Daily patriot and union. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1858-1868, January 05, 1861, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    RATES OF ADVERTISING-
•
four lines or lees constitute half a square. Ten Ono
;,; more than four, constitute a square.
s oßeday... —50.25 One eq., oneday.—.--4 0 . 66
g a lin,
one week.— 1.00 " one week.... 1.25
one month— 2.00 one month.... 3.00
three months. 3.00 to three motithe. { 0 .49
sir:months— . 4.00 " Six montba.— B.ou
one year-- 6.00 " one year...— 10.00
Eg . Easiness notices inserted in the Loo.m. COLUMN, or
Wore marriages and deatts3, F. 115 0 WITS ran LINK for each
rgt,ertion_ to merchants ad n others advertisingby %eye*?
libel The
ta will be Odered.
rce numborofinsertions must be ieSigtl6Udon the
lvertisement
IE7 . M a ages and Deaths will be inserted at the am
*WI as regular advertisements.
Booko, Otatiourrn, $“.
QCIIOOL BOOKS.—School Directors,
Teachers, Parents, lleholars, and others, in want of
6.hc , 61 Hooke, mod otationeri, iism j will nod a complete
assortment at R. M. POLLOCK di 211H41 MIK STOIIO,
Market Square, Harrisburg, comprising in part the follow-
lit tiADEßlefinffey's, Parker's, Cobb's, Angell's
SPILLING BOOKS.—McGulfers, Cobb's, Webster%
rown'e,Byerly's. Combry's.
NAOMI GRVIMANIC--BitHion's, Smith's, Wood
tear's, Sionteitit,ll, Tuthill% Bart% WePO_
DISTOILUIS.--Grimsbaw's, Davenport's, Frost%
tlode,Willed's, Goodrich% Pinnockle, Goldsmith's and
Clark's-
ARITHELITIC'S.—GreenIears, Stoddard's, Emersion's,
Pike's, Rase's,Dolburn's, Smith and Duke ' s, Davie's.
ALORICIAB.—GroeuIti" D 2 ViO% P37'03 Bay gi
MOTIONARYI3.—WaIker's school, Cobb's, Walker,
Worcester's Comprehensive, Worcester's Primary, Web
ster's Primary, Webster's Sigh &hod, Webster's Quarto,
Academie.
NATURAL PllLOSOPWRS.—Comirtock's, Parker's,
&dive. The above wail a great variety of atom ciui at
any time be found at my store. Also, a complete assort.
meet of School Stationery, embracing in the win le a com
plete onttit for school purposes. Any book not in the store.
procured tt one days notice.
IV' Country Iderclaantssapplied at wholesale rates.
ALMANACS.--Inha Baor ando oll % Almanac tor saje ai
5.1141. POLLOCK & BOWS SOON STORM, Harridan,
Kr Wholesale and Retail. myl
JUST RECEIVED
AT
SCHEFFER'S BOOKSTORE,
ADAMANTINE SLe7TES
ON VARIOUS SIZES AID PRIORS,
Willa, tor btaxity cod age, cannot be OZOol l ed,
REMEMBER THE PLACE,
SC/LEFF/3E 7 S BOOSSTORB,
NO. 18 MARKET STREET. t M 2
B OOK AUCTION.
•
BEN F. FRENCH
wingupply his Old friends and customers with the
following Books at Auctionprioce;
Facile Railroad, 10 vols., complete, 4 illustrations
2 4
11. '
Japan Rapeditien, 3 vols., complete, illustrated and
illuminated, $l2.
Smerrekrpedition, 2 vols., complete, illustrated
illeininated, 210_
Congreasional Globe, $1.50 per volume.
Waverly Novo* complete, 12 vole., cloth, $lO.
111 II " 27 vols.; half calf, $34; &c.,
fte.,&c.
All of the above Books I will deliver in Harrisburg
tree of charge. BEN Y. FRENCH,
278 Pennsylvania Amino, Washington, D.C.
fOll-dtf
N E W BOOKS!
• ______
7118 T RBORIVND
"BEAL AND BAY," by the author of "Wide, Wide
World,” "Dollars sod Oeots, ,, &o. -
ttgraTOßy (a jUtTHODISIC"ItryA.Stovems,LI..D.
Tor Bale at BUIIIiMPO BOOKATORE,
sp9 No. IS Marks st.
JUST RECEIVED,
A LARGE .AND SPLENDID ASSORTMENT OP
_RICHLY GILT ARP ORNAMENTAL
WINDOW CURTAINS,
PAPER BLINDS,
Of various Designs and Colors, for 8 Gents,
TISSUE PAPER AND CIIT Y ritr - z7c, — --
At trnyai SCILEPPERIS BOOKSTORE.
- NNT ALLPAYER I WALL PAPER, ! !
trist received, our Spring Stock of WALL PAPER,
BORDERS, PIRE SCREENS, /to., &c. It ist helargest
and best selected assortment lathe city, rangingin price
/lOU/ 11121 (0 cents up to one dollar and Solllarter (Slab.)
As we purchase very low for oash, we are prepared to
eell at as low rates, if not lower, than can be had else
where. if purchasers will call and examine, we feel
confident that we can please them in respect to price
and quality. R. M POLLOCK. & SON,
ap3 Below Jones , House, Market Square.
