Daily patriot and union. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1858-1868, January 10, 1861, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    BATES OF ADVERTISING.
fear linen or leas ennstitute half a square. Ten lines
cz more than roar, emsetitate a Square.
usirso,ousdn.l"- 11 0 .26 One sq., one day.--.-150„04,
one week. 1.00 gi one week.--. 1.26
nue month- . 2.00 " one month.., 8.00
three months,. 3.00 " three mulatto. 6.06
D ix menths.... 4.t10 i 4 nix months._ g.or
One year— _ 8.00 4 , 6116 10.00
to" Badness notices inserted in the LOOM. comma, or
tet . o , wa -muge - and deaths, nro C Odra PER WEE for each
insertion to merehanteand others advertisingby therm?
.I,otaios. se will be adored.
o y, The Bili nherefinsertions must badesisnatedon the
avertisreen.
man i li gati and Deaths will be inserted it the ft=
rtes as relr.dar advertisements.
Bookol Stationery, tc.
cHOOL BOOKS.—School Directors :
Teaehers, Parents, Scholars, and others, in want of
school g oo ks, School Stationery, &e., will Oda complete
so chrcent at E. K. roLLocx & SON'S BOOK STOIIIII,
maul knare, Malmberg, comprising in part the follow.
'"k g , i -DERS.-3)lltOrtffey's, Parker's, Cobb's, Angell's
SPELLINt3 BOOKlL—HeGuffers, Cobb's, Webster's,
TOlllOB, Byerif Combrf
ORLON OR PACK Akg —Bullion's, Smith% Wood
go's Watchful, Tuthill% Hat's , Wells'.
HigybAlNS.--Grirnalattw% Davenport% Prost% Wtl
ton's'. Willard% Goodrich's,Pinuock% tiommith's and
soak's.
AIUTECHNTICI3.--Greenlears, Stoddard's, limerson's,
Pike's, Rees's, °album's, Smith and Duke's, Davie's.
ALURBRAS.—tireenleave, Davie's, Day's, Ray's,
r
".
YDOTIONARTS.—WaIker'S School, Cobb% Welker,
Woronster's Comprehensive, Worcester's Primary, Web
der's Primary, Webster's High School, Webster's Quarto,
Academie.
NATURAL PHILOSOPHIRS.—Ckimetock's, Parker'sswift ' s. The above with a great variety of others can at
any ruse be round at my store. Also, komplett) awe,
ment of Scheel Stationery, embracing in the whi to a MA
plate outfit for school purposes. Any book not in the store.
procured done days notice.
117 Country Merchants eapplied at wholesale rated.
ALMANACS —John Baer and Son's Almanac for sale al
I. rowpag & SQ.I)PB BOOK STORM, Harrisburg.
gry-
wholesale and mail. nxyl
UST RECEIVED
AT
lEFFER'S BOOKSTORE,
ADAMANTINE SL .R TES
OP VARIOUS SIZES AND PRIORS,
Wklak, for twat, and nee, cannot be excelled.
RENLIDEBER THE PLA.OR,
8011R.FFER , S BOOKSTORE,
NO. 18 MARKET STREET. mars
BOOK AUCTION.
BEN F. FRENCH
Wilisupply Lie old blonde nit 00 11 t 0 ulerli with the
following Boobat Lnctionprices:
Pac4lls Dallroad, 10 vole., complete, 4 illustrations
Japan Dxpedition, 3 vols., complete, illustrated and
illuminated, $l2.
limery'llspeslition, 2 vols., complete, illustrated
illonsinated,
Congressional Globe, $1.40 Per volume.
Waverly Novels, complete, 12 vole ., cloth, $lO.
27 vols., half calf, $34; acct.,
are.
611 ef the abase Boobs / Will deliver in Harrintnng
Kee 0 charge. Dial' P. ,FitliDOD,
2711 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, D. C.
tebll.dtf
NEW BOOKS!
JIIIIT RZUZITIOD
"SEAL AND SAY," by the author of "Wide, Wide
World," +(Dollars sad Cents" &o. -
"HISTORY Olf, METHODISM," by A. Stevens, LL.D.
For sale at LICKNIFBIIB 2 BOOKSTORE,
No. 18 Marks st.
JUST RECEIVED,
A LARGE AND SPLENDID ASSORTIifIiNT OP
RICHLY GILT AND ORNAMENTAL
WINDOW R
B .ou LINPB,
xxso,
PAPER
Of visions Designs and Colors , for 8 cents,
TISSUE PAPER AND CUT FLY PAPER,
At ling24l SCHREYER'S BOOKSTORE.
WALL PAPER 1 WALL PAPER 1 1
Tont received, our Opting Rock of WALL PAPER,
BORDERS, FIRE SCREENS, &c., &o. ttis thelargest
and best selected assortment in the city, raugickg in price
from six (8) cents up to one dollar cud e.quarter ($1.25.)
As we purchase very low for cash, we are prepared to
sell at as low rates, if not lower, than can be had else
where, if packager* w3ll eaU and examine, we feel
;confident that we Can please - them in *aspect to price
and quality. B. II POLLOCK to SON,
ap3 Below 'Tones' House, Market Square.
