Daily patriot and union. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1858-1868, April 23, 1861, Image 1

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    RATES OF ADVERTISING.
Poor lines or lees oonetitate half a spars. Ten UM
Cr more than four, constitute* square.
nlifiCtomoollY— 80.25 One aq., one day
" one west.— 1.00 gg one week. —. 1.21
4‘ 8.00
u one month..
onesmith_ 2.00 ..
u th r ee sien tB l . 8.00 cc three month s. 6.00
sixmonthe.... 4.00 g 'six months. B.or
14 ono raiz_ coo g , one year.— 10.00
Thlableril notices inserted in the LOCAL MM. or
tam marriages and dea ths, nem Cairn rsa tans for
iametkaL sters hastiouid others advertietngbytheyear
Mberattei in will be offered.
Er The mun esrofinaertiona most be designated on the
inertieement.
m arr i a ges and Deaths will be Inserted at the lame
sac iegn ur Advertisements.
Books, Stationerp, Su.
QCHOOL BOOKS.—School Directors,
I . Teachers, Parents, Scholars, and others, in want of
School Books, School Stationery, &c., will find a complete
assortment at B. M . POLLOCK & SOWS BOOK STORE,
Market Spare, Harriaburg, comprising in part the follow-
'v im)
ERS.—MeGnffers, Parker's, Cobb. AsVIPs
SPELLING BOOKS.—MeGuffey% Goth's, Webster's,
Tomes, Ilyerly's. Oombry's_
ENGLISH GBAKILIBS.—BoIIion% Smith's, Wood
bride's, Monteith,s, Tuthill', Hart% Wells'.
BISTOBISS.--Grimehaw's, Davenport's, Frost's, Wil
son% Willard's, Goodrich's, Pinnock , s, Goldsmith's and
Marrs.
JUSixtustariC , l3.--Greenlesra, Stoddard's sEmerson's,
Meals, Roesis, Colburn's, Smith and Duke's, bavie'e.
ALGHBRAL—Greenleara, Davis's, Day's, Hers,
1112 V. •
ITlONARTlL—Worces*er's Quarto, Academic, Com
prehensive and Primary Dictionares. Waiters nohow,
Cobb's, Walser, Webster's Primary, Webster's High
School. Webster's Quarto.. Academic.
NATURAL eaThOSOPHLRe.--elomstocles, Parker's,
Swift's. The above with a great variety of others can at
any time be found at my store. Also, a complete assort
ment of School Stationery, embracing in the win le a com
plete outfit for school purposes. Any book not in the store.
preened at one days notice.
Er Country Merchants sapplied at wholesale rates.
ALMANACS.—John Baer and Son's Almanac tor sale al
N. POLLOCK & SON'S BOOR STOGY, Harrisburg.
Wholesale and Retail. aryl
PHOLSTERIN. 9- .
C. F. VOLLMER
Is prepared to do all kinds of work in the
17PROL STE RING BUSINESS.
Pays particular attention to MAKING AND PUTTING
DOWN CARPETS AND REPAIRING MAN
TRAS/IBS, REP AIRINGMAKING
FURNITURE, Itc., &c. He
can be found at all times at hie residence, in the rear of
the William Tell louse, corner of Raspberry and Black
berry alleys. sep29-dly
LETTE R, CAP, NOTE PAPERS,
AA Pens, Holders, Pencils ? Envelopes, Sealing Wan, of
the best quality, at low prices, direct from the mann
factories, st
mar3o
SCHREYER'S CHEAP BOOKSTORE
LAW BOOKS ! LAW BOOKS !!-A
general assortment of LAW BOORS, all the State
Reports and Standard Elementarj Works, with many of
the old English Reports, scarce mad rave, together with
large assortment of second-hand Law Books, at very
low prices, at the oree price Booketore ef
E. IL POLLOCK Sr SON,
na yS Market Square, Harrisburg.
Atlistellantous.
•
AN ARRIVAL OF
NEW GOODS
APPROPRIATE TO THE SEASON!
SILK LINEN PAPER
FANS! FANS!! FANS!!!
incases Awn smisnin Lor or
SPLICED FISHING RODS!
Trout Flies, Gut and Hair Snoods, Grams Lines, Silk
and Hair Plaited Lines, and a general assortment of
FISHING TACKLE!
• armee TAMMY OP
WALKING •CANES!
Which we will sell as cheap as the cheapest!
Silver Head Loaded Sword Hickory Fancy
Canes! Canes! - Canes! Canes! Canes!
KELLER'S DRUG AND FANCY STORE,
no. 91 MARKET STREET,
South side, one door east of Fourth street je9.
WE. OFFER TO
C - USTOMERS_.
LADIES' PURSES,
Of Beautiful Styles, Embstantiallf made
A splendid Assortment of
GENTLEMEN'S WALLETS.
A New and Elegant Perfume,
KNIGHTS TEMPLARS' LBOQUET,
Pnt up in Cut Glass Engraved Bottles.
A Complete Assortment of
!HANDKERCHIEF PERFUMES,
Of the beat Manufacture.'
A very Handsome Variety of
POWDER PUFF BOXES.
lzw.LT RR'S DRUG STORE,
Jen 91 Market street
,CANDLESII!
PARAFFIN CANDLES,
SPERM CANDLES, - -
STEARIN E CANDLES,
ADAMANTINE CANDLES,
ciumicAL SPERMCANDLES,
STAR Wynnton) CANDLES,
TALLOW CANDLES.
