty killed and wounded, and be
tween three and four hundred prisoners, with
arms, officers and colors.
At half past ten o'clock a. m. the enemy had
drawn off entirely, and the firing .ceased as the
white flag was run up at Vicksburg. 4
Our total I,iss in killed; wounded and,missing
has been 280; that of the enemy at least 2000.
They estimate their own loss at 2200,_among
them the entire field and'staff of two or three
regiments.
ABOLITION RESISTANCE TO THE ENROLLMENT
IN CLARK COUNTY, ILLINOIS.—On one night
last week the house of Mr. Simon. F. Andrews,
on Dotson Prairie, who had undertaken to en
roll the western part of the county, wee sur
rounded by about fifty men, and his enrolling
papers captured. Re was absent at the time,
and his wife delivered them up. .
Oo the following evening. Mr. Lewis Ryani.
enrolling officer fur Cumberland township, was ,
made to give up his enrolling books and pa
pers by about fifty men, some of them colored,
and on the same night the house of Mr. E. N.
Tarble, enrolling officer of Parker township,
was surrounded and his enrolling books and
papers taken. from him, and on the following
sight, Mr. Richard B srbee, enrolling officer
for Westfield, was captured, but he had not his
books with him, and he gave an order to his
captors to M. Yost, of Westfield, for them, but
the order was not ‘ . ‘honored," as Mr. Y. said
they were not there, and though . diligent
Search was made for them, they werenot found.
"Privets property" everywhere was "respect
ed," which would argue that the depredations
were committed by "rebels ;" but., taking a
serious view of the case; it is getting to be
generally pretty welt understood that these
depredations -were committed by "loyal" men.
No Democrats are known to have been ab
sent from their homes on ebher of those occa
sions, and the enrolling offieers themselves.
show a most remarkable resignation to their
Apparent bad fortunes. There is no hue and
cry raised by their confidential friends or the
Union Leagues generally.
The Union Leagues seem to have got scared
at the draft, and to have taken the above means
to break it down.—Murahog illinotaan.
A VAST CEMETERY.—A correspondent of the
Philadelphia Press, writing from Gettysburg,
says : -
Hundreds of acceaSioos has the Gettysburg
Cemetery rreeived these memorable
days. In one place we counted over one hun
dred graves of New York volunteers, the names
of the brave men all inscribed on 'simple head
boards. In close proximity lie fifty-six rebels
in one trend!), and not far off forty-two more,
without a solitary name inscribed. The spot
itself is designated by a board nailed against
the. tre with the inscription that here lie
so many rebels. 'Several soldiers are buried
within arms length of Dr. Krauth`B real - door.
The Seminary grounds and Dr. Schmuclter's
garden contain a number, and thus it is. all
through the country, within a circuit of eight
or ten miles. It is a vast burial ground.
STOP:START STANTON said the other day, ''lf
a eina,le regiment of•L'e'9 army gets back i nto
•Virginia in an organized condition it will prate
that I am totally unfit to be /Secretary of War."
The people wilt cheerfully adopt the conclu
sion. •This- bull-beaded hien , ul is a greater
drag weight on the government than the na
tionaldebt itself.--Plain Dealer.
Smith. the-rsior strop wittn4.now •hi the 14011
New York regitnent, , lwee,hadly woundel- in
the leg at 'Gettysburg. But he bee '•just one
more left." • ,
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7 „
THE VICKSBURG BATTERIES.
The famous batteries, which made Vicks
burg so.long the Gibraltar .of the Mississippi,
have been thfkobjecitfof mach Curious ii3Speo
- during even the brief time that we hate
been in posession of the city. To the naval
offtoers Wye special
ohkets of attraction s and curious throngs from
the gunboats may be - seen along the bluffs,
examining every gun with exceesiirg minute
ness. -
The formidable character of these' whityksand
the special intifesi which atfaelieSl4 Mein in
connection with the history of the war on the
Mississippi, render more than a passing notice
necessary in speaking of them, and tc that end
I devoted a few hours in a.visit to them:
The be t).ies 'abcve the city were the most
important is the defense of the city and river,
and, in fact, were the main reliance for that
purpose, from the impregnable nature of their
position, as well as the command: which they
bad of the stream for many miles above. The
Mtssiscippi at this point is deflected from its
general course, at a very sharp angle, to the
northeast., and then bending round again as
sharply to the southwest, flows past 'tricks
.burg. The country between this-bend is a
long, narrow spot, covered with brush and
timber, and fringed with a fiat edge of sand.
The timber on the upper end orthia capeLlike
projection was cutaway, leaving nothing but
a waste of stubble, low brush and sand be
tween the batteries and the opposite channel,
so that a vessel, to reach Vicksburg, from up
the river, had to pass in range not only in the
further channel, tut repass in the nearer one,
subjecting itself to . a Continuous - fitte during
the time required to run several . miles.'