LETTER, CAP, NOTE PAPERS,
Pop, Holders, Panelis t Envelopes, Sealing Wax, of
the beat qualify, art law linen, Croat from the mann
fatteries, at
marSG SCHSPFEWS CIINAP BOOKSTORE
W BOOKS ! LAW BOOKS ! !-A
general assortment of LAW BOOKS, all the State
Iterate and Standard Elementary Works, with many of
the old English Reports, stases and rare, together with
a large assortment of second-hand Law Books, at very
lew prieee, at the oar price Bookators of •
R. M. POLLOCK lc SON,
my* Market Square. Harrisburg.
Alistellancoug.
AN ARRIVAL OF
NEW GOODS
APPROPRIATE TO THE BEASON!
SILK , LINEN PAPER
PANS! PANS!! PANS!!!
JAMMU AND arsamorn LOT Or
SPLICED ILIZZING RODS!
Trout Plies, Gat and Hair Snoods, Grass Lines, Silk
and Hair Plaited Lines, and a genera l assortment of
PISHING TACKLE!
A easaw TARTEST OP
WALKING CANE SI
Which we will Nell as cheap as the cheapest!
Silver Head Loaded Sword Hickory Panay
Canes! Canes! Canes! Canes! Canes
KELLER I S /MVO AND FANCY STOKE,
no. ill HAMLET STRUT,
South side, one door east of Fourth street jet!.
ipt J. HARRIS,
WORKER IN TIN,
Sit ET IRON, AND
- METALLIC ROOFING,
&wood Street, below Ciseessur,
HARRISBURII, PA.
le prepared to fill orders for any article in his branch of
bESness awl if not on hand, he will Wake to order on
sten Rotas.
ArKTALLIC ROOFING, of Tin or eialvanised Irons
sonstantly on hand.
Also, Tin and Sheet-Iron Ware, Spouting, /be.
Re hopes, by strict attention to the wants of his custo
mers, to merit and receive a generous share of public pat
meNts.
Every prondse Strictly fuitilled.
S II !
B. L. HARRIS,
Second Street; below Oheetnet
*el -dl)]
MACKEREL, (Nos. 1;2 and 3.)
SALMON, (very superior.)
BRAD, (mess and very tine.)
HERRING, (extra large.)
COD FISH
EmoRED HERRING, (extra Digby.)
gsGOTCHIIBIutme.
BARDINT.2 AND ANCHOVIES.
Of the above we have Mackerel in whole, half, quarter
and eighth bble. Herring in whole and half bble.
The entire lot new—nnomr FROX THE triellERIEB, and
will Bell them at the lowest market rates.
01144 WU. DOCK, Ja., & CO.
VAMlrbir 131. IMES, from 14 to 01.0 )
s t rw pism4 LandAomel, bound, printed on good paper,
with elegani q.byri new Sype, sold at
snab3/ ganigi" llll ' B Chesto Book ivy!,
PRANBERRIES !!!-41 SPLENDID LOT
VisaMAT*/ by • _
callaWM_ DOCK, 00,
FOR a i3upelifir and clasp TAI 3 LE or
SALAD OIL go to•
,Kwarals IWO STORR.
THE Wait l arhiferif liarglboOk---by
WA II/Re—irluileealtriudretalat' ' •
metal • ENMINIPPERPS Booluttore.
SS PERM CANDLES.—A large nappl7
Nat resolved by •
WM.TOCILOD.
K"LER'S DRUG STORE is the place
to hal the beet assortment of Pore MOSalliell.
F I S H!!!
_
• - Thr - 4 4 Li
▪ • •
4 1 11'
I i
r •
-,•••• ▪ • -.
pettriot
I
• •• I
it' ' •
• • - -!
-7•;
VOL. 3.
(goal.
TO THE PUBLIC!
JOHN TILL'S
COAL V A U D,
SOUTH SEOOND STREET,"
BELOW PBATT'S ROLLING MILL,
HARRISBURG, PA.,
Where he hew constantly on hand
=KENS VALLEY BROKEN., EGO, STOVE AND
NUT COAL
ALBO,
WILKESBARRE STEAMBOAT, BROKEN, STOVE
AND NUT COAL,
ALL OF THE BEST QUALITY.
It will be delivered to consumers clean, and full
weight warranted.
emesumr,Rg apiz Biz A FALL FOR YOUR
WINTER SUPPLY.
ICJ- Orders left at my house, in Walnut street, near
Fifth; or at Brubaker's, North street; J. L. Speen%
Market Square; Wm. &WOK'S, corner of Second and
South streets, and John Lingle , a, Second and Mulberry
streets, will receive prompt attention.
jyl3-dem TORN TILL.
COAL! 00[ALI!
ONLY YARD IN TOWN THAT DEL/YEBB
COAL BY THS
P A TENT WEIGH CARTS!
NOW IS TJI. TIME
For every family to get in their supply of Coal for, the
winter—weighed at their door by the Patent Weigh
Carts. The accuracy of acte CAM *a one dispatch alld
they never get out of order, as Is frequently the ease of
the Platform Scales; besides, the consumer has the
satisfaction of proving the weight of his Coal at his
own house. •
hare a large supply of Coal on hand, cony rag of
8. M. CO.'S LYKENS VALLEY COAL all sizes.
LYKENS VALLEY do it
WILKESDARRE do.
BITUMINOUS BROAD TOP ,do.