A invoice of the above in store; and for sale at
surmsy low rates, by
WM. DOCK, 7a., & CO.,
janl Opposite the Court House
GUN AND BLASTING IJOWDER.
JAMES M. WHEELER,
HARRISBURG P .
AGENT .FOR ALL
POWDB-B, AND FUSE
MAIIIIFIBTURBD BY
I. E. DUPONT DE NhIMOURS & CO.,
WILMINGTON, DELAWARE.
1E4.'1 large supply always on hand. For sate at manu
iseturees priced_ Magazine two miles below town_
117. Orders received at Warehouse_ nol7
TIIST RECELVI+IO—A large Stock of
SCOTCH ALES, BROW STOUT and LONDON
TORTER. For sale at the lowest rates by
JOHN H. ZIEGLER,
73 Market street.
jan.ll
S 1111 FI S Hll,l
F
MACKEREL, (Nos.l, 2
sA and 3.)
LmoN, (very superior_)
STEAD, (Mess and very fine.)
HERRING, (extra large.)
COD FISH.
SMOKED 'HERRING, (extra Digby.)
SCOTCH HERRIN G.
SARDINES AND ANCHOVIES.
Of the above we have Mackerel in whole, half, quarter
sad eighth bbls. Herring in whole and half bbls.
The entire lot new—DIRECT FROM THE FISHBRIES, and
will sell them at the lowest market - rates.
Sepl4 WM. DOCK, .Tn., de CO.
ThOW KY WOOD! 1-A SUPERIOR LOT
ud
'b received, and for sale in quant t WHEELER to Emit pur-
chasers, y JAMES M.
Also, OAK AND PINE constantly on hand at the
Dowest prices. dcc6
FAMILY BIBLES, from 10 to *lO,
strong and handsomely bound, printed on good paper,
with elegant clear now type, sold at
mot= 80FIEFFIIIVS Cheap Booluttwe.
BOIIRBON WHISKY.—A very Supe
rior Article of BOURBON WHISKY, in quart bot
tles, in store and for sale by JOHN , II. ZIEGLER,
mars 73 Market Street.
ITARRISON'S.HOUSEHOLD SOAP.
50 BOXES OF THIS PERFECT. SOAP. For sale
at Manufacturer% prces. A. ROBINSON& CO.
mar°
TTAVANA ()RANG - ES !I !
A prime lot Just received by
oc3o. WM. DOCK, Ja., fr, Co.
WI a onperior and cheap TABLE or
.2. SALAD OIL go to
KELLER'S DRUG STORE:
.T" Fruit Growers' Handbook—by
WAKlNG—waolessip and retail at
mahal 80 IT ERIFERni Bookritnre.
'PERM eA.NDLES.—A large supply
m,.. just received by
yin DOGS. Jx.. & 00.
GARDEN SEED 1.11-A FRESH AND
COUPLET& assortment, jut received and, for sale by
Egin Vol. DOCK, TL, & CO.
CIRAbi 13E RRIES ! !—A SPLUDID LOT
1 - 0
mat reeeived by
octie
PRANBERALIES--A very Superior lot
NJ at ooze.] WM. DOOK, Js. & COI
WM. DOCK. Zs-, & CO
- •
\•• -
\i.777:-- , •
atr
iot
•
-.:1.
11 '1111714 • • ..1;111 , 1
' -
VOL. 3.
tin:o of Zrauel.
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD.
SUMMER TIME TABLE.
L.,,.,._,,N-.1 I- .r.j" „ir7F: - ' 77:77777- g r.: 4o e;';•• . '
7 - _ - 17, 4111111, a 7 - Al•Slar.
Cr 111 I j tI i i 1I II I II":
ON AND AFTER
MONDAY, APRIL 15, 1861,
The Passenger Trains of the Pennsylvania Railroad
Company will depart from and arrive at Harrisburg and
Philadelphia as follows :
EASTWARD
THROUGH EXPREaS TRAIN leaves Harrisburg at
1 15 a. in., and arrives at West Philadelphia at 5.10 a. m.
FAST LINT leaves Harrisburg at 6.20 a. m., and ar
rives at West Philadelphia at 10.05 a. in.
FAST MAIL TRAIN leaves Harrisburg at 1.15 p. in.,
and arrives at West Pbiladelphiat at 5.10 p. m.
These Trains make close connections at Philadelphia
with the New York Lines.
ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, No. 1, via Mount Toy,
leaves Harrisburg at 7.30 a. in., and arrives at West
Philadelphia at 12.30 p. m.
HARRISBURG ACCOMMO s DATTON TRAIN, via Co.
lumbia, leaves Harrisburg at 4.10 p. in., and arrives at
West Philadelphia at 9.25 p. m.
ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, No. 2, via Mount Joy,
leaves Harrisburg at 4.20 p.m., connecting at Dillerville
with HARRISBURG ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, and
:knives at West Philadelphia at 9.20 p. m.
WESTWARD,
THROUGH EXPRESS TRAIN leaves Philadelphia
10.45 p. m , Harrisburg 3.05 a. in., Altoona 8.05; arrives
at Pittsburg 12.40 p. m.
MAIL TRAIL leaves Philidelphia 7.30 a. in., Harris
burg 1.10 p. m., Altoona 7.05 p. m. , and arrives at Pitts
burg 12 20 a, in.
