Daily patriot and union. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1858-1868, November 22, 1860, Image 1

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    RATES OF ADVERTISING.
Ion: line: or loss constitute half a. square. Ten ling.
n: more than four, constitute I annre.
Halts; ,oneday... .... 30.25 One «1., onod3lmso.6t
f‘ Ottawa’s”... 1.00 I “ oneweek.” 1.26
“ onemonth._ . 2.00 l ‘5 one month. .. 3.00
‘= three months. 3.00 3 “ threemontha. 5.00
‘5 six months... . 4.00 5 “ six months... B.oo'
“ one year—... - 5.00 “ one year"... 10.00
g - aniuesa notices inserted in the LOCAL aonm, or
before marriages and deaths: rm: 0 ems PER m: for each
insertion. I‘9 memhmtsand other: advartisinghy the you
nun] can :3 will be (Mere-. 2. .
gj’jl'he numberofinsertious mus: bedasignatedon tho
flverliflament.
W Marfiages and Deaths will be inserted at tho sum
ates as ngulst advertisements.
Books, Stationery, Ba.
SCHOOL BOOKS—School Dlrectora,
Teachers, Parents, Scholars, and others, in want of
School Books, School Stationery, kc. will find a complete
nsaoxtxnent :1: 1:. u. vonLoqx a; son’s BOQK s'ronn,
33ft Square, Harrisburg, comprising in part the follow-
READERB.—Mcfiufl'ey’s, Parker’s, Cobb’s ”new.
WILLING BOOKS.-—Mc&nfiay73, 00131115: “”3133”,!”
Town’s, Byerly’a. Oombry’e.
ENGLISH GRWARS.~—Bnllion’s Smith’s, Wood
bug’s, Monteith,s, Tuthill’a, Hart’s, “9115’ .
TOBlES.—Grimshaw’s, Davenport’s, Frost’s, Wil
son’s, Willard’a, Goodrich’s, Piunoek’s, Guldsmith’s and
alert-’5.
AMTHMETIO’S._LGmnieaDg, Stoddard’s, Emerson-‘3,
Pike’s, Rose‘s, Colbum’a, Smith and Duke’s, Davis’s.
Brfinm.—Gx~eenleafis, Davie“, ”3T5: ‘ 39'3":
l l
mum-mamm—Wazm's tunnel, Cobb’s, Walker.
Wom‘dg comprehensive, Wornestet’a Primary, Web
ster’s Primary, Webster’s 51'5" 3‘91”“; Webster’s Quarto,
Academe.
puma PHILOSOPEIES.-—Gomstock’l, Parker-‘5,
Swift’s- The above with a great nfiety of others can at
any fine be found at my atone‘ Also, a complefa assort
ment of School Stationery, embracing in the WI“ le 3 com
plete outfit for school purposes. Any book not in the store.
weaned \t one days notice
51:? country Merchants supplied a: wholesale rates.
ALmNAOS.—Jnhn, Baa: and Sam's Almanac [or sale Ii
5. M. POLLOGK :3: 5021’s BOOK STORE, Harrisburg.
L? Whoiwne and Retail. myl
{Er—€l7 #1175613 vED ‘ -
u
, A T
SCEEEFER'S BOOKSTORE,
:2 EPA. MAN TIN]; SLut’i TES
‘ GR VARIOUS SIZES AND PRICES,
Willfih, for beauty null use, cannot be axe-311m].
REMEMBER THE PIACE,
FCHEFFER’S BOOKSTORE,
NO. 18 MARKET STREET.
BOOK AUCTION.
BEN F. FRENCH
Will supply his old friends and customers with the
following Books at Auction prices:
Pacific Railroad, 10 vols, complete, 4 illustrations
$24.
Jay-m Expedition, 3 vols., complete, illustrated and
illumimted, Sl2.
Emery’aExpeditlon, 2 vol-3., complete, illustrotcfl
il}uminnted,3lo.
Congressional Globe, $1 50 per volume.
Waverly Novels, complete, 12 rols., cloth, $lO.
& J .“ “ 27 vols.,halx‘calf, $34; Jno.,
c., c.
All of the above Books I will deliver in Harrisburg
free of ehuge. BEN F. FRENCH.
3:78 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, DIG.
few-(1. ‘
NEW BOOKS!
JUST RECEIVED
“SEAL AND SAY,” by the author of “Wide, Wide
World 7’ “ Dollars and Gents,” (to.
.-; Efsronr or nm'ruomsn,u by A. Stevens, LLB.
For sale Lt SCHEFFERS’ BOOKSTORE,
spD No.lB Marke st.
JUST RECEIVED,
.5 LARGE AND SPLESDID ASSORTMENT 0F
BICHL Y GILT AND ORNAMENTAL
WINDOW CURTAINS,
PAPER BLINDS,
0f vaious Designs and Colors, fox-8 cents,
TISSUE PAPER AND CUT FLY PAPER,
.5“ W4l JQEEFFER’S 300K339§&,_
WALL PAPER! WALL PAPERI!
Just received, our Spring Stock of WALL PAPER,
BGBDEBS. FIRE SCREENS, m., kc. It is the largest
and boat selected assortment in the city, ranging in price
from 55: (6) cents up to one dollar and nquarter ($1.25.)
A: we purchase very low for cash, we are prepared to
sea seas low rates, if not lower, than can be had else
when- 11' purchasers will call and examine, we feel
cement that we can please them in respect to price
and quality. E. M POLLOGK B'. SON,
33:3 Below Jones’ House. Market Square.
