Daily patriot and union. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1858-1868, February 18, 1861, Image 1

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    RATES OF ADVERTISING.
four lines or less constitute half a spare. Ten linse
or more 'dual four, constitute a square.
fialfsg.,oneday— --. $0.25 One sq., one 50.60
one wees. —.... 1.00 cc one 5.00
1.26
" one mouth— 2.00 " one month.
Lc three months. 3.00 " three =Oaths. 5.00
six months 4.00 eg six months... 8.00
ucc • one year-- 5.00 gs one year.— 1 0 . 0 0
ej- Business notices inserted in the LOCAL
fervorCO
before marriagez and deaths,
others3Wra PER men f
insertion. Tomeroliantssue advertisingbytheyear
Waal teL MI win be offered.
la" The mimberainsertions must be designated on the
ilyerlisement.
marriagw ,,,d Deaths will be inserted at the same
ease regular advertisements.
flow, Otationerv,
SCHOOL BOOKS.—School Directors,
Teachers, Parents, Scholars, and others, in want of
liohool nooke, School Stationery, km., Will Ida complete
assortment at R. N. POLLOCK & SON'S BOOK STORE,
market Spare, Harrisburg, comprising in part the follow
3ng--
BRADKR3.—McGuffers, Parker's, Cobb's, Angell')
SPILLING ROOKS.—MeCinlfey% Cobb's, Webster's,
T O Wil'B,llyerly'S. Oombry's.
SN4LISH Smith's, Wood
bridge's, Monteith s, Tuthill's, Hart's, Wells'.
r)BIRS.--Grimshaw's, Davenport's, Frost's, Wil
ton% Wk's, Goodrich% Pinnock's, Goldsmith's and
Clark's.
ARITHMETIC'S.--Greenlearls, Stoddard% Emerson's)
Pike's, Bose's, Colburn% Smith and Dake'e_, Davie%
AlaCllßßAß.—Gremileaf% Davie% Par% Ra Y%
Bridge's.
WICTIONARNS.—WaIker's School, Cobb% Walker,
Woreester's Comprehensive, Worcester% Prinewy, Web
ester's Primary, Webster's High School, Webster's Comte,
Academic.
NATURAL rirthosoraras.—Oomatodes, Parker%
Swift's. The above with a great variety of others can at
any time be found at my store. Also, a complete assort
ment of School Stationery, embracing in the win le a com
plete outfit for school purposel. Any bon not in the store.
procured vt one days notice.
er Country Merchants supplied at wholesale rates.
ALMANACS.—John Baer and Son's Almanac for sale at
. M. POLLOCK & SON'S BOOK STORM, Harrisburg.
or Wholesale and Retail. myl
JUST RECEIVED
AT
scHBFEER'S BOOKSTORE,
ADAMANTINE SLATES
ON TABUN:Ia SIZES AND PRIM,
Whick for beauty and use, cannot be excelled.
REMEMBER TEE PLACE,
SCHEF.F.E.II I B BOOKSTORE,
NO. 18 MARKET STREET. . insr2
' N B w B 0 0 K S 1
.TIIST REOEIVED
"ORAL AND Lily , by the author of "Wide, W 149
World," "Dollars and Cents," &e.
"HISTORY Olt KETHODISM,"by A.Stevene, LL.D.
Tor sale at SCREFFERS , BOOKSTORE,
sp9 l'io.lB Markt, at.
JUST RECEIVED,
A LARGE AND SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OP
_RICHLY GILT AND ORNAMENTAL
WINDOW CURTAINS,
PAPER BLINDS,
Of various Designs and Oolong, for 8 cents,
TISSUE PAPER AND CUT FLY PAPER,
At [my24] SCHEFFEE'S BOOKSTORE.
WALL P A PER I WALL PAPER ! !
iniit received, our Spring Stock of WALL PAPER,
BORDERS, FMB SCREENS, &c., &c. Itis the largest
and best selected assortment in the city, ranging in price
from six (6) cents up to one dollar and a quarter ($1.26.)
Ati we purchase very low for cash, we are prepared to
sell at as low rates, if not lower, than can be hail else
where. If purchasers will call and examine, we feel
• confident that we can please them in respect to price
and quality. E. M POLLOCK A SON,
apS Below Imam? Howe, Market Square.
LETTE R, CAP, NOTE PAPERS,
11 Pens, Holders, Pencil's, Envelopes, Sealing Wax, of
the best quality, at low prices, direct front the menu
feetexies, at
metal WHEFFEWO CHEAP BookBtOra
TAW BOOKS! LAW BOOKS I-A
AA general assortment of LAW BOOKS, all the State
- Reports and Standard Elementary Work*, with many of
the old English Reports, scarce and' rare, together with
a large assortment of second-hand Law Books, at Yery
low prices, at the one price Bookstore of'
B. Zd. POLLOCK. & SON,
Market Square, Harrisburg.
my
Illisceltaneous.
AN ARRIVAL OF
NEW GOODS
APPROPRIATE TO THE SEASON!
BILK LINEN PAPER
FANS! FANS!! FANS!!!
ANOTHER AND SPLENDID LOT OF
SPLICED FISHING RODS!