TTE R, CAP, NOTE PAPERS,
11 Pena, Holders, Pencils, Envelopes, Sealing Wax, of
the beat quality, at low prices, direct from the manu
factories, at
scarao
SOREFFER , 3 CHEAP BOOKSTORE
LAW BOOKS ! LAW BOOKS I 1-A
general assortment of LAW BOOKS, all the State
Reports and Standard Elementary Works, with many of
the old English Reports, scares and rare, together with
a large assortment of second-hand Law Books, at very
low prices, at tke one price Bookstore of
$, N. POLLOCK & SON,
rgyg - Market Square, travgAlsurg_
,ffliortUancotte.
AN ARRIVAL OP
NEW GOODS
APPROPRIATE TO THE SEASON!
lIVIILIE LINEN PAPBB
V.A.NSI l'Alitill PiNg!!!
/MOTHER. AND SPLENDID LOT Of
SPLICED FISHING RODS!
Trout Flies, Gilt and Hair Snoods, Grass Lines, Silk
and Hair Plaited Lines, and a general assortment of
FIB RING- TACKLE!
A. GREAT VAKIZTT 01
WALKING CANE 8!
Which we will sell as cheap as the cheapest!
Sliver Sebd Loaded Sword Hickory Fancy
Canes! canoe! Canna! Canes! Canes!
ENLLICII , I3 DRUG AND FANCY STORN,
so. 91 KARIM 815991,
South. side, one door east of Fourth street je9
B. J. HARRIS,
WORKER IN TM,
SHEET IRON, AND
METALLIC ROOFING ,
Second Street, below Chestnut,
HARRISBURG, PA;
prepared to fill orders for any article in his branch of
!Mims ; and if not on hand, he will make to order an
start notice.
METALLIC ROOFING, of Tin or Stalvanized Iron,
constantly on hand.
Also, Tiu and Sheet-Iron Ware, Spouting, &o.
He hopes, by strict attention to the wants of his eusto
=re, to merit and receive a generous Share of public pat.
mar.
117-. Every swan) Staidly fulfilled,
B. J. HARRIS,
jan7-dly] Seoond Street, below Chestnut.
F sII 11
MACKEREL, (Nos. 1 3 2 and 3.)
SALMON, (very superior.)
SHAD. (Mesa and very tine.)
HERRING, (extra large.)
1110 D MISR
SMOKED HERRING, (extra Digby.)
- MOTOR URRRING.
SARDINES AND ANCHOT/E9,
Of the above are have Mackerel in whole, half, quarter
tied eighth bbls. 'Jarring in whole and half bbls.
The entire lot new—DIRECT FROM THE FISHERIES ' and
trill Bell them at the lowest market rates.
aepl4 WM. DOCK, & CO.
FAMILY .1311314 M, from 1§ to 010,
stro n g and handeeniel, brand, Printed 611 goad paper,
with elegant eltntr new type, mold at
loch= SCHAFF Eft% Cheap BooltAt we.
CRANBERRIES !I—A SPLraiDID LOT
pot Temind by
iratl6
FOR a superior and cheap TAISLE or
SALAD OIL go to
SELLER'S DRUG STORE.
THE Fruit Growers' Handbook—by
A.
WAHlNE—wholesale and retail at
inehal 8117111114 Bookstore.
RPERM OA.NDLES.—A large supply
st-ecti“ ur
a O P I B
W.M. DOCK. 75., k 00.
V ELLER'S DRUG STORE is the place
t. fina the beat senttlostit of Porte Mounds'.
FISH!!!
wu, DOCK, 11., dr. 05
.. .
. .
•--...,•-= • p 177----.. ------,
, :, • : :i:- .. ...::• . :—.
1 1 1, • . ~,,, :•; •.t:11=T• 7,- - -. 1 !.. 5 3 , 2117 , , t:iil-'•_ - _ - ..., :
&•.,...,: , i'l4; t aiii . . ! 4 1 - -,--'-'- -
. : 4 --.7- -,.A.,*•• -, 0 , ',..•; ;; ' ' ; '''';;. - t - -,...—..-- P -.... t - .
___-.l•e- . 0.• , • , , . '"'' ...i.;,-,- • _
VI a t rio t
..____,.....,1.
_....7.,,.._,,,...,„7.
union
._,..._,.....
_
~....,.„..:.,..,.__..
VOL. 3.
Goal.
TICE PUBLIC!
11
JOHN TILL'S
COAL YARD,
SOUTH SECOND STREET,
BELOW PRATT'S ROLLING MILL,
HARRISBURG, PA.,
Wham ha hag eongtg.ntly on hand
LYKENS VALLEY BROKEN, EGG, STOVE AND
NUT COAL
ALSO,
WILKMARDET STEAMBOAT, BROKEN, Ir/VV.4
AND NUT COAL,
ALL OF THE BEET QUALITY.
It will be delivered to consumers clean, and full
weight warranted,
11:r CONSUMERS GIVE 101 A CALL FOR YOUR
WINTER SUPPLY.
13:7 Orders left at my house, in Walnut street, near
Fifth; or at Brubaker's, North street; J. L. Speel's,
Market Square; Wm. %Stier% eorner of Second and
South streets, and John Lingle's, Second and Mulberry
streets, will receive prompt attention.
jyl3.dlim JOHN TILL.
COAL! COZAL!!
ONLY YARD IN TOWN THAT DELIVERS
COAL BY THIS
PATENT WEIGH CARTS!
