Daily patriot and union. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1858-1868, April 12, 1861, Image 2

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    ;11alriot Rim
FRIDAY MORNING}, APRIL 12, 1861-
-
O. BARRETT & THOMAS 0- ateaDOWELL, Pub.
limbers and Proprietors. •
Oonnonnioationswill not be published in the PATRIOT
AID 'Mums unless accompanied with the name of the
•mother.
S. M. PET TENGILL & CO.,
Adwertining A g ents, 119 Nassau street, New York, and
10 State street, Boston, are the Agents for the PATRIOT
lAD UNION, and the Brost influential and largest circu
lating newspapers in the United States and Catawba
They are authorized to contract for mat ourietesstrates
FOR SALE.
. _
A eecond-hand ADAMS PRESS,Diatell 3934 by 26inehee,
In good orders can be worked either by hand or esteem
power. Terms moderate Inquire at thin office.
To Members of the_ Legislature.
Members wishing extra copies of the DAILY PATRIOT
ism llama, can procure them by leaving their orders
at the publication office, Third street, or with our re
porters in either House, the evening previous.
THOMAS CORWIN, who, from his place in the
'United States Senate during the Mexican war,
expressed the hope that the 'Mexicans would
welcome our soldiers "with bloody hands to
"hospitable graves," has been rewarded by this
Administration with a foreign mission for his
patriotism; while the pensioned agents of the
same Adminutration are engaged in the work
of denouncing every free citizen, who refuses
to approve of the policy and take part in the
business of slaughtering his own countrymen,
as a traitor and tory. In other words, it is
all right to take part with a foreign enemy with
whom the Government is at war, but all - wrong
not to sympathize with and applaud the same
Government when it is about to engage in a
bloody civil war with our own countrymen.
The Administration apprehends that an at
attack may be made upon Washington, and
troops are being assembled at that point to
repel any assault that may be made_ Whether
any good reason exists for this apprehension
we are unable to determine ; but are certain
that the best way of protecting the Capital
from danger is to pursue a vigorous peace
policy. Washington can be in no great danger
of capture as long as Maryland and Virginia
remain loyal to the Union. But the immediate
consequence of war in the seceded State would
be to increase the disaffection in the Border
States, and to render a large military force
necessary for the defence of the Federal Cap
ital. The Administration seems to fear that
the policy it is pursuing will widen the area of
secession, and convert the very seat of Gov
ernment into a beleagured fortress.
The partizans of the Administration, who
are so violent in their denunciations of all who
do not approve of the policy of civil war, do
not pretend that war will result either in the
enforcement of the laws or the restoration of
the Union. On the contrary, the admission
is explicitly made that "war with the seceded
States will not bring them back into the Union."
Indeed, after the daily exhibitions of intense
hatred to the Southern Siates, made by that
class of Republican journals most anxious for
war, it is impossible to believe that they desire
to be again associated with the seceded States.
If, then, war is not to bring these States back
into the the Union, what is its object? When.
we are called upon to stand by the Administra
tion, we would like to know what the Admin
istration is driving at.
Peace is Patriotism.
Freedom of opinion o,nd freedom in the ex
pression of those opinions is the happy privi
lege of every citizen in this Republic. We have
no censorship of the Press here. We have no
secret police to note every word uttered in
Opposition to the conduct and policy of our
rulers, and to terrify the dissenting into out
ward concurrent by severe punishments. We
are not obliged to whisper our opinions in closed
rooms, with bated breath, lest some spy of
the Government may overhear and expose us
to stripes and imprisonment. In short, we are
not subjected to the fearful despotism over
mind. exercised in absolute governments like
Russia and France. Some of the partizans of
the Federal Administration entirely overlook
this fact. They act as if they believed the
Government had - the right to control not only
the army and navy, and to launch the thunder-
bolts of civil war against the people, but also
to gag the press and to stifle every expression
of opinion adverse to the policy of the Govern,
meat. They have fallen into a grevions error,
in supposing that the possession of the offices
and patronage of the Government constitutes
them autocrats of public opinion. The settled
conviction of the people that civil war is an
unnecessary evil, and that it will widen the
breach between sections of the Union, cannot
be suppressed by the cry of treason and traitor;
and the sooner the self constituted censors who
are now attempting this game learn its futility,
the better for them.
It has been reserved, at this late day, for the
partisens of an Administration which usurped
power under the deceptive cries of "freedom,
free speech and a free press," to undertake the
task of crushing out differences of opinion, and
compelling a dead conformity to the war
measures of the Federal Government. To
borrow the very expressive language of Mr.
LINCOLN, "it can't be did." The people see
what influences have brought them to the brink
of the fearful precipice, and they will hold the
Administration to a strict accountability for its
misdeeds. They see that the party which
cunningly and wickedly arrayed one section
of the countty against the other at the ballot
box, is now about to re-enact the same crime
upon the bloody battle field by substituting
bayonets for billots. They see war deliberately
chosen as preferable to peace, when either
course was open to the Administration, an d
when war means disunion, and peace offers the
only prospect of an ultimate restoration of the
- Union_ And seeing this, they will net applaud
when duty requires them to -condemn, or de
clare that the Administration is right, when
they know in_ their inmost hearts that it is
wrong.
The Administration organs talk of treason.
What is treason ? Is it treason to object to
the policy of the Federal Administration ?