LE TTE R, GAP, NOTE PAPERS,
Pens, Holder-:1. Pencils, Envelopes, Sealing Wax, of
the best quality, at low prices, direct from the munch
factories, at
Eli-'3O
SGHBFFER’S CHEAP BOOKSTORE
LAW BOOKS ! LAW BOOKS ! !—A
' general assortment of LAW BOOKS, all the State
Reports and Standard Elementary Works, with many of
the old English Reports, scarce and rare, together with
8 large amendment of second-hand Law Books, at very
low prices, at the one price Bookstore of
E. M. POLLOGK k SON,
Market Square, Harrisburg.
I=3
filiscellunenug.
-AN ARRIVAL o’l
NEW Goons
APPROPRIATE I‘o THE SEASON!
5:“: LINEN PAPER
FANS! FANS” FANS!!!
ANOTHER 33D SPLRNDID 1401' OF
SPLIL'ED FISHING RODS!
Trout Flies, Gut and Hair Snoods, Grass Linea, Silk
sud Hair Plaited Lines, and a general assortment uf
FISHING TACKLE!
A an.“ mums" or
WALKING CAKES!
Which we will sell as cheap as the cheapest!
Either Head Loaded Sword Hickory Fancy
Ganea! Canes! Canes! Canes :. Canes:
iiiLLER’S DRUG AND FANCY STORE,
NO. 91 MARKET swam,
South side, one door east of Fourth street je9
B J . HARR I S ,
'
WORKER 1N TIN,
SHEET IRON, AND’
METALLIC ROOFING,
Second Street, below Chestnut,
HARRISBURG, Pl.
In prepared to fill orders for any article in his branch of
business; nndif not on hand,hs will mks to order on
short notice!
METALLIC ROOFING, of Tin or Galvanized Iron,
constantly on hand.
Also, Tin nnd Sheet-Iron Ware, Spurting, see.
He hopes, by strict attention to the wants of his custo
mers, to merit and receive a generous share of public pat
lounge.
3:? Every promise strictly fulfilled.
B. J. HARRIS,
jan'l-dly] Second Street. below Chestnut.
EIS H 1 l
HACKEREL, (Nos. 1, 2 and 3.] -
SALMON, (very superior.)
BEA-D, (Meg and very fine.)
HERRING, (extra large.)
GOD FISH
SMOKED HEI‘RING e t 'D'vb .
mm“ “Wm ~ .( xm:o y)
SARDINES AND ANCHOVIES.
0f the above we have Mackerel in whole, half, quarter
and eighfl} but Herring in whole and half bbls. '
The elm" ‘o‘ “Br—manor non TEE nannmns, and
Win sell them at the lowest market rates.
«1,14 WM. BOOK, In, a; co.
FAMILY BißliEs, from. 1% to $lO,
all Inn 01119 y boflud .
5131153331811: clear new typefisom ’agnnted on good. paper,
m 3! ' SCH FFER’SGhenp Book-I; are.
‘ 1 y y__ .
Cfiéfifififigglfis ~-- A SPLENDID LOT
out 0
#6R a’ superior and chea TAB
F mum on. go to P LE 0‘
KELLER’S nlmstE_
THE Fruit Growers’ Handbook—by
-WABlNG—wholeaala andretail at
Incl-31 scumrmn’a Bookstore.
813E111; CANDLES.——A large supply
.313”: "mm by WM. max. .73.. k 00.
IF you are in want of a. Dentifrice go to
nun-ma, 91, mm It.
FISH!!!
WM. DOCK. 311., k 00
5 ,--- t 2: -
* _.‘F 1‘ if: v - ¥”SEE a’% 'i *’ »
7.1:: 43.7”“ L" -' -/_ " 1:3“
A , . -955?” lmu Tun; '
g“? 94.1.9.2 .. “at; ‘
. . )b'ig’gzgiffmy‘ gags»? ? 1’1“: 9
_} 1' 1 V ' .E:l . ;
——~_ " ’6
VOL. 3.
flimry fitable
CITY LIVERY STABLES,
fl BLACKBERRY ALLEY, fl
IN THE REAR OF HERR’S HOTEL.
The undersigned has re.commenced the L I V]? R Y
BUfiIh‘ESS in his NEW AND SPACIOUS STABLES,
located n 8 above, with a. large and varied stock of
' HORSES, CARRIAGES AND OMNIB USES,
Which he will hire at moderate rates.
octlS-dly I". K. SWARTZ.
FRANK A. MURRAY
Successor to Wm. Parkhiu,
“VERY & EXCHANGE STABLE
THIRD STREET BELOW MARKET.
HAVING purchased the interest of J. Q. Adams :1 the
establishment, and made large additions to the stock, the
unassigned is prepared to accommodate the public with
SUPER 0E HORSES for Saddle or Curio? purposes, and
with every variety of VEHICLES of the stest and most
:pproved styles, on reasonable terms.
PLEASURE PARTIES will be secommodated with 0111
nibnssen at short notice. ‘
Carriages and Omnibuuen, for funeral occasions, will be
furnished, accompanied by careful and obliging drivers.
Ha invites an inspection of his stock, satisfied that it is
fully equal to that of any other establishment of the kind
in town. FRANK A. MURRAY
BRANCH STABLE
The undersigned has opened a branch of his ”Livery and
Exchange Stable" in the buildings lately occupied by A.
W. Barr, in Fourth street, opposite the Bethel, where he
isprepured to accommodate the public with Horses and
Vehicles, at all timesl on reasonable terms. His stock is
large and varied, and will recommend itself.
nulfi-dtf FRAN K A. MURRAY.
fitiétflifiifiifif
TAKE NOTICE!
That we have recently added to our already full stock
0 F SEG A R S ‘
LA NORMATIB,
KARI KARI.
EL MONO,
LA BANANA.
OF PERFUMERY
Eon rm: llAxnxr-mcanzl':
TURKISH ESSENCE,
ODOR 0F MUSK. ‘ ‘
LUBIN’S ESSENCE BOUQUET.