PAS LINE leaves Philadelphia 11.45 a. in., Harris
burg 4 05 p. m., Altoona 8.40 p. m.. and arrives at Pitts
burg 1 00 a. m.
HARRISBURG ACCOMMODATION TRAIN leaves
Philadelphia 230 p. m., Lancaster 6.05 p. m., Columbia
6.40 p. m., and arrives at Harrisburg 8.05 p ni.
ACCOMMODATION TRAIN leaves Philadelphia 4.00
p. m., Lancaster 7.44 p. m., Mount Joy 8.28 p. m., Eliza
bethtown BAB p.m., and arrives at Harrisburg 9.45 p. m.
Attention is called to the fact that passengers leaving
Philadelphia 400 p. m. connect at Lancaster with
MOUNT JOY ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, and arrive
at Harrisburg at 9.45 p. m. ' SAM'L D. YOUNG,
Supt. East. Diu. Penna. R. R.
Harrisburg, April 12, 1861.—dtf
ITEW AIR LINE ROUTE
T 0
NEW. YORK.
•
Shortest in Distance and Quickest in Time
' BETWEEN THE TWO CITIES OF,
NEW YORK AND HARRIBBIIEG,
VIA
READING, ALLENTOWN AND EASTON
MORNING EXPRESS, West, leaves New York at I
a. in., arriving at Harrisburg at - Ip. in., only 6 hours
between the two cities.
MAIL LINE leaves New York at 3214 noon, and as
rives at Harrisburg at 8.15 p. in.
MORNING MAIL LINE, East, leaves Harrisburg
8.00 a. in arriving at New York at 5.20 p. m.
AFTERNOON EXPRESS LINE, East, leaves Harris
burg at 1.80 p. m., arriving at New Yoik at 9.45 p. m.
Connections are made at Harrisburg at 1.00 p. m. with
the Passenger Trains in each direction on the Pennsylva
silt, Cumberland Valleyand Northern Central Railroads
All Trains connect at Reading with Trains for Potts.
trills and Philadelphia, and at Allentown for Mauch
Chunk, Easton, &c.
No change of Passenger Cars or Baggage between New
York and Harrisburg, by the 6.00 a. in. Line from New
York or the 1.15 p. in. from Harrisburg.
For beauty of scenery and speed, comfort and acconi
medation; this Route presents superior inducements to
the traveling public.
Fare between New York and Harrisburg, FIVE DOLLARS
For Tickets and other information apply to
J. J. CLYDE, General Agent;
dels Harrisburg.
11HILADELPHIA
AND
READING RA ILR 0 Arlo
WINTER A'RRANG.EMENT.
ON AND AFTER DEC.' 12, 1860,
TWO PASSENGER. TRAINS LHA.V.2 RARRISBURG
DAILY, (Sundays excepted,) at 3.00 A. M., and 1.15 P.
51., for Philadelphia, arriving there at 1.25 P M., and 6.15
P. M.
RETURNING., LEAVE PHILADELPHIA at 8.00 A.M.
and 3.80 P. M., arriving at Harrisburg at 1 P. M. and 8.10
P.M.
FARES To Philadelphia, 40. I•Care, $3.25; No. 2,
(1* same train) . 32.75. • , •
FARES ReadjuP; $1.60 and $l.BO.
At Reading, connect with trains for Pottavige, Wines
vile, Tamaqua, Catawissa, &c.
FOUR TRAINS LF,AYE READING FOR PHILADRL
PHIL DAILY, at BA. M.,10.45 A. M.,12.80 noon and
8.43 P. M.
LEAVE PHILADELPHIA ROE READING at 8 A.
ii.j.oo 8.80 2. Di., gad 5.00 P.
FARES:—Reading to' Philadelphia, 31.75 and $1.45.
THE MOBBING TRAIN FROM HARRISBURG CON
NECTS AT READING with up train for Wilkeabarre
Pittston and Scranton. •
For through tickets and other information apply to
' J.J. CLYDE,
dels.dtf General Agent.
PHILADELPHIA
AND
READING RAILROAD.
REDUCTION OF PASSENGER FARES,
ON AND AFTER MONDAY, APRIL 2, IE6O
COMMUTATION TICKETS,
With 20 Coupons, will be issued between any points
desired, good for the holder and any member of his
family, in any raDBODgOr train, and at any time—at
per cent. below the regular fares.
Parties having occasion to use the Road frequently on
business; or pleasure, will find the above arrangement
convenient and ernoomioal; as Four Passenger trains
run daily each wsv between Reading and Philadelphia,
and Two Train , i'v' v between Reading, Pottsville and
Harrisburg. 0 , Svriart, onlyone morn ing train Down.
and one &igen Crr train Up, rang between Pottsville:m.l
philaelphi• aai eo Passenger train on the Lebanon
Valley Brerr, Railroad.
For the above Tickets, or 'any Information relating
theretr apply to S. Bradford, Req., Treasurer,Philadel
phia., a the respective Ticket Agents on the line, or to
R. A. NICOLLS, General Supt.
Maven 27, 1860.—mar22-dtf
NORTHERN CENTRAL RAILWAY.
NOTICE.
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
SPRING ARRANGEMENT.
ON AND AFTER. FRIDAY, MARCH lsr, 1861 the
Passenger Trains of the Northern Central Railway will
leave Harrisburg as follows
GOING SOUTH;
• ACCOMMODATION TRAIN will leave at..S•OO a. m.