Trout Flies, Gut and Hair Snoods, Grass Lines, Silk
and. Hair Plaited Lines, and a general assortment of
FISHING TACKLE!
A GMAT TARIZTY Or
WALKING CANES!
Which we will sell as cheap as the cheapest!
Silver Head Loaded Sword Hickory Fancy
Canes! Canes! Canes! Canes! Canes!
HELLER'S DRAM AND FANCY STORE,
NO. 91 MARKET STREET,
South side, one door east of Fourth street je9.
BJ. - HARRIS,
WORKER IN TIN, •
SHEET IRON, AND
METALLIC ROOFING,
Efecond Street, below Chestnut,
HARRISBURG, PA.
16 preparel tc fill orders for any article in hie branch of
Minium and if not en hand, he will make to order on
short notice.
METALLIC ROOFING, of Tin or HalvaniSed Iron,
constantly on band.
Also, Tin and Sheet-Iron Ware, Spouting, Ito.
He hopes, by strict attention to the wants of his custo
mers, to merit and receive a generous share of public pat
ronage.
lir Every promise strictly fulfilled.
B. 7. HARRIS,
Second Street, below Cheatnat.
FISH!!
'MACKEREL, (Nee. 1, 2 and 3.)
SALMON, (very Superior.)
MAD, (Memo and very tine.)
HERRING, (extra large.)
COD VISH.
SMOKED HERRING, (extra Digby.)
SCOTCH HERRING.
SARDINES AND ANCHOVIES.
Of the above we have Mackerel in whole, half, quarter
sad eighth bbls. Herring in whole and hall bble.
The entire lot new—DIRECT FROM THE PIIIIERIES, and
will sell them at the lowest market rates.
sepl4 WM. DOOK, 7E., & CO.
CHAMPAGNE. WINEBI
DUO DE MONTEBELLO,
MEIDSIECIC. & CO.,
CHARLES EINIDBIBCR,
GIESLER & CO.
ANCHOR—SiLLBRY MOUSSEUX,
BPARHLING biIISCATEL,
AWASH & CO.'S
VERzP.Niy,
CABINET.
In store and for sale by
JOHN H. ZIEGLER,
73 Market street
de2o
ECKORY WOOD! I-A b`UPERIOR LOT
nat received, and for sale in quantities to snit pur
chasers, by JAMES M. WHEELER.
Also, OAR AND PINE constantly on hand at the
lowest prices. dece
ADEIIAr BIBLES, from 18 to $lO,
strong and handsomely bound, Printed on good paper,
with elegant clear new type sold at
inehBl SCHLEFPEIPS Oben 800k...Vv..
CRANBERRIES I I I .—A SPLEND6 LOT
V just received by
octlo
'D MA
OR a superior and cheap TA or
- 2 ; SALAD OIL go to
ICELLER7B DRUG STORE.
T"Fruit (,*rowers' Handbook—by
WARlNG—whbleEtle and retail at -
mchal 80 FIEF PIMPS Bookstore.
RPERM CANDLES.—A large supply
4 , 0 rest received by
opt wht. DOOR. 3A., 80 CO-
VELLER'S DRUG STORE is the place
Ja. to dad tho bast aionbalent Porte Mod ' idieL '
FISH!!!
WM- DOCK. JR., & CO
I -- - - - _
- -
• --
, -
1 I[l 1111„to: - . •- •71±7 - 7
• I•''',• '
•
4 0 '
4 , 1111 , 1;-1
-
1:111 _ 4 . trio
VOL. 3.
Baal.
TO THE PUBLIC!
JOHN TILL'S
COAL YARD,
SOUTH SZOOND STREET,
BELOW PRATT'S ROLLING: MILL,
HARRISBURG, PA.,
Where he has constantly on hand
LYKENS VALLEY BROKEN, EGG, STOVE AND
NUT COAL.
ALSO,
WILKESBARRE STEAMBOAT, BROKEN, STOVE
AND NUT COAL,
ALL OF THE BEST QUALITY.
It will be delivered to eonsamers clean, and full
weight warranted.
Irr CONSUMERS GIVE ME A CALL FOR YOUR
WINTER SUPPLY.
irr Orders left at my house, in Walnut street, near
Fifth; or at Brubaker's, North street; J. L. Speel's,
Market Square; Wm. Bostick's, corner of. Second and
South streets, and John Lingle's, Second and Mulberry
streets, will receive prompt attention,
jy13.46m JOHN TILL.
COAL! COAL!!
ONLY YARD IN TOWN THAT DELIVERS
coAL BY THE
PATENT WEIGH CARTS!
NOW IS TEE TIME
Nor every fami/y to get in their supply of Coal for the
winter—weighed at their door by the Patent Weigh
Carts. The accuraey of these Carts no one disputes, and
theynever get out of order, as is frequently the case of
the. Platform Scales; besides, the consumer has the
satisfaction of proving the weight of his Coal at his
Own house.
I have a large supply of Coal on hand, con:tat:leg of
0. M. CO.'S LYKENS VALLEY COAL all sizes,
LIKENS VALLEY do Ca
WILEESBARRE ' do.
'BITUMINOUS BROAD TOP do.