PO2 ms Inna:
EAU LUSTRALE,
CRYSTALIZED POMATUM,
MYRTLE AND VIOLET POMATUM.
Fox ms 00301.3wa :
TALC OF VENICE,
ROSE LEAF powmm,
. NEW MOWN lIAY POWDER,
BLANC DE PERLES.
o F soA P s
BAzm’s thnsr
MOSS ROSE, ,
BENZOIN,
UPPER TEN,
VIOLET,
NEW MOWN HAY,
J OGKEY CLUB.
Having the largest stock and best assortmentof Toilet
Articles, we fancy that we are better able than our com—
petitors to get up a. complete Toilet Set at any price de
sired. Call and see.
Always on hand, uFRESII Stock of DR UGS MEDI
CINES, CHEMICALS, kc , consequent of our re
ceiving almost daily additions thereto.
KELLER’S DRUG AND FANCY STORE.
91 Mnrket Street, two doors East of Four-1.14 Stu-ct,
sep6 South side.
PHOENIX FOUNDRY.
LLDSLEn. W. LOSER.
JOHN J. OSLER & BROTHER,
(scecsssons 10 JAMES M. BAY.)
FOUNDERS AND MACHINISTS,
Corngr Pennsyltan Ea Railroad and State She's-t,
HARRISBURG, PA.
ZUIIJ. HEARING, IRON FENCES, HAIL}: 0.11?
AND CANAL WORK,
AND ALL DESCRIPTIONS 0P
IRON C’ASTINGS '
0N HAND 0R MADE TO ORDER.
MACHINE WORK AND REPAIRING PROMPTLY
ATTENDED TO.
PATTERB’S MADE TO ORDER.
We have a large and complete assortment of Patterns
to select from. ‘ M 122
JUST RECEIVED!
A FULL ASSORTMENT 0F
HUMPHREY'S HDMEOPATHIC SPECIHCS!
T 0 wnxun WE 12"?wa THE
ATTENTION OF THE AFFLICTED!
For sale at
SCHEFFER-‘S BOOKSTORE,
ap9 ‘ , No. 18 Market st.
WEOFF E R T 0
C II S 'l‘ 0 M E R 3
. A New Lot of
LADIES’ PUBSES,
0f Beautiful Styles, substantially made
A Splendid Aslorhnent of
GENTLEMEN’S WALLETS.’
A New and Elegant Perfume, _
KNIGHTS TEMPLABS’ BOQUET,
. Put up in Out Glam-1 Engraved Bottles.
A Complete Assortment of
HANDKEBCHIEF PERFUMBS,
0f the beat Manufacture.
A very Handlpme Variety of -
POWDER PUFF BOXES.
KELLEB’S DRUG STORE,
'Jyl 7 Wi” 7 N 91 Market street
ESTABLISHED IN 18110
FANCY DYEING ESTABLISHMENT.
J. Jr. W. JONES, No. 432 N. Front Street, above Cal
lowhill, Philadelphia, dye SILKS, WOOLEN AND
FANCY GOODS of every description. Their superior
style of Dyeing Ladies’ and Gentleman’s Garments is
widely known. Grape and Merino Shawls dyed the most
brilliant or plain colors. Grape and Merino Shawls
cleaned to look like new—also, Gentleman’s apparel.
Curtains, 530., cleaned or rev-dyed.
11:? Call and look at our work before going else
where. “1111-11311:
CHOICE SAUGES!
WORCESTERSHIRE.
LUCKNOW CHUTNY,
CONTINENTAL,
SOYER’S SULTANA, .
ATHENEUM, -
LONDON CLUB,
SIB. ROBERT PEEL;
INDIA SOY,
READING SAUCE,
ENGLISH PEPPER. SAUCE.
For sit}: by ‘ WM. DOCK, .13., A: CO.
my
DYOTTVILLE GLASS WORKS,
' PHILADELPHIA,
MANUFACTU‘E
CARBOYS, DEMIJOHNS,
WINE, PORTER, MINERAL _WATER, PICKLE AND
PRESERVE BOTTLES
01" EVERY DESCRIPTION. '
' 11.3.55 G. W. BENNERS
ocl9-dly 21 South Front stete’c, Philadelphia.
INSTRUCTION IN MUSIC.
1'- W . WEBER, nephew and taught by the well re
mempered late I . W. Weber, of Harrisburg, is prepared
:30 give lessons in music upon the PIANO, VIOLIN.
ELLO, VIOLIN and FLUTE. He will give lesson. .1;
his residenca, comer of Locust street and River Alley
lo: M: the homes of pupils. HMS-dam
SOHEFFER’ s 130 W»
buy Gold Penn—vamntod
HARRISBURG, PA., THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 22, 1860.
tout
To THE PUBLIC!
JO H N TI L L ’ S
C 0 A L ' Y A. R l) 3
SOUTH SECOND STREET,
BELOW Pkirr’s ROLLING MILL=
HARRISBURG, PA.,
Where he has constontly on hand
LYKENS VALLEY BROKEN, EGG, STOVE AND
NUT COAL.
ALSO,
WILKESBARRE STEAMBOAT, BROKEN, STOVE
AN D NUT GOAL, ’
ALL OF THE BEST QUALITY.
It will be, delivered to consumers clean, and full
weight warranted. V
{ET CONSUMERS GIVE ME A CALL FOR YOUR
WINTER SUPPLY.
{l3' Orders left at my house, in Walnut street, near
Fifth; or at Brubaker’s, North street; 1. L. Speel’g,
Market Square; Wm. Bostick’s, corner of Secoxrd and
South streets, and John Lingle-‘s, Second and Mulberry
streets, will receive prompt attention.
jyl3—d6m ‘ JOHN TI LL.
COALIGOALH
ONLY YARD IN TOIVN THAT DELIVEJIS}
COAL'BYTHE
PATENT WEIGH CARTS!