EXPRESS TRAIN will leave at . 7.40 a. in.
MAIL TRAIN , will leave at .. LOU p.m.
GOING NORTE •
MAIL TRAIN will leave at --.... 1.40 p. m.
EXPRESS TRAIN will leave at...........p. m.
The only Train leaving Harrisburg en Sunday will I e
the ACCOMMODATION TRAIN South_ at SAM a. azi.
For further information apply at the office, in Penn
sylvania Railroad Depot. JOHN W. HALL, Agent.
Harrisburg. March 14-dtf. •
j al MD BEEF—An extra lot of DRLED
„Ij BUY pint received by
• un9 WM. DOCK, Jte., & CO.
It WILING - TON HERRING I
Tu4 recoiied by WM, POCK, k 00.
ocl
HARRISBURG, PA., TUESDAY, APRIL 23, 1861.
Vatriot
TUESDAY. MORNING. APRIL 23, 1861.
THE LAST DAYS OF CHARLES 11. OF
SPAIN.
The prince on whom so, much depended was
the most miserable of human beings. In old
times he would have been exposed as soon as
he came into the world, and to expose him
would have been a, kindness. From his birth
a blight was on his body, and on his mind.
With difficulty his almost imperceptible spark
of life had been screened and fanned into a dim
and flickering flame. His childhood, except
when he could be rocked and sung into sickly
sleep, was one long, piteous wail. Till he was
ten years old his days were passed on the laps
of women, and he was never once suffered to
stand on his rickety legs. None of those
tawny little urchins, clad in rags stolen from
scarecrows, whom Murillo loved to paint beg
ging or rolling in the sand, owed less to edu
cation than this despotic ruler of 30,000,000 of
subjects. The most important events in the
history of his kingdom, the very names of pro
vinces and cities which were .among his most
valuable possessions, were unknown to him. It
may well be doubted whether he was aware
that Sicily was an island,, that Christopher
Columbus had discovered America, or that the
English were not Mohammedans. In his youth,
however, though too imbecile for study or
business, he was not incapable of being amused.
He shot, hawked and hunted. He enjoyed with
the delight of a true Spaniard two delightful
spectacles: a horse with its bowels gored out
and a Jew writhing in the fire. The time came
when the mightiest of instincts ordinarily wa
kens from its repose. It was hoped that the
young king would not prove invincible to female
attractions, and that he would leave a Prince
of Asturias to succeed him. A consort was
found for him in the royal family of France,
and her beauty and grace gave him a languid
pleasuie. He liked to adorn her with jewels,
to see her dance, and to tell her what sport he
had had with his dogs and falcons. But it was
soon whispered that she was a wife only in
name. She died, and her place was supplied
by a German princess nearly , allied to the im
perial house. But the second marriage, like
the first, proved barren, and long before the
king had passed the prime of life all the politi
cians of Europe had begun to take it for granted
in all their calculations that he would be the
last descendant in the male line of Charles V.
Meanwhile a sullen and abjeCt melancholy took
possession of his soul. The diversions which
had been the serious employment of his youth
became distasteful to him. He ceased to find
pleasure in his nets and boar spears, in the
fandango and the bullfight. Sometimes he shut
himself up in an inner chamber from the eyes
of his courtiers. Sometimes he loitered alone,
from sunrise to sunset, in the dreary and rug
ged wilderness which surrounds the Escurial.
The hours which he did not waste in listless
indolence were divided between childish sports
and childish devotions. He delighted in rate
animals, and etili.morein dwarfs. When nei
ther strange beasts nor little men could dispel
the black thoughts which gathered in his mind,
he repeated Ares and Credos ; he walked in
processions ; sometimes he . starved himself ;
sometimes he whipped himself. At length a
complication of maladies completed the ruin of
all his faculties. •
His stomach failed; nor was this strange,
for in him the malformation of the jaw, char
acteristic .of his family, was so serious that he
could not masticate his food, and he was in the
habit of swallowing.ollas and sweetmeats in the
state in which they were set before him. While
suffering from indigestion he was attacked by
ague. Every third day his convulsive trem
blings, his dejection, his fits of wandering,
seemed to indicate the approach of dissolution.
His misery was increased by the knowledge
that everybody was calculating how long he
had to-live, and wondering what would become
of his kingdom When he should be dead. The
stately dignitaries of his household, the phy
xicians who ministered to his diseased body;
the divines whose business it was to soothe his
not less diseased mind, the very wife who
should have been intent on those gentle offices
by which female tenderness can alleviate even
the misery of hopeless decay, were all thinking
of the new world which was to commence with
his death, and would have been perfectly wil
ling to see him in the hands of the•embalmer,
if they could have tieen ceitain thathis Succes
sor would be the prince whose interest they
espoused.
f" In a very short time the king's malady took
a new form. That he was too weak to lift his
food to his misshapen mouth; that at thirty
seven he had the bald head and wrinkled face
of a man of seventy ; that his complexion was
turning from yellow to green; that he fre
quently fell down in fits, and remained long
insensible—these were no longer the worst
symptoms of his malady. He had allifiysheen
afraid of ghosts and demons, and it lad 'long
been necessary that three friars should watch
every night by his restless bed as a guard against
hobgoblins. But now he was firmly convinced
that he was bewitched, that he was possessed,
that there was a devil within him, that there
were devils all around him. He was exercised
according to the forms of his church, but this
ceremony, instead of quieting him, scared him
out of almost all the little reason that nature
had given him. In his misery and despair he
was induced to resort to irregular modes of re
lief. His confessor brought to court impostors
who pretended that they could interrogate the
powers of darkness. The devil was caled up,
sworn and examined. This' strange deponent
made oath, as in the presence of God, that his
Catholic majesty was under a spell, which had
been laid on him many y ears before, for the
purpose of preventing the continuation of the
royal line. A ding had been compounded out
of the brains and kidneys of a human corpse,
and had been administered in a cup of choco
late. This potion had dried up all the sources
of life, and the best remedy to which the pa
tient could now resort would be to swallow a
bowl of consecrated oil every morning before
breakfast.
