Daily patriot and union. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1858-1868, December 14, 1860, Image 1

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    RATES OF ADVERTISING.
Pour final or less constants hllf : square. Ten lino!
or more thin font, constitute : square.
nalfaq..oneday.. m. 30.25 One 31., onodaymsov“
“ one week"... 1.00 “ one weekuno 1.25
“ one month" . 2.00 “ one month- - 3.00
“ three months. 3.00 “ three months. 5-09
“ lixmonths” . 4.00 H six. months... 8.0!
“ one year-.... . 5.00 “ one year...“ 10.09
1]? Business notices inserted in the noon- ooLm, or
before marriages and deaths, nu; (mm mm mu for em
insertion. I'o memhsntsand others advertising by they.“
liberaltm u will be offered.
a? The numberofinsertiana must bodesignntedon tn.
dnrtiaement.
fij’ Morninges and Desthu will be matted at the um
“as a regular advertisements.
5300159, Etafiumm, 821:.
ICHOOL BOOKS—School Duectora,
b when, Puents, Scholua, and othenfin want of
fiuhwl 300138011001 Stationery, 86¢. will find I. complete
mottment s 1:. M. POLLOOK a sdx’s 3003 51031:,
market Square, Harrisburg, oompriling in part the follow.
In '-
fillADEßS.—Mc6ufiey’a, Parker’s, Gobb’g , Angell’n
SPRLLING BOOKS.—M¢Gnfisy’l, Cobb's, Webster:
"£33111???" Gomhry’a. Bull ’
W.— ion’u Smith’
mfifi’fi Monteith a, “mum, Hart's, 'Weua’. I’ WON
TOMS-Afimmfl, Davenport’s, Frank’s, Wil
lon’a, Willard’s, Web’s, Pinnack’a, Goldmith’s Ind
Oink’l.
.ABITEMETIG’S.—GmnIeafiI‘, Stoddard’a, Emerson-'3,
Pme’a Rose’s, Golbum’a, Smith and Duke’s, Davie’s.
Bfinéanm'fimeflw" ~ Dnvie’l, Dam, Bum:
D¥gflOßAßYß.—deefla School, Cobb”, Walker,
Womgiter’a Comprehensive, Wereeatet’l Prim“! 1795'
3m“: Pdm’u-y, Weh'ghr’n mg]: school, Webster’s dunno,
Maine. ‘ ' ‘ '
NATURAL PKILOSOPHIES.—-Gomtock’l Pgrker’a
Slifi’i. The above with a gust variety of Mailers on 3%
an; tin. be found :1: my store. Also, a complete amt:-
ment of 3611601 Stationary, embracing in the win lo a 'com
sloo9 outfit for uhml pnrpoflel. Any book not in the store.
procured \t one days nofiee. ,
113- Omtry Morchantl supplied at wholame um.
”MANAGE—John Rae: and Son’s Almanac tor uh Ii
I. M. P014500]! 85 SON’S BOOK STORE, Harrisburg.
in' Wholoule and man. ' myl
JUSE‘BECEIVED
. A T
SCHEFFER’S BOOKSTORE,
AD-AIMANTINE SLfl TES
or vuuous SIZES AND nicks,
‘wmch, for hunt: “a use, «Jun: be excelled.
' “nun Tm: yuan, -
scanryrrn ’5 .9 o OKs-10111;},
no. 181 mm! smnr. mm
800 K A'UCT'IO‘N.
BEN F. FRENCH
Will supply his old friendsendouetomere with the
{alleging Bosh at Auctionprlcel :
Julio Rolland, 10 voln., complete, 4 illustrations
Jepen Expedition, 3 vole., complete, illustrated” and
lllumineted; sl2._
Rusty’s Exfeditlon, 2 vole., complete, illustrated
illuminated, 10.
Congressional Globe ,1! .50 per volume.
Weverly Novels, complete, 12 vol: ~ cloth, $lO.
'9 a“ ‘ “ “ 27voh,helfoflf,$34; km,
3. e.
All of the shove Book] I will deliver in E 89153“;
free of charge. BEN l‘. FRENCH,
218 Pennsylvania» Avenue, Washington, D. 0.
(obs—(Rf
N E W B O O K.B !
JUST REOEIYBD
“3m AND SAY," by the author of “Wide, Wide
World,” “ Dollars and Conn," &c.
“HISTORY 01' METHODISM,“byA.StevonA; 1114.1).
For n.l- l‘t ' SCHEFFEBS' BOOKSTORE,
IpD' ’-' ‘ ' No.lB Marks at.
J‘Us-T RECEIVED;-
A Lmqn AND SPLEN’DID ASSOBTMBNT 0F
RICIEY GILT AND ORNMIENTAL
WINDOW CURTAINS,
PAPER BLINDS,
. 0f nriods Designs and Colors, fol-8 cents,
TISSUE PAPER AND OUT FLY PAPER,
At [myZi] SCEEFFER’S BOOKSTORE.
WALL PAPER! WALL PAPER !!
Just received, our Spring Stock of WALL PAPER,
BORDERS, FIRE SCREENS, &c., Jno. Itis the largest.
am! beet selected assortment inche city, ranging in price
from. six (6) cents up to one dollar and aquarter ($1.25.)
A: we purchase '81? low for cash, we are prepared to
1911 gt as low rates, i not lower, than can be had else-
Vllal'a. 1f purchaser! will call and examine, WB [BOl
confident that we can please them in respect to price
and quality. I']. M POLLOOK Br. SON,
:13 Below Jones’ House, Market Square.