AU Coal of the beat quality mined, and delivered free
from all impurities, at the lowest rates, by the boat or
cox 104 aloglo, half or third of tons, and by the bushel.
iAmiso M. WHEELER.
Harrisburg, September 24, 1880.-1425
U P
T Q W
PATENT-WEIGH CARTS.
Yor the convenience of my numerous up town custom.
ers, I have established, in connection with my old yard,
a Atraneh Coal Yard opposite North street, in a line with
the Pennsylitania etitiai, having the once formerly occu
pied by Mr. R. Harris, where iuriniumest of Coal in that
vicinity and Verbeketown can receive their Coal by the
PATENT WEIGH CARTS,
WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE FOR HAULING,
And In any quantity they may desire, as low as , can be
purchased anywhere.
FIVE THQ WAND TONS COAL ON HAND,
Of LY/CENS VALLEY and WILKEREAREE, all sizes.
Er Wittin g so maintain fair prices, but unibining
to Os undersold by any partses.
iirENAllB6**Menigilitratr=t - : - --
Orders received at either Yard will be promptly filled,
nd all Coal delivered by tee Patent Weigh Carts.
Goal n o g by Bost, Oar load, single, half or third of
tons, sad by the bushel.
JAMES M. WHEELER.
Harrisburg, October 13, 1863.—0ct15
T . YKENS VALLEY NUT COAL—
ALA ror Bale AT TWO DOLLAAS PUR TON.
iFr Au cosi oistivorod by PA
TENS ENT WEIGH CAR Ts
S M. WREELNA
Coaldellvered from both yards. nol7
Alebical.
HELMBOLDPS HIELMBOLD 9 S
HELMBOLD'S HELMBOLDPS
HIELMBOLIPS HELMBOLD S S
lIELMBOLDPS HELM BOLD'S
ULM HOLM HELMBOLDIS
HELMBOLDPS lICELBIDOLIPS
HELMBOLDIS ELMBOLIPpi
Extract Budge, Extract Bache,
Extralt Baran, Extract Bache;
Extract Raclin Extract nterha,
Extract Maid, I 2 E.ticant Binh%
Extract Been, ilstraid Dacha,
Extract Ettchit, Extract Bache,
Extract Bitchn, Extract Bache
FOR SECRET AND DSLicaTE pISORDIRS.
FOR SECRET AND.DELICATE DISORDERS.
10K SEORST AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
FUR SECRET ANII DELICATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AND DAL.ICATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AAD DELICATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
A PellitiTO and Specific Remedy.
A Persitive and %mite Remedy.
A Positive and Speedo Remedy.
A Poeitive cad liriejan
A Positive and species semedy,
A Pool lye and Specific Remedy.
A Positive and Specific Remedy.
FOR SMARM WI TEE
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER ,
ORAYSL, AIDNEYs, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, EiDNKYS, DROPsv,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNRYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY ,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY,
OROANIO WISAKNEdB,
ORGANIC NrN ARN kNif,
ORGANIC WEAKNESS,
ORGANIC WEAKNESS,
00CIAN 0 WmAILNBAEI,
ORGSNICI
And all Precasts of Seamed Organ',
And all Pig- 1 153 Qf Sexual Fergana,
And ail Diseases of Sexual Dross,
And all Diseases of Sexual Organs,
And ail Diseases of Sexual Organs,
And all Diseases of &Mita Organs,
ARISING fatal
Excesses, Exposures, and Imprudent:les in Life.
sactoaa, Itipogarek and ImAtUdendied in lac
Excesses, Exposure-, and Impeudnneteg in Life.
Racemes, Era ruses, and Imtundencies in Life.
Rumen, Exposures, and Imprudenciee in Life.
Excesses, Exposure*, and Impruaencies in Life.
Prom whatever car se originating, and whether existing in
MALE OR FR ti ALE.
. .
rema,l t ea, take no more Pills 1 They are or no avail for
Complaints incident to jet. UM
EX VRAZT BUOIM.
•
Helmbold'a Extract !Nicht' is a Medicine whieh is per
fectly pleasant in its
TASTE AND ODOR,
Bat i mmed i a t e i n its goian, giving Health and Vigor to
the frame, Bloom to the Pallid thinnii, and sentorl9g the
patient to a perfect state of
aFALrri AND PURITY.
Helmbold's lextruct Bacon is prepared according to
Pharmacy and Chemistry, and is pr. irribed and abed by
THE jrQST E.III7.NENT PaYsICIANS.
Delay no longer. Procure the Awned, at once.
Price $1 per bottle, or six for $5.
Ds,pot 1% South Tenth strret, Philadelphia.
BEW'ARB OF 17NPRINOIPLED DEALERS
Trying to palm off thrir own or other *Melt:sof BUORE
on the reputation attained by
RELltiltoLDM EXTRACT BITCH%
The Original and only Unmans.
We desire to run ow thn
MERIT OP OUR ARTICLE.'
Thair's is ikrthimi sold At Minh sera ra NA Com
missions, consequent; PaYtrig a much bettor profit.
WA DEPT CO vIPSTITION
Atik far
lIILMBOLD'S /TXTNAOTDIJOHO.
Take no raker.
&IS by JOHN %TEM, Druggist, corner of Market and
Second streets, Ihrrisbarg, •
AND ALL'DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE.
nod narardni. . • .