NOW IS THE TIME
For every family to get in their supply of Coal for the
winter...weighed itt their door by the Patent Weigh
Carts. The accuracy of these Carts no one disputes, and
they never get out of order, as is frequently the case of
the Platform. Scales; besides, the consumer km the
satisfaction of proving the weight of his Coal at his
own house.
I have a large supply of Coal on hand, co^...zizt.lng of
S. M. CO.'S LYMENS VALLEY COAL all sizes,
LYKENS VALLEY do " "
WILICESBAHRS do,
BITUMINOUS BROAD TOP do.
All Coal of the best quality mined, and delivered free
from all impurities, at the lowest rates, by the boat or
car load, Angle, half Or third of tone, and by the bushel.
JAMES M. WHRELEB.
Harrisburg, September 24, 1860.--Rep.245
U P TOWN!
- . .
PATENT WEIOH CARTS.
Per the 6Ouvenionee of my unmerons uptown ow/Som
ers, I have established, in connection with my old yard,
a Branch Coal Yard opposite North street, in line with
the Pennsylvania canal, having the office formerly occu
pied by Mr. R. Harris, where consumers of Coal in that
vicinity and Verbeketown can receive their Coal by the
PATENT WEIGH CARTS,
WITHOUT EXTRA CHAROB FOR HAULING,
And in any quantity they may de - aw l as low as can be
purchased anywhere.
FIVE THOUSAND TONS COAL ON HAND,
Of LYKENS VALLEY and WILKESBARRE, all sizes.
Willing to maintain fair prices, but unwilling
to be undersold by any parcres.
All Oval forked up and delivered clean and free
tra m all impurities, and the best article Mined.
Orders received at either Yard will be promptly Ailed,
nd all Coal delivered by the Patent Weigh Carts.
Coal sold by Boat—Car load, single,. half or third of
cons, Ay IJILNUrs• -
JAMES M. WHEELER.
Harrisburg, October 13, 1869.—0Ct15
T . YRENS VALLEY NUT COAI4-
.14 For Sale AT TWO DOLLARS PRR TOR. •
All Coal dolivered by PATE
MESNT WEIGH CA
LERRTS
JA M. WILEE
CosideliTered from both yards. non
211.0ical.
HELMBOLIPS HELMBOLDPS
HE.LBIZOLP's lIELMBOLIVS
RELMBOLDPS HELMBOLDJS
lIELMBOLD'S LIELMBOLDIS
HELMBeLIPS HELMBOLD 9 S
lIELMBOLD'S HELMBOLD , B
HELM.LsOLips HELMBOLD'S
Extract Bnahn Extract 800% •
Extralt Rocha: Extract Bnehn,
Extract Elnan, • Extract Buchn,.
Extract - Swim, Extract Buchu,
Extract Rocha, Extract Bruhn,
Extract Bachn, Extract Duchy,
Extract Bodin, Extract Baohn, -
FOR SECRET AND DELWATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DiiOR.DDERS.
R SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
EDit SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
Fan SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
A podrive and Specific Remedy,
• A Positive and Specific Remedy.
A Positive and Specific Remedy.
A Positive and Specific Remedy.
A Positive and Specific Remedy.
A Positive and Specific Remedy.
A POlittiTe and Specific Remedy,
POE DISEASES Or TUE
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY'
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY,
ORGANIC WEAKNESS,
ORGANIC WE AMISS,
ORGANIC WEAKNESS,
ORGANIC WEAKNESS,
MANIC WEAKNESS,
ORGANIC WhiAItNESS,
And all Diseases of Sexual Organs,
And all Diseases of Sexual Organs,
And all Diseases of Sexual Organs,
And all Diseases of Sexual Organs,
And all Diseases of Sexual Organs,
And all Diseases of Sexual Organs,
ARISING FROM
Exc~,Erposttres, and ImpradenCiel in Lire,
Excesses, Exposures, and ImprUdencies in Life.
Excesses, Exposure', and Imprndencies in Life.
Excesses, Exposures, and Imprndencies in Life.
Excesses, Exposures, and Imprndencies in Life.
Excesses, Exposures, and Imprndencies in Life.
From whatever cause originating,and whether existing in
MALE OR WEIALE,
Females, take no mere Pills Tha7 are at no avail for
COraplaltits incident to the sea. Use
EXTRACT RUCRU.
Helmbeld's Extract Duchn is a Medicine which is per
fectly pleasant in its
TASTE AND ODOR,
Bat lamellate in ite salon, giving Health and Vigor to
the Prime, Bloom to the Pallid Oneek, and teetering 41► e
patient to a perfect state of
REALM AND PURITY.
lifelmbold's Extract Baclnt is prepared according to
Pharmacy and Chemistry, and is prescribed and used by
THE MOST EMLVENT PHYSICIANS.
Delay no longer. Procure the remedy at unee.
Price $1 per bottle, or six for $5.
Dopot 104 South Tenth street, Philadelphia.
BEWARE OF UNPRINCIPLED DEALERS
Trying to patio off their own or other articles of SUGHT7
on the reputation attained by
HYLIf. i10LD 7 .3 _EXTRACT DITCHIL
The Original and only Genuine.
We desire to run on the
MERIT OF OUR ARTICLE
Theirls is wcrthless —is sold at mueb. less rates and com
missions, consequently paying a much better profit.
WE DEFY COMPETITION!
Ark for
TLELMBOLD'II EXTRAOT BIJOHII,
Take tie other.