LE TTE R, CAP, NOTE PAPERS,
Pens, Holders, Pencils, Envelopes, Sealing Wax, of
the best quality, at low prices, direct from the manu
fneßoriea, st
man-30
SGHEFFER’S CHEAP BOOKSTORE
LAW BOOKS-l LAW BOOKS I I—A
general assortment of LAW BOOKS, sll the State
Reports Ind Standard Elementary Works, with many of
the old English Reports, scarce and run, together with
a, Inge assortment of second-hand Law Books, at very
low prices, at 3)» one price Bonkstun sf
E. M. POI-LOOK 8c SON,
Market Square, Herrisburg.
CM
filimllaumna.
AN ARRIVAL 0F
NEW GOODS
APPROPRIATE TO TIEE SEASON!
31m: LINEN PAPER
FANS! FANS” FANS!!!
Axons: AND SPLINDID L 0! 0!
SPLICED FISHING RODS!
front Flies Gut and Hair Snood: Ema Linea, Silk
and Hair Plaiéed Lines, and a gaunt-If assortment of
FISHING TAOKLVE:
A can! vnul'u or
WALKING CARES!
Which we will sell a: cheap as the cheapest!
Silver Hand Bonded. Sword Hickory Fancy
Omen: canes! Canal! Genes! Canes!
KELLER’S DRUG AND FANCY STORE,
no. 91 tunn- sum“,
South side, one (106: east of Fourth street je9
B J. HA B ' ‘ ,
O
WORKER IN TIN,
SHEET IRON, AND
METALLIC ROOFING,
Second Street, below Gheetnut,
HARRISBURG, PA.
1! prepared to fill order- for any article in his branch of
business; and if not on hand, he ‘will nuke to order on
short notice.
METALLIC ROOFING, of Tin or Galvanised Iron,
(Instantly on land.
Also, Tin and Sheet-Iron Were, Spoufing, 6:6.
He hopee, by Itrict _lttention to the went: of hie custo
mers, m merit and receive a generous share of public pat
range.
{s' Eur promise strictly fulfilled.
y B. J. HARRIS,
amend Street. below Chestnut.
FIS H l !
jan7-dly]
mcuun, (Nos. 1, 2 and 3.)
SALMON, (very superior.)
BRAD, (Mess and very fine.)
HIT-BRING, (extra. large.)
00]) FISH. '
BMOKE‘D HEREING, (extra. Digby.)
SARDINES AND ANCHOVIES.
0f the “We we have Mackerel in whole. half. quarter
ind Eighth bbla Herring in flame and half bbla.
' The entire lot. new—mum non rm: “sauna, and
will sell them at the lowest. market rates.
up“ WM. noon, .13.. a; co.
AMILY BIBL ES, from 1&5 to $lO,
strolls and handsomely bound, printed on good paper,
with elegant clear new typeémld at ‘
1 31mm FFER’ on.» Book-hrs.
RANBERRIE 211..
ij received by S A SPLENDID LOT
06310 ' A 33“ & co. -
"OR "a su' érior and 011'
Fun“, 0133.,» cap TABLE or
V . manna mum noun.
THE Frmt v- Growers’ Handbook—by
WARlNG—wholufle and aid! gt .
mm 80!! B'IIR’B Book-ton,
Sham NDLES.-—;A large 'supply-
In“ reusing by” ' .
“1’“ , WM. 1300:. m. I. 00.
IF 3011 train wsnt of 3.l)éutifi‘io‘e‘go t 0
’ mums. 91. mm;- It-
FISH!”
: -_ a. 3
.e . . ifs-é fig - '
45757;, " . . $2.. \‘)- 7;" ._‘J «h» '‘2 7“
-.. . ;%,,=\l .“H'l‘kaé'” " '
. :' -: ‘hxaflé a 1:: ,frwhyi-W'E‘f‘" ‘7" I '- 9
." ‘ .-: ;~ "E, A ‘ é:\§§%@l@§y‘:~r I
.= , 12:. 3, : : :,2#w_i J: ‘ ’ I ’2‘ I
z. . . .54 'I l fif-iéiy'ffi ~ 1 1 2‘4: ‘'l -5137? " ‘ ‘ v
, ’ ' V' ' ‘;:.' ‘| (.' ’T‘Mi- .I‘ ' A i‘ I
‘. . 174 At .1133}? - ' ¥ .
,:-:e§7¥' "la. _;' '3 I I
, , , _ - ;\—,‘«7:~_"¢Nsi&7§fi§%as;‘i""l2" ‘
if > t ' r
VOL. 3.
13inch) fitahlefi.
-CITY LIVERY STABLES,
fl BLACKBERRY AL L EY, fl
IN THE REAR 0F HERE’S HOTEL.
The finder-signed has re—commenced the L IVE R Y
BUSINESS in his NEW AND SPACIOUS STABLES,
located as above, with a. large and varied stock of
HORSES, CARRIAGES AND OMNIB USES,
Which he Will hire at moderate rates. ,
octla-dly ‘ » l!" K. SWARTZ.
FRANK A. MU RRAY
Successor to Wm. Purkhill,
LIVERY & EXCHANGE STABLE
THIRD STREET BELOW MARKET.
t
A. .. 4 u. ~ ._
“ :cr‘ “5913 ' I 'j‘
'«fi-vo’ : I:5 1 ~ -
HAVING push-mi the intereat or J. Q. Mum n tho
enabliahmont, and mule lugs addition! to the Hack, the
undersi had is prepared to accommodate the public with
SUPEBEOR HORSES for Saddle or Obi-rim? purposes, and
with every valet: of VEHICLES of the m: and moat
npproved styles on reasonable terms, . i '
nusuxn banks will be mmodatod with On:
nibumu at short notice. . ' .
Clarifies and Omnihuuea, for funeral cushions, will be
(uninh , accompanied by careful md obliging driven.