All Coal of the beet quality mined, and delivered free
from all impurities, at the loviest rates, by the boat or
car load, single, half or third of ton's, and by the bushel.
JAMES M. WHEELER.
Harrisburg, September 24,1860.—5ep25
UP TOWN!
PATRNT WEIGH CARTS.
For the convenience of my numerous uptown custom
ers, I have established, in connection with my old yard,
a Branch Coal Yard opposite North street, in a line with
the. Pennsylvania canal, having the (MO formerly occu
pied by Mr. R. Harris, where consumers of Coal in that
vicinity and Verbeketown can receive their Coal by the
PATENT WEIGH CARTS,
WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE FOR HAULING,
And in any quantity they may desire, as low as can be
purchased anywhere.
FIVE THOUSAND TONS COAL ON HAND,
Of LYKENS VALLEY and WILKESEARRE, all sizes.
Da" Willing to maintain fair prices, but unwilling
to be undersold by any parties.
Er All Coal forked up and delts....m clean a n d f r ee
from all impuritie., sea the best article mined.
Ordwia....ccivad at either Yard will be promptlyillled,
nd all Coal delivered by the Patent Weigh Carts.
Coal sold by Boat, Oar load, single, half or third of
tone, and by the bushel.
NAMES M. WHEELER.
Harrisburg, October 13, 1880.—oct15
EYIIEN3 VALLEY NUT 00,4.14-
-La For 81110 AT TWO DOLLARS TER TON.
E AU Coal doliveredby PATENT WEIGH" CARTS
JAMS M. WHEELER
Coaldelivered from both yards. norf
,ffiebical.
HELMBOLD'S HELMBOLD'S
HELMBOLD'S HELMBOLD'S
HELMBOLD'S HELMBOLD'S
HELMBOLD'S HELMBOLD'S
HELMBOLD'S HELMBOLD'S
HELMBOLD'S HELMBOLD'S
- HELMBOLD'S HELMBOLD's
Extract Bach% Extract Ruch%
Extract Bache, Extract linchn,
Extract Dacha, Extract Swint,
Extract Beebe, Extract Enchn,
Extract Bachtt, Extract Buchtt;
Extract Bachn, Extract Dacia',
Extract Bach'', Extract Bache.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
A Positive and Specific Remedy.
'A Positive and Specific Remedy.
A Positive and Specific Remedy-
A Positive and Specific Remedy.
A Positive and Specific Remedy.
A Positive and Specific Remedy.
A Positive and Specific Remedy.
FOR DISEASES OF THE
BLADDER, GRAVEL. KIDNEYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL; EIDBEYS, bliorsY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY;
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY ,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY,
ORGANIC WEAKNESS,
ORGANIC WE ISNERS,
ORGAN/C WEAKNESS,
ORGANIC WEAKNESS,
ORGANIC WEAKNESS,
ORGANIC WEAKNESS,
And ail Diseases of Sexual Organs,
And all Diseases of Sexual Organs,
And ail Diseases of Sexuai Organs,
And ail Diseases of Sexual Organs,
And all Diseases of Sexual Organs,
And oil Diseases of Sexual Organs,
ARISING FROM
Excesses, Exposures, and Imprudencies in Life.
Excesses, Exposures, and Imprudencies in Life.
Excesses, Exposure., and Imprudencies in Life.
Excesses, Exposures, and Imprndeneies in Life.
Excesses, Exposures, and Imprudencies in Life.
Excesses, Exposures, and Imprudencies in Life.
From whatever cause originating, and whether existing in
MALE OR FEMALE.
Females, take no more Pills i They are of no avail for
Complaints incident to the eez. Um
EXTRACT BUCRU.
Helmbeld , s Extract Buchn is a Medicine which ill per
fectly pleasant in its
TASTE AND ODOR
,
. .
But immediate in its action, giving Health and Vigor to
the Frame, Bloom to the Pallid Cheek, and restoring the
patient to a perfect state of
HEALTH AND PI7RITY.
Helmbold's Extract &whit ie prepared according to
Pharmacy and Chemistry, and is prearribea and need by
THE MOST EMINENT PHYSICIANS.
Delay no longer. Procure the remedy at once.
Price $1 per bottle, or six for $l.
Dopot 104 South Tenth street, Philadelphia.
BEWARE OF UNPRINCIPLED DEALERS
Trying to palm off their own or other articles of BUCRU
on the reputation attained by
HELMBOLD'S EXTRACT BUCHU,
The (Menai and only Genuine.
We desire to run on the
MERIT OP OUR ARTICLE !
Their's is worthies,' —is sold at much lees rates and arm
minions) consequently payin g a much better profit.
WE DEFT 0031 PETITION !
Ask for
HELMBOLD'S EXTRACT BUCHII.
Take no other.
Sold by JOHN WYETH, Druggist, corner of Mikket and
Second etreete l garrieburg,
AND ALL , DRUGVISTS.ECERYWHER N.
nol4 Wew3i.n.
EXTRACTS! EXTRACTS!
•
WOODSWORTII 811.NN8L , 13 •
SUPERIOR FI,AVORING.E'XTRACTS
01
BITTER ALMOND,
NEOTARINE,
PINE AI , PLE,
STRAWBERRY, •
tilto . ll A.