EXTRACTS! EXTRACTS!!
WO WOBTS ODB & BITNNBLIB
SUPBRIOR FLAVORING - RXTRACTS
BITTER ALMOND OF
.
14319TARISE
EINB , I
•
STRAWBERRY,
• .
ROBE
4873red uk ;
:not reendrod and for pale by
WM. DOCK, Js., k CO.
HARRISBURG, PA., THURSDAY, JANUARY 10, 1861.
E4e Vatriet & Union.
THURSDAY MORNING, JAN. 10, 1861
OFFICIAL PAPERS
CORRESPONDENCE BETWEEN TUE PRESIDENT
OF THE UNITED ST ATES AND TIIE COMitISJION
ERS OR SOUTH CAROLINA.
The Charleston journals give publicity to the
official correspondence between the President
of the United States and the Commissioners of
South Carolina during their late visit to Wash
ington city. It was laid before the South
Carolina Convention, when in seorot session,
on Friday night last. We place the whole of
it before our readers.
Tlit commissioner." to the President :
WAsomoron, Dee. 28, 1860.
Ste : We have the honor to transmit to you
a copy of the full powers from the Convention
of the people of South Carolina, under which
we are "authorized and empowered to treat
with the Government of the United States for
the delivery of the forts, magazines, light
houses, and other real estate, with their ap
purtenances, in the limits of South Carolina;
and also for an apportionment of the public
debt, and for a divide!! of all other property
held by the Government of the United States
as agent of the confederated States of which
South Carolina was recently a member, and
generally to negotiate as to all other measures
and arrangements proper to be made and
adopted in the existing relation of the parties,
and for the continuance of peace and amity
between this commonwealth and the Govern
ment at Washington."
In the execution of this trust it is our duty
to - furnish you, as we now do, with an official
copy of the ordinance of secession by which
the State of South cerolina has resumed the
powers she delegated to the Governmetit of
the United States, and has declared her per
fect sovereignty and independence.
It would also have been our duty to have
infer/lied you that we are ready to negotiate
with you upon all such questions as are neces
sarily raised by the adoption of this ordinance,
and that we are prepared to enter upon this
negotiation with the earnest desire to avoid all
unnecessary and hostile oollieien, and BO to
inaugurate our new relations as to noun DlU
tual respect, general advantage. and a future
of good. will and harmony beneficial to all the
parties concerned. But the events of the last
twenty-four hours render itteit an assurance
impossible.
We came hire the representative's cif ; an au
thority which could, at any time within the
past sixty days, have taken possession .of the
forts in Charleston harbor, but which, upon
pledgee given in a manner that we cannot doubt,
determined to trust to your honor rather than
to its own power. Since our: arrival here an
officer of the United States, acting, as we are
assured, not only without, but against your
another, thus altering, to a most important ex
tent, the condition of affairs under which we
came. .
Until these cireuinstances are explained in a
manner which relieves us of all doubt as to the
spirit hi which theie negotiations shall be con
ducted, we are forced to suspend all discussion
as to any arrangements by which our mutual
interests might be amicably adjusted.
And, in conclusion, we would urge upon you
the immediate withdrawal of the troops from
the harbor of Charleston. Under present cir
cumstances they are a standing menace which
renders negotiation impossible, and, as our
recent experience shows, threatens speedily to
bring to a bloody issue questions which ought
to be settled with , temperance and judgment.
We have the honor to be, very respectfully,
your obedient servants, •
R. W. BARNWELL )
J. R. ADAMS,
JAMES L. ORR,
Commissioners.
To the Puma:own , of the United States.
The President to the Commissioners.
WASIIINGTOi December 30, 1860.
GANTLYMEN : I have bad the honor to receive
your communication of the 28th instant, to
gether with b copy of. "your full powers from
the Convention of the people of South Caro
lina," authorizing you to treat with • the Gov
ernment• of the United States on various im
portant subjects therein mentioned, and also a
Copy Of the Ordinance, bearing date on the
20th instant, declaring that 'the Utsion now
subsisting between South Carolina and other
States, under the name of the United States of
America, is hereby dissolved."
In answer to this communication I have to
say that my position as President of the United
States was clearly defined in the message to
Congress on the 8d instant. In that I stated
that "apart from the execution of the laws, so
far as this may be practicable, the Exeeutiva
has no authority to decide what shall be the
relations between the Federal Government and
South Carolina. He has been invested with no
such discretion. He possesses no power to
change the relations heretofore existing be
tween them, much less to acknowledge the in
dependence of that State. This would be to
invest a mere executive officer with the power
of recognizing the dissolution of the Confede
racy among our thirty-three sovereign States.
It bears no resemblance to the recognition of a
foreign de facto Government, involving no such
responsibility. Any attempt to do this would,
On his part, be a naked act of usurpation. It
is, therefore, my duty to submit to Congress
the whole question in all its bearings."
Such is my opinion still. I could, therefore,
meet you only as private gentlemen of the high
est character, and was entirely willing to com
municate to Congress any proposition you might
have to make to that body on the subject. Of
this you were well aware. It was my earnest
desire that such a disposition might be made of
the whole subject by Congress, who alone poe
sees the power, as to prevent the inauguration
of a civil war between the parties in regard to
the possession of the Federal forts in the har
bor of Charleston, and I therefore deeply re
gret that, in your opinion "the events of the
last twenty-four hours render this impossible."