Ho invites a inspection of his stock, antiqued that it is
fully equal to tint or my who: entalv'llshmaeng o! the kind
in to". FRANK'AJIURRA!
BRANCH STABLE
The undersigned nu opened . branch of his Hunky-ad
Exchange atoms” in the buildings htolgemnplod by A.
W. Bur; in fourth Itreot, oppollto the thel, where he‘
uncured in mammals!» the publio with nomad
Vehicles, at all times, on romanticism; nil stock ll
urge and varied, and will mammal! itself,
Elnlfi-dtf FRANK A.‘ MURRAY.
filiwlluueaus;
TA K E NOTI (I E l
'llth we have recently added to our elreedy full stock
0 F SEG A R 8
LA NORMATIS,
KARI KARI,
. EL MONO,
. LA BANANA.
0F PERFU‘MERY
Fen um mxnu'nemsl :
TURKISH ESSENCE, ‘
ODOR 0F MUSE,
' LUBIN’S ESSENCE BOUQUET.
Fox was Hun : - -
EAU LUSTRALfi -
OBYST IZED POMATUM,
. MYRTLE AND VIOLET POMATUM.-
Eon ml Connexion, 3 - l .
TALO OF VENICE, ‘
105 E LEAF POWDER
NEW MOWN Heir POWDER,
' BLANO DE PERLES.
0 F SOA P 8
Burma Ems-er \‘
moss nose,
Ennzom,
UPPER TEN,
VIOLET, ‘
NEW MOWN HAY,
' JOCKEY CLUB.
Having the largest stock Ind beet assortment of Toilet
Articles, we fancy that we are better able than our com
petitors to get up I. complete Toilet Set at any price de
sired. Cell and see. ‘ '
Alwnya on hand, a. FRESH Stock of DR UGS MEDI
CINES, CHEM'ICALS, aw , consequent of our re
ceiving Almost daily addition: thereto.
‘ KELLER’S DRUG AND FANCY STORE,
91 Market Street, two doors East of Fourth Street,
38116 South side. _
PHOENIX FOUNDRY.
J. .1. 031.33. 1. 1. 051.33.
JOHN J. OSLER 8n BRO‘I‘ HER,
(51100233035 10 Jules I. In.)
FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS,
Corner Pennsylvania Railroad and State Street,
HARRISBURG, PA.
MILL GEARING, IRON FENCES, RAILROAD
AND CANAL WORK
Axe ALL nnsoxlrrmxs or
IRON CASTINGS
ON HAND OB MADE TO ORDER.
MACHINE WORK AND REPAIRING PBOMPTLY
ATTENDED I'o.
PATTERNS ' MADE TO ORDER.
We have a. large and complete assortment of Patterns
to select from. ' 31122
JUST RECEIVED!
A FULL ASSORTMENT or
HUMPHREY’S HOMEOPATHIO’SPEBIFICSH
to ‘llch In: mm? 1n:
ATTENTION OF THE AFFLIOTEDI
For Role at
SOHEFFEB’S BOOKSTORE,
No. 18 Market at
WE OFFER TO
CUSTGMERS
A New Lot of
LADIES’ PUREES,
0f Beautiful Styles, substantially made
A' Splendid Assortment of V
GENTLEMEN’S WALLETS.
A New and Elegant Perfume,
KNIGHTS TEMPLARS’ BOQUET.
Put up in Out Glass Engnved Bottles.
A Complete Assortment of
HANDKERGHIEE PEBFUMES ,
Of the beat Manufacture.
A very Handsome Variety of
POWDER PUFF BOXES.
KELLER’S DRUG STORE,
jyal ~ 7 , 91 Market street
ESTABLISHED IN 1810.
FANCY DYEING ESTABLISHMENT.
J. a; W. JONES, l‘fo. 432 N. Front Street, ebove Gal.
lowhill, Philadelphia, dye SILKS, WOODEN AND
FANCY GOODS of every deacriytion. Their superior
style of Dyeing Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s Garments is
widely known. Grape and. Merino Shawls dyed the most
brilliant or plain colors. Grape and Merino Shawls
cleaned to look like new—‘also, Gentleman’s apparel.
Curtains, km, cleaned or rte-dyed.
33’0“} and look at our work before going else
where. sepll-dsm
CHOICE SAUGES!
WORCESTERSHIRE‘
LUGKNOW OHUTNY,
CONTINENTAL,
SOYEB’S SULTANA,
ATHENEUM,
LONDON CLUB,
818 ROBERT PEEL,
INDIA soy,
READING SAUCE,
ENGLISH PEPPER SAUCE.
For like by WM. DOCK, 13., an 00.
my
DYOTTVILLE GLASS WORKS,
PHILADELPHIA,
unmuo'runl
OARBOYS, DEMIJOHNS,
WINE, PORTER, MINERAL WATER, PIOKLE AND
. PRESERVE BOTTLES
or "In! nlsanlnxon.
. H. B. A: G. W. BENNERS,
“19411, 27 South Front Ital-ct, Philadelphia.
INSTRUCTION IN MUSIC.
1'- W. WEBER, nephew-ml taught by the well ro
llmnbu-od Int. I . W. Weber, of Harnsburfi, la prop-rad
‘° Btu lessons in mule upon the BIA _o, 710 nm.
o‘LLO. VIOLIN Ind ILUTJI; no will give lesson: gt.
5“ "“10““, corner of Loon-t “not And ijor 1118’
0! It tho home: of pupill. , “88-dam
SGHEFFEB’S
bu; Gold Ptnl—wunnhd ‘
HARRISBURG, PA., FRIDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1860.
(Ural.
