Daily patriot and union. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1858-1868, November 02, 1860, Image 3

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    L {)oer NWS
Tan DULY P A;n101‘ Mm UNION may be had at
Jack’s Book Smre,corner of Third and Market
streets. --. —o— —— ‘
Rumor Axm"°‘"Th° DAILY PATRIOT nu)
Uxxox can be w by Dauphin subscribers, every
morning: a: the periodical store of J. S. FRAIM.
-_ *- W
A. 5:. S'ruDDARD will open, on Thursday, Ewan
her 15:, an assortment of Fall and Winter Milli-
Gwom‘.——For the last fuur days the weather has
Leen gloomy—sultry, with occasional showers—
an& altogether unseasonahle, as. well as unhealthy
——~+ "——
A stated meeting of the Washington Hose Gom-
Fwy will be held at their Hose House this (Friday)
evening, at 7;: o’clock. Punctual attendance is re—
quircd.
LOCAL Yawn—There was a terrible dearth in
the local news department yesterday. We could
nO9 pick up anything of any consequence in our
exchange papers, and for finding anything to writ-9
about, that was totally out of the question.
A Emma—The coal miners on the Allegheny
mountain, in the employ of Watson, Deniston J;
90., have made a. strike for ail-Sh payments. They
refuse to go to work themselves, and are trying to
prohibit others from taking their places.
Lonanns.——Three able-bodied men were turned
(mt of the lock-up yesterday morning. They were
from Philadelphia, on their way to Carliele, 11w
bably to enlist in the army, were out of spondu—
fix, and forced to lodge at- the expense of the city.
THE New Camp or PoLlcn.-—lsaac S. Water
bury, the newly appointed Chief of Police,.we are
informed, will enter upon the discharge of his du
ties'next Monday. The appointment gives general
satisfaction, the prevailing opinion being that. Mr.
Waterbury will make an excellent oflieer.
Barnum—The Mayor returned from his gun
ning expedition on Wednesday evening. The
weather was against him to all intents and pur
poses, and he had but a. few hours shootingfluring
the two days he was absent. He bagged thirty
one partridges.
=nom
A FATAL Ammun—Mr. Mclntosh, of New,
Blair county, was killed last week on the railroad
near Sonman. Mr. Mclntosh was walking through
a deep eat on the road when the Eastern and West
ern trains were passing at that point. He attempted
to escape by stooping down, but was struck by the
passing cars and instantly killed.
STATE CAPITAL HOTEL.—COI. Omit has put the
State Capital Hotel in repair for the winter cam
yaign. Many of the rooms have been newly
pa‘pered and painted, and all other arrangements
necessary for the guests of this old 'and well-known
stand, have been made, and it is to be hoped that
the Colonel will receive the usual patronage be
stowed upon his establishment.
Les-r Guru) RALLY or run BELL AND Evnnnr-r
CLUE—A meeting of the Constitutional Union
Club, of this city, will he held at the ofice of Col.
John Roberts, in Chesnut street between Second
and Third, on Saturday evening, November 3,
1860. All persons favorable to the election of
John Bell, of Tennessee, and Edward Everett, of
Massachusetts, for President and Vice President
of the United States, are cordially invited to be
present. By order of the President,
E. W. SHELL, Sec’y.
Anus—We acknowledge the receipt, by the
Adams Express, of a. barrel of apples, of the vari
ety generally known as pound apples—not very
prime for eooking,but an excellent article for eat—
ing, as the four juveniles who have had the run of
the barrel for the last three days, will probably
readily testify. The apples were raised in Bed
ford county, and sent us from Hollidayshurg, where
they sell for 50 cents a. bushel.
The man from Bradford disposed of his entire
10t—3,000 bushels—on Tuesday last.
New RAILROAD.——The grading of the Ehensburg
and Gresson railroad has been completed to the
east end of Ebenshnrg. The liberality of the citi
zens and the energy of the officers certainly deserve
the highest commendation. It was a. great under
taking for a. town with only 1,000 inhabitants ever
to attempt to make a. railroad of ten miles in
length; yet the attempt was made, and the toad is
so far completed that the cars will be running on
part of it before the New Year. The Pennsylvania
Central Railroad Company has agreed to commence
the laying of the track by the 15th of this month.
I=l
Ammsrs.—On Wednesday oflicer Fleck arrested
a man named J aok Pool,a. stranger in the city, for
being drunk and disorderly, and landed him in
CM
Yesterday be arrested a young black Icamp in
Tanner’s alley, named Charles Dufi‘, the principal
in an assault with clubs on one Joseph Parker.