Then they have been guilty of this crime for
years. Is it treason to prefer union without
war to disunion with war 1 1 It may be in the
estimation of those who are filled with hatred
and malignity towards the Southern States and
who desire to drive them out of the Dnion at
the point . of the bayonet ; but in the estimation
of those who desire to restore those fraternal
sentiments without which union is impossible,
the policy of favoring peace and opposing war
is the highest patriotism,
The War Spirit.
There is great danger that the war spirit wil
become so much aroused, both North and
South,that it cannot be repressed. The feelings
of the peoplb have long been gravitating in that
direction—and although a few months ago the
idea of a general war between the North and
the South would not have been for a moment
entertained, there was being engendered a
spirit of prejudice, hatred and distrust., which
only needed the events that have since oc
curred, to bring those who ought to be friends
into an attitude of open hostility to each other.
A few days ago there were glimmerings of
peace. But they were only glimmerings, to be
succeeded by the threatenings of war. Our
readers need not be told that since the com
mencement of the secession movement we have
seen but faint hopes of an amicable adjustment
of our national difficulties. Occasionally our
intense desire and wish for a:peaceful solution
has mastered our judgment, founded on the con
dition of the country and the true aspect of
affairs, so far that we have indulged in flatter
ing visions of fraternal relations-re-established
—of a Union restored ; but these illusions have
been quickly dispelled by the hard logic of
EMI
Upon what has this apprelfe . nsion of war and
carnage rested? Why have the friends of
peace found so little to encourage and cheer
them in these days of national calamity? Simply
because of the existence of a hostile spirit
among the people. Continued union can only
be mainiained as the fruit of kindness and fra
ternal relations ; and it ought not, therefore,
to
surprise any body that secession and aliens
lon and war follow as the legitimate issues of
a bitter and malignant spirit between the two
sections
It is not our purpose to charge this wrong
exclusively upon any class of people, or upon
any section of country. That is a task never
coveted by us, and perhaps agreeable to none.
But what we desire to show at this time is, the
tendency of that animosity between the sections
to culminate in an appeal to arms.
It is painful to witness the war spirit now
rife throughout the country. It is slits highest
pitch at the South, and is fast rising to fever
heat in the North, At the rate things go on,
the country in less than thirty days will be
ripe for a bloody contest ; so that whatever
President Lincoln or President Itavis may
think or wish, war will be inevitable. We. are
fast becoming a nation of haters ;:and now that
we have no national antipathies towards for
eigners, we indulge in the very reprehensible
conduct of hating our own brethren and kins-
men
It is time for the people to pause, and ask
themselves whither we are drifting ? What
will be the consequence of this spirit of ani
mosity towards our fellow-countrymen ? Is it
not possible for us to differ decently and like
men; without indulging in a spirit of malignity ?
Cannot men be in favor of slavery or opposed
to slavery, without rushing at each' other like
wild beasts, as if they would devour those who
differ with them in opinion ?
We ask these questions because we are con
rinsed that the present unhappy complications,
which threaten to destroy our nationality, have
their origin in, and draw their sustenance from,
that unchristian spirit which denounces all men
as sinful and wrong, who do not conform, in
morals, in polities, and in religion, to the
standard set up by the self-righteous men, who
can brook no dissent, nor forgive an independ
ent judgment. If there be any one thing now
needed more than any other in human judgment,
it is charity. Were there more of this, and
less of denunciation against those who do not
see according to a given standard, we should
have greater hope of a safe deliverance.
Something must be done to arrest the pre
vailing war spirit, or the country will speedily
enter upon a course which, whateier may be
the physical superiority of one or the other
section, can'produce only disaster and distress.
Individual citizens may not consider their
limited influence of great account—and yet it
is of these that the aggregate sentiment of the
country is composed. It will be seen, there
fore, what. is the duty of every man who would
avert impending evils. It, is, to resist and
discourage the war feeling so industriously
cultivated by fanatics, and to inculcate a spirit
of moderation and peace. Let each individual
do this, and a radical change in the tone of the
officials at Washington will speedily manifest
itself.—.lournal of Commerce.
The Washington correspondent of the Jour.
nal of Commerce makes the fol l owing, sug
gestions concerning the destination of the
troops whose departure from New York has
created so much excitement and apprehension
throughout the country:
“There is to be no war as a consequence of
any movement by this Government in regard to
Forts Sumpter and Pickens, or any movement
by President Davis.
The greater portion of the expeditionary
force sent from New York is destined, as I have
informed you, for Brazos Santiago. The im
portance of that point in a military, commercial,
and political view cannot be overrated. If you
consicter the character of the materials shipped
you will see that it is for the purpose of throw
ing up field works, of erecting barracks, and
of employing in a level country flying artillery.
You will notice, too, that the country on the
Brazos for 300 miles is very rich; and will be
the wealthiest and most conservative part of
Texas. It now embraces important commercial
points—for instance, Brownsville, 40 miles
above Brazos Santiago. From Brownsville
there is a great trade with Maxie°, and with
the interior of Texas. The imports of foreign
goods at. Brazos and at Brownsville are large
and increasing—over five millions in 1852.
Besides, the goods and merchandise from non
seceded States will amount to as much more,
all which will pay duty to the Texan Custom
House, unless the United States Government
maintain a military post at Brazos Santiago.
One object, therefore, is to protect the revenue
at this point.