TO THE PUBLIC!
J 0 H N TIL L ’ S
C 0 A L Y A R D 5
SOUTH SECOND STREET,
BELOW PRATT’S ROLLING MILL»
HARRISBURG, PA.,
Where he he: constantly on hand
LYKENS VALLEY BROKEN, EGG, STOVE AND
NUT com.
A x. s o ,
WILKESBARRE STEAMBOA'I‘, BROKEN, STOVE
_ AND NUT COAL,
ALL or NH: BEST QUALITY.
It. will be delivered to consumers clesn, and full
weight warranted.
{IT CONSUMERS GIVE ME A CALL FOR YOUR
>WINI‘EB SUPPLY. -
in,- Order! 1m at my house, in Walnut street, near
Fifth; or At Brubaker’e, North atreet; J. L. Speel’a,
Market Square; Wm. Bostick’a, corner of Second and
South streets, and John Lingle‘r, Second end Mulberry
streets, will receive prompt attention.
jyls-dam ‘ - JOHN TILL.
COAL! COAL‘H
ONLY YARD IN TOWN THAT DELIVERS)
GOAL BY THE
PATENT W EIGH'GARTS!
NOW IS THE TIME'
For every femil'y to get in their supply of Coal for the
winter—weighed at their door by the IPatent Weigh
Car». 17" accuracy of these Cans no one disputes, find
they never get out of order, as is frequently the use of
the Platform Scales; besides, the consumer has the
satisfaction of proving the weight of his Coll tt hi!
on house. ' ‘ -
I haw a Inga lupply of Coal on hand, couizfing of
E. M. 0023 LYKENB VALLEY GOAL .11 sizes.
WILKESBABRE do. - "
BITUMINOUS BROAD TOP do. .
All Goal of. the best quality mined, and'dqlivered free
from :11 impurities, it the loweét rates, by the bout or
cu- load, single, half or third bf tons, and by the bushel.
_ . . - JAMES“. WHEELER.
Hurisburg, Septembqr 24, 1.360.——5ep25! .
GOAL! G'OALH GOAL!!!
HOW IS YOUR TIME
TO GET“ CLEAN COAL!
FULL WEIGHTAND NOTHING SHORT OF IT!
Thankful .to my friends and customer: for their liberal
patronage, I woul‘l inform them and'the public generally;
that I am fully prepued, on short notice, to supply them
with all kinds of ' , V
SUPERIOR GOAL OF ALL SIZES.
FREE FROM SLATE, AND CAREFULLY SOBEENED,
A! As Low A
FIGUR-J? AS FAIR DEALING WILL AFFORD!
Although my Coal is not weighed in SnLr-mennm
GAB-rs, an! is mammal) 0N SCALES Acauxunr raga-an
3! THE SEALER or WEIGHTS AND MEASURES, and con
sumers may rest assured that they will be fairly and
honestly dealt wflh. I sell nothing but the very best
article, and no mixing.
Also, HICKORY, OAK and PINE WOOD always on
hand. sepA-d3m GEO. P . WIESTLING.
U P T 0 W N! _B
PATENTWEIGHCARTS
For the convenience of my numerous up town custom
ers, I have established. in connectionwlth my old yard,
a Branch Coal Yard opposite North street, in a line with
the Pennsylvania canal, having the otfice formerly occu
pied by Mr R. Harris. where consumers of Coal in that
vicinity and Verbeketown can receive their Coal by the
PATENT WEIGII CARTS, .
WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE FOR HA ULING,
And in any quantity they may desire, as low as can be
purchased anywhere.
FIVE THOUSAND TONS GOAL 0N HAND,
0f LYKENS VALLEY and WILKESBARRE, all sizes.
{FWill'ing to maintain fair prices, but unwilling
to be tendersold by any part-ms.
{Frill Coal forked up and delivered clean and free
from all impurities, and the best article mined.
Orders received at either Yard will be promptly filled,
nd all 0031 delivered by the Patent Weigh Carts.
Coal sold by Boat, Oar load, single, half or third of
tons, and by the bushel
JAMES M. WHEELER
Harrisburg, October 13. 1860.—onus
filehiml.
HELMBOLD’S HELMBOLD’S
HELMBULD’S HELMBOLD’S
HELMBOLD’S HELMBOLD’S
HELMBOLD’SV HELM BII‘LD’S
HELMBflLD’S HELMBOLD’S
HELMBOIJPS HELMBOI.D9S
HELMBOLD’S HELMBOLD’S
Extract Buchu, Extract Buchu, _ .
Exumt Buchu, ‘Extnct Buchu,
Extract Buehu, Extract Bur-bu,
Extract Buchu, Extract Buchu,
Ext'act Buchu, Extract Buchn,
' Extract Buchu, Extrmt Buchu,
Extract Buchu. Extract Bachu,
FOR SECRET AND DELIUATE JIISORD ERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
170 K SECRET AND D FILIUATE DISORDERS.
EUR SECRET AND DELIUATE DISDRUERS.
FOR SECRET AND DLLIGATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AAD DELIGATE DISORDEKS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
A Positive and Specific Remedy.
A Punitive and Specific Remedy.
A Positive and Specific Remedy
A Positive and Specific nemedy.
A Positive end Spocifle Remedy.
A Posi‘ive and Specific Bemefly.
A Positive and Specific Remedy. '
FOR DISEASES OF THE
BLADDER, GRAVEL; KID NEYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDA'EYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KID NEYS, DROPSY,
BLADDER, GRA VEL, KIDNEYS, DROP-51',
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, BRO PSY.