Held to bni] for trial. '
0n yesterday he also arrested three young dar
kies—Frank White, Caleb Ennis and Cassius Main,
on a charge of stoning the house of Charlotte E.
Weaver, in Tanner’s alley. Justice Beader let
them of with a reprimand.
Snsqum-umu Suntan—Some few of these
finest of all fish taken in the Susquehanna, have
found their way to our market this fall, but the
Prim they are held at places them out of the reach
of men who keep no bank accounts, or are not
troubled with plethoric pocket-books. The other
morning we noticed one weighing about three
pounds nan, lying in abaaket. “Ho! he!” said
we to ourself, “ Mrs. J. we’ll trouble you to scale
that fellow—we’ll have boiled salmon for din
ner !” “ What’s the price?” said we to the dealer.
“ Seventy—five cents,” said be. Well, we didn’t
dive on boiled nlmon that day—we compromised
on cabbage, beef and potatoes.
p 011. Excmunnr A“! TmrourE.—New discoveries
of valuable oils wells at Tidioute are being made
! nearly every day, says the Warren Ledger. Every
} 1’03! seems to he carried away in the whirl of ex-
A citement, and this section of the State is destined
to rival California. in its palmiest days. The cen
_ tre 0f “filament is around Tidioute Island, at pre
sent. This Island contains some four acres, and,
until within 3 few months was considered of no
value 5 consequently it remained in the possession
of the Commonwealth till the time mentioned,
when a citizen of Warren took out a, patent for it
at the land office 3‘ Harrisburg. Some valuable :
wells have been found upon the Island, and the
u squatters” have taken possession of an the adja
cent bars and shoal places in the river. The ‘
owners of the Island complain that this cordon of
derricks surrounding their PTOPETW: is an infringe
meat upon their personal rights. and the whole of
fair is likely to prove an innumerable number of
law-suits, if not to serious breaches of the peace.
Already, we understand, the parties interestedhan
cut adrift some of the floating “ claims” which sur
roud the Island, and this of itself will tend to in
crease the intense excitement which now prevails.
Asia usual in such cases the current of popular
feeling drifts strongly in favor of 'the‘“ equatters”
and this practical illustration of the principle of
“squatter Sovereignty.” . It does not become us to
give an Opinion as to whatis right or wrong in this
“Mr.“ “16 whole controversy will likely come be—
fore a judicial tribunal for adjudication.
MlDDLn‘rowx Itmks.—We clip the following items
from the Journal of yesterday :
Rob-benesc—ltseems that our borough is at pm
sent infested With a. bend of robbers. There is
scarcely a. night but somebody’s kitchen or cellar
is robbed. A few nights since, the cellar of Mr.
Samuel Landis was entered and robbed of a. bar
rel of mackerel, and all the eatahlel in the house;
9, large copper kettle was stolen from the PTF‘PiS“
of Mr. Jacob Rife, and a. number of other citizens
suffered more or less, by these seeundrcls, during
the present week. It is high time that something
was done to put an end to this wholesale 53'3“!“ Of
plunder. ‘
Accident.——On last Thursday afternoon, a young
lad of Mr. E. S. Yentzer, was severely out In the
face with aknife. It occurred during the recess
of school hours, while another young boy "as cut
ting at a stick, the knife slipping ofi‘ struck the nu.
fortunate boy in the face, as above stated._ This
should teach all others not to use a. knife in the
above manner, while a number of children are
standing around; in fact, it would he better if such
small boys were not allowed to curry knives at all.
Protracted Meeting—A pretreated meeting oom
mcnced in the Bethel Church on last Friday eve
ning, and is still in progress. Rev. J. 0. Sea
hrouks, of Landishurg, Perry county, and Rev. J.
Myers, of Auburn, Sohnyl kill county, were present
Attempted Bmylary.—We are informed that some
seoundrel made an attempt to enter the house of
Mr. Beck, on last Tuesday night, but evidently
suspecting some danger nigh, ho relinquished the
undertaking. We would advise the fellow and all
those of his stamp not to try it again, if they do
not wish to smell something that scents like pow
der and lend. These midnight robberies are beco—
ming too frequent in our place ; and why it is that
our citizens do not make arrangements to detect
these seoundrels, we do not understand. A num
ber of persons have procured revulvers, whieh'they
intend using on the first person who may attempt
to enter their premises.
Sabbath School Lechcre.—~A free lecture will be
delivered in the Lutheran Church on Sunday af
ternoon, the 11th of November, at. 2 o’clock, by
Mr. Geo. Kutzmnn, of this place, for the benefit of
the South Ward Mission School, of which Mr.