But.,
besides all these reasons, you will find
another in 'he fact that Governor Houston made
a formal application to this Government for
military and for the protection of the State
from invasion and insurrection, and the expe
dition may be intended as a response to the
application.
sKys the Boston Shoe
About six months ago,
and Leather Reporter, a manufacturer in this
city sent a lot of shoes to a workman in Maine,
to be made, and having a pplied to him in vain
.to return the shoes, received a few days since
•a letter in which the writer states that being
very much in want of money he had sold the
shoes on his own account.
110 W DOES IT LOOK NOW?
From the Boston Courier
Last fall, when the Republicans were hurry
ing along our streets, night after night, jost
ling and running over each other in their
eagerness to join the torchlight procession;
hailing each other boisterously as brave and
intrepid "Wide Awakes," displaying their
broad capes, fanciful lanterns and flags, deco
rated with witty devices and funny mottoes,
we warned them, again and again, of the sad
and disastrous consequences which must follow
their possible success in electing a sectional
President. We told them over and over again
to beware. We begged of them, by every con
sideration of patriotism and of humanity, to
desist from a course which must inevitably
prove ruinous to the best interests of the
country. We referred them to the prophetic
warnings of the wise men in all ages of the
Republic, from Washington down. We sa id
then, and we repeat it again, it is utterly impos
sible and forever out of the question to live in
peace, in a Republic, where all have a common
intesest in the government, without affording
the fairest and the fullest opportunity for all
to vote for their governors and their rulers.
The Republicans did not believe us. The
Wide Awakes would not even listen to our
warnings. The lanterns and capes and flags
multiplied in our streets and in our public
squares. Cannons were fired, banners floated
in the breezes of the night, trumpets Were
blown and drums were beaten, until the young
men and maidens, old men and matrons, fairly
ran mad with the idea of being able to elect a
President without the aid of the South. Well,
the deed is done. The Wide Awakes have
triumphed. To their care is committed the
government of these United States, what there
is left of them.
Gentlemen of the Republican party, gentle
men of the Wide Awake clubs, how do you
like it ? How does it look now ? To those of
you who have been successful in procuring of
fice at Washington, no doubt the prospect is
pleasant; but we beg to inquire respectfully of
those who have been unfortunate in their ap
plication, how the matter stands with them?
And then, there are thousands who never ex
pected place or office, thousands who live by
the sweat of the brow—shoemakers, carpen
ters, hatters, weavers, spinners, painters, en
gravers, in short, all sorts of mechanics' and
laborers - , those whO have to earn by their toil,
bread for themselves and for their children.—
How does it look to you, gentlemen ? No longer
ago than the very last autumn, you had plenty
of employment, at very good wages. You could
readily meet your rent, your grocer's bill, your
doctor's bill, and those .of your tailor and
butcher, Now, you find these necessary ex
penses very hard for you. You can scarcely
sleep at night in peace for anxiety about them.
How does it all look to you? The Republi
cans told you, told all of us, repeatedly, every
where, that if Mr. Lincoln were only once
elected all would be calm and quiet and peace
ful ; that labor would be in demand, and the
people would be happy again. But so far from
realizing any advantages from the election of
Mr. Lincoln, things are certainly growing
worse. The Wide-Awakes, if You ask them
to-day, cannot but admit that we are not im
proving in the least, but are, in fact, upon the
retrograde. Who, then, has gained anything
by the election of a sectional President ?
Rather let us ask, who has not lost ? Seven of
the States of this Union have left us. Nearly
all the advantage which the vast carrying trade
of the South has been to us is now gone. The
Southern market is all but lost to us. Our
people are compelled to be idle, all but those
who are hunting after office, with but a poor
prospect indeed for the future. And all of this
for no other cause, none in the world, except
the election of a sectional President. But for
the election of Mr. Lincoln, the country would
have been at this moment in as prosperous a
condition as it. has been since the war of the
Revolution. There is no cause known or con
jectured by anybody, but the election, which
has brought upon us our present misfortunes.;
WAR'S GLORIES
From the Baltimore American
Enough of the brute belongs to human nature
to make "glorious war," with its pomp and cir
cumstance, an attractive amusement. To men
who have never encountered its sober realities
the waving banners, the glittering arms and the
showy uniform are the things that captivate the
imagination, and the actual shock of battle is,
as a general rule, only dear to the valiant gen
tlemen who .figure in romances. But still the
brutal element in human character is more or
less blood-thirsty, and war loses its horrors to
men whose trade is slaughter. We read the
account of a prize-fight, and cannot conceive
how any one with human sympathies can endure
the mere sight of such brutality ; yet the gen
tlemen of the "fancy" not only look with
indifference upon the horrible tortures inflicted
upon a fellow-being, but actually enjoy the
scene the more in proportion to the severity
of the "punishment." The memory of a rail
road accident, where seven or eight fatally
wounded men were extricated from the ruins of
a passenger car, will last us our life out, and
suffice for a description of battle-fields, with
all the heart-rending details. We have no
desire to witness any sadder reality.
That there are cases in which an appeal to
arms is necessary and proper no one can deny.
Our own history as a nation began with a
struggle, and we have plenty of dismal proph
ets among us who predict a bloody termination
of the same history. But the war of the Revo
lution covered the American name with glory,
while the war that is threatening to burst upon
us will be infamous, no matter how it begins
or how it ends. Our children will live to exe
crate the memory of their fathers when they
read the story of our magnificent empire shiv
ered to atoms by an unnecessary contest be
tween madmen. The verdict of posterity will
be nothing more than the story of a race of
suicides, who destroyed themselves at the very
moment when their life was the most promi
sing and attractive.