NOXV IS THE TIBIE
For every family to get in their supply of 0031 for the
winter—weighed at their door by the Patent- Weigh
Carts. 17w accurdcy qf these Carts no one disputes, and
they never get out of order, as is frequontly the .case of
the Platform Scales; besides, the consumer has the
satisfaction of proving tho weight of his Coal at his
9wri house
I have a large supply of 00:11 on hand, ct~~‘:.2:;“ug of
S. M. 0038 LYKENS VALLEY COAL all sizes.
LYKENS VALLEY do “ “
WILKESBAR‘RE do. ‘
BITUMINOUS BROAD To}? do.
All 009.] of the best quality mined, and delivered free
frvm all impurities, at the lowest rates, by the boat or
car load, single, half or third of tons, and by the bushel.
JAMES M. WHEELER.
Harrisburg, September 24. 1860.—5ep25
GOAL! COALI! GOAL!!!
NOW IS YOUR TIME
_TO GET CLEAN COAL!
.FULL WEIGHT AND NOTHING SHORT OF IT!
Thankful to my friends and customers for their liberal
patronage, I would inform them and the public generally,
that I am fully prepared, on short not-ice, to supply them
with all kinds of
SUPERIOR GOAL OF ALL SIZES.
FREE FROM SLATE, AND CAREFULLY SCREEXED,
A 1 As Low A ‘
FIGURE AS FAIR DEALING WILL AFFORD!
Although my Coal is not weighed in Snu—Wsmnma
GARTS, nu'r xs wzmmm 08 Songs ACCUBATELY “swan
3! mm SEALER or WEIGITS AND Masseuse, and con
sumers may rest assured that they will be fairly and
honestly dealt with. I sell nothing but the very best
Edit-JP, and un uniting}. _
Also, HICKORY, OAK and PINE WOOD always on
hand. sep4-d3m GEO. P. WIESTLING.
I] P ’l‘ O W N!
PATENTWEIGHCARTS
For the convenience of my numerous up town custom
ers, I have established, in connection with my old yard,
9. Branch Coal Yard opposite North street, in a. line with
the Pennsylvania canal, having the oflico formerly occu
pied by Mr. E. Harris, where consumers of Coal in that
vicinity and Verbeketown can receive their Coal by the
PATENT WEIGII CARTS,
WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE FOR HA ULIXG,
And in any quantity they may desire, as low as can be
purchased anywhere.
FIVE THOUSAND TONS C_OAL ON HAND,
0f LYKENS VALLEY and WILKESBARRE, all sizes.
FWilling to maintain fair prices, but unwilling
to be undersohl by any prunes.
WAR Coal forked up and delivered clean and free
from all impurities, and the best article mined.
Orders received at either Yard will be promptly filled,
m 1 all 009.] delivered by the Patgm Il’eigll Cans.
Coal sold by Boat, CM lead, single, half or third of
tons, and by the bushel.
JAMES M. WHEELER.
Harrisburg. October 13. 1860.—onus
mam
HELMBOLD’S lIELMBOLD’S
HELMBOLD’S HELMBOLD’S
HELMBOLD’S lIELMBOLD’S
HELMBOLD’S HELMBOLD’S
HELMBOLD’S HELMBQLD’S
HELMBOLD’S HELMBOLD’S
lIELMBOL’D’S HELMBOLD’S
Extract Buchu, Extract Buchu,
Extract Buchu, Extract Buchu,
Extract Buchu, Extract Buchu, ~
Extract Buclm, Extract Buchu.
' Extract Buchn, Extract Buchu,
Extract Buchu, Extract Buchu, . ,
Extract Buchu, Extract Buohu, '
FOR SECRET AND DELIGATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELTCATE DISORDERS.
EOE SECRET AND DELIG'ATE DISOR‘ ERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISOR ERS.
FDR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
FOR SECRET AND DELICATE DISORDERS.
A Positive and Specific Remedy. i
A Positive and Specific Remedy.
' A Positive and Specific Remedy.
A Positive and Specific Remedy. f
A Positive and fipeciflo Remedy. ’
A Positive and Specific Remedy. 1
A Positive and Specific Remedy. 3
FOR DISEASES OF THE ‘-
BLADDER, GRAVEL 2 KIDNEYS, D OPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, D OPSY,
BLADDER, GK-AVEL, KIDNEYS, D OPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, .D OPSY,
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, D OPSY.
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNEYS, Dr OPSY.
BLADDER, GRAVEL, KIDNE YS, OPSY,
ORGANIC WEAKNESS,
ORGANIC WEAKNSSS,
ORGANIC WEAKNESS,
ORGANIC WEAKNESS, '
, ORGANIC WEAKNESS,
030 mm wsunsss. P
And all Diseases of Scum: Organ ,
And all Diseases of Sexual Organ,
And all Diseases of Sexual Oigmv ,
'And all Diseases of Sexual Organt,
And all Diseases of Sexual Orgag,
And all Diseascs of Sexual Orga ,
ARISING FROM '- -
Excesses, Exposures, and Impmdenciea ii Lire.
Excasses, Exposures, and Imprudencies it Life.
Excesses, Exposures, and Imprndenciss it Life.
Excesses, Exposures, and Imprndencies i Life.
Excesses, Exposures, and Imprudencies ' Life.
Excesses, Exposures, and Imprudenciefl i Life.
From whatever cause originating, and whethe ‘ existing in
MALE 0R FEMALE. :
‘ Females, take no more Pills! They are of o avail for
Complaints incident to the sex. Use
V EXTRACT BUOHU.
Helmhold’s Extract Buchn is a Medicine wiich is per
fectly pleasant in its [
TASTE AND ODOR, .