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS. DROPSY,
ORGANEG WEAKNESS,
ORGANIC WE AKNRSB,
ORGANIC 'WEAKNESS,
ORGANIC WEARNESB,
ORG-ANN} WEAKNESS,
ORGANIC WEAKNESB,
Am! all Diseases qf mum! Organ.
And all Disnases of Sexual (-Irgaus,
And all Diseases of Sexual Organs,
And all Disausefi of Sexual Organs,
And all Diseases of Sexual Organs,
And all Diseases of Sexual Organs,
ARISING FROM
Excuses, Expoeures, and Impmdencies in Life.
Excuses, Exposures, and Imprudencies in Life.
Excuses, :{s‘xposm-iul and Imprudsncies in Life.
Excesses,'Exposures, and Imnrudencies in Life.
Excuses, Exposures, and Imprudencies in Life.
Excuses, Exposures, and Impruneuoies in Life-
From whatever cause originatiu ,and whether existing in
MALE 0R FEMALE.
Females, tske no more Pills! They are or no avail for
Complaints incident ta 1119 sex. Use
EXTRACT BUOHU.
Holmbeld’s Extract Bucks in. Medicine which is par
fectly pleasant in its
TASTE AND ODOR,
But immadiate in its action. giving Health and Vigor to
the Fume, Bloom to the Panid Cheek, and restoring the
patient 1» a perfect state of
HEALTH AND PUBITY.
Helmbald’n Extract Buchu is prepared according to
Phemncy and Chemistry, and is prescribed and used by
THE MOST EMINENT PHYSICIANS.
Delay no longer. Broom-e the remedy at on“-
Price $1 pnr settle, or six for $5. .
Depot 104 South Tenth street, Philadelphia-
BEWARE on uupnmcxpun DEALERS
Trying to palm at! their own or other utielel of BUOEU
on the reputation nttalued‘ by
EELMBOLD’S EXTRACT BUOHUI
The Oxiglnal and only Genuine.
We denim to run on tho' ' .
MERIT OF OUR ABTIGLE -
Thnir’l In wurthlens —-i| sold at mughbgzfirserzggd oom
‘ lieu a ti ' a lune ' .
m- to, c Waifiyflégffrmflo“ 3
uh I
HELMEOLD’B EXTRACT BUOHU.
Tabs no other. . . .
8 3011327301!!! “3:11, Datum, consul Hunt “a
000 recall“!!- I _
AND ALL 1231703}er EVERYWHERE.
no“ avian. V
@th whim 1% 239 cm,
FRIDAY MORNING. DEC. 14, 1860
EMERSON’S 001 m (102' OF LIFE.
From Mr. Emerson’s new volume, we give
the following extracls; ~
FATE
The book of Nature is the book of Fate. She
turns the gigantic pages—leaf after leaf—mover
re-turning one. One leaf she lays down, a floor
of granite, then a thousand ages, and a bed of
state; a thousand ages, and a. measure of coal;
a thousand ages, and alayer of marl and mud;
vegétlsble foams appear; her first. misshapen
animals, zoophyte, mlobium, fish; than, sunri—
aus—rude forms, in which she has only blocked
her future statue, eoqcealing under these un
wieldy monsters the fine type of her coming
king- 1, The face of the planet cools and dries,
the, races meliorate, and ' man is born. But:
when a race has livcd'ita term, it comes no more
again.
" The population of the world is n conditional
population; not the best, but the best- that
could live now, and the scale of tribes, and the
steadiness with ‘which- victory adheres to one
tribe, and defeat to another, has uniform as
the superposition of strata. We know in his
tory what weight belongs to race. we see the
English, French and Germans planting them
selves on every shore and market of America.
and Australia, and monopolizing the commerce
of these countries. We like the nervous and
victorious habit of our own branch of the fam
ily. We follow the (step of the Jew, of the
Indian, of the Negro. We see how much will
has been expended to extinguish the Jew, in
vain. . Look at the unpalatable conclusions of
Knox, in his “Fragment of Raees,”—-a rash
and unsatisfactory writer, but charged with
pungent andrunforgetable truths.
‘fNeture respects race, and not hybirds."—
“Every race has its own . habitat.” “Detach a
colony from the race, and it deteriorates to the
orab.”. See the shades of: the picture. The
Germsnand Irish millions, li-kethe Negro, have
a great deal of guano in», their, destiny. They
are ferxied _over the Atlantic, and hearted over
America, to glitch and to drudge, to make corn
cheap, and then ,to lie down prematurely to
malte'a spot of green grass on the prairie.
Fate is .unpenetrated causes. The water
droWns ship and sailor, like a grain of dust:—
Bnt learn to swim, trim your bark, and the
wave which drowned it will be cloyeu by it,
and carry'it, like its own foam, a. plume and a.
power! The cold is inconsiderate of persons,
tingles'your blood, freezes a man like a flow
drép._ ,B‘ut learn to skate, and the ice will give
you a graceful, sweet and poetic motion. The
cold Will brace your limbs and brains to genius,
and make yeti foremost men 0! time. Cold and
sea will train an imperial Saxon race, which
nature cannot hear to lose, and, after cooping
it up for a thousand years in yonder England,
gives a hundred Englands. a hundred Mexicos,
All the bloods it shall absorb and domineer;
and' more than Mexicos—the secret of water
and steam, the spasms of electricity, the duc~
tility of metals, the chariots of the air, the
rudder-ed balloons are awaiting you.
NATURE
‘ Nature is a spenuthrift, but takes the short
est way to hex-ends. As the general says to,
his soldiers, ”if you want a fort, build a fort,”
Bo nature makes every creature do its own work
and get its living—his it planet, animal or tree?
The planet makes itself. The animal cell
makes itself; then, what it wants. Every
creature, wren or dragon, shall make its own
lair. As soon as there is life, there is'self—
direction, audabsorbing and using of material.