We need not draw our arguments in favor of
peace from the future, however. The ques
tions that divide this nation are certainly sus
ceptible of a pacific solution, and until it can
be demonstrated that civil strife will be profita
ble to either aide there is no excuse that can
be imagined, which the world will accept, if we
allow that strife to commence. It is easy enough
to point out a dozen pretexts upon which it may
begin, but God only knows what the end of
such a contest would be ! The first effect would
be the total destruction of our commerce and
manufactures and the inevitable depreciation
of every description of secpriiy. Investments
that have hitherto been counted among the
most infallible sources of revenue will become
totally valueless, and what we now understand
as the rights of property will give place to the
right of the strong hand. It is perfectly idle
to talk of the exhaustless resources of this
great country, when a few months or even a
few weeks of war would make all these resour
ces altogether unavailable. Let any holder of
real estate try to convert his property into
money wit r only a tolerably prevalent rumor
of war upon the breeze, and he will find a
ridiculous discrepancy between his ideas of
value and the facts in the case.
It is needful to go a step higher, and ask for
the advantages to accrue to our wives and
children from this business of blood-shedding ?
Where shall we place them out of' the sight and
sound of war's horrors ? By what enchant
ment shall we provide far them the common
necessaries of life, to say nothing of the com
forts to which they have been accustomed ? If
we fight, our main business is to make as many
widows and orphans as we can, and how will
their cries of anguish accord with our shouts of
victory, if we gain it? The thought of their
tearful eyes, raised to Heaven, and mutely
pleading for vengeance upon a nations of Caine,
would spoil the most magnificent vision of
military glory. War is, truly, a " damnable
trade !"
Finally, we ask our countrymen to pause a
moment before they plunge into a sea of trou
ble, and consider whose policy they are going
to carry out. Is it to consolidate the power of
South or North ? Is it to place Mr. Abe Lin
coln more securely in his seat or Mr. Jeff. Davis '
in his ? Is it to gratify a handful of atheistical
fanatics at the . North, who deny both God and
Devil and who have no appetite for anything
but blood ? Or is it to quiet the hot temper of
a few demagogues at the South, who are pant
ing for "banner. brand, and bow," and for the
pleasures of military despotism?"
SOME QUEER STORIES.—Some queer stories
are told of sharp practice in connection with
the recent throwing out of Illinois banks. A
Chicago banker, who was in the secret., on
Saturday morning gave some sixty thousand
dollars to a grain speculator with which to
"operate." He bought. wheat to the amount
and told the sellers to call at his office for their
pay, where he detained them on various ex
cuses until after bank hours and then paid
them in interior Illinois banks. On Monday
morning the currency was "shut down on,"
leaving the wheat sellers out from fifteen to
twenty cents on the dollar.
Patca OF PULLING A NEW YORK ALDERMAN'S
NosE.—A sheriff's jury, who had in considera
tion the question of the amount of damages to
be awarded to the complainant, in the case of
alderman John Russell vs. ex-alderman "Billy"
Wilson, for an assault committed on the 14th
of May last, in the vestibule of the City Hall,
when Wilson attempted to give Russell's nose
a vigorous lengthening, but failed because the
latter drew back too quickly for him, have at
last determined that the alderman bone fide
must be paid from the pockets of the en-alder
man the sum of sl,ooo.—Express.
In excavating for the temporary grave of the
Duchess of Kent a small opening was made
into the vault which contains the coffins of
Henry VIII. and one of his queens, Lady Jane
Seymour, also the coffins of Charles I. and an
infant child of Queen Anne. The coffins, and
even the crimsons on which are placed the
coronets, were in a tolerable state of preserva
tion, and the spear hole in the coffin of Henry
VIII„ said to have been made by one of the
soldiers of Oliver Cromwell, was clearly dis
cernible.
SUICIDE OF A WEALTHY GENTLEMAN.—On
- . .
Monday night Stephen Van Rensselaer a mem
ber of the celebrated Van Rensselaer or "Pa
troon" family of Albany, committed suicide in
New York by swallowing a dose of laudanum.
It appears that for many years past he' had
given way to habits of dissipation to such an
extent as to render him totally unfit for the
transaction of the most ordinary business
affairs.
The steamer Persia's apparent time of ma
king her last trip is nine days and twenty
hours. This is said to be the shortest, on re
cord, averaging considerably over three hun
dred miles per day, and on one day she made
three hundred and fifty miles.
SEIZURE OF JEWELRY.-A seizure of diamond
jewelry was made at Noir York, on Tuesday,
on board the steamship Persia, one of the pas
sengers having about $3OO worth upon his
person. The passenger asserts they are for
private use, and not for sale.
'"'A boy drunkard, only 10 years old, was sent
to jail in Boston on Friday. The wretched
young inebriate is an orphan; a policeman
testified that he 'carried him home several times
dead drunk.
Joseph Laing, who died last week at To
ronto, C. W., has consumed a pound of epsom
salts daily, as a remedy for fits. In the ten
.years prior to his death, he used up a ton and
a half of the medicine.
Captain Anderson, of Nicaraugua fame, and
Col. itudier, Oen. Walker's companion, have
gone to Charleston to " enlist."
LATEST BY TELEGRAPH
From Washington
The city is comparatively composed to-day,
though everybody is anxiously awaiting tidings
from Charleston. •
The President informed a gentleman to-day
that he did not expect, there would be any de
cisive events before Saturday next,
The Government is swearing in more volun
teers to-day.