VANILLA
Jnet received and for pale b; r1 . 11 •
HARRISBURG, PA., MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1861.
Clt Pitrioa anion.
MONDAY MORNING, FEB. 18, 1861.
THE NATIONAL CRISIS.
LINCOLN AND THE CRISIS.
From the Baltimore Exchange.
We earnestly desire to do Mr. Lincoln strict
and impartial justice; to "extenuate nothing,"
nor "to set down aught in malice." His ad
mirers claim for him the possession of every
quality that should distinguish a great ruler.
They say that he is bold, fearless, independent
and sagacious ; a man of stern integrity and of
the most exalted patriotism. We have not been
disposed to place too much reliance upon the
eulogies of political partisans, but we have
nevertheless hoped, for the sake of the Union,
and the interests of all who desire its perpetua
tion, these lauditery compliments were not
wholly undeserved. We therefore looked for
ward, not without anxiety, to the time when he
should feel it incumbent upon him to express,
however briefly, his views in regard to our
national troubles, and shed some light upon the
line of policy which he proposes to adopt in a
crisis so imminent,. At length he has spoken,
and we confess that the only feeling with which
we have read the remarks imputed to him at
Indianapolis, and. Cincinnati, and Columbus,
is one of intense and bitter disappointment.—
Well may the New York Tribune triumphantly
refer to . the speech of the President elect at
Indianapolis, as a . justification of its own
course in opposition .to conceding anything
whatever to the demands of the South, and as
confirming, both in spirit and in letter, its
public declaration, often and persistently made,
that Mr. Lincoln will .never consent to any
concession or compromise by the North, but
will inexorably exact it of the Sonth. In fur
ther support of this position, the Tribune quotes
"two remarkable articles which appeared in the
Springfield Journal, of last week," and
which; it confidently asserts, "were obviously
inspired by the President elect, if not actually
written by his own hand." Those articles
demand that the South, whose people are stig
atized as "traitors," shall concede "that they
are in rebellion; that it is the duty of this Gov
ernment to put down rebellion, and that
slavery is the creation of local law:" In the
same spirit Mr. Lincolnintimates, in his speech
at Indianapolis, that for the United States to
wrest from the seceding States the foils and
arsenals and public property which are within
their lindits, and of which they now hold pos
session, or collect the duties on foreign impor
tations, or withhold the mails, is not e,oeroion.
But who does not know that if he attempt to
re-garrison the Southern forts, and collect the
revenue en board of armed Besse's, in Southern
harbors, such acts, however interpreted at the
North, would come within the difinition of co
ercion, as understood by every State south of
Meson and Dixon's line, and would be the sig
nal for the commencement of the bloodiest civil
war that ever desolated a country ?
If, then, the policy of the President elect be
a policy of force, in scorn of consequences, he
may call that policy by any name he thinks
proper; but, in its essence, it is coercion, and
its practical assertion would be tantamount to
a declaration of war. None, therefore, but the
most credulous of optimists, or the most radical
of Republicans, can derive any consolation
from the Indianapolis speech of Mr. Lincoln.
The National intelligeneer, painfully conscious
of the unfavorable impression which that speech
has produced, is disposed to question its entire
accuracy; but all doubts on this head are eel
at rest by the statements in the Herald and
Tribune. Both these journals endorse the
corectness of the report, and assert further that
the speeches to be made at all the principal
points between Springfield and Washington
were carefully studied and committed to paper
by Mr. Lincoln before he entered upon his
journey, At Cincinnati he Contented himself
with quoting some portions of a speech which
was made by him in that city a year previous
to the Presidential election, and which was
especially addressed to the people of Kentucky.
So far as those remarks are applicable to the
existing state of affairs, they are entitled to be
regarded, in the language of the National Intel
-1(q d as of "a pacific and fraternal character."
But what do they amount to ? Merely to a
declaration that the people of the alai e States
" have as good hearts in their bosoms" as the
Republicans claim to have ; and that the latter
have no desire to interfere with the institution
of slavery in the States where it now exists.--
Beyond that Mr. Lincoln does not go. He
adheres to the doctrine of the extreme wing of
his party, that " slavery is the creature of local
law," and is wholly mute as to the right of the
South to carry this species of property into the
Territories. He is silent because he will not
concede the right. We now come to his last
recorded speech—that which he made at Colum
bus on Tuesday last, in the presence of the
members of the Ohio Legislature. He begins
by modestly informing them that a task has
fallen upon him more difficult to execute than
any that ever rested upon the Father of his
Country. He gives his reasons why he has so
long remained silent in relation to the policy
of the new Administration, and still thinks he
was right in keeping his lips closed. The rest
we quote :
"I have not maintained silence from any
want of real anxiety. It is a good thing that
there is no more than anxiety, for there is no
' thing going wrong.
" It is a consoling circumstance, that when
we look out there is nothing that really hurts
anybody. We entertain different views upon
political questions, but nobody is suffering
anything. This is a most consoling circum
stance, and from it I judge that all we want is
time and patience, and a reliance on that God
who has never forsaken the people."