&i d. by JOHN WYETH, Druggist, corner of Market and
Second streets, Harrisburg,
AND ALL DRUGGISTS .E'VRRYWHERR.
not 4 4dcwBm.
EXTRACTS! EXTRACTS!!
WOODSRT F L AV OR I NG` NELS
SUPERIOR EXTRACTS
OP
BITTED ALMOND,
KNOTARINN, •
PINE APLII,
BOBS
Liniol l l iND
'VANILLA, '
Ant fieslved sad for isle b
1,29 M. DOOM, Is., & Co.
HARRISBURG, PA., SATURDAY, JANUARY 5, 1861.
fivern etables.
(CITY LIVERY STABLES,
DLACKBEERY ALLEY, 24
IN THE REAR OF HERR , s HOTEL
The undersigned has re.commerwed the LIVER I"
BUSINESS in his NEW AND SPACIOUS STABLE'S,
located as above, with a large and varied stock of
HORSES, CARRIAGES AND OMNIBUSES,
Which he will hire at moderate rates.
oetl3-aTy p, g, 9WARPZ.
FRA-NK A. MURRAY
Successor CO Wm.. Parkhiti,
LIVERY it EXCIIANGE STABLE
THIRD STREET BELOW MARKET.
. mo s i pr o •
- ..• "
RATING purchased the interest of J.. Q. Adams n the
establishment, and made large additions to the • stock, the
undersigned is prepared to accommodate the public with
SUPERIOR HORSES for Saddle or Carriage purposes, and
with every variety of vrapous of the 11440 and most
approved styles, on reasonable term.
PLEASURE PARTIES will be accommodated with Om
nibrisses at short notice.
. • Carriages and Omnibuses, for funeral occasions, will be
furnished, accompanied by careful and obliging drivers. -
He invites an inspection of bje stock, satisfied that it is
dilly equal to that of any other establishment of the pledin town. TRANS A. - 1111TRRA
T
-BRANCH STABLE
The undersigned boa opened a branch of his giLlvery and
Etchakie Stabls" in the buildings lately occupied by A
W. Barr, in Fourth street, opposite the Bethel, where he
is prepared 'to accommodate the public with Horses and
•
Vehicles; at all times, on reasonable terms . His stock is
large and varied, and willrecommend itself.
• suil6-dtf • FRANK A. 111IIBBAY.
Atiscellantons.
TAKE NOTICE!
That we here recently added to oar already fall stock
OF SEGAIIB
LA NORMATIS,
HARI KARI,
EL MONO,
LA BANANA.
OF PERFUMERY
FOR THE HANDKEROHIET
TVEICISIE ESSENCE,
ODOR OF MUSK,
LUBIN'S ESSENCE BOUQUET.
FOR THE HAIR:
EAU LUSTRALE,
CRYSTALIZED POMATTIM,
MYRTLE AND VIOLET POMATUM.
FOR THE COMPLEXION
TALC OF VENICE,
ROSE LEAF POWDER,
. NEW MOWN HAY POWDER,
BLANC DE NUMBS.
OF SOAPS
HASHI'D Piltnew
MOSS ROSE,
BENZOIN,
UPPER TEN,
VIOLET,
• NEW MOWN HAY,
JOCKEY CLUB.
Having the largest stock and best assortment of Toilet
Artieles, we fanny that we are better able than our com
petitors to get up a complete Toilet Set at any price de.
sired. Call and see.
Always on hand, a FRESH Stock of DR fIGS, MEDI
CINES, CHEMICALS, &c , consequent of our re
ceiving almost daily additions thereto.
HELLER'S DRUG AND FANCY STORE,
91 Market Street, two doors East of Fourth Street,
eepti South able, -
CLE.N I X F_O_ILN n - 1 ;t V
J. J. OSLER
JOHN J. OELER & BROTHER,
OTIOOESSOREI TO JAMES M. BM)
FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS,
Corner PennsOvania Railroad and State Street,
' HARRISBURG, PA.
MILL GEARING,' IRON FENCES, RAILROAD
AND CANAL WORD',
AND ALL DESCRIPTIONS OP
IRON CASTINGS
ON HAND OR MADE TO ORDER
MACHINE WORE AND REPAIRING PROUPPLir
ATTENDED TO
PATTERNS MADE TO ORDER.
We have a large and complete assortment of Patterns
to select from. an 2
JUST RECEIVED!
A FULL ASSORTMENT OF
HUMPHREY'S HOMEOPATHIC SPECIFICS
TO WHICH WE INVITE THE
ATTENTION OF THE AFFLICTED!
Tor ado st
OCIIEFFER'S DOOZSTOB 2 ,
sp9 No.lB Market at.
WE OFFER'T . O
IDU•S T- OMERS
A New Lot of
LADIES' PURSES',
Of Beautiful Styles, substantially made
A 130.9ndid Assortment of
412NTLEMENIS WALLETS.
A New and Elegant Perfume,
KNIGHTS TEMPLARS' BOQUET,
Put up in Cut Glass Engraved Bottles.
A Compltto Agoartmant of
HANDKERCHIEF PERFUMES,
Of the beat Manufacture.
A very Handsome Variety of .
POWDER, PUFF BOXES.
SELLER'S DRUG STORE,
5y 31 91 Market etrsot
BOOTS AND SHOES.
JACKSON .10 CO.
Have opened a Boot and Shoe Store at No. 90X BUR
EAT STREET, corner of Fourth, where they 'keep con
stantly on hand a MI and varied assortment of the
BEST CITY MADE SHOES.