The opening of the bids for the new Trea
sury notes is postponed till this afternoon.
The Commissioners of the Confederate States
left Washington this morning for Montgomery.
Before their departure they replied to Mr.
Seward's note.,
-
The Committee from the Virginia Convention
visited President Lincoln this morning and had
an interview which lasted for some time ; but
it is understood that nothing definite was ar
rived at. They are fully satisfied that the Gov
ernment intends to supply Fort Sumpter and
hold it.
The Federal Troops In Texas.
NEW ORLEANS, April 11
Advices from Galveston to the 9th inst., state
that the Federal troops remaining in Texas are
concentrating at some given point, but for what
purpose is not stated. The transports Star of
the West and Empire City, are still off Indian
ola. The Mexicans at Ms tamoras have planted
cannon pointing towards Brownsville. The
State Legislature has passed a bill dividing the
State into six Congressional Districts ; also a
bill to issue State bonds to the amount of one
million, to be secured by a special tax.
Fort Pulaski.
An order was issued yesterday from the Ad
jutant General's office at Fort Pulaski, prohib
iting, vessels from passing Pulaski, though
previously giving information of their pacific
character. Every vessel is required to stop,
and send a boat to the wharf at Cockepur Is
land, to convey a commissioned officer's order,
who will make an examination. Fort Pulaski
has been thoroughly garrisoned.
Secession of Arizona.
The New Mexican correspondence of the
Republican, states that the citizens of Arizona,
at the Convention in Messina, held on the 16th
ult.., resolved themselves out of the Union.—
Gen. W. C. Jones, formerly of Missouri, has
announced himself as a candidate to represent
Arizona in the Congress of the Confederate
States.
From Charleston.
The floating battery is now moored in a po
sition commanding the barbette guns of Fort
Sumpter. She carries two 32 pounders and
two 52 pounders, and is manned by sixty-four
men. The Federal steamers are expected to
arrive off the bar to-night. The city is filled
with troops.
Preparations to Attack Fort Pickens.
PENSACOLA, April 11
From the Navy Yard to the new light house,
a distance of two and a half wiles, all the guns
have been ranged to bear on Fort Pickens and
command the channel.
Arrival of Troops from Texas.
NEW YORK, April 11
The steamer Coatzacoalcos is below. She
probably brings home the U. S. troops from
Texas, for which purpose she was chartered
by the Government.
oy it
The Sloop of Wir PPeaholltaB
NORFOLK, VA., April 11.
The sloop of war P.ocahontas sailed to-day
under sealed orders.
MARRIED.
In this city, yesterday morning, (April 11) by the
Rev Mr. Catt4ll. Mr. MIRK Few, of Blizebethtown, to
Miss MARY WOURDY, Of this oily.
WASHINGTON. April 11.
SAVANNAH, April 11
ST. Loins, April.ll
CHARLESTON, April 11
New Muertisementri.
PENNSYLVANIA.
SUMMER TIME TABLE
mmtpeaga
. /104
FIFE TRAINS DAILY TO & FROM PIIILADELPRIA.
ON AND AFTER
MONDAY. APRIL 15, 1861,
The Passenger Trains of the Pennsylvania It ,Hroad
Company will depart from and arrive at Har.isburg and
Philadelphia as follows :
EASTWARD.
THROUGH EXPRESS TRAIN leaves Harrisburg at
1 15 a. m., and arrives at West Philadelphia at 5.10 a. m.
FAST LINE leaves Harrisburg at 6.20 a. m., and ar
rives at West Philadelphia at lain a. m.
FAST MAIL TRAIN leaves Harrisburg at 1.15 p. m.,
and arrives at West Philadelpirlat at 0.10 p. m.
These Trains make close connections at Philadelphia
with the New York Lines.
ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, No. I,'via Mount Joy,
leaves Harrisburg at 7.30 a. m., and arrives at West
Philadelphia at 12.30 p. m.
HARRISBURG ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, via Co.
lumbia, leaves Harrisburg at 4.10 p. m., and arrives at
West Philadelphia at 9.25 p. m.
ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, No. 2, via Mount Joy,
leaves Harrisburg at 4.20 p.m., connecting at Dillerville
with HARRISBURG ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, and
arrives at West Philadelphia at 9.25 p. m.
WESTWARD.
THROUGH EXPRESS TRAIN leaves Philadelphia
10.45 p. m , Harrisburg 3.05 a. m., Altoona 8.05, arrives
at Pittsburg 12.40 p. m.
MAIL TRAILS leaves Philadelphia 7.30 a. m.,Harris
burg 1.10 p. m., Altoona 7.50 p. m., and arrives at PHU
burg 12 20 a. m.
FAST LINE leaves Philadelphia 11.45 a. in., Harris
burg 4 05 p. m., Altoona 8.40 p. in.. and arrives at Pitts
burg 1 00 a. m.
HARRISBURG ACCOMMODATION TRAIN leaves
Philadelphia 2 30 p. in., Lancaster 6.05 p. m., Columbia
6.40 p. m., and arrives at Harrisburg 8.05 p in.
ACCOMMODATION TRAIN leaves Philadelphia 4.00
p. m., Lancaster 7.44 p. m., Mount Joy 8.28 p. m., Eliza
bethtown 8.48 p.m., and arrives at Harrisburg 9.45 p. m.
Attention is called to the fact that passengers leaving
Philadelphia 4.00 P. m. connect at Lancaster with
MOUNT JOY ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, and arrive
at Harrisburg at 9.45 p. m. SAM'L D YOUNG,
Supt. East. Div. Penna. R. B.