In one breath he declares that his silence
must not be imputed to any want of real anxi
ety, and, in the next, alleges that no cause for
anxiety exists, for, says he, "there is nothing
going wrong." Is this a statesman speaking ;
or is it a man just emerged from the backwoods
and utterly ignorant of the progress of events
for the past three months ? "Nothing going
wrong," when seven States have seceded from
the Union, and a separate and independent
Confederacy has been organized! Nothing go
ing wrong, when committees have been op
pointed by both Houses of Congress to take
into consideration the national troubles, and,
if possible, to agree upon, and report some plan
of adjustment. Nothing going wrong, when
Crittenden, and Corwin, and Adams, and Kel
logg, and Douglas, and Rice, and the members
from the border States have submitted such
propositions as seemed to them, respectively,
the best adapted to bring about a reconcilia
tion; when petitions containing, in the aggre
gate, over two hundred and fifty thousand sig
natures have been sent to Congrees, praying for
the
.adoplion of satisfactory measures Of com
promise ; when a thousand troops and several
batteries of artillery are' concentrated at Wash
ington, ostensibly for the defence of the Capi
tar, and when Commiesioners from twentyone
States are in session in that city, charged with
the same high and solemn duty which of'right
devolves. upon..Cengresai but which Congress
.. has:so aignallyfailed4o.perform t .
If these are not evidences sufficient to prove
that not only is there something wrong, and
radically wrong, in the present condition of
affairs, but also that the crisis is of too grave
a nature to be treated flippantly, we are at a
loss to understand what signs and portents
would satisfy the President elect that the
country is in peril. This, however, is not all.
As, in the opinion of Mr. Lincoln, there is
"nothing going wrong," it follows, as a logical
consequence, that there is'nobody hurt,"
and "nobody suffering ;" and that such is the
fact he has blandly assured us_ If, then, we
have confidence in what he says, we must
believe that, politically, we are enjoying a hal
cyon calm, and that, commercially, there is no
stagnation of trade, no suspension of banks,
no mercantile failure 9, no depreciation of
values, no suffering among the laboring popu
lation. To do this we musrutterly ignore the
truth , of the reports which reach us from every
section of the Union, confirmed as they are by
the evidence of our own senses. It is strange
that such opinions should be publicly expres
sed by one who has to deal with issues so
momentous. In the little which he has said,
thus far, he has shown either a wilful blind
ness to the perils which environ the Govern
ment, or a dangerous contempt for them. In
the present temper of the country, no man who
claims to be a Statesman would dare to treat
these matters lightly; and if Mr. Lincoln
imagines that, when clothed with Executive
authority, he can easily control the storm and
reduce, the seceding States to submission, by
the adoption of any measures that bear even the
semblance of coercion, he is destined, we fear,
before long, to be fatally undeceived.
A SENSATION IN NEW YORK
A tremendous sensation was created in New
York on Wednesday by the appearance of a
bogus newspaper called "Extra Express," with
the fallowing flaming head lines over the matter
printed:
“The national erieis—Attiok on Fort Sump
ter—Charleston Bombarded by Major Anderson
—Retreat of the Rebels, with 150 men Killed
and 40 Wounded—The Floating Battery a Fail
ure—Col. Rayne Wounded—Major Anderson
inotorieus—Charleaton to be Bloaaded--Vir
ginia fcir Union—Georgia Assisting North Car
olina—Relief to Major Anderson—The Peace
Convention—New York State Militia—Martial
Law at the South—Oppression in Mississippi."
4
The police seized six hundred copies of it,
which they' found in a policy office in Ann
•street, hidden away in a dark room. The offi
cers first seized upon those in posseslon of the
newsboys, who said they had been supplied
with thaw at the rate of $2 per. hundred. Some
six hundred were sent off to Brooklyn before
the police made the seizure.
THE COMMON TERRITORIES
From the Journal of Commerce
Two boys, brothers, whom for convenience
sake, I shall designate by the initial letters N.
and 8., respectively, wanted an apple ; but the
price was two cents, and each of the brothers
had one and only one, in his pocket. But
both wanted the apple. In this dilemma they
resorted to the very cents-able expedient of
combining • their finances, and . were thus
enabled to purchase the apple. But scarcely
had the brothers taken it into their joint pos
session than a quarrel arose between them as
to the question of joint use ; N. insisting that
as he was larger and stronger than S., he
would appropriate the whole of the apple to
himself; and S. insisting just as strenuously
that this was not fair, because he had contribu
ted his full share of the purchase money, and
declaring that he would not stand it, notwith
standing his brother's boast of superior strength,
but would fight before he would submit to such
a wrong. Forgetting that they were brothers,
the boys were about to decide their quarrel
after the manner that wild beasts decide their
quarrels ; but meantime the dialogue took place
between them which I now report to the pub
lic, as follows :
N.—l don't want to fight about it ; you know
I don't. I love peace ; you know I do. lam
very desirous of settling this quarrel without
fighting ; you know I am ; and I therefore most
earnestly and affectionately entreat you, bro
ther, not to oppose me when I declare my
purpose to have the whole of this apple ; for I
am determined to have it, and to oppose me
must lead to a fight. Pray consider how wicked
that would be, and how sorry I should feel to
find myself obliged to thrash you. You know
I could easily beat you into mince-meat in a
very short time. But I love peace, and sin
cerely hope you will not make fighting neces
sary by insisting on having a part of this ap
ple.