In conclusion, you urge upon me "the imme
diate withdrawal of the troops from the harbor
of Charleston," stating that "under present
circumstances they are a standing menace,
which render negotiations impossible, and, as
our recent experience shows, threaten speedily
to bring ton bloody issue questions which ought
to be settled with temperance and judgment."
The reason for this change in your position
is, that since your arrival in Washington " an
officer of the United States, noting, be (yen)
are assured, not wily without but against your
(my) orders, has dismantled one fort and occu
pied annther—thus altering to a most important
extent the nonditiost,Of affairnunder which we
(you) came." You also allege that, youpoaule
tare " the representiOres of at authority
which coeld,,at ORA 74tkigt44 4 410est
dap. have taken, possession,- gf il *aorta an •
Charleston harbor, but widish, upon pledges
given in a manner that we (you) sonnet doubt,
determined to trust to your (my) honor rather
than to its power."
This brings me to a consideration of the
nature of those alleged pledges, and in what
manner they have been 0 - rata-TO.
In my message of the ?Al of December last,
1 stated, in regard to the property of the
United States in South Carolina, that it " has
been purchased for a fair equivalent, by the
Consent of the Legislature of the State," for
the erection of forts, magazines, arsenals, &c.,
and over these the authority "to exercise
exclusive legislation" has been expressly
granted by the Constitution to Congress. It
is not believed that any attempt will he made
to expel the United States from this property
by force ; but if in this I should prove to be
mistaken, the officer in command of the forts
has received orders to act strictly on the defen
sive. In, such a contingency the reeponSibitily,
for consequences would rightfully rest upon
the heads of the assailants.
This being the condition
.of,the parties, on
Saturday, Bth December, four of the Represen
tatives from South Carolina ealted upon me
and requested an interview. We had an ear
nest conversation on the subject of these forts,
and the best means of preventing a collision
between the parties, for the purpose of sparing
the effusion of blood. I suggested, for pru
dential reasons,
that it would be best to put
in writing what they said to me verbally.—
They did so accordingly, and on Monday mor
ning, the 10th instant, three of them presented
to me a paper signed by all the Representatives
from South Carolitta, with a single esoeption,
of which the following is a copy.
WASfIINOTQX, 9TH DIICEMIRR, POO.
To his Eirciteocy James Buchanan,
Ppesidant of the United Slates
In compliance with our statement to you yesterday,
we now express to you our strong convictions that nei
ther the constituted authorities, nor any body of the
people of the State of South Carolina, will either attack
or molest the 11, 0. forts bathe harbor of Charleston, previ
ously to the action of the Convention, and w hope and
believe not until an offer has been made through an ac
credited representative to negotiate for an amicable ar
rangement of all matters between the State and the
Federal Government, provided that no reinforcements
shall be cant into those forts and their relative military
status shall remain as at present.
*long ht.'6lncen,
M. L. BONHAM,
W. W. BOYCE,
Lawannos Rem.
And here I must, in justice to myself, remark
that at the time the paper was presented to me
I Objected to the word "provided," as it might
be construed into an agreement on my part,
which I never would make, They said that
nothing was farther from their intention ; they
did not so Understand it, and I should not so
Consider it. It is evident they could enter inte
no reciprocal agreement with me on the sub
ject. They did not profess to have the authority
'0 de this, and were acting in their individual
chareeter. I considered it as nothing more, in
effect, than the promise of highly honorable
gentlemen to exert their influence for the pur
pose expressed. The event has proven that
they have faithfully kept this promise, although
have never since received a line from any one
of them or from any member of the Convention
'on the subject. It is well known that it was
my determination, and this I freely expressed,
not te reinforce .the forts in the harbor, and
a% 171" 111 .;:ftititti %sic
ste
deuce that they were about to be attacked.—
This paper I received most cordially, and con
sidered it as a happy omen that peace might
still be preserved, and that time might be thus
given for reflection. This is the whole founda
tion for the alleged pledge.
But I acted in the same mane; as I would
have done had I entered into a positive and for,
mat agreement with parties capable of con
tracting, although such an agreement would
have been on my part, from the nature of my
official duties, impossible. The world knows
that I have never sent any reinforcements to
the forts in Charleston harbor, and I have cer
tainly never authorized any change to be made
"in their relative military status." Bearing
upon this subject, I refer you to an order is
sued by the Secretary of War, on the 11th in
stant, to Major Anderson, but not brought to
my notice until the 21st instant. It is as fol
lows :
"Memorandum of verbal instruetioxs to Major doctor
son, First Artillery commanding Fort Moultrie, S. Car-
Mart.
Yen are aware of the great inlay or the Secretary
of War that a collialon of the troops with the people of
this State shall be avoided, and of his studied determi
nation to pursue a coarse with reference to the military
force and forts in this harbor which shall guard against
such a collision. He has therefore carefully abstained
from increasing the force at this point, or taking any
measures which might add to the present excited state
of the public mind, or which would throw any doubt on
the confidence he feebs that Souih Carolina will net at
by violence to obtain possession of the public
works, or Interfere with their occupancy.