Unhappily, the authors of this story fell into
contradictions which they could excuse only
by throwing the blame on Satan, who, they
s'tid, was an unwilling witness, and a liar from
the beginning. In the midst of their conju
ring the inquisition came down upon them. It
must be admitted that if the buly office had
reserved all its terrors for such cases, it would
not have been remembered as the most hateful
judicature that was ever known among civilized
men. The subaltern impostors were thrown
into dungeons. But the chief criminal contin
ued to be master of the king and of the kingdom.
Meanwhile, in the distempered mind of Charles
one mania succeeded another. A longing to
pry into those mysteries of the grave irom
which human beings avert their thoughts had
long been hereditary in his house. Juana,
from whom the mental cGnstitution of her pos
terity seems to have derived a morbid taint,
had sat, year after year, by the bed on which
by the ghastly remains of her husband, ap
parreled in.the rich embroidery and jewels
which he had been wont to wear while living.
Her son Charles found an ementrio pleasure in
celebrating his own obsequies, in putting on
his shroud, placing himself in the coffin, cov
ering himself with the pall, and lying as one
dead till the requiem had been sung, and the
mourners had departed, leaving bim alone in
the tomb. Philip /L found a similar pleasure
in gazing on the huge chest of bronze in which
his remains were to be laid, and especially on
the skull which, encircled with the crown of
Spain, grinned at him from the cover. Philip
IV., too, hankered after burials and burial
places, gratified his curiosity by gazing on the
remains of his great grandfather, the emperor,
and sometimes stretched himself out at full
length, like a corpse, in the niche which he
had selected for himself in the royal cemetery.
In that cemetery his son was now attracted by
a strange fascination. Europe could show no
more magnificent place of sepulture. A stair
case incrusted with jasper led down from the
stately church of the Escurial into an octago
situated just beneath the high altar. The vault,
impervious to the sun, was rich with gold and
precious marbles, which reflected the blaze from
a huge chandelier of silver. On the right and on
the left reposed, each in a =Say sarcophagus,
the departed kings and queens of Spain. Into
this mausoleum the .king descended with a long
train of courtiers, and ordered the coffins to be
unclosed. His mother had been embalmed
with such consummate skill that she appeared
as she had appeared on her deathbed. The
body of his grandfather, too, seemed entire,
but crumbled into dust at the first•touch. From
Charles neither the remains of his mother nor
those of his grandfather.could draw , any signs
of sensibility. But when the gentle and grace
ful Louise, of Orleans, the miserable man's first
wife, she who lighted up his dark existence
with one short and pale gleam of happiness,
presented herself, after the lapse of ten years,
to his eyes, his sullen apathy gave way. ,"Lihe
is in heaven," he cried, "and I shall soon be
there with her ;" and, with all the speed of
which his limbs were capable, he tottered back
to the upper air.
MURDER WILL OUR
A young butcher, who lived with his mother
near Smithfield Bars, was better known in the •
ale-house in the neighborhood than he was in
the market, and was generally accounted as
great a rascal as was. to be met with out of
Newgate. Cards and dice, drink and dissolute
company, emptied his pockets of every groat,
and the mother's slender resources. were con
stantly drained to supply his vicious propensi
ties. One night inflamed by liquor and losses
at the gaming table, he cam) home, and look
ing into his mother's room, found her asleep
He had a suspicion that the money with which
the grazier was to be paid, was hidden some
where in the room, and creeping in as lightly
as he could, be began to search the drawers,
but found nothing but a steel, a blue apronand
a butcher's knife. With the last in his hand
he approached the bed where his mother lay
asleep, and beneath her pillow caught sight of
a leacher pouch ; he reached out his hand,
seized it, and himself was seized. The poor
woman grasped him tightly by the arm, and
screamed for help. Not knowing who was her
assailant, she screamed for her son—and that
son silenced her cry for ever! With £2O in his
possession he stole away from the house;
hired a boat at Billingsgate to carry him to
Tilbury, pretending he was going, to buy cattle
at a fair in Essex. The boat pushed off, and
he was never seen again.
When the murder was • discovered in the
course of the next day, suspicion was at, once
excited that he had been her assassin. His
wild course of life and frequent quarrels with
his mother were well known ; the brutal threats
he had been heard to utter, the desperate
things he had been known to do, all assisted in
fixing the guilt of the murder upon him ; but
search was made for him in vain. He had been
seen to enter the hdluse at Smithfield Bars ; he
had not been seen •to leave it; but a person
answering to his description had been observed
at Billingsgate, and nothing further could be
traced.
Some people conjectured that he had escaped
to foreign parts; others that he had fallen into
the river and been drowned, but nothing was
known with certainty for many years after.