Life is freedom—life in. the direct ratio of its
amount. You may be sure the new born man
is not inert. Life works both voluntarily and
super-naturally in its neighborhood. Do you
suppose he can be estimated by his weight in
pounds, or that he is contained in his skin,
this reaching, radiating, jaculating fellow?
The smallest candle fills a mile mth its rays,
and the papillae of a man run out to every star.
When there is something to he done, the
world knows how to get it done. The vege
table eye makes leaf, pericarp, root. bark or
thorn, as the need is; the first cell converts
itself into stomach, mouth, nose or nail, accord
ing to the want; the world throws its life int-o
a hero or a shepherd; and puts him where he
is wanted. Dante and Columbus were Italians
in their time; they would be Russians or Amer
icans to-day. Things ripen, new men come.
The adaptation is not capricious. The ulterior
aim, the purpose beyond itself, the correlation
by which planets subside and crystalize. then
animate beasts and men, will not stop, but will
work into finer particulars, and from finer to
finest.
BEHAVIOR-
A high-born Turk who came hither fancied
that every woman seemed to be suffering {or a
chair; that all the talkers were brained and
exhausted by the ‘deoxygenated air; it spoiled
the best persons; it. put all on stilts. Yet here
are the secret biographies written and read.—
The aspect of that man is repulsive; I do not
Wish to deal with him. The other is irritable,
shy, and on his guard. The youth looks humble
and manly; I choose him. Look on this wo
man. There is not beauty, no brilliant say
ings, nor distinguished power to serve you; but
all see her gladly; her whole air and impres
sion are healthful. Here comes the sentimen
talists, and the invalids. Here is Elise. who
caught cold in coming into the world, and has
always increased it since. Here are creep
mouse manners, and thievish manners. “Look
at Northcote,” said Fuseli; “he looks like a
rat that has seen a out.” In the shallow com~
pany, easily excited, easily tired. here is the
columnar Bernard; the Alleghenies do not ex~
press more repose than his behavior. Here are
the sweet following eyes of Cecile; it seemed
always that she demanded the heart. Nothing
can be more excellent in kind then the Corin
thian grace of Gertrude’s manners, and yet
Blanche, who has no manners, has better man
ners than she; for the movements of Blanche
are the sallies of a spirit which is sufficient for
the moment, as sh'e can afford to express every
thought by instant action.
WEALTH
Wealth is in application of mind to nature ;
and the art of getting rich consists not in
industry, much less in saving, but in a better
order, in timeliness, in being at the right spot.
One man has stronger arms. or longer legs;
another seen by the course of streams and
growth of markets, where land will he wanted,
makes a clearing to the river, goes to sleep,
and wakes up rich. Steam is no stranger now
than it was a hundred years ago; but is put to
better use. A clever fellow was acquainted
with the expansive force of steam; he also
SEW the wealth of wheat and grass rotting in
Mlchigan. Then he eunningly screws on the
steam-pipe to the wheat crop. Putf now, 0
steam! The steam wife and expands as berefe.
but this time it is dragging all Michigan at I”
back to hungry New York and hungry England.
CW’J- lay in ledges under the ground 511100 the
11005. until a laborer With pick and windlaqa
brings it to the surface. We may "11 “u “‘
black diamonds. Every basket is pay"? and
civilization. For _coal is a portable clunate.—-
It carries the heat of the tropics to Labrador
and the polar circle; and it. is the means of
transporting itself whithensoever it is wanted.
Watt mud Seephenson whispered in the ear of
mankind their secret, and a half-ounce of coal
will draw two lons a. mile, and coal carries
can], by mil and by boat. to make Canada as
warm as Calcutta, and with its comfort brings
its industria! power.
When the farmer‘s peaches are taken from
under the tree and carried into town. they
have a new look, and a. hundredfold value over
the fruit. which grew on the same bough, and
lies fulsomely on the ground. The craftof
the merchant is this bringing a. thing from
Where it, abounds to where it is costly.
Weuhh begins in a. tight. roof that keeps the
rain and wind out; in a. good pump that yields
you plenty of sweet. water ; in two suits of
clothes, so to change your dress when you are
web; in dry sticks to bum; in a good double
wick lamp; and three meals; in 9. horse, or a.
locomotive, to cross the land ; in a boat to cross
the sea; in tools to work with; in books to
read; and so, in giving, on all sides, by tools
and auxiliaries, the greatest possible extension
to our powers, as if it. added feet and hands,
and eyes and blood, length to the day, and
knowledge and good-will.
WANTS
There are three wants which never can be
satisfied; that of the rich, who wants some
thing more ; that of the sick, who wants some
thing different, and that of the traveler, who
says: “Anywhere but hera.”. The Turkish
endl said to Leyerd, “ After the fashion of the
people thouhast wandered from one place to
another, until thou art contented and happy
in none.” My countrymen are not less infat
uated with the rococo toy of Italy. All America
seems on the point of embarking for Europe.
But we shell not always traverse seas and lands
with light purposes, and for pleasure, as we
say. One day we shall cast out the passion of
Europe, by the passion of, America. Culture
.will give gravity and domestic rest to those
who now trowel only as not knowing how else
to spend money. Already, who provoke pity
like that excellent family putty just arriving
in their well-appointed carriage, as far from
home and any honest end as ever? Each na
tion has asked successively, “What are they
here for l” nntilat lost the party are shame
faced, and anticipate the question at the gates
of the town.
Genial manners are good, and power of ac
commodation to any circumstance, but the high
prize of life, the crowning fortune of a man,
is who born with a bias to some pursuit, which
finds him in . employment and happiness—
whether it be to make baskets, or broadawords,
or canals, or statues. or songs._
BEAUTY.