"But, as the counsel sad ;tote of rash and impulsive
pentane may possibly disappoint these expectations of
the Covernmeat, be deems it proper that you should be
prepared with instructione to meet so unhappy a 004-
Urgency. He has, therefore, directed me verbally to
give you such instructions.
"You are carefully to avoid every act which would
needlessly tend to provoke aggression, and for that sea
eon yett are net, without nowsity, to take up any posi
tion which could be construed into the assumption of
hostile attitude ; but you are to hold possession of the
forts in this harbor, and, if attacked, you are to defend
yourself to the last extremity. The smallness of your
force wilt not permit you, perhaps, to occupymore than
one of the three forts, but an attack on, or attempt to
take possession of, either of them will be regarded as
an act of hostility, and you may then put your command
into either of them which you may deem most proper
to increase its power of resistance. You are also au
thorised to take similar steps whenever you have tan
gible evidence of a design to proceed to a hostile act.
6 ;D. P. Boman,
"Assistant Adjutant General.
FORT MOULTRIE, (S. 0.,) DECRUBBR 11, 1880.
"This is in conformity to my instructions to Major
Buell.
"Jong B. FLOYD ; Beeretary Of War."
These were the last instructions transmitted
to Major Anderson before his removal to Fort
Sumpter, with a single exception, in regard to
a particular which does not in any degree affect
the present question.
Miller these circumstances it is clear that
Major Anderson acted •upon his own responsi
bility, and without authority, unless, indeed,
he had " tangible evidence of a design to pro
ceed to a hostile act" on the part of the au
thorities of South Carolina, which has not yet
been alleged. Stilihe is a brave and honorable
officer, and justice requires that he should not
be condemned without a fair hearing.
Be this as it may. when I learned that. Major
Anderson had left Fort Moultrie and proceeded
to Fort Sumpter my first promptitigs were to
command him to return to his former position,
and there to await the contingencies presented
in his instructions. This could only have
been done with any degree of safety to the
command by the concurrence of the South
Carolina authorities. But before any step
could possibly have been taken in this direction
we received information that the " Palmetto
flag floated out to the breeze at Castle Pinck
ney, and a large military forte Went over last
night (the 27th) to Fort Moultrie." Thus the
authorities of South Carolina, without waiting
or asking for any explanations, and doubtless
believing, as, you have expressed it, that the
effieer had acted not only without but against
my orders, on the very next day after the night
when the removal was made seized, by a mili
tary force, two of the three Federal forts in
the harbor .of_ Charleston, and have covered
t4em under their own flag instead of that of thee.
Voited States.
At,this-gloomy period of our history start
ling events ,attoceed. each ;other rapidly. .On
the very day, the 27th instant, that possession
of these firm forts were taken, the Palmetto
flag was raised over the Federal customhouse
and post office in Charleston ; and on the same
day every officer of the customs—Collector,
Naval Officer, Surveyor and Appraiser—re
signed their Offices. And t his, although it was
well known from the language of my message
that as an executive officer I felt myself .bound
to collect the revenue at the port of Charleston
under the existing laws. In the harbor of
Charleston we now find three forts confronting
each other, over all of which the Federal flag
floated only four days ago; but now over two
of them, this flag has been supplanted, and the
Palmetto flag has been substituted in its stead.
It is under these circumstances that I am
urged immediately to withdraw the troops from
the harbor of Charleston, and am informed that
without this negotiation is impossible. This
I cannot do ; this I will not do. Such an idea
was never thought of by me in any possible
contingency-. No such allusion had been made
in Any communication between myself and any
human being.
But the inference is that I am bound to
withdraw the troops from the only fort remain
ing in the, possession of the United States in
the harbor of Charleston, because the officer
there in command of all the forts thought
proper, without instructions, to change his po
sition from one of them to another.
At this point of writing, I have receives' in
formation by telegraph from Capt. Humphreys,
in command of the Arsenal at Charleston, that
"it has to-day (Sunday, the 30th) been taken
by force of arms." It is estimated that the
munitions of war belonging to the United States
in this arsenal are worth half a million of dol•
lara.
Comment is needless. After this information,
I have only to add that, whilst it is my duty to
defend Fort Sumpter as a portion of the public
property of the United States against hostile
attacks, from whatever quarter they may come,
by such means as I may possess for this pur
pose, I do not perceive how such a defence can
be construed into a menace against the city of
Charleston.
With great personal regard, I remain, yours,
very respectfully, JAMES BUCHANAN.
To Honorable Rounn2 W. EAnxwELL, AMU H.
ADAMS', JAMES L. OAR.
Second Letter of the Commissioners to the President,
(but returned by him.)
WASILINGTON, Jan. 1, 1861.
kits : We have the honor to acknowledge the
receipt of your letter of the gOth of December,
in reply to a note addressed by us to you, on
the 28th of the same month, as Commissioners
from Mouth Carolina.