But immediate in its action. giving Health :pd Vigor ’6O
the Frame, Bloom to the Paliid Cheek, and restoring the
patient to a perfect state of ’
HEALTH AND PUMTY. ,
Helmhold’s Extract Buchu is prepared com-ding to
Pharmacy and Chemistry, and is yrescribe-g’flnd used N
THE MOST EMINENT PHYSI ANS.
Delay no longer. Procnre the remedy at (Pee.
Price $1 per bottle, or six for $5. .
Depot 104 South Tenth street, Philadelphi .
BEWARE OF UNPRINOIPLED DE LERS ,
Trying to pain: ofl‘ their mm or other arms] of BUCHU
on the reputation attained by
HELMBOLD’SQXTBAGI' BUCHF,
T 11; Oéiginal hnd only (1}: nine. - I, -
e esire to run on t a
MERIT OF OUR ARTIcLfi.’
Their’sis Worthless —is sold at mufihbgztsts ‘ tea End com
missions cons uentl pa 'n a mm: er ro t.
’ vevqs Dm’rY 305219131131“: 9
Ask for 7 ,
k HELMBOLD'B EXTRACT BUGHL',
Ta one other. ~.
8 Sold by JOENHWKIEEH' Dmgglst, corner 4'! Market and
econd streets I. urg .
AND ALL DRUGGisz's EVERWHERE_
1:014 “mam. : .
Me fi‘fiattiot 66 Winn.
_. .*F...._...
THURSDAY MORNING, NOV. 22, 1860
0.4 PTA IN THOMAS.
1 hold it as a rule that nine men out of ten
are unfortunate. in their first attachments; and
I hold it as another rule, that it’s a very good
thing for them that. they are. If my first love
had been successful, I should have united my
self to uyoung lady of thirty-five, assistant at
a pastry cook’s in the neighborhood of the
academy where I was educated, with whom I
became enamored at. the age of nine and three
quarters. Naturally, the lady repulsed my ad
dresses on account of my tender years, though
I had two Latin grammars, a book of French
exercises, a penknife, Telemachus—with the
verbs in italic—'—nnd a new pair of b‘o‘ots; with
which I oli'crod to endow her upon my marriage.
1 wept when she refused me, and she gave me
a stale Bath bun, which had the cfi'ect of cho
king rather than of consoling me. I believe she
was afat woman with red hair; but I saw her
then with ll“) glamor of first love about her,
and I thought she was a happy combination of
Mary Queen of Scots (I was familliar'with that.
ill—used potentnte through an itinerant exhibi—
tion of waxwork) and a young lady I had seen
at Richardson’s, dancing the Highland Fling.
So I, being one of the nine men out of the
ten above alluded to, was unlucky in my first
attachment.
I can’t say that 1 was any more fortunate in
my second, which flame was illumincd by the
bright. eyes of a cousin three years older than
myself, who boxed my ears on my declaring
myself in the back parlor on a wet- Sunday. I
knew to what. cause to attribute this repulse; I
was not yet out of jackets, and I glanced be
hind me in the direction where my coat tails
ought to have been, and felt there was my on
emy.
My third passion was equally htcltless: my
fourth no more successful; and I really think I
hed'the honor of having my hand in marriage
refused seventeen times, counting from the
pastry cook, when my happy stnrs(l said happy
stars then, I know now how the hand of a.
malignant genius was in the business) threw me
across the path of Rosa Matilda. I met her at.
’9. tea party otSomers Town, whither my sisters
had taken me in a cab—for which I had to pay
_tight boots and a. White waistcoat. New [
have always considered that the end and aim of
that snare and delusion which is popularly
called a friendly cup of tea. is to sit in an un
comfortable position in an uncomfortable chair ;
drink hot weak tea, which afilicts you with
temporary dropsy ; eat spongy preparations
of the genus lun or mutfin, which inflict grief
upon your digestive organs ; utter articulate
innnities and let your hands get red. lam not
a. very brilliant man, I believe, at the very best
of times. I never remember throwing an
assembly into convulsions of laughter or elec
trifying it with my eloquence. I may have
done so often, but my modesty has prevented
my being conscious of the fact. But. oh, let
me be so luckiess as to be invited to join " a
few friends” to tea. at 'Bovnn, and the vericst
phantnsm or a uphentnsm captain” is 3. Cha
mier, Maryat-t or Basil 'llall, in powers of
amusing conversation, compared to me. Oh,
how 1 hate the simpering hostess in her best
silk gown! but I know that she is fidgety about
that eighteen-penn’orth of cream, that won’t
go round with the third cup, and that her heart
sinketh at the sight of n.‘ three~cornered bit of
muffin dropped, greasiest side downwards, on
the new- Brussels ; yes, I know she is wretched,
and I could almost pity her. But- oh, my hatred
for the “ few friends 5” I hope that. young
men from the War Ottice has got tight boots on.
too; there is a. look about the corners of the
mouth that. can come fromnothing hut. eorns.
Yes; I am no physiognomist if that nervous
twitch of the foetal muscles doesn’t mean hard
come, and the patent-leather is drawing them.
He and I, in all that heartless throng, are
friends and brothers. But for the rest—who
seem to have not. a care on earth, whose proper
element seems hot weak ten with too much
sugar in it, and to whom underdone sponges
nppearto he wholesome and invigorating food
—for them my hatred is unalloyefl by any
touch of sympathy or pity. We are foes—foes
to the death, or rather to the door-met; for
once out of the abominable Castle of Despair
——whcn once their cubs have driven them 011‘ to
the “ Supreme Silences,” and mine has driven.
me to my lodgings, I think of them no more.
I digress. Revmons a 720.9 moutons ,- that is
to say, Rose Matilda. I met. her at a. tea-party.
Oh, that so lovely an Aphrodite could rise out
of the mud ocean of o “ few friends." I think
I wds more than usually brilliant. that evening.