S.—l don't make so many professions of a
love for peace as you do, but I am willing to do
more, to sacrifice more than you are to secure it.
Don't let's fight about this apple. Divide it.
I am willing you should take the bigger half,
and give me the other part.
N.—l'll d 0 such thing. I HAVE DECIDED to
eat the whole of this apple; and I've told you
my decision in very clear language ; and you'll
find there's NO BACKING DOWN with me on that
point.
A wrathful silence ensues. 'Tie the awful
stillness that precedes the storm. Each moment
the clouds that sit upon the brows of the two
brothers are gathering blackness. BO before
the storm bursts, N. speaks again!
N.—To show you, brother, that I really want
to settle this dispute, amicably, if possible, I
will say that if you will agree to what I now
propose, I don't know but that I might agree
to it, too, as a compromise. Divide the apple, as
you propose, into two parts. Give me the lar
ger part and put the other aside on the mantel
piece for the present, and we'll decide whose
that shall be some other time and in some other
way. Whoever can get it, let him have it. We
may have to fight about this smaller part after
wards, it is true, but this "compromise" settles
the question about the bigger half forever, and
(if you'll agree to it) postpone all trouble about
the smaller slice.
S.--I can't agree to that. If that's the best
you offer me, I'm afraid we'll have to fight it
out. And 1 feel that it isn't at all my fault,
either. I made you a very fair offer and you
reject it, and offer me instead a very absurd
one, which it is really hard for me to think you
can be serious in , proposing.
[Shortly afterwards the boys commenced
fighting, and while intent on damaging each
other. some wild beasts came out of the woods
and destroyed them both.]
This little story presents us with a miniature
picture of what is similarly done and paid
among " children of a larger growth," and on
a grander scale, in the political world. It is
a picture in little of the territorial dispute
which is' now leading us to anarchy and blood
shed. . .
The'South claims a right to take its property
into all the common Territories, and to have it
recognized and protected there try the belional
Government, on the ground that it is "Common
Territory," and they rely upon the. constitu
tional interpretation of the COnetitution to
sustain them in. this position. The North, on
the other hand,- denies this right ; says it
cloesn',t• like- slavery ; that it must stay where
it is.; that it shall not be extended ; that the
South shall not have2tdayery recognized or
protected in any of the Territories. ,
This, then, is the point at issue. • The South
insists upon PROTECTION in ALL the Territories;
PROHIBITION in NONE. The North, on the con.
trary, wants PROHIBITION in ALL ; PROTECTION
in NONE.
Nov in what way can this dispute be peace
fully adjusted ? What would be a fair and
reasonable compromise?
Mr. Crittenden's proposition (with the Powell
amendment) would settle the question, abso
lutely, North and South, forever. That, cer
tainly, is one great merit. Let us see if the
proposition is not a perfectly fair one, so far,
at any rate, as the North is concerned. What,
then, is this "Crittende,n Compromise," so far
as it relates to the Territorial Question ? Let
us see. It proposes to draw a line, 86 ° 30 0 ,
certainly not at all South of the line which
nature would draw to decide the question, if
Nature were left to herself. It proposes that
in all territory North of that line the North
shall have its way, viz.: prohibition; and that
in all territory South of that line, the South
shall have its way, viz.: protection.
Can any proposition possibly be more fair—
more reasonable ?
The South, some weeks ago, would have ac
cepted this proposition, and distinctly said so,
If the North had seasonably accepted this com
promise, it would have saved the Union, which
the North loves so much that it is very ready
to give its blood (though it would not give up
any of its abstractions by way of compromise)
to preserve it. The North in various ways
said "No." Secession, as was naturally to be
expected, went on; and to-day an opposition
Republic is to be set up. And what is the
proposition which the Republicans very
strangely call a Compromise, and seem to
imagine may be still effectual to "save the
Union," and which they are just beginning to
think they might possibly be induced to
accept, even though it be called "a Compro
mise ?" It is to draw the line as aforesaid ;to
enter into a mutual agreement that North of it
slavery shall be prohibited, and South of it
slavery shall neither be prohibited nor pro
tected. How absurd to call such a proposition
a "Compromise!" It is wholly one-sided, and
wholly in favor of the North. Consider how
absurd such a one.eided proposition would
seem to every anti-slavery Northerner, if the
one-sidedness were the other way. Such a
proposition, as much one-sided in favor of the
South as the one now under consideration is
one-sided in favor of the North, would be as
follows : South of the proposed line, slavery
shall be protected ; North of it, slavery shall be
neither protected nor prohibited. How would
Republicans treat such a proposition ? Would
they treat it seriously ? Would not its being
offered to them be Considered a mockery and
an insult, rather than an honest and serious
"Peace Proposition ?" And yet this is just
the sort of one-sided arrangement which the
Republicans propose to offer, as a compromise
to the South. •
I fear it is too late now to save the country
by any compromises. The cotton States have
been driven too far to recede. Such is what is
to be feared. But one thing is absolutely ne
cessary, viz., that the South will accept nothing
less than the Crittenden compromise,, and that •
they will never seriously entertain for a single
moment the absurd one-sided proposition which
we have just been considering. If that is the
best that the Republicans offer the South, the
whole responsibility of the consequences, how
ever dreadful, will rest exclusively with them.