Having been engaged in the SHOE UPPER BUSI
NESS in this city for more than a year, they are pre
pared to mike ALL KINDS OF FANCY SHOES to
order, at short notice, of the best materials, mud war
ranted to give satisfaction every way.
frr Please call and examine my assortment before
purchasing elsewhere.
It7 - 13ssateteber the place-90A' Market street, sign 0
the [nol7-d3m] GOLDEN BOOT.
CHOICE SAUCES!
WORCESTERSHIRE.
LAJcN.Now CHIITNY,
CONTINENTAL,
SOYDR , S SULTANA,
ATIIEN/EC
LONDON CLUB,
SIR ROBERT PEEL,
°INDIA SOY,
HEADING SAUCE,
ENGLISH PEPPE m. c
PEPPER SAUCE.
see
by
wM.
Js,,
Co.
mylo
DYOTTVILLE GLASS WORKS,
, PHILADELPHIA,
buimuLtoiums
CARBOYS, ,DEMIJOHNS,
WINE, PORTER, MINERAL WATER, PIORLE AND
PRESERVE BOTTLES
lir wrap? DIIIORIPTION.
K. B. & O. W. BRNNERS
27 Routh Front eteret, Philadelphi
a.
QUEABFFER'S Bookstore is the place to
1,, l 647 q 1144 PAnow.warrantpd
VELUM'S DRUG STORE its the place
J. 36 to bay Moot Motto into,
Ely patriot &anion,
SATURDAY MORNING, JAN. 5, 1861.
,50,11,02 7 111 NC, _ABOUT SUICIDES,
Man is at all times a very interesting book
to study, but never more so than when, under
the pressure of his passions and the working
of his mind, he is driven to commit suicide.—
A strange and entertaining book might be writ
ten on the subject of suicides, and we hope
that if ever a philosopher takes his pen to treat
that subject, he will devote a whole chapter to
the over prudent Frenchman, who, being folly
decided to end his wretched existence, went to
a post set up by the seaside, a little before high
tide. And now see what a fearful amount of
trouble the little Gaul went to in order to do
such an easy.thiug as to put an end to one's own
life.
He had provided himself with a ladder, a
rope, a pistol, a bundle of matches and a phial
of poison. For he intended to poison, to hang,
to drown; to burn himself and to blow out his
brains, Therefore, tying ono end of the rope
to the top of the post, and the other end
around his neck, he went up the ladder. Then
he resolutely took the dose of poison, set his
clothes on fire, and just as he was prepared
to kick the ladder away, he applied the muzzle
of his pistol to his forehead in order to scatter
his brains to the four winds. His last hope
was that the tide would soon reach his high
place, and covering his Way, complete the
work.
Unfortunately for the execution of this com
plicated plan, the jerk which he made to throw
down the ladder, as he was going to shoot
himself, changed the position of the pistol, and
the ball, instead of killing him, cut in two the
slender rope which was his only suppoit. He
fell into the sea, and the matches left in his
pockets, which had already reduced into ashes
a good portion of his coat skirt, were immedi
ately put out. Moreover, the few draughts of
briny water which the man took unconsciously,
acting as an antidote, counteracted the effect
of the poison, and the would-be suicide,
washed away by the tide, was finally left on
th e Imol a , slowly to recover his senses and find
himself, in spite of all his measures, unhanged,
unshot, unpoisoned, unburnt and undrowued.
So much for human wisdom and the kind in
terference of Providence.
However singular that unsuccessful attempt
may appear, the unhappy man who made it
may have had tolerably good reasons for wish
ing to depart this life. But the twonases of an
Englishman who shot himself in the old French
City Of Montpelier, anti of a Frenchman who
resorted to the halter is Paris, are 'very extra
ordinary ones.
The Englishman was a most splenetic fellow,
very wealthy, blase for the last ten years, an
egotist from the end of his hair to the sole of
his foot, whom nothing could move or interest.
The Frenchman was quite the reverse, vindic
tive, wicked in the extreme, grumbling all the
time about something or somebody, looking at
every one with suspicion,
and for the least of
fence planning the direst vengeance.
The Englishman, whose name was Mr. Henry
G. IV—, was traveling in the south of France,
unlucky enough not to find any. By the end`
of the month of September, be found himself
at Ate pleasant little old town of ' Montpelier,
renowned in oneient and modern history for its
faculty of medicine, its delicious climate, and
its pretty grisettes. Being more weary than
ever, Mr. W. thought that he must be sick, and
went to a celebrated physician. As soon as the
doctor saw the Englishman, and had heard him
explain his case, he knew what kind of patient
he had got, and how necessary it was to in
dulge him in his imaginary malady.
"It is very true," said the physician, "that
you are sick ; but I can cure you, sir, if you l i
do what I recommend you. Every morning at
8 o'clock, and every afternoon at 5, go to one
of the graperies in the neighborhood of the
city, and eat, on the spot, half a pound of fresh
grapes every time, I hope that the lively scenes
of our vintage will amuse you." "No, they
wont," said Mr..W., with the utmost gravity;
"but what kind of grapes must I eat—black or
yellow' ones ?"
The question was so little expected and so
ludicrously put, that for a minute it fairly
dumbfounded the man of science; _but quickly
recovering his presence' of mind, .he said ;
"black; 'by all means, black."