About eleven ye ars after the murder, two:
watermen, named Smith and Gurney, were
playing at a shuffle-board in .a tap-room.—
Quarrelling over the game, incited to fury by
the liquorthey had drank, they began to accuse
each other of crime.
" Be careful, Mr. Gurney, or I'll hang you'
yet !»
"Hang me !" retorts the other," there belt
Jong cord and short shrift. for bo th of us."
"I told thee no good would come of it; that
to murder the fellow would be a safe road to .
the gallows."
"And I told thee that sharing the money and
washing the boat was not a whit the better."
These angry words collected - a crowd of
idlers, who were drinking in the tap-room, and
among them a parish constable, who immedi
ately took both into custody.
On the examination of the prisoners, it ap
peared that the butcher, who took a boat . with
'them on the night of the murder, boasted of the
moneyise possessed, and that they agreed to
rob and murder him, and in this attempt they
succeeded, stabbing the man, taking his money
which they shared between them, and throwing
the body overboard.
On their own confessions, they were convic
ted, condemned, and executed at Maidstone,
and banged in chains a little above Gravesend.
None of the butcher'e relations knew what
bad become of him until this happened, but
the fact was then established that the murder
er, in his efforts to elude justice, had met a
barbarous death, but that the instruments of
his punishment were not allowed to escape, and
also that by a strange and mysterious course
of events they betrayed themselves, and were
brought to justice.
DISCOVERY OF MOUNTAINS IN AFWICA.-In
England considerable excitement has been
created among naturalists and geographers, by
the startling discoveries recently made in Cen
tral Africa by a gentleman now in London, Mr.
Chaylion, a gentleman of mixed French and
American blood, who, mailing himself of the
facilities given by his position as son of a con-
Maim officer near the Gaboon river, has pene
trated across the African continent on the line
of the equator, and has there discovered, in a
densely wooded region, a range of lofty moun
tains, (one peak calculated by him 12,000
feet,) which contain, according to his convic
tion, the sources of the four great rivers of the
African continent, the Nile, the Niger, the
Zambesi, and the Zaire, or Congo.
SHOCKING ACCIDENT IN NEW YORK.—The
Russian Consul Killed.—Mr. Jno. C. de Nott
beck, the Russian Consul for the port of New
York, was instantly killed on Friday last. He
was driving up Broadway in a buggy, accom
panied by his wife, when near the corner of
Pony-ninth street his horse became restive and
fell. Mr. de Nottbeck was thrown from the
vehicle, striking on the pavement, and taken
up insen s ible. He was removed by the police
into an adjoining station house, where he died.
TILE WAR NEWS !
PROM NEW YORK
Naw Youx, April 21.—Evening—The Rhode
Island regiment, under command of Governor
Sprague, one thousand strong, arrived here this
morning, and left in the steamer Coatzacoaloos
at sundown.
The Sixth, Twelfth and Seventy-first New
Yprk regiments, comprising 3,000 men, marched
dowik Broadway to-day, fully armed and equip
ped. The scene on Broadway was perfectly
.unparalleled, and the march was a perfect ova
tion. The crowd was estimated at nearly a
million of people, who showered their blessings
on the troops, and exhibited the wildest demon
strations of patriotism.
The Twelfth regiment embarked on the
steamer Baltic, and the Seventy-first on the
steamer R. R. Cuyler, which left at 6 o'clock,
accompanied by the Revenue cutter . Harriet
Lane. The latter sails under sealed orders,
probably as an escort.
The steamer, Columbia also joined the fleet,
taking the Sixth regiment.
The steamer Ariel will take the Third battal
ion of rifles, of Massachusetts, and some regu
lars. The , steamer Chesapeake took aboard
300 seamen, but returned them, the orders being
countermanded.
The harbor was a scene of great excitement
as the fleet left. All the piers, landings. and
housetops of this pity, Jersey City, Hoboken
and -Brooklyn, were crowded. The battery was
covered with people, and thousands of boats
saluted the fleet as they started clown the bay.
Flags were dipped, cannon roared, bells rang,
steam' whistles shrilly saluted, and thousands
upon Thousands of people sent up cheers of
parting. •
The steamers Monticello, Marion, James Ad
ger and Roanoke have their steam up, ready to
sail at a moment's notice. e The steamer Parks
burg, and the steamers Florida, Alabama and
Augusta, of the Savannah lines, have been
chartered by the Government.
. It is understood that the fleet. will rendezvous
in the lower bay, and all start together in the
morning. • •
W. W. Leland, of this city, a large landholder
of Texas, whose property there has been con
fiscated, has 'been tendered and, accepted a
Major's commission in the Engineer Corps,
Ninth Regiment.
Archbishop Hughes, in common with a great
number. of other private citizens, has. suspen
ded the Stars and Stripes from the w,indows of
his residence.
A large number of the most respectable citi
zens of foreign birth are volunteering in addi
tion to the regular Irish and German militia
regiments. The same is true of New England.
The Emmett ,Guard, of Worcester, Mass., is
among the arrivals to-day.
The sons of our most wealthy merchants,
lawyers, judges and divines are enlisted in the
ranks of the defenders of the Union.
Each regiment which left to-day numbered
nearly 1000 men.
Tao; April 21.—General Wool will leave
here to-morrow morning for New York, to
make that city his headquarters for the Depart
ment of the East.
There was considerable, excitement at the
Westervliet Arsenal to-day.