THE SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY CONOI4ESS—RRE
PARATION FOR THE INAIIOURATION OP PRESI
DENT DAVIS.
MONTGOMERY, February:lsth.—Congress to
day appointed a committee of sin to make
suitable arrangements for the reception and
inauguration on Monday next, at one o'clock,
of the President elect.
The chair stated that as ootatt m1'0,10401:1, had
been received relative to the purohase of vessels
for the Provisional Government—referred.
Mr. Fearn presented a letter in reference to
a new projectile approved by scientific military
men—referred.
An official copy of the Texas ordinance of
secession was presented, with the credentials
of the deputies of that State. Only one of
them has arrived.
Objection was made on the ground :that the
Texas ordinance was not yet ratified.
The delegate present, Mr. Gregg, was invi
ted ton seat on th floor, and his papers were
referred.
The Convention then went into secret session
and passed an act and a resolution, the secrecy
on which was removed.
The act continues in office the officers con
nected with the Collection of customs at the
time of the adoption of the Constitution of the
Confederated States, with salaries and powers
as heretofore ; provided said compensation does
not exceed $5,000. The collectors are required
within two weeks to execute the same bonds as
heretofore, and subordinates are to give bonds
in one week after the collectors.
All officers are required to take an oath to
discharge the duties and support the Constitu
tion of the Provisional Government.
The resolution adopted continues in °Ede,
until otherwise ordered, the several officers
connected with the collection of duties until
the let of April, and the Secretary of the Trea
sury is instructed to report a plan, to go into
effect on the Ist of April, diminishing the ex
penses of collecting the revenues at. each (sus
tom-house at least 50 per cent.
THE OBJECT OF THE SOUTHERN CONFEDERACY,
The New Orleans Picayune of,the sth instant
cco
The Southern Confederacy will not be the
work of politicians. It will be the refuge of a
people who seek, beneath the shelter of their
own government, the peace and equality which
were denied them under the old Union. They
ask now, as then, to be let alone. They desire
the ruin of no one—they entertain no aggres
sive feeling towards any country. They would
not, if they could, destroy any of the property
of the North, or abridge any right that is theirs.
They would part in peace, and be friendly, as
a separate people, with those with whom they
could not live together as one. They have
been driven from the common territory of the
Confederacy; they have been denied their equal
right in the common inheritance, and now they
have given up all, to settle down on their own
soil and surround themselves with institutions
essential to their well-being. Is such a people
to be conquered? Will it be any easy matter
to subjugate them ? Will the North undertake
it?
Let those who love the Union se much that
they would be willing to undertake, the most
fearful of all wars, a war of conquest, to pre
serve it, reflect for a moment that. this
,Union
was as dear to the. people
.of the South as to
themselves; and then let them consider the
amount of oppression and wrong they must
have suffered before resorting to.disunion as a
remedy. If the'Northern people give a thought
in this direction they will come to safer con
clusions than any, which a calculation of the
cost of civil war is likely to suggest. They
will reverse their hostile action, sympathize
with those whom they have wronged beyond
endurance, and obtain, through the, instrumen
talities of good neighborhood fad , kindness,
hat war never yet procured for any one.
BY O .I3ARRETT & CO
TU DAILY PATRIOT AID Mawr will be aortal to sub
scribers residing in the Borough for SIX UNITS PIN WRRX
payable to the Carrier. Mail enbeeribure, SODA ROL
Lifts PIN
Tun %remit will be published as heretofore, semi
weekly during the session of the Legislature, and ones a
week the remainder of the year, for two dollars in ad
ranee, or three dollars at the expiration of the year.
Connected with' tide cetabliehment le an catthmiTl
JOB OFFICB, containing a variety of plain and fentey
type, unequalled by any eatablishment in the interior of
the State, for which the patronage of the public is so
licited_
NO. 143.
The Chicago Democrat pitches into the plat
form of its party in the following style:
All platforms are humbugs, and intended to
be such. Take the platforms of all the politi
cal parties since the foundation of our govern
ment and you will find that they are capable
of a double construction. Take the late Chi
cago platform, for instance. Upon that plat
form stood Owen Lovejoy in this State, who
has ever been an ardent opponent of slavery,
and who was, in 1856, a warm supporter of
Col. Fremont. Upon that same platform also
stood Joe Gillespie, of Alton, who opposeli
Col. Fremont in 1856 with all his energies, and
who hates every drop of blood that flows
through the veins of a man like Lovejoy.—
Now, either Lovejoy or Gillespie is cheated,
and it is not very difficult to tell which. After
the repeal of the Missouri Compromise we re
solved to fight on the side of human liberty,
and we kept on fighting until we found ourselves
inside of what's known as the Republican or
ganization. But Lincoln had not been long
nominated before a lot of the Gillespie order,
who love spoils more than liberty, notified us
that we were too radical, that our notions :of
liberty were hurting the party. Now, we did
not care anything about the party as such....