I asked her if she’d seen Milleis's “ Vale of
Rest,” and if she didn't. think the nuns were
ugly '3 I knew I.was safe in saying this; I’d
heard the remark made so often. I asked her
it‘ she liked muflins? and if she didn’t consider
them indigestible ‘2 and if she didn’t think they
were always administered to people at a tea
party to incapacitate them from eating any
supper '3 She said I was a. quiz, she. was sure.
Iwes glad she was sure, because I was myself
by no means so convinced of the fact... I asked
her if she’d read the “ Tale of Two Cities,” and
if she didn’t think it more'atfecting than -‘ Pick
wick ‘2” I asked her which she liked -best,
“ Frederick the Second” or the “ Virginians ;"’
and which of the heroines of the Idyls she
thought would have made the best housekeeper
for a young man who married on two hundred
a year? Enid, no doubt, because she didn’t
mind Wearing faded silk. She told me she
thought Gemini. a. horrid brute of a husband,
and that. Lancelot was the only men in the book
worth anything; and that. Guinivere was very
Silly in throwing away the diamonds, even if
she threw of the lover. She thought. Elaine
a very forward young person, who couldn’t
leave ofi‘ running after the men, even when she
was dead. This and‘much more she said, which
Ito hear of' course did seriously incline—in
fact so seriously, that I ran some risk of sliding
off my hostess’s Slippery embroidered chair in
bending over the scented tresses ot‘ the lovely
bemg who was seated on a. low confessional by
my side. Raptor-ous moments ! I remarked
on the Opposite side of the room the female
parent of my charmer, who from time to time
cast uneasy glances in the direction of her
daughter and myself; presently she addressed
some few whiSpered words to our hostess, and
euher my eyes deceived me or that lady’s lips
shaped the syllables “ five hundred a. year and
expectations.” At any rate the communication
was pleasing, and the momma of my loveliest
smiled radiantly upon her child. After too.
she _sung, and I turned over the leaves of her
music‘delightful task? I believe I always
turned them over in the wrong place. Who
could keep his eyes upon inanimate crochets
and quavers while she was singing? In short,
my time was come! I beheld .my first love—-
all but seventeen. The evening was a. dream;
she sang—l didn’t know what she sang; 9h}?
Plf‘ye‘l—it might be Sebastian Bach;_ 01‘ 1‘
mlght be variations on the Christy Minstrel
Melodies—but it. was to me the music 0f the
spheres, and would have been had it been the
met-est, domestic request to “P 0113" _to make
the Ordinary preparations for the evening meal.
I took her into supper. I sat next her at sup- ‘
per, and We were crowded. I procured hex
chieken, and I carved a tongue for her. I sent
a lot of perti-colored jujuhes which adorned
that comestible into her lap in my enthusiasm;
but “ Ame-re cl severe—3’ the proverb is some
what musty—but nobody ever did you know.
Oh, the nectar that these dismal liquids the two
shillings Cape and the two-and~sixpenny Mar~
sale, to say nothing of the African sherry, he‘
come when you qnofied them by her side! I
introduced her to my sisteré. They said
afterwards in the cob going home that she was
an otfected thing, and that her crinoline set
vilely. What didl care for her crinolinc ?- ‘
And if that silk, as they said, was bought in
St. Paul’s Churchyard and would wear greasy,
what did I care ‘2 M y Enid was lovelier than
all the world; and as to her faded silk—why,
I’d buy her a new one-or she should have it
dyed—and so, and so. Momma—her mamma—
she wore a front; but she was her mamma;
and, it was omighty eifort, but I always looked
as ifl believed in it. Her momma. asked me
to call; and I know most of the managers of
the West end theatre (I hope those gentlemen
will forgive me, but they must have been in
love with her themselves at some period of their
exisleuec,) and that 1 could get. orders, and
might I bring them to the I‘ocklintons ?
[Poeklinton was my Rosa. Matilda‘s surname.
Mr. Poeklinton (Mrs. I'. was a. widow) had
been in the l’ostoifice—l never asked what;
he might have beena “ two penny” ora. “ gen
cm‘ol" for ought I cared] I might bring the
orders. I did. I got them from my old friend
Serauncher, who does the theatricals for the
Daily Searifier; and I treated him to uncoun
table “ hitters” at the hostelry where he broke
cover. So Rose. Matilde, Mrs. 1“. and myself
went in a- cab, I with my back to the horse, of
course ; but cabs are narrow, and she was 01)
posite ; I didn’t think the fare from Morning
ton-place to the Olympic too much.
Oh, my Rosa, “hello whom-ted !” Where.
where are the twopences I used to spend on
those dear. (leluding yellow omnibusses, that.
were always beckoning to me in the Strand, and
that would draw me to the Hempstead-road in
spite of myself? The conductors must have
known my secret—there was a. degree of insin
uation in the tone in which these Circes in
corduroy would utter the familiar cry of
“S’t’road!” that convinced me they knew my
weakness.
Well, my eighteenth venture seemed to be a.
fortunate one; Rosa. Matilda. and I were on
gaged. Yes; I bud said one day in the draw
ing—room (momma had a call to make and would
I excuse her?)——-we were alone—l had said
“that. the happiness—future life—depended“
oac word—~rcndcr happy or miserable.” And
Rose. Matilda. had said, “Lor, Mr. Strothers!
(I forgot to mention, hy-the-hy, that my name
is Strothers—Christianname, Benjamin—and
that has told against me on some oécasions.)
Lor, Mr. Strothcrs! what can I say to make you
happy or miserable ’1” “What can you say—l’”
and then, and then—the old, old pitiful, hack.
neyed, worn-out, new and original, eminently
successful force! the blushes, the smiles, the
tears, the little trembling hand, the surprise,
and all the shabby old propertiesthereunto
belonging, and I am accepted.