SECESSION MOVEMENTS
LOUISVILLE, Ky., April 20.—Ex-Vice Presi
dent Breekinridge . addressed a large audience
at the Court House this afternoon. He de
nounced President Lincoln's Proclamation as
illegal; saying that he - could not make his 75,000
men efficient till after the meeting of Congress.
He. proposed that Kentucky should present
hertielf to Congress on the 4th of July ,through
her Senators and Representatives, and pi otest
against the settlement of the present difficulties
by the sword. Meanwhile, that Kentucky
should call a Convention to aid her 'Congress
men in.presenting such a protest. Should that
fail, the honor,
interest and duty of Kentucky
unite her with the South.
Governor Magoffin has not called a special
session of the Legislature on the 29th inA., as
reported in our newspapers. The'Proclamation
has been diawn up, but not issued by the au
thorities.
A military alliance is about to be formed
between this city and 'New Albany and Jeffer
sonvillai Indiana, to preserve a peaceable
status bet Ween the three cities and to, preserve
amicable relations in any event.
The Holm Guard for this city was organized
this evening.
MISSOURI
, INDEPENDENCE, April 20.—At'ant early hour
this utorning the arms and munitions of war
held at the Arsenal, in Liberty, Clay county,
were, at the demand of some citizens, given up.
It is stated that there were 1300 stand of arms
and ten or twelve pieces of cannon, and a con
siderable amount of powder in the Arsenal.
This will be distributed in Clay and the adjoin
ing counties.
Ninety stand of arms and a cannon• have been
brought here.
KANSAS CITY', Mo., April 20.—The Arsenal
at Liberty, has been 'garrisoned by 100 men.
A large secession meeting was held here to
day, and thousands from the adjoining coun
ties of Missouri and Kansas were present, A
secession post was raised, and many prominent
places were decorated with secession flags.
Sr. JOSEPH, Mo., April 20.—The Secession
flag was unfurled and carried through the
streets to-day by a mounted company, after
which it was raised on Market square, without
disturbance or much enthusiasm. Considera
ble, excitement is manifest,- and Secession is
the' prexailing sentiment.
THE NEW YORK UNION MEETING.
NEW Yonx, April 21.—The Union meeting
yesterday was attended by over one hundred
thousand people. and there were half a million
in the streets. The ,feeling was of the most
enthusiastic character: The flag of Fort Sump
ter was raised on the statue of Washington;
the hand of the bronze statue of the Father of
his Country grasping the shattered flagstaff.
The Commercial Metropolis is a unit for the
Union.
FROM WASHINGTON
The Washington correspondent of the New
York Herald, writing under date of April 20,
says:
In the second patrol of Col. Cassius M. Clay's
command I visited to-night, carbine in hand,
the Capitol of the United States of America..
As we approached that magnificent edifice the
prompt call of the sentry brought us to a halt;`
but soon the conference of the officer in com
mand of the patrol with the officer of the'guard,
procured us admittance. As we arrived, two
ladies, escorted by a gentleman, who were un
derstood to be volunteet nurses for the mem
bers of the Massachusetts regiment wounded
at Baltimore, applied for admittance, though it
was then past midnight. During the pirley
between our officer and the officer of the guard,
we had leisure to admir e the ample arrange
ments in the way of barricades, which were
mainly composed of barrel . of cement placed
endwise, and piled up ten feet high between
the immense marble piers and columns that.
form the various entrances of the building.—
Entering, we passed along its tessellated floors,
sentries meeting us at every turn and directing
us through all the devious approaches that led
PUBLISHED EVERY MORNING.
SuNDAve axosprzn,
BY 0. BARRETT & 00
Ism DAILY PAT2IO, Awn ITllon will be served to anti
scribers residing in the Borough's.? six OENTO PIS Wl=
payable to the Carrier. Fail subscribers, revs nos.
1.418 Pit ANNUM.
Sus Waanzir will be published as heretofore, semi
weekly during the session of the Legislature, and once Si
week the remainder of the year, for two debars in ad
vance, or three dollars at the expirationef the year.
Connected with this establishment fe ..en extensive
JOB OFFICE, containing a variety of plain and fancy
type, unequalled by anyestablishment in the interior of
the State, for which the patronage of the public is so
licited.
NO. 198.
us to our special object of search, the quarters
of the Massachusetts regiment. We found'
these tired and sleeping men in the Senate.
Chamber, where were delivered the last national
speeches of Mr. Jefferson Davis. The men,
exhausted by four sleepless nights of travel, bad
thrown themselves down to sleep, the moment
they reached the building ; but a few of their
officers and a surgeon of one of the Washing
ton regiments, detailed to attend upon their
wounded, gave us an account of the melee at
Baltimore, substantially the same which your
enterprising reporter had managed to forward
for your columns, having, by virtue of his
earnest representations, gained consent for its
transmission from the army officer in charge
of the Washington telegraph office, which had
at an early hour been taken possession of for
the exclusive use of the government.
Besides the Massachusetts regiment who were
relieved from guard duty, the Pennsylvania
troops were posted in the Capitol, and also one
company of United States artillery. Alertness
and discipline seemed to prevail at every point.