Leaving the city by Washington Street—the
main and busineae thoroughfare—the road
gradually ris.a to the bluffs, and iri'the succes
sive elevations of from twenty to fifty feet on
the ground between this road and the river are
the gunsetatiened: Tlie works are constructed
after the manner of forts, but each gun is en
closed by itself, at distances of an eighth and
a quarter eif a mile. Each. has its own inde
pendent parapet, earthifrork, terreplein and
magazine. All, hewever,' are connected by a
covered way, so that, if they do not present
the . consolidated appearance of a regular fort,
the whole eeries may be regarded as but one
extended fort, in Which the stretches of
ground between the guns serve as curtain.
The first gun - outside of the city, and the
lowermost one in the range, is not one of much
importance or great calibre. It was useful in
'keeping up the chain._ The next is the famous
.-Whiltiling Dick," so 'well known in the his
tory of the Beige. 'My remarks on it, how.ever,
form its obituary notice; as its days of execu
tion are over. It burst just betore the sur
render, and a rebel officer informs us fired the
last shot discharged at our mortar-boats.—
Like the desperate criminal, when about to
fall into the hands of justice, it committed
suicide.
Battery Tennessee is the 'designation of the
next gun in the series,. and, though not so
large as many others, its commanding position
rendered it by far the most terrible engine of
death in the whole line. The bluff at this
point is crowned by a beautiful grassy knoll,
and in the heart of this knoll, in an excavation
planked and I 7 oarded, is the gun. It is of En
glish trinufacture, considerably resembling
our Parrott gun, and throws a sixty-pound
conical shot. It is mounted on a 'ship car
riage, With circular traverses, and is eenneeted
by a trench with the magazine, which is
mound-like in shape and heavily sodded.
Ttueremainieg guns about the city are sta
tioned in like eligible positions, and a descrip
tion of them. is unnecessary, as it would bet but
a tepetition of what has been said of the oth
ers.
Mn. VALLANWGHAM IN CANADA.—Soon after
Mr. Vallandigham's presence in ;Montreal be
came known, a dinner was offered him, at, the
club. He declined it on account of having to
leave town lsy the first, train, but the director
of the road offer,ing.bim a special train instead,
he finally accepted the dinner, which was par
taken of by a goodly company . , Mr. Walker, of
London, well known in the Hudson Bay Qom
paay negotiations, presiding. A correspondent
says :
, Mr. Vallandighatn confined his remarks to
general principles of liberty, law, magna
charta, habeas corpus, without any perelnafap
plications to tad own case, and dwelt upon how
much the framers of our Constitution Were
guided by the British barons, of-Runnymede—
my. Lord Coke--the extorters of the right of
petition• from King Charles, the persevering
energy that drew out that British writ of lib
erty, the habeas corpus, &o.' his remarks were
admirable, and did honor to the American
name. The people were urgent that the dem
onstration should be public, but Mr. V. would
not consent to, it. All Canada would have
turned out, if there bad been time, to • testify
through him to magna charta and habeas corpus.
At 11 p. tn. he went off in an extra train which
Mr. Bridges bad provided for him. Our Mon.
treat gentlemen were dilighted with Mr. Val
landigham's understanding of, and compre
hension of, the' great, etre, glee we bad in En
gland to preserve British liberty—which had
cost our fathers two revolutione, one of blood
and tine of peace, in which we bad dethroned
a king and taken a 'queen (William arid Mary.)
One of. the spealtere—Mr. R —said, in com
pliment. the pleasure of meeting Mr. Vallan
.l ghata would fully repay his voyage across
the Atlantic.
A BLACK MAN NOT /1. WHITE MAN'S MILITARY
EQUIVALIiNT —A circular has been• it.sued by
Col. J. F. Bamford, Provost M'r"hal General
of Pennsylvania, which says: "Any min who
is an equivalent for the person drafted, may be
received as a substitute, but a negro, under ex
isting laws, is not• a military equivalent for a white
man." We de not know where Bomford gets
his authority for so deciding. The enrollment
law certainly makes no such distinction be
tween black - and white, for tooth are liable to
enrollment wtyl' to be drafted. Bdmford wlll
be pi , ched into by the radical Abolitionists for
this decision. They have betn asserting the
equality of the negro to the white man, but
here is a provost marehal who will not allow a
black man to be the "military eqnivalent" even
of the white man, or in other woidenot fit to
take his place as a soldier, though there is not
a bin& lino in the law to warrant such a de-
Bomford probably takes for his law
our State Conetitution, which dnes not recog
nize a negro Lobe a citizen, and our State mili
tia laWi which says the militia shall be composed
of able-bodied white citizens. Conscripte,*how
ever, are not the militia, and B.t.mford is not
acting under State laws and State aathority.—
Philadel hia Ledger.
It is stated that out- otNetrerat hundred men
drafted in Providence, R. 1, opiy one man thus
far has been mustered in.. All the rest paid
the $3OO commutitsion.
FLOC? BUGHlXatlai AND LOOMS WILL Or WO
Decr.r," was the assertion invaded by the Re
publican papers in : Connecticut during theist('
Buckinfitiont Whs ei,cledi