Seventeen performances had, perhaps, taken
a little of the freshness out of the said cosmopo
litan force. Seventeen wakings from the some
dream made it, perhaps, rather hard to forget
that the dream was a dream. Perhaps there
was an arricra pcnocc oven in that gush of
rapture, and I may have thought, I am only
playing at being happy after all. But, came
diam, and here is Mrs. l’ocklinton come home;
and “Well, she never l—end of all the suprising
things—and Rosey, naughty girl, to be so sly—
nnd how strange that she should never-have had
the least. idea l” And I have not the slightest
doubt that. this woman and her daughter had
talked over me and my prospects, and the ad
vantage of a marriage with me, and the con
flicting advantages of that oll‘er of Brown’s, and
that possible ofi'er of J oues’s, with the strong
probability that before long Robinson himself
might “pop,” these hundred limes by their bed
room fires during our brief acquaintance. But
better, as the poet says. “to have loved and
lost:"—-—-‘oetior to have been the weakest of fools
than to loose the capability of being made a fool
of'—better the maddest dream earth can give
than that sober waking which tells us we can
dream no more! So I was, upon the whole,
glad, that Rosu Matilda accepted me, and I
bought her a. turquois ring that afternoon, and
I put it. upon her finger after test.
So we were engaged; I had taken a. house
and furnished it, guided by my future mother
in‘-lnw. The day was fixed for our marriage.
It was to take place in December. We were
now in November; yes, we were in that dreary
and suicidal month, when I for the first time
heard his name—the name of my unknown and
mysterious rival—the name of the being on
Whom, for some months of my life, I poured the
inurticulate anathema, the concentrated hate of
a hitherto peaceful mind. It was in this wise:
we had been to the theatre; we had seen a. force;
I forget the title, but I know Mr. Buckstone
had his coat. split up the back. and that every
body tOOk everybody for somebody else; so; as
I dare say these incidents only occur in one
piece, my readers will recognize the dramatic
production of which I have forgotten the name.
We had been to the theatre and I had returned
to the Pocklintons to supper: we had scalloped
oysters—l was helped twice; the bottled ale
was peculiarly delicious. Life seemed that
night one bright and golden dream. I little
knew the Damoclesian sword which was at that
moment dangling from the whitewashed medul
li‘on in the centre of the ceiling. I little knew
that the Thundercr had his bolt in his hand,
and was only waiting the most convenient
moment for launching that instrument at the
devoted head of Benjamin Strothers, of the
Inner Temple. I had my fork midway between
my plate and my mouth—the moderator lamp
was burning brightly—that nightmare of a
young women in a. rustic dress was asking that
eternal “momentous question” of that Frank
enstein of a. man in chains on the wall oPl}oglte
me—lhe fire was fierce and glowing: a. ‘fmder
fell out into the fender, I remember (3°: "1, {he
great epochs of our lives. ‘lO the “’O5“ tnvral
things impress us!) I wondered whether the
housemnid would use that. cmder 1n the mor
hing to light the fire (ii-whether she would
throw it on the ash-heap 1n the “Ck garden
when Mrs. I’ocklinton remarked, “ You are
fond of {l5ll, Mr. Six-others ‘2” I thought this
was a. hit at me for home been helped‘twice ;
if it was it was mean ; for weren’t. those very
oysters part of a barrel of Colchesters of my
own presenting ? .
“You are load of fish—wasn’t Coptuin
Thomas fond of fish, Rosey ‘3”
' The sword had dropped—the belt was
launched—tho Ihunderer put his hands in his
pockets, and, I dare say, resumed that. little
skirmish with the oxeyed about. his predilection
for late hours and fancy dress—the blow was
struck ! Captain Thomas! -
The reader will naturally observe, “W 011,
what then“? What then! There is nothinsin .
the mere mention of the name of Captain i
Thomas; there is nothing even in Captain :
Thomas being fond of fish.” But I think there ‘
is a great deal in Rosa. hiatildo’s starting up
at the mention of that. name, putting her hand
kerchief to her eyes and darting hurriedly from
the room. .
“Sensitive child 1" said Mrs. Pooklinton.
PUBLISHED EVERY MORNING,
BY 0. BARRETT 6:: 60.
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Connected with this eetebliehment is an extensive
108 OFFICE containing avariety of plain end fang
typo, unequalied by any establishment in the interior of
the State, for which the patronage of the public in go
licited.
NO 71
“It is very add how we actually daren’t mention
his name before her. It was amost extraordx
nary infatuation!" V
Extraordinary infatuafion! Now this was
pleasant for me, wasn’t, it?
“And pray, madame," I said, not without.
sozne degree of severity, “may I be allowed (I
lald_ a, little sarcastic stress upon “allowed”)
to mquire who (another sarcastic stress upon_
“Who,” and theri 1 Was done up in the way of
breath), Capt-{min Thom-. 13 may be ‘3"
“011,” said Mrs.].’., “the dearest creature!
He was—” And she didn’t, say what he waS.
for at this very moment vet-entered Rosa Matilda
with red eyes.
“Forgive me, dear Benjamin, for being so
silly ; 1 know its very, very Weak and childish;
but he loved me so. poor dear, and I I————”
symptoms of more tears. “I’d had him so
long.”
She had him so long! He couldn’t have
been—No; that was too horrible! And, be—
sides, he was a'captnin—n warrior—a men of
mature years—an accepted lover of course—my
predecessor in the alfections of this false girl
and Mrs. P 35 scalloped oysters.
Well, what was to be done? Discard liosn
Matilda. and get the upholsterer to take back the
furniture at a. reduction, like the dear, volatile
hem of M. do Kock’s romance, who was always
furnishing apartments and always selling his
movnbles and gornitures. No; prudence whis—
pered I should lose by the transaction, and I
loved Rosa Matilda. This Captain Thomas.
this military or naval commander, as the case
might be, was a. being of the past. I, I was
the conquerol'; and when once married to Rosa
Matilda, I registered an inward vow, that it
should be my care that she should have more
substantial causes for red eyes than phantasm
Captain Thomnses.