April 12, 1861.—dtf
Harrisbnr
OTICE.—The undersigned offers for
1.1 sale the largest, greatest and beat collection of
FLOWERING PLANTS
Ever offered or exhibited in Harrisburg. My stock con
sists in part of
CAMELIAS, AZALIAS, NEW DAHLIAS, HELIO
TROPES, FCSCHIAS, LAN TANNAS,
GERANIUMS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION,
CARNATION AND ENGLISH MONTHLY PINKS,
PANSIES, PETUNIAS, &C., &C.
' I have also a very large collection of ROSES, such as
GIANT DE BATTELS. LORD RAGLAN, HERMOSA,
GLORIE DE ROSEMON, AGRIPENA, &C., &C.
I have on hand a variety of EVERGREEN AND OR
NAMENTAL TREES, such as
ARBOR VITA, ENGLISH. AND IRISH YEW.
All of which will be sold at low prices by
JOHN M. MECH.
a 2.dtawlm Above the Car Factory, Harrisburg.
ENGLISH - AND CLASSICAL
BOARDING SCHOOL,
FOR YOUNG MEN AND BOYS,
MOUNT JOY, LANCASTER COUNTY, PENNA.
Students prepared for College or business. Location
pleasant, healthy and easy of access by Pennsylvania
Central Railroad. For Circulars containing terms, tes
timonials, &c., address the Principal
ap4-10tda4tw
VENTRAL NURSERIES, YORK, PA.
J EDWARD' J EVANS & (O. PROPRI ETORS.—
Fruit and Ornamental Trees, Grapes, Small Fruits, Rhu
barb, Asparagus, Shrubs. BoseP, Bedding Hants, & e., in
reat variety. Orders left with G. H. SMALL, at the
tate Capital Bank, will receive prompt attention. Cat
ogues gratis on &nitration. marl6-Imda4tw
1/PS. E. QSLER will open on the 15th
of April a SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, at 32 North
Second street, below North. apH-d3t*
NEW SHOE STORE!
NEW SHOE STORE!!
'THE PHILADELPHIA
SHOE STORE
NO. 38.1 MARK•ET STREET,.
NEXT DOOR TO CEO. W. MOALLJOR JRWRLRT STORK:
AS CHEAP AS THE CHEAPEST!
AND AS GOOD AS THE BEST!
The undersigned begs leave to inform the Shoe buying
public of Harrisburg that he has opened a Shoe Store at
the above named place, where will be found a large as
sortment of
BOOTS AND SHOES,
• WHICH WILL BE SOLD
VERY CHEAP FOR CASH.
Give us a call and examine our goods at the
PHILADELPHIA CHEAP SHOE STORE,
NO. 381 MARKET STREET.
apll-dtf J. O. KIMBALL.
0 F. MIIENCH,
k).
TRAVELING AGENT 01 THE
OLD WALLOWER LINE
This old Transportation Line is still in succerful
operation, and prepared to carry freight as LOW as any
other individual be' wean Philadelphia, Harrisburg, Sun
bury, Lewisburg, Williamsport. Jersey Shore, Lock Ha
ven, and all points on the Northern Centr.l, Philadel
phia and Erie, and Williamsport and Elmira Railroads.
Local Agent at Harrisburg, D. A. MUENCH.
Goods sent to PEACOCK, ZELL & HINCHMAN, No.
808 and 810 Market street, above Eighth, by 4 o'clock,
p. m will arrive at Harrisburg, ready for deli•ery, the
next morning. O. P. 311JENCH,
ap4•dtf • Traveling Ageot.
TO BUILDERS.—The undersigned is
prepared to dig. take up, excavate, construct and
erect sewevs, drains and ditches of every description
within the city limits upon the shortest notice, and on
reasonable terms. FREDERICK TRACE,
Second street, near Chesnut,
Harrisburg, Pa.
ap3-d6t
R E M O V AL.
JOHN W. GLOVER,
MERCHANT TAILOR,
Has removed to
60 MARKET STREET,
Where he will be pleased to see all his Menem.
oetB-dtf
FOR RENT.—A COTTAGE on Pine
street. Inquire of MRS. MURRAY,
mar27-dtf Corner of Second and Pine Ste.
WARNE'S RIFLE AND PISTOL
GALLERY.—Now' opPn for a short lime, in the
rear of Brant's Hall, Harrisburg. ap3•d2w*
V I MPTY BARRELS ! of every deserip
r tion. A large lot on hand and for sale by
aplo WILLIAM DOCK, Ja., & CO.
TT AMS!-3,000 lbs. EXTRA SUGAR
CURED HAMS in store and for sale low for cash.
aplo WM. DOCK, JR., & Co.
NOTICE.—The undersigned has this day
disposed of his entire stock of a-oceries, Queens
ware Glass, China-ware and Liquors to B F. MAIL
MAN. J. MAILMAN.
April 9, 1861.—ap10.-at*
SIGNOR BLITZ
WILL GIVE TWO OF 1118
ENTERTAINAIENTS
AT BRANT'S HALL,
ON THURSDAY AND FRIDAY EVENINGS,
11TH AND 12TH
For the benefit of the
STATE CAPITAL BAND.
Ono afternoon performance, for the accommodation of
tiChoolN on Friday.
TICKETS 25 CENTS—TO SCHOLARS, 10 CENTS.
ai44l4t
H EALTH, MONEY I. HAPPINESS ! !