A s ' the Englishman was taking a stroll On
the Peron, a public garden where the promo- .
nader sees before him as fine a view and as
much varied, though not so grand as the
scenery from the Durham terrace in Quebec,
he was thinking deeply of the conversation he
had just had with the physician. "It may be,"
thought he, "that grapes would cure me ; but
what kind of grapes ? The doctor hesitated
a while before he pronounced in favor of the
black ones. This is not quite satisfactory; I
must go to another physician." And so Mr.
W. called on a second disciple of Escaulapius,
as renowned as the first. After relating to him
part of his conversation with the first doctor,
'your confrere," said he, "forgot to tell me
what kind of grapes I should eat, and I forgot
to ask him. Will you be so kind as to enlighten
me ?" The Languedocien thinking the English
man was making fun of him, and wishing to
give him a
. gibe for his fib, answered, "take
them yellow; they are the only medicinal ones."
The Englishman left the office more per
plexed than before. "My case must be a des
perate one," said he to himself, "for there are
two famous doctors who don't agree at all'on
my malady. One prescribes black grapes, the
other yellow ones. Decidedly, I must be very
far gone, since the faculty has no sure remedy
for me. Well, would it not be better to make
short work of it and end at once this miserable
life, instead or draeging along the stages of a
long and cruel mortal disease? Yes, a pistol
will do what those doctors would try in vain to
accomplish. It will end all my miseries."
At the end of this monologue, which the
traveler wrote down almost word for word in a
letter penned hastily on the table of a cuffee
house, and directed to the Mayor of the city,
ho went to his room at the Hotel du Midi, and
a few minutes later, when the report of a pistol
was heard in the house, the last scene of the
drama was performed between black and yel
low grapes. Mr. W. had chosen a lead one.
But atter all, the Englishman, tired of his
life, and believing that he was good for nothing
in this world, had in his own opinion, an ex
cuse for "shuffling off this mortal coil." Not
so with the Frenchman we alluded to, One
day, being as he believed, a little slighted by
a companion of his,
he vowed he would visit
him with the most fearful revenge. The un
fortunate man he had to complain of, was
known as a timorous creature whom a child, a
shadow, could at any moment scare to death.
Accordingly, the wicked Frenchman went one
morning to hang himself behind the door of
his companion's office, and he had so well ex
ecuted his plan, that when the latter opened
the door, the first thing he saw, just a foot or
so from his nose, was the horrid face of the
dead man, who seemed to grin at the new corner
and threaten him wiekedly. The HMSO Of
the diabolical sacrifice was as complete as pies-
W. F. OFILIS
Bible. The living man fell in a swoon, at, the
dangling feet of his dead enemy, and when he
was discovered by other persons of the house,
his excess of terfer had caused an incurable
paraly xis, with which he died a few days after
wards.
THE PENANCE OP THE WHIP
From the earliest times we hear of self-mor
tification for the purpose of appeasing the
wrath of Heaven. Our Creator made us for
enjoyment, and yet, by some perversity of hu
man nature, we are prone in too many instan
ces to be miserable. Among the most common
and repulsive methods of mortifying the body
is self-castigation, which is often supposed to
have commenced under the darker ages of the
Christian dispensation, but such is not the case,
for Herodotus relates that, at Bubastis, all the
Egyptians, men and women, attending the cer
emonies, beat themselves whilst the fire was
consuming the sacrifice. The Carious, living
in Egypt, did even more, as they used to cut
their foreheads with knives to show that they
were foreigners. The Syrians also beat and
maltreated themselves in honor of the mother
of their gods, and Apuleius describes a scene
only equalled by the performances of mediaeval
flagellatore.
We find the same custom in Greece, and es
pecially among the Lacedemonians, who used
to flog themselves partly in honor of their gods,
partly in order to beeeine inured to pain. On
a certain day a great number of youths were
cruelly beaten at the altar of Diana; but it was
voluntary, and the boys thronged to this rude
sport; it having been considered a great honor
to be able to endure sharp flogging without ,
uttering a sigh. The ceremony was carted on
with great solemnity; a priestess of Diana,
holding a small statue of the goddess in her
hand, presided, and priests seriously examined
the wounds inflicted by the whip, in order to
discern future events by them. These painful
exercises were encouraged by all parents, al
though some ambitious youths dropped dead
under, or died after the whipping, without ha
ving .shed a tear. To such young heroes col
umns were erected in a public place. The
custom outlived even the liberty of the Lace
demonians ; and, in the time of Tertullian, one
of the fathers of the Church, the festival was
kept. The Thraciane had adopted a like cus
tom.
There existedphilosophical sects in Greece
who instructed the youths in inurement to work,
want and pain. These philosophers and their
pupils flogged themselves severely, or tore off
parts of their akin with instruments made for
the purpose, for which they were often ridi
culed by the philosophers of other schools.—
An exact counterpart of this custom is to this
day prevalent among our Indian tribes.
In Italy, the feast of Lupercal had been kept
before the building of Rome. It fell on the
15th of February, and was in honor of Pan.—
The skins of the sacrificed animals were cut
into strips, with which the young men, after
having beaten themselves, ran through the
streets of Rome to whip all women they met.
It was thought to be well with a woman who
received a blow. The old religion, the repub
lic, and the empire perished; but" this merry
festival was kept up by the Roman ladies.