.‘ Th’at beauty in the normal state, is shown by
the perpetual efi‘ort of nature to obtain it.—
Mirabeau~ had an ’ ugly face on a handsome
ground ; and we see faces every day which have
a good type, but have been marred in the cast
ing; a proof that we are all entitled to beauty,
should have been beautiful, 'if our ancestors
had kept the laws—as every lily and every rose
is Well. But our bodies do not fit as, but our;
icature and satarize us. Thus short legs, which
constrain us to short, minoing steps, are akind
of personal insult and coutumely to the owner;
and long stilts, again, put him at perpetual
disadvantage, and force him to stoop to the
general level of mankind. Martial ridicules a.
gentleman of his day whose countenance re
sembled the face of a swimmer seen under
water. Sandi describes-s schoolmaster "so ugly.
and erabbed that a sight of him would derange
the ecstacies of the orthodox." Faces are
rarely true to any ideal type, but are a record
in sculpture of a thousand anecdotes of whim
and folly. Portrait painters say that most
faces and forms are irregular and unsymme
trical; have one eye blue and one gray; the nose
not straight: and one shoulder higher than
another; the hair unequally distributed, &0.
The man is physically unwell as metaphysically
a thing of shreds and patches, borrowed une
qually from good and bad ancestors, and a mist.
from the start. .
A beautiful person, among the Greeks, was
thought. to betray by this sign some secret fa~
yor of the immortal gods; and we can pardon
pride, when a woman pose‘ssel such a figure
whenever she stands, or moves, or leaves a
shadow on the'woll, or sits for a. portrait to the
artist, she confers a. favor on the world.
THE EMPR E'SS E UGENIE
From the Baltimore Exchange
Eugenie Marie de Guzman, Countess of Teba
and Empress of France, at the age of thirty
four, and in the full bloom of womanly beauty,
already begins to grow weary of the rigid for.
malities of an Imperial Court, of the splendors
of Royalty, and of those stately “ progresses,”
which, as consort of the foremost man in all
Europe, she has recently been making through
Algeria and the Franco-Italian provinces of
Nice and Savoy. The high spirit for which
she was distinguished on her first appearance
in the salons of Paris, in 1851 ; the pretty dis
dain with which she refused to conform to the
petty conventionalities of fashionable society,
and the gaiety of disposition that gave an ad
ditional charm to her wondrous loveliness,
have departed from her. Possessed of all the
accomplishments that bcfit her to fillworthily
the imperial station to which she has been ele
vated; graceful in her deportment, and with
manners so attractive as to win. the afiection of
all classes of people, she is also reputed to be
a liberal aims-giver, and a. generous and unsel
fish friend, but of a. nature ,too sensitive and
impressible, and perhaps too ingenious, to be
able to mask her feelings or to subdue her ap
prehensions. These attributes, so essentially
feminine, constitute at once the source of her
strength and of her Weakness—of the popular
attachment which she has inspired. and of the
‘ fears with which she is impressed. Women of
such a temperament pass easily from one ex
‘ treme to another. In some, “ a youth of folly”
subsides into " an old age of cards." In others
the change is still more strongly marked, and
1 rapid, and mysterious. The very suddenness
‘ of the act of transformation bewnldm the
imagination. The woman WllO J’esmrfjay en‘
‘ joyed life with a. hearty zest; .who was the
light and life of all circles in which she moved;
whose spirits were the most buoyant and Irre
pressible, and Whose laugh had the merriest
ring—all at. once, and without any risihle pre
monition, fol-sakes the drmng‘roong and the
opera, for the church and the confessional, and
from the gayest of pleasure seekers, becomes
the most rigid of oevotees. Such appears to
he the case, al- this time, With the Empress
Eugenie. The cores and exactions of Imperial
Stu“, , the troubles of the Church to which she
is ardently attached; the recent loss of her
sister, the Duchess of Alba; all these things
press heavily upon her, and, since the death of
her sister, have brought on a profound reli
gious melancholy, combined with hypochcn
driacal symptoms. To those whose who suffer
under this frame ofmind, the courier is a much
more useful personage than the physician,—
Change of scene, change of air, the bustle of
travel, and the quickening influence of novel
associations—these are the remedies which
have been found most efi'ectual in such cases;
Ind B_o the Empress has been persuaded to give
up her predilection for mash and micron, and
take a brief tour, incongit‘o, through some par.-
tions of Scotland. Why a more genial climate
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Connected with this establishment is an extenaivo
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licited.
NO 89
than that of Scotland was not recommended by
her advisers, seems to have puzzled the English
journalists quite its much as the suddcnness of
her presence in "the inviolate Isle,“ and the
Privacy which marked her entrance into and
departure from London. Some, too, wondered
why she should have undertaken the journey
at all; and for a moment, but for a moment
only, scandal began, as usual, to connect the
name of the Emperor with that ofthe Countess
Castlglione. The English Court Journal was
among ”12 first to state the impelling cause;
and the truth of that statement was speedily
corroborated from other sources. If the fair
maladc imaginairc had gone to Italy, her appear
ance there would have been ascribed to matters
of State Policy. In Spain she would scarcely
have been welcome to the lust of the Bourbon .
soverigns, or to the Orleonist party at that
Court, which clusters round the Montpensiers.