We were for principles. If Republican prin
ciples were not right, then we ought not to
oppose the Democratic party, If they were
right then we ought to stand by them, let the
coneequences be what they will. We foresaw
that it would turn out in the end that men had
got control of the Republican organization,
who loved patronage, power and plunder more
than they did liberty.
THE STRUGGLE FOR POWER UNDER THE LIN
COLN REGIME.
The speeches of Mr. Lincoln in the West are
the signal for an active development of opposing
combinations that have been in existence for
some time to control him. It is easy to see
that he will arrive in Washington with a dizzy
head, and staggering under the responsibilities
surrounding him. He is unequal to the crisis,
and will feel it so sensibly when he arrives
here that it is inferred he will rush for safety
into the arms of some man of strong will, who
will keep his conscience and manage his gov
ernment. The struggle is, who shall it be. And
on this question probably are suspended the
issues of peace and war. Seward and Chase
are the rival aspirants. The former is backed
by the Wall street moneyed interest and touch
of the old Whig element of the Republican
party. Whatever of indirect influence the con
servative, peace•loving people of the country,
can exert, is also thrown in the same scale ;
and all of these influences are manipulated by
the Mephistophelean fingers of . Thurlow Weed,
who is unceasing la/making his arrangements,
Mr. Chase is supported by the radical part
of the Democratic party that sloughed off in
1848, and again in 1854, assisted by Greeley
and all the fanatical abolitionists. It is a
powerful combination in point of numbers,
talent and influence.
-'REPORT OF THE CONFERENCE COMMITTEE—MI
A special dispatch to the Baltimore Sun,
dated Washington, February 15, says :
I need not repeat, what. I informed you of two
days since, namely, that the committee of the
Peace Convention have adopted substantially
the Guthrie proposition of compromise, and
recommends its passage by the convention, to
which report was made to-day. Some com
plaint was essayed therein concerning the
early publication of important acts of the com
mittee, but the New York press was not blamed
on that score.
The vote on the Guthrie programme was
twelve in favor to seven against. Mr. Sedden
offered to amend it, substituting the Crittenden
propositions, with the Virginia ultimatum art
nexed. The latter requires protectionby Con.-
gressional legislation of slavery in Territories
south of thirty-els thirty, and also demands tho
right of transit of slaves through free States.
It is also understood that Mr. Sedden will sup
port the proposition that a State shall have the
right to secede from the Union.
Messrs. Field, Baldwin and Crowninshield
said that they differed in views from those de
clared in the reports of the committee. In re
commending that Congress shall refer the
amendments to the Constitution that may be
proposed by the convention to the action of
the people, many republicans do not consider
that it necessarily implies approval of these
amendments.
It is stated that Alexander H. Stephens has
written that hope of a reconstruction of the
Union must now be abandoned.
So strong an opposition exhibits itself to the
features of the Morrill tarriff bill which materi.
ally changes the warehousing system, that
some republicans are willing to compromise
with the interest represented by the New York
Chamber of Commerce.
The republicans of the House tletertulnefl
caucus to-night to support Bingham's bill to
enforce the collection of revenues, and also
the measure which eathorizes the acceptance
of the services of volunteers to enforce the
laws.
I hear that Messrs. Sedden, Tyler and other
distinguished delegates from the South, have
little hope of ultimate action in the convention
favoring just compromise. Mr. Lincoln'.
speeches are regarded as hostile thereto. The
action of the republican caucus to-night look);
more like war than peace.
REMAINEATA.E DEATH OF A LITTLE Bor. All
inquest was held in New York on Thursday
upon the body of Henry M. Toner, a boy about,
13 years of age, whose death resulted from in
termittent fever, consequent upon an maiden.
tal injury to his eyelid, received on the 22d of
last December. On the day in question the
deceased was playing with his companions
around the barn. In running round the cor
ner of the building he came in contact with a
pitchfork which a man was using to load a
cart with manure. The only apparent injury
was a scratch upon the eyelid, but the lad at
discovering the blood became very nervous,
and having been taken home, sunk into insen
sibility. He continued unconscious about a
week, only speaking when aroused. After
wards he recovered sufficiently to go about the
house, but remained feeble, and intermittent
fever setting in, be died. Deceased was of a
very nervous organization, and had fainted at
the sight of blood, when his cousin accidental
ly cut his finger. There is no doubt that his
fatal illness resulted from fright at the alight
in'u • he suffered.
DISTRESS AMONG THE ENGLISH OPERAnyleff.
The late London and Liverpool papers are
filled with the dreadful accounts of starvation
and suffering in the manufacturing towns and
cities, in consequence of a lack of employment,
resulting mainly from the countermanding of or
dersfrom the United States. "Relief societies,"
"soup houses" and " fuel and clothing associ
ations" are springing up in all manufacturing
districts. Manchester,. Leeds, linddersfield,
Nottingham and Coventry are sellout'. sufrerers.
The number of poor has increased
In one town the out door leetPients are over
2,000 more than last
year.at the same time.-fi-
U . nder such circumstances,
.how. long would
England, with her eurerio. r naval power.
,sub
mit to a - blockade of t4oOtion'yorta
ern Republic, "Pips
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