Moses introduced the whip into the laws of
the Jews. The instrument consisted of three
m o m ty4,44eh were ort, but the mid-
The strokes were limited to thirteen, as one
stripe more would have been two stripes beyond
the law. None of the Jewish writers recom
mended self-torment till the year in which two
rabbis compiled the Babylonian Talmud, which
introduced many new superstitions into the
Jewish rite.
Flogging in schools was customary, both
among the ancient Greeks and Romano. Then,
as they do now sometimes, masters abused
their authority. Plutarch and Quintilian wrote
against this manner of punishing children. In
monasteries the novices were treated cruelly,
and, while monks and priests were everywhere
chosen as teachers, the custom of flogging
pupils was a thing'of course. It was not even
thought improper for a young monk to apply
the rod to a young lady if she were his pupil.
The history of the unfortunate Abelard is
known by every one, and he tells us himself
that he often gave the rod to Heloise, not out
of anger, but because of gentler feelings. How
dangerous it is to beat young children with
the rod Rousseau has argued, but, we an , told
that many, French nurses beat children confi
ded to their care, because they think this ex
ercise conducive to their right growth.
About the middle of the fourteenth century,
a desp e r a t e 'Waging for penitence came Oyer
the world, first manifesting itself in Perugia,
by a great pilgrimage of penitents, who flogged
themselves cruelly. A flogging epidemic spread
• over It aly and Germany. Ten thousand peni
tents, headed by the clergy, with crosses and
banners, overrun the country. At first laughed
at, and even refused entrance in the towns, they
ended by infecting others with their insane
zeal. At this time the Block Death was raging,
and the end of the world was believed to be at
hand. In Germany almost one-half of the
population died. The fanatics accused the
Jews of having poisoned the wells, and these
were persecuted and murdered by the mob, who
were assisted by the prilgriins. The fanaticism
became so ungovernable as to be dangerous to
the Church, and Pope Clement VI. condemned
the flagellators in a bull. Nevertheless, their
practices were continued for many years, though
Chrneh and State combined to put them down.
At last, the Church resolved to patronize and
take under her own control the brotherhoods
of flagellators. In Rome. there existed no less
than a hundred of such fraternities, and they
were also to be found in other towns, in France
and Germany, flourishing especially during the
sixteenth century ; when the Jesuits patronized
them. King Henry 111., of France, once ran
through the streets with his courtiers, bare
footed, and clad in sackcloth, all flogging them
selves. Many confessors abused this custom of
penance, and the discipline is not yet Wholly
out of date. Within the present cenntury,
scenes occurred in the neighborhood of Salerno
as atrocious as any that could have happened
half a thousand years ego•
How FRENCH ACTRESSES AVOIDED GIVING
THEIR AGES IN PUBLIO.—The Paris correspond
ent of a Boston p ;per thus relates how two
noted actresses of Paris avoided the public rev
elation o f their ages :
A servant robbed Mlle. Mars of her dia
monds one evening while she was at the theatre.
Arrested, he was put upon trial and witnesses
were summoned to bear testimony to his guilt.
Among these was Mlle. Mars. She was greatly
annoyed at this, as according to the rules of
French practice, the witness, after being sworn,
gives his age. Now the age of Mlle. Mars was
an impenetrable mystery, for it was a theme
she never talked on, and she possessed the art
of arresting time's flight, or at least of repair
ing its ravages so effectually, her face never
revealed acquaintance with more than twenty
years. She was for moms days evidently de
pressed; then, all at once, her spirits 1089 ea
buoyant as ever. This puzzled the court—for
people in her eminent position always have a
court; parasites are plenty in Paris—they did
Bet know whether she had determined frankly ,
to confess her age, or nlethOr eke had hit upon
PUBLISHED EVERY MORNING,
SUNDAYS EXCEPTED,
BY 0. BARRETT. & CO.
l i ge DAILY PATRIOT AND UNION will be served to Bab
senbersresiding in the Borough for Om DENTS PER WEER'
payable to the Carrier. Mail rabscribers, roux DOI.
LARS PER ANNUM.
Tag WBBELY will be published as heretofore semi
weekly during the acaaion of the Legielature,aneence
week the remainder of the year, TOP !We dollars is ad
vance, or three dollars at the expirationof the year.
Connected with this establishment, is an extensive
1013 OFFICE, containing a variety of plain and fano,
type, unequalled by any establishment in the interior of
the State, for which the patronage of the public: Is so
licited.
NO 107.
some means of eluding this thorny point of
practice
The day of trial came, and she was at her
place. The court-house was filled chock full,
and when she was litit in the witness box every
ear was bent towards her to catch the age she'd
give as her own. "Your name ?" said the pre
siding judge. "Anne Francois() Hippolyte
Mars," "What is your profession 7" "An
actress of the Proud' Comedy." "What is
your age ?" "—ty years." "What ?" inqui
red the presiding judge, leaning forward. "I
have just told your honor!" replied the actress,
giving one of those irresistible smiles, which
won the most hostile pit. The judge smiled lilt
turn, and when he asked, as he did immediately,
" Where do you live ?" hearty applause long
prevented Mlle. Mars from replying.
Mile. Ciao was summoned before a court the
Other day to bear witness in favor of some cos
metic assailed for a poison by victims and their
physicians. All the youngest actresses of Paris
were there, and they reckoned upon a good
deal of
,merriment and profit when Mile. Cico
came to disclose her age. shi, was called to
the stand—sworn—gave her name and profes
sion. When the judge said "How old are you?"