The state of popular feeling in Germany, as
exhibited towards Napoleon 111, scarcely ad
mitted of her traveling in that country. without .
running the risk of being subjected to annoy
ance. Switzerland is at issue with France in
relation to the once neutralized districts of
Savoy. Where, then, could she 'go so readily
and with so perfect an assurance of a cordial,
yet respectful reception, as to the old home of
1 her ancestors, the Kirkpatriolrs of Closeburn,
‘ who emigrated from Scotland to Spain soon.
after the‘expulsion 'of the Stuart dynastyrfron
the throne of England? It may also be trap,
that she desired to consult an eminent physi
cian of Edinburgh, on the proper treatment “to
be pursued in her case. Whether this be so or
not, it is evident that the enthusiasm with
which she was welcomed by the citizens of the
various towns through which she passed on
her journey Northward: the cordial desire
expressed by the City Council of Edinburgh
that her sojourn in the Scottish Capital “ might
conduce to her health and happiness,” and her
subsequent visits to Holyrood and Loch Levin
Castle—the palace and the prison of Mary,
Queen of Scots—and to Abbotsfoi‘d and Mel
rose Abbey, have already produced a beneficial
effect upon her spirits. Some surprise has
~been expressed that, on her arrival at London.
she did not proceed atoms to Windsor, or that
some official recognition of her presencei'di'd
not take place. Respect for the mental depress
sion which she had sought to alleviate, by a
temporary absence from Paris, may very well.
account for the non-observance of “ the usual
forms and ceremonies of Court etiquette ;" and
besides, it is understood that on her return
from Scotland, she will become the guest» of
Qheen Victoria, at Windsor, and, that the Eat-g.
pér'or will meetyher there and accompany her
back to Paris. Simultaneously with the'nrrival
of the Empress Eugenie at Edinburgh, the
youthful Empress of Austria, who has been
gradually wasting away under the olfects of an
obscure malady, made her appearance ofi‘ the
shores of England, from whence shewas to sail
to Madeira. in‘ search of health, in the royal
steam yacht which had been generously placed,
at her disposal by Queen Victoria. It is a
singular conjunction of events, that of two Em
presses, both wandering in search of health,
theone afflicted mentallyand the other bodily,
and both satedwith grandeur—the one seeking
relief from an ever-present sense of impending
evil in active travel among the rugged but his
torically memorable scenery and architecttb
ml ruins of Scotland-Aha other hoping _to
strengthen her feeble hold upon life by enjoy
ing a brief period of quiet and repose in the
suit, delicious atmosphere, and amid the sub
lims scenery of Madeira. There is, moreover,
.a moral to be drawn from this story, but it. is so
trite and obrions that welesve it to our readers.
with the less n which it inculcates'. '
A GAME MISTAKE—Many of our renders
remember the stately presence, the dignified‘
bearing and imposing manner of Colonel Wil
liam CV Preston, of South Carolina,“ It was
when all those qualities were in their prime.
and Preston represented his State in the Senate
of the United States, that. business or pleasure
called him to the West, and to take passage
down the Mississippi river. In those “flush
times” the steamers swarmed with hoosiers.
greenhorns, and gamblers, the latter politely
designated “sporting gentlemen,” the term
“gambler” or “blackleg” entailing on the
speaker a. ‘pistol shot or a wipe from a bowie
knife.
The boat was on the eve of departure, and
our Senator, standing on the deck and holding
a small mahogany box, was observing with
great interest and pleasure the busy scene on
the wharf, when an individual, luxurieting in_
a. rather ornate style of dress, approached him,
and in subdued tone demanded:
“I any. old teller, when are you going to
comme'nce'!”
“Commence what, sir 2" asked the aston
ished Senator.
“Pshaw! none of that gammon with me!
The fact. is, a. few of us boys want a little fun,
and we won't pile on too strong for you; so
come and ope? at. once.”
“Really, sir," replied Preston, “lam-lo
tany at a loss to guess your meanigg; open
what. ‘?”
Open what! Why the bank of course. May
be you think our pile isn’t large enough to
make it an object. But we’re not so poor as
all that any how!”
The Senator meditated gloomily, but all was
dark to him, he was plunged into a sea of
doubt, and he had never met any problem not.
even a political one so hard to solve.
“ Perhaps,” broke in his pertinacions friend
again, after a considerable pause, “ perhaps
you, will say directly that you are not. a sport
ing man.” . ‘
“Icertainly am nothing of the kind, air,”
replied Preston, rather angrily ; “ and I can’t
imagine what put the idea into your head." ‘
“Not a. sporting mun? Whew-w! I never
heard of such a piece of impndence! Well,
if you are not a. sporting man, will you plea”
to tell me why you carry that. about with you 2”
and he pointed to the mahogany box which he
still carried.
A fight- broke on Preston’s mind! “The
mahogany box!” he cried. “Ha! ha! ha!
hat—very natural mistake, indeed my good
sir, very natural indeed! my good sir; very
indeed! Well, I will show you the contents."
And laughing heartily he opened the box in
question, which was in fact, a. dressing 035°.
and displayed the usual parade of brushes,
combs, razors, soap, etc., which usually fill
that article of traveling comfort
Our friend looked at the case, then at Preston
again. Then he heaved a long sigh, and then
he pondered. .
“ Well," he broke out atlength, “I 1!“! take
you to be a sporting gentlemanf-I did; but
now I see you are a barber; but}! I’d known
it, d—n me if I had 3. spoke to you.”
Summon AT THE CAPITOL—The Washington
State: of Monday says: The sermon at the
Capital yesterday by the Rev. Thomas H-
Stockton was attended by great number! 01'
persons of both sexes, filling the seals on ”19
floor and all the galleries. The preacher 3.1-:
luded in a most pathetic manner to the exlatf
ing state of afiairs in our nation, and dew:
cued sadly the ill-feeling between the dgfitent
sections of our confederwy- garish-on; “”9
the Uniqn sentiments which he expromdthst
several members of Congress rose and left the
Hall.