In reference to the declaration with which
your reply commences that your " position as
President of the United States was already de
fined in the Message to Congress of the 3d in
stant;" that you possess " no power to change
the relations heretofore existing" between South
Carolina, and the United States, "much less to
acknowledge the independence of that State,"
end that consequently you could meet us only
as private gentlemen of the highest character,
with an entire willingness to communicate to
Congress any proposition we might have to
make, we deem it only necessary to say that,
Viet; eo4 Ora igarri
which underlies all our political organizations,
declared herself sovereign and independent,
we, as her representative, felt no special soli
citude as to the character in which you might
recognize MG
Satisfiied that the State had simply exorcised
her unquestionable right, we were prepared,
in order to reach substantial good, to waive
the formal considerations which your constitu
tional scruples might have prevented you from
extendin g . W e c ame here, therefore, expecting
to be received as you did receive us, and per
fectly content, with that entire willingness of
which you assured us, to submit any proposi
tion to Congress which we might have to make
upon the subject of the independence of the
State. That willingness was ample recognition
of the condition- of public affairs, which ren
dered our presence necessary.
In this position, however, it is our duty both
to the State which. we represent and to ourselves,
to correct several important misconceptions of
our letter into which you have fallen. You
say :
"It was my earnest desire that smith a dispositionmight
be made of the whole subject by Congress, who alone
possesses the power to prevent the inauguration of a
civil war between the parties in regard, to the possession
of the Federal forts in the harbor of Charleston; and I
therefore deeply regret that in your opinion the events
of the last twenty-four hours render this impossible.) ,
We expressed no such opinion i and the lan
guage which you quote as ours is altered in its
sense by the omission of a most important part
of the sentence. What we did say was :—"But
the events of the last twenty-four hours render
such an assurance impossible." Place that
"assurance," d 5 Cant/tined in our letter, in the
sentence, and we are prepared to repeat it.—
Again, professing to quote our language, you
say :
`•Thum the authorities of South Carolina, without
waiting or asking for any explaination 4 and dOillAleas
believing, as you have expressed it, that the officers had
actted not only without but against my orders," &c.
We expressed no .such opinion in reference
to the belief of the people of South Carolina.
The language which pm have quoted was ap
plied solely and entirely to our assurances ob
tained here, and based, as you well know, upon
your own declaration—a declaration which, at
that time, it was impossible for the authorities
of south Carolina to have known.
But, without following this letter into all
its details, we propose only to meet the chief
points of the argument.
Some weeks ago the State of South Caro
lina declared her intention, in the existing
condition of public affairs, to secede from the
United States. She called a convention of her
people to put her declaration in force. The
Convention met and passed the Ordinance of
Secession. All this you anticipated, and your
course of action was thoroughly considered in
your annual message. You declared you had
no right, and would not attempt to coerce a
seceding State, but that you were bound by
your constitutional oath, and woiptidefend the
property of the United States within the her
ders of South Carolina, if an attempt was made
to take it by farce. Seeing very early that
this question of property was a difficult and
ted a desire to settle
delicate one, you manifested
it without collision. You did not reinforce the
garrison in the harbor of Charleston. You
removed a distinguished and veteran officer
from the command of Fort Moultrie because
h e attempted to increase his supply of ammu
nition. You refused to send additional troops
to the same garrison, when applied for by the
officer appointed to succeed him. You ac
cepted the resignation of the oldest and most
eminent member of your Cabinet, rather than
allow the garrison to be strengthened. You
compelled an officer stationed at Fort Sumpter
to return immediately to the arsenal forty mus
kets which he had taken to arm his men. You
eitm:essed, not to one, but to many, of the most
distinguished of our public characters, whose
testimony will be placed upon the record, when
ever it is necessary, your anxiety for a peace •
ful termination of this controversy, and your
willingness not to disturb the military status
of the forts, if Commissioners should be sent
to the Government, whose communications'
you promised to submit to Congress. You
received and acted on assurances from the high
est official authorities of South Carolina that no
SUNDAYS EXCEPTED,
y 0_ BARRETT & CO.
lir DAILY PATRIOT AND UNION Win be gerred to sub
Beribera residing in the Borough for etx CCNTB rsa wars
psybbi• to the Carrier. Mail rubsaribere, POUR DOL
teas VIM ARNOW-
Tuts WEEKLY Will be published to heretofore, nem.
weekly during the session of the Legislature, and once a
week the remainder of the year, for two dollars in ad
vance, or three dollars at the exptrationof the year.
Connected with this establishment is an extensive
foli OFFICE Containing a variety of plain and Amer
type, unequalled by any eflistaiin/1246. 10 . in the teterioe of
the State, for which the patronage of the piano is so.
H cited.
NO. 110.
attempt would be made to disturb your possett
sion of the forts and properly of the United
States if you would not disturb their existing
condition until the Commissioners had bees
sent, and the attempt to negotiate had failed:
You took from the members of the House. of
Representatives a written memorandum that AO
such attempt should be made, "provided that
no reinforcements shall be sent into those forte,
and their relative military status shall remain
e.,5 at present," And although you attach no
force to the acceptance of such a paper—al
though you "considered it as nothing more in
effect than the promise of highly honorable
gentlemen"--as an obligation on one side with
out corresponding obligation on the other, it
must be remembered (if we are rightly In
formed) that ycn were pledged if you ever did
send reinforcements to return it to those from
whom you had received it before you executed
your resolution. You sent orders to your
officers commanding them strictly to follow a
line of conduct in conformity with such Silt
understanding. Besides all this you had re
ceived formal and official notice from the Gov
ernor of South Carolina that we had been ap
pointed Coniffihtsionera, and were on our imy
to Washington. You knew the implied condt4
hot' under which we came ; our arrival was
notified to you, and an hour appointed for an
interview.