So, I let it pass; and I had hot Mandy and
water aftersupper, and Rose Matilda had spoon
fulls out of my glass, and she burnt my hand
with the bowl of the spoon in fascinating play
fulness, and we behaved with the infantine
simplicity of a. pair of turtle doves, to whom
sorrow and sighing and Captain Thomases were
unknown.
The first time, I have said before, it was in
this wise: the second time it was in another
Wise.
Our house was furnished, and we went one
afternoon to look at it. The Brussels was down
in the dining-room—the tapestry in the draw
ing-room. It was Mrs. l’.’s taste. I don’t
believe in sky-blue roses in a primrose ground;
but. I dare say she did. and she would have the
carpet. The Kidderminsters upstairs were the
nest innocent, gushing, simple-minded paterns
you ever saw. They were meant, I believe, to
represent grass, but they had the effect of green
vermicelh‘; but didn’t they throw up the white
curtains and the white and gold china, and the.
maple wardrobe with looking glass doors and
china knobs to the drawers! Mrs. P. said the
house was a. bijou, and that if the two treasures
she had recommended to us, as cook and house—
maid, only kept it in order, as she would see
that they did (I said “’l‘hank you.” I made a.
mental resolve to have no interference from her;
but there was no harm‘ in saying “thank you,")
we should have the most perfect establishment
at the West End. It was Camden Town, but
she called it the West End. Well, we were in
the drawiugvroom; we had admired everything
—-and Rosa Matilda. would make me open all
the cabinet drawers and all the chifi‘onier doors;
they were stiff and I hurt myself, but we
weren’t married yet, so of' course I couldn’t be
rude enough to refuse—and we were just going
away, when all of a. sudden Mrs. I’. was struck
by the hearth rug.
“It was so beautifully soft; and those lovely
forget-me-nots! (The blue roses were forget
me-nots.) Such an exquisite—she might say—-
poetical idea. It was really like walking 0n the
'ldayalls of the King,’ ‘ It. seemed the heaven,’
if She might be so bold as to make such a porn
phruse, ‘ upbreuking through the hearth. ’ ”
I said, “Oh, oh; yes, to besure.” I didn‘t
quite know what. she was driving at, when
Rosa. Matilda- said, in her most gushing manner
_that. was the worst. of Rosa Matilda, she
would gush:
“Oh mamma, mammal wouldn‘nt Captain
Thomas have been happy here ‘2"
Oh, upon my word ! I was close to a spring
sofa and I sank down on it aghast. L—l—had
furnished this house. I had submitted to,per‘
haps, such extortion from the most respectable
of tradesmen as no man ever before endured.—
Mre. P. paid the bills.for me; and there was
a new‘som, value £l2 $25., if a half penny, in
her drawing—room in Mornington place, that I
never quite made out. I had done all this, and
now I was told how happy Captain Thomas
would have been in this house of my providing.
Oh! I am not. a. man prone to use unconstitu
tional language, but I said“ Oh 1" But, bless
you, this was nothing; the Thunderer hadn’t
done with me yet. .
“ Yes ; wouldn’t he ?” said that elderly ser
pent of a mother-in-law, that was to have been,
of mine. “ This hearthrug, how he would
have loved it! He'd have appreciated it more
than you, Mr. Strothers, I know.”
‘." 011, would he ‘2” This, of course, was ahit
at my taste. Captain Thomas would have un
derstood the aesthetics of those blue anomalies;
they were as big as breakfast cups. ‘
“Yes, momma; for I should have brought
him here, you know, poor darling, if we hadn’t
lost him,” said Rosa. Matilde. “ You shouldn’t.
have kept him all to yourself, I can _tell you.”
Oh, now! talk of————- Well! a rivalry be
tween mother and daughter! Why, in the
Roman Empire, at its very worst-stage of cor
rupt-ion, when Vitellus set the Txber on fire
and played the yiolin while it was blazing—
when Julius Caesar lighted Athens with burn
ing Calvinists, could there have been anything
worse than this 1’
I said, “ ha. I ha !” l was quite beyond words,
so Isaid, “Ha! ha. E”
“The dear," she continued, my wife that
was to be, continued—(Why Desdemona both
ering Othello about the pocket-handkerchief
she wanted him to give to Cossio-wns nothing
to this !)—“ You would have grown so fond of
him Benjamin !”
Should I, Benjamin? Oh, I dare say “ No,"
I said, “no madam; I will have no Captain
Thomnses here. I—l—since it’s gone so far,
and since the house is furnished and my new
coat come home, we will say no more ; but 110
Thomnses here; no, no i”
“ You don’tfikefihcm,” she said ;
odd !”
011, odd, was it? Well, I had .seen a book
with a. yellow paper cover at Mornmgton place,
a book in a. foreign language, and I attributed
the evident absence of moral religion in the co
rebral development of the woman I adored, to
a. gradunl'eating away of that department of the
brain. from the perusal of books in a foreign
language; and I registered another vow, that
when married to me, Rod's. Matilda should only
read those sterling English works of fiction
which elevate the moral sense while they de
velop the intellectual organs. ‘
She should have her modest ' two‘penn’arth
from the pure fountains of Fielding and Smollet,
the pious inculcations of Jonathan Sterne (con
nected with the church I know, and I behave an
Irish bishOp,) and not those exemng and poi~
sonous droughts whose spring 13 m Selle-square
and the Burlington Arcade. to say nothing of
dear ohliging Mr. Jefi's fill Brighton, and that:
darling little shop at Holborn (kept by the
SUNDAYS EXOEP‘IED,
, how very