We found these soldiers in the most magni
ficent quarters in the world. They ascended
starcases lined with heavy wainscots of the
marble of Tennessee. They traversed corridors
where the eloquence of the noblest orators of
the Republic, dead and living, had daily re
sounded. Ceilings, rich with all the magnifi
cence of the decorator's art, were above their
beads, and from the walls looked down upon,
them the counterfeit presentments of the heroes'
of an earlier age of the Republic, who little
dreamed that their countrymen should behold:
a scene like this.
With the reflections which such , aspectacle
inspired, our patrol (made up of gentlemen of
education and culture who could appreciate its
historic aspect,) returned to our quarters in the
Peace Congress Hall, at Willard's Hotel:
There we found some hundreds of our comrades
under arms, enjoying, as we arrived; their ra
tions of coffee and biscuit. Soon a reporter of
the Herald—a corps which seem to be übiqui
tous—came in and relieved the monotony of
the watch by detailing the latest news of war-.
like import We maintain our guard till morn
ing, but all feat of a sudden dash of . marauding
thieves upon the capital to-night is dismissed
from our minds. It is protected in every di
rection, and scouts hourly arrive with reports
of every symptom which 'can be tortured into
a hostile demonstration. There are ample
troops now here to protect the city against any
possible attack which can be made upon it by
any forces the enemy can immediately concen
trate. Depend upon it, Washington is for the
present safe, and with the troops mow rapidly
concentrating upon it, it will be held against
all the devices of a set of ingrate rascals who,
for the devotion they owe the republic, substi
tute thievery, treachery, bad faith and rascality
on a scale as large as their pretensions and as
mean as their performance.
LANDING OF THE FOURTH REGIMENT OF MAO
&WILL-SETTS VOLUNTEERS AT FORT MONROE
TUCrBOATS LYING IN WAIT FOR THE STEAMER.
STATE OF MAINE-THE ESCAPES-DESTRUC
TION OF THE BRIDGE AT OLD POINT COMFORT
BY THE SECESSIONISTS, &C., &C.
The steamer State of Maine, Captain Allen,
left Fall River, Massachusetts, on Wednesday
last for Fort Monroe, Virginia, with the Fourth
regiment of Massachusetts volunteers, consis
ting of four hundred and seventy-one men, un
der the command of Colonel Packard, on
board. On her passage one of the men—a re
cruit—died. It seems that the deceased had
purchased a bottle of liquor from one of the
boats that were flying around the ship. It
seems that the 'villainous stuff had been adul
terated with some strong kind of acid. The
consequence was that he was poisoned. During
the paroxysms arising from his fatal mistake,
he stabbed himself with his bayonet, but the
wound was insufficient to cause death, which'
is attributable only to the use of the bad
liquor.
On Saturday morning, about four o'clock,
the State of Maine arrived at Fort Monroe,.
having had a pleasant passage all the way.—
The troops were all landed to the great joy of
the garrison at this timely reinforcement.
On nearing her destination, it was ascertained
ou board the steamer that four steam tugs were
in waiting to capture her, upon which Captain
Allen put out all the lights on board, and a
friendly storm coming on at the time, the tugs
bad to make a port at Smith's Island, while
the State of Maine went up and landed, the
troops. She left at twelve o'clock on Saturday,
and reached New York at half-past ten yak'''-
.
day.
When de steamer was about to leave, the
commandant of Fort Monroe, anticipated trou
ble, and proposed at first to put a gun on board
of her; but he altered his mind, and telegraphed
either to Washington or to Baltimore for a ves
sel-of-war to act as convoy to the State of
Maine; but before any assistance could arrive
she had left.
The secessionists had possession at the time
of the entire shore to the west of Old Point
Comfort, and they had cut away the bridge
connecting the Point with the mainland, thus
converting the Point into an island.
At eleven o'clock on Saturday, just before
the departure of the State of Maine, the
steamer S. It. Spalding arrived from Boston
with more troops. The garrison, before these
reinforcements were poured in, consisted of
some three hundred and twenty men. They
were augmented to about twelve hundred by
the troops taken On by the State of Maine and
the Spalding.
UM;2I.UJU.=a.i.S2MMUI=U s A
CONCORD, N. H., April 21.—Ez-President
Pierce made a most patriotic speech last night
in favor of sustaining the flag and the Union
at all hazards.
The steamer. Louisiana arrived at Baltimore
from Norfolk this (Sunday) morning, and brings
intelligence that the Federal officers were de
straying all the United States property at the
Navy Yard, and that the United States steam
ers Germantown, Merrimac, and other United
States vessels, had been scuttled and sunk by
order of the United States Government. •
A Putow-CAsE.—The newspapers state that
" Genaral Pillow otters to raise ten thousand
men for the Government." Which side of the
works will this scientific warrior take ? Re
member his old achievement:
" I hang my harp upon a willow .
Whene'er I think of General Pillow,
The man who dug for Polk and Marcy
His ditch of breastworks vice versa."
IMPORTANT.—The Charleston !Mercury, of• the
160, says several guns will be spared to North
Caroline, in obedience to the request of Gov,
Ellis, and will be forwarded immediately.--,
There is one unfortunate quality South Caro
lina possesses more than all others—that:of
quarreling with her friends. She first fired
upon the American flag, and now gives her
neighbors on the north a cannon aid.
A new mineral has appeared in England.
called the Torbanehik coal—which is not coal,
but bituminous schist, which gives seventy-five
per cent. of tar oil, and is expected to come
into general use.
Frank Blair is a candidate for Speaker of the
next Congress, with a prospect or an election
GOVERNMENT VESSELS SCUTTLED