She quitted the stand, went up to the bench,
stood on tip-toe and whispered in the judge's
ear the malicious ztertt ? The bench smiled,
and kept her secret.
THRILLING Guosr STORY-THE ' CHILD'S
GIIOBT.—The New York Presbyterian relates
this story:
We were returning from our spring meeting
of Presbytery—one gentleman and two young
ladies—in a "rockaway," and the road none of
the hest. Night, cold and damp, (maim* Us
eight or ten miles from home, but only a short
distance from Judge Blank's, who, after we
had:arrived at his house, narrated the following
unique tale. Said the Judge as follows:
"Years ago we had lit Out` house a sweet
little child, about four years of age, and the
object, of course, of a very tender affection.
But sickness laid its hand upon it. Remedies,
promptly resorted to, all proved in vain. Day
after day the rose faded from the cheek, SEW
the fire in the eyes burned low, and at length
death closed those eyes and sealed those lips
forever; and we learned by trying experience
how intense darkness follows the quenching of
one of those little lights of life.
if The time rolling sadlyon, broiight us at
length to the hour appointed for committing
ourtreasure to the ordinary custody of the grave.
The friends assembled, the customary services
were held, the farewell taken, and the little
form securely shut beneath the well-screwed
coffin lid, and in due form the grave received
its trust. We looked on and saw the earth
thrown in, the mound raised above, and the
plats of sod neatly adjusted into a great shel
tering roof, and then wended our way back to
our desolate home. Evening came on and wore
away. My wife had gone into an adjoining
room to give some directions to a servant, and
I, unfitted by the scene of the day for aught
else, had just laid my head on my pillow in our
room upon the first floor of the house, when I
heard a shriek, and in a moment more my wife
came flying into the room, and springing upon
the bed behind me, exclaimed:
See there ! our child ! our child!'
' , Raising my head, my blood froze within
me, the hair upon my head stood up, as I saw
_tk u ljjaohing fr in_Brav9 ctotht , F, , with open, but.
we gave it the last kiss, walking towardriiK
Had I been alone—had not the extreme terror
o f my wife compelled me to play the man I
should have leaped from the window and lied
without casting a look behind. nut, not
daring to leave her in such terror, I arose, sat
down in a chair, and took the little creature
between my knees—a cold sweat covered my
body—and gazed with feelings unutteritlge
upon the object before me. The eyes were
open in a vacant stare. The flesh colorless,
cold and clammy; nor did the child appear to
have the power of speech, or hearing, as it
made no attempt to, answer any of cur queen
tions. The horror of our minds was the more
intense as we had watched our child through
its sickness and death, and had been but a few
hours before eye witnesses of its interment.—
While gazing upon it, and asking in my
thoughts, 'What can this extraordinary provi- •
dence mean ? for what can it be Bent ? the
servant girl, having crept to the door, after a
time suggested, 'lt looks like Mrs.
eitild_7
" Now our neighbor had a child about the
same age as ours, and its constant companion.
But what could bring it to our home and in
such a plight ? Still the suggestion had opera-
ted 4,4 4 sedative upon our excited feelings, and
rendered us more capable of calm refleetion.
And, after a time, we discovered in truth that
the grave clothes were night clothes, and .the
corpse a somnambulist. And it became mani
fest that the exeitement attending the losti anti
burial of its playmate, working upon the child's
mind in sleep, was the cause to which We were
indebted for this untimely and startling visit.
"Wiping away the perspiration and taking a
few long breaths, I prepared to countermarch
the little intruder back to its forsaken bed.—
Back we went, it keeping at my side, though
still asleep. I had walked quite a distance
across the wet grass. I found the door of its
home ajar, just as the fugitive had left it, and
its sleeping parents unconscious of its absenoe.
The door creaked as I pushed it open, and
awakened the child, who looked wildly around
a moment, and then popped into bed.
"Now, if it had not been for my wife, as I
have said, I should, on the appearance of this
apparition, have made a leap of uncommon
agility from that window ; and after a flight of
uncommon velocity for a person of my age(and
dignity, I should have been ready to take my
oath in any court, either in Christendom or
heathendom, that I had seen a ghost."
CERTAINTY OF &TENOR—LT. MAI:FRT.—A re
markable instance of the practical value of
scientific knowledge, in the science, too, which
is least settled and certain og all, WRO
lately by Lt. Maury. He sailed from this
country seven days after the sailing of the
Prince of Wales, and arrived several days
before him. The British Admiralty asked his
opinion of the fate of the missing vessels. He
replied, in writing, describing what weather
the royal squadron had experienced; on what
part of the ocean it had proved most adverse;
what course the ships had taken, and when
they might be expeeted in port. Their arrival
verified this opinion in every particular.—
Knowing the prevailing winds and the natural
course of the storm, Lt. Maury was able to
predict the course of the ships with perfect
accuracy, demonstrating that such knowledge
must be of the highest value to captains and
commercial men.
OPERATIONS OF THE UNITED STATES MINT.—
The following is the statement of deposits and
coinage in the United States Mint in Philadel
phia for the month of December 1860: Depo-,
sits of gold from all sources, $7,148,097 37
silver, $71,894 36. Total, $7,219,992
Copper cents received in exchange for cents of
new issue, $14,415. Coinage—Gold $4,506,-
620 ; silver, $66,560; copper $7,400. Total ;
number of pieces coined, 1,821,781, of the value
of $4,880,159.