At this season of year. when so much sickness prevails,
every one should provide himself with DR. HUM
PHREY'S HOMCSOPATHIO MEDICINES, and prevent
disease in its beginning.
A fresh supply always on hand at
IiCHAFFEWO BOOR-STORE,
Harrisburg.
marl 9
ONLY ONE DOLLAR EACH!
romo BEAUTIFUL STEEL PLATE ENGRAVING
OF THE LORD'S PRAYER FOR SALE!
VALITABLE PROPERTY GIVEN AWAY!
The idea of representing the LORD'S PRAYER by an
engraving, and of ornamenting and arranging it in suck
a manner as to produce at once a model of neatness and
taste, was conceived and carried out by ORMSBY, the
celebrated Bank-note Engraver or New York city. it
commences with exquisitely executed words of "Olut
FATHER." and then follow in succession the other parts
of the Prayer, every phrase of which is engraved in the
most elegant and tasteful manner. Near the bottom of
the picture is a superbly executed head of OUR SAV HAM,
and encircling the upper part of the engraving are ten
angels, each bearing one of the TEN COMMANDMENTS.
The engraving has received the most unqualified praise
from the religious community, as there is nothing of a
sectarian character about it, having been recommended
by clergymen of all denominations. As an ornament it
is one of the - most splendid ever pub' ished in this country,
and is destined to take the place of a poorer class of
engravings The size of the plate is 20x28 inches, a n d
is unquestionably the cheapest engraving ever offered in
this country.
Who that loves Art—who that delights to stud3-a fine
engraving—who that would possess a beautitul Pictur e
- - who that would receivA the impressions whi.-h such a
work is calculated to impsrt. wou'd fail to secure a espy
when the price is only ONE DOLLAR, with the chance of
securing for that sum in addition a permanent home or
another valuable Gift?
As a work of art this valuable and beautiful engraving
is worth more than the dollar asked fot it, as will readiily
be acknowledged on an inspection of it; but the
subscribers intend to make a Girt Distribution to
purchasers of the engraving of valuable presents. P.S
follows
1 House and Lot in York Borough;
2 Building Lots :
2 Butagies : Quinn & Palmer's make, warranted ;
1 Rockaway;
100 Valuable Books ;
50 Barrels of Flour, warranted;
1,000 Gilt Frames to suit Engraving of Lord's Prayer;
seo Steel Plate Engravings—Birth of Christ; Magnilit
cent Looking-glasses;
Gold and Silver Watches ;
All kinds of Jewelry, embracing came,,,, Ploren
tines, Mosaic, Gold Stone. &c.
A Gift worth from 50 cents to $500.00 with each En
graving sold:
When the Engravings are all sold, a meeting of the
purchasers will be called at Washington Hall. Vork,Pa..
when the Gifts named above will be distributed in such
manner as the purchasers may determine—the purchasers
selecting a committee of disinterested persons to make
the awards in such manner as they may designate,
The proprietors, from the favorable manner in which
this Gift Enterprise has been received, and the number
of Engravings already sold, hope to be able to have the
whole amount disposed of by the first of July ensuing,
and when'all are sold they will notify the purchasers and
have the distribution of the Gifts proceeded with.
This Engraving has received the commendation of the
Reverend Clergy, our first citizens, and, indeed, of all
classes, who enter into it with interest and spirit.
Send on ONE Dott„ln and four Red Stamps to pay
postage on Engraving, and you are sure to get it by re
turn mail. Address AUSTIN & WEHRLY,
York, Penna.
J. M. AUSTIN. GEORGE WERRLY.
General Distribution Office : No 10, South George St.,
York, Penna., where Engravings may be seen and pur
chased.
Agency for 'Harrisburg at WM. D JACIT. I 3 Book and
Periodical Store, corner Third and Market Ste. Any
person sending a club of ten will get an extra copy and
ticket.
We are kindly permitted to refer to the undersigned,
who have given us written recommendations. but want
of space prevents us from giving them in full. .Read
the folloWing
THE LORD'S PRAYER.
We have carefully examined this Engraving, offered
for sale in this community by Messrs. Austin & Wehrly,
and do not hecitate to pronounce it one of the finest
works of American Art we have ever seen. The design
is beautiful, the style of execution is superior, and the
illustrations are excellent. Its appearance will at once
secure for it the admiration of a refined community, and
recommend it to the Christian public It is highly or.
namental, and is calculated to exert a refining influence
in a family, and an elevating and purifying effect upon
the morals and religion of society, and it should meet.
as we understand it deserves, with a rapid and extensive
sale.
Rev. A. H. Lochman, L. L.-D., Pastor Ist Lutheran
Church. York. Pa.
Rev, A. W. Lilly, Pastor 2d Lutheran Church.
Rev. C. W. Thomson, Rector St Johns Prot. Episco
pal Church.
Rev. F. F Hagen, Pastor Moravian Church.
Rev. Jos. A. Rosa, « M. E. Church.
Rev. Syl Eagle, C , St. Patrick Church.
Rev. Mettle. Jos. Meirer, Pastor St. Mary's Church.
Hon. Thomas E. Cochran, Aud. Gen. Peoria.
Henry Welsh, President York Bank.
David Small, Postmaster, York Pa., and manyothers.
irrEdittirs or Publishers of papers giving this ad
vertisement six insertions will be entitled to an Engra
ving and Ticket, by forwarding the paper for that time
to our address, or inserting it until that time appointed
for the distribution, with an Editorial notice once in
four weeks. Will receive the Engt acing. Lamed with a
fine gold gilt frame to suit its size. and a ticket.