We arrived in Washington on Wednesday, at
three o'clock, and you appointed an interview
with us at one the next day. Early on that
day, Thursday, the news was received here of
the movement of Major Anderson. Thatnews
was communicated tO you immediately; and
you postponed our meeting until half past two
o'clock on Friday, in order that you might con
sult your Cabinet. On Friday we saw you, and
we called upon you then to redeem your pledge.
You could not deny it. With the facts we have
stated, and in the face of the crowning and
conclusive fact that your Secretary of War had
resigned his seat in the Cabinet upon the pub
licly avowed ground that the action of NOM'
Anderson had violated the pledged faith of the
Government, and that unless the pledge was
instantly redeemed he was dishonored, denial
was impossible ; you did not deny it. You do
not deny it now, but you seek to escape from
its obligations on the grounds—first, that we
terminated all negotiations by demanding, as
a preliminary, the withdrawal of the United
States troops from the harbor of Charleston;
and, second, that the authorities Of south Car.
olina, instead of asking explanation and giving
you the opportunity to vindicate yourself, took
possession of other properly of the United
States. We will examine both.
In the first place, we deny positively that we
have ever in any way made any such demand.
Our letter is in your possession ; it will stand
by this on record. In it we informed you of
the object of our mission, We say that it would
have been our duty to have /Maffei you of
our readiness to commence negotiations with
the most earnest and anxious desire to settle
all the questions between us amicably and to
our 'mutual advantage, but that events had
rendered that assurance impossible. We stated
the events, and we said that until some satis
factory explanation of these events was given
made for exPlanatiitii; - iire Aided -
a n d, in eenetuston, we would urge upon you
the immediate withdrawal of the troops from
the harbor of Charleston. Under present cir
cumstances they are a standing menace, which
renders negotiation impossible." &o. " Under
present circumstances !" What circumstances?
Why clearly the occupation of Fort Bumpier
and the dismantling of Fort Moultrie ly Major
Anderson, in the face of your pledges and with
out. explanation or practical disavowal. And
there is nothing in the letter which would or
could have prevented you front declining to
withdraw the troops and offering the restora
tion of the status to which you were pledged
if such had been your desire. It would have
been wiser and better, in our opinion, to have
withdrawn the troops; and this opinion we
urged upon you, but we demanded nothing but
such an explanation of the events of the last
twenty-four hours as would restore our coat.
dente in the spirit with which the negotiations
should be eon:lusted. •
In relation to the withdrawal of the troops
from the harbor we are compelled, however, to
notice one passage of your letter. Referring
to it yell say
Lophi s I cannot do, This 1 will set dn. 6uoh sn Idla
was never thought of by me in any possible contingency.
No allusion to it had ever been made in any communica
tion between myself as d any human being."
In reply to this statement we are compelled
to say that your Conversation with us left upon
our minds the distinct impression that yen AK
seriously contemplate the withdrawal of the
troops from Charleston harbor. And in sup
port of this impression, we would add that we
have the positive assurance of gentlemen of the
highest possible reputation and the most un
sullied integrity—men whose name and fame,
secured by long service and patriotic achieve
ment., place their testimony beyond cavil—that
such suggestions had been made to and urged
upon you by them, and had farmed the subject
of more than one earnest discussion with you.
And it was this knowledge that induced us to
urge upon you a policy which had to recom
mend it its Olen Wisdom and the might of such
authority.
As to the second point, that the authorities
of South Carolina, instead of asking explana
tions, and giving you the opportunity to vin
dicate yourself, took possession of other prop
erty of the United States, we Would observi :
Ist. That even if this were so, it does not avail
you for defence, for the opportunity for decis
ion was afforded you before these facts occur
red. We arrived in Washington en Wednesday ;
the news from Major Anderson reached here
early on Thursday, and was immediately com
municated to you. All that day men of the
highest consideration—men who had striven
successfully to lift you to your great office—
I who had been your tried and true Mende
through the troubles of your Administration,
sought you and entreated you to act—to act at
once. They told you that every hour compli
cated your position, they only tr,ked you to
give the assurance, if the facts were so--that
if the commander had noted without and against
your orders, and in violation of your pledges,
that you would restore the status you had
pledged your honor to maintain. You refused
to decide. Your Secretary of War, your im,
mediate and proper adviser in this whole mat
ter, waited anxiously for your decision until
he felt that delay was becoming diehenor.—
More than twelve hours passed and two Cabinet
meetings hail adjourned before you knew What
the "authorities of South Carolina bad done, and
your prompt decision at any moment of that
time would have avoided the subsequent com
plications.
But, if yon had known the gets of the authori
ties of South Carolina, should that have pre
vented your keeping your faith What was
the condition of things? For the last sixty
days you have bad in Charleston itarW not
force enough to held the forte egainninnettite
enemy. Two of them were emptyv one! of
those two the most important in the Intraor.—
It could have been taken at any atria., ~Fau
ought , to know better than any man . that it
but for the 'effcrt:e: of
/ould have been taken
those who put their trust in your Win, 'Be.
lieving that they were threatened by Fort Sump
ter especially, the people were with difficulty
PUBLISHED EVERY MORNING,
IMM=IIII