AUSTIN & MERELY.
YOBS., Feb. 19, 1861 —apl-dtjyl
E. L. MOORE
BLACKWOOD'S MAGAZINE
E
D
BRITIS REVIEWS
L. SCOTT & CO., NEW YORK COEllinne to publish the
following leading 'Wash Periodicals, vi 4 ;
THE LONDON QUARTERLY, (Conservative.)
2.
THE EDINBURGH REVIEW, (Whig.)
3.
THE NORTH BRITISH REVIEW, (Free Church.)
THE WESTMINSTER REVIEW, (Llbtral.)
5.
BLACKWOOD'S EDINBURGH MAGAZINE, (Tory.)
The present critical state of European affairs will ren
der these publications unusually interesting during the
forthcoming year. They will occupy a middle ground
between the hastily written news-items, crude specula
tions and flying rumors of the daily Journal, and the
ponderous Tome of the future historian, written after
the living interest and excitement of the great political
events of the time shall have pass* d away. It is to
these Periodicals that readers must look for the only
really intelligible and reliable history of current events.
and as such, in addition to their well-established lite
rary. scientific and theological character, we urge thew
upon the . consideration of the reading public.
• EARLY COPIES.
The receipt of ADVANCE SHEETS from the British
publishers gives additional value to these Reprints, in
asmuch as they can now be placed in the bands of
sub
scribers about as soon as the original editions.
Pen ann.
For any one of the four Reviews - - 5 8 00
For any two of the four Reviews - - 500
For any three of the four Reviews - - 700
For all four of the Reviews - - - 80 0
ir , z• Blackwood's Magazine - - - - 300
For Blackwood and one Review • . - 500
For Blackwood and two Reviews - - 700
For Blackwood and three Reviews - - 900
For Blackwood and the four Reviews - - 10 00
Money current in the 6tate where issued will be received
at par
CLUBBING.
A discount of twenty-tl.e per cent. from the above
prices will be allowed to CLUBS ordering four or more
copies of any one or more of the above work*. Thus
Four copies of Blackwood, or of one Review, will be sent
to one address for $9; four copies of the four Reviews
and Blackwood for $3O , • and so on.
POSTAGE.
In all the principal Cities and Towns these works will
be delivered FREE OF POSTAGE. When sent by mail,
the rune GE to any part of the United States will be but
TWENTY-POUR CENTS a year for '•Blackwood," and but
FOUNTEEN CENTS a year for each of the Reviews.
N. B —The Price in Great Britain of the five Periodi
cals above named is $3l per annum.
TO
SCIENTIFIC AND PRACTICAL AGRICULTURE.
BY HENRY STEPHENS F. R S., of Edinburgh, and the
late J. P. NORTON, Professor of Scientific Agriculture
in Yale College, New Haven. 2 vols. Royal octavo.
3,600 pages, and nuinerous Engravings.
This is, confessedl.& the most complete work on Ag
riculture ever published, and in order to give it a wider
circulation the publishers have resolved to reduce the
price to
FIVE DOLLARS FOR THE TWO VOLUMES!!
When sent by mail (post-paid) to Ca' ifornia and Ore
von the price will be $7. To every other part of the
Union, and to Canada, (post-paid,) Vt. tl7' This book
is NOT the ord "Book of the Ftirm."
Remittances for any of the above publications should
always be addressed, post paid, to the Publishers,
LEONARD SCOTT & CO,
No 64 Gold street, New York
AUCTION ! AUCTION ! !
ap9•dlw
I will sell by Public Auction, en Wednesdav, the 10th
day of April, A. D. 1861, and to be cnntinued - from day
to day u , iil all is disposed of. at the Store Room, No.
12. N' rth-western ride of Market Square, next to Felix 'S
Confectionery. the entire sock of goods embracing
China and blase Ware. Tea and Toilet Sets, Molasses
of diffe-ent grades Black and Green Teas, White and
Brown Sugars, Coa l Oil and Plaid Lamps and Lanterns,
Oil Stands and Oil, Tea, Caddy& PI tform and Counter
Scales. Sugar Mill, &c. Also, Liquors, such as Brandy,
Wine, &c.; some old in bottles. Sale to commence at S
o'clock in the forenoon, when terms will be made known
by [ap9-dtf] W. L. TREWICK.
A RBOR WIVES FOR SALE.—The
subscriber has a lot of these beautiful ev ergreens,
just r eeeived from Pittsburg, for sale at his Green-house,
above town, or at his stall in the lower Market House,
on M rket mornings. They are in excellent condition,
an. aro probably the finest specimens ever brought to
this place.
ALSO, a lot of Locust Posts, fromJolll 6to 22
M e .SHECK. fet in length ;
whi , be will sell low for cash. .1
ap9-d2w
I ' HE BE FLE ON PI V( di CR—The fol
.' lowing words are from Mark x. v. 9, 12:
"What, therefore, God has joined together let not mac
put asunder."
"Whosoever shall put away his wife and marry another
Committeth adultery. And if a wriman shall put away
her husband and marry again she committeth adultery."
Legislators and others, the above is the edict of the
supreme Lawgiver . from which there is do appeal.—
"What. therrture, God has joined together /et no
do
put asunder.), janl2 tf
TERMS
THE FARMER'S GUIDE