K.is Superintendent. Subject—The Training of
the Young. Mr. K. is one of our most intelligent
German citizens, and will no doubt deliver an in
teresting address. The lecture will be in English,
and a collection will be taken up at the close, to be
appropriated to the assistance of the Sabbath
Schgol mentioned. The public are invited to at
ten . .
The Fisherville correspondent gives the follow
ing items : - .
Yesterday, While several children, belonging to
J. F. Lantz, were playing on a stack of straw, one
of them, aged about nine years, slipped of and fell
upon a. knotty rail, one of the projecting knots
entering his body an a very dangerous place, and
serious doubts are entertained for his recovery.
A small child, while playing with a stick, fell off
a chair and broke its collar bone.
A very interesting revival is now in progress at
Straw’s Church ; scores are seeking salvation. The
exercises are conducted by Rev. J. W. Davidson ,
Paste..- of the E. Lutherqn congregacion.
CELLAR WALLS Axn FLoons.——Most cellars are
built without adequate provision being made for
keeping moisture from passing through the walls
from the outside, and up through the earthen floors
inside during rainy weather. The collar of a. house
should be dry, so as to render it comfortable and
healthy, as moisture in the lower part. of a dwelling
generelly makes the upper stories damp and chilly,
and causes mildew in clothes, books, and all house—
hold articles made of cloth and leather. Cellars
can be easily built so as to have dry walls, and
hard, dry floors; and the latter are invaluable to
prevent rats from burrowing, as well as dampness
‘from coming up from the soil beneath. To render
the cellar walls dry, they should be coated on the
outside with hydraulic cement, mixed with sand.
Houses in our cities have their cellar walls thus
treated in many instances, but their floors are ne
glectedr To make a cement floor the surface should
first be rammed down and leveled ; then hydraulic
cement mixed with sand, of about the consistency
of thick mortar, should be laid on to about one inch
in thickness, and its surface levelled with a scra
per made of a thick plank. In laying down such
a floor sections of about eight feet square should be
marked 05, and finished one after another. A coat
of clean sand or gravel, one inch thick, should be
laid on the top of the cemént; and, after it has
stood about half an hour, the whole should be
rammed down smooth witha pounder, when the
work is complete, after the surplus sand has been
swept ofl'. In a few days such a. floor becomes hard
as a stone, and quite impervious to water.
im::•
A BLACK REPUBLICAN FRAUDr—On Wednesday
last, on information of oflicer A. J. Wickert, Con
rad Miller was bound over to take his trial at the
next sessions for illegal voting at the late election.
The proof of his doing so consists in the fact that
he never took out his final naturalization papers
until Monday last. ,
A: frauds of this kind were no doubt extensively
perpetrated throughout the State in order to give
Gui-tin the large majority he received, and as it
will no douhtba repeated again on Tuesday next, we
caution our Democratic friends to he on their guard.
The following section of the law provides for the
punishment of such extenders: .
“91. If any person, not by law qualified, shell fraudu
lently vote at any election within this Commonwealth,
or being otherwise qualified, shall vote out of his proper
district, or if any person knowing the want of such
qualification, shall aid or 'pracure such person to note,
the person or persons so olfending, shall, on conviction,
be fined in any sum not exceeding two hundred dollars,
and 1211114} imprisoned for any term not exceeding three
mon s.
Conrad Miller was taken to the polls by Alex.
Koser, and he voted the entire Republican ticket.
Of course his guilt is clearly established. It is
also due to the purity of the ballot-box to oscertain
whether Koser was cognizant of the fact that Mil
ler was not a qualified voter, and also whether Mil
ler received any bribe, in “ meat, drink, money or
otherwise,"for which the law provides a. penalty.
Koser is a butcher, and most liberally patronized
by Democratic customers, none of whom have any.
objections to squandering the profits he has made
of them on Wide Awake parades or Black Rebup
lican jubilees, but 'they do most emphatically
object to him leading up illegal .votels to the polls,
to aid in defeating those who are legally entitled
to vote, and they will not let the matter rest either.
LYxnns Innis—We clip the following items
from the Journal of yesterday:
Progressing.—The Washington Rifle Company
is practicing the Zouave and other new drills, with
a view to attending the inauguration of Gov. Cur
tin. As Harrisburg does not profess to have a
military company, we presume the Washington
Rifle Company will have to represent the county
and receive the companies from abroad. -
Good Shoo/ing.—Dr. Geo. Dock, of Harrisburg,
visited these regions on a gunning excursion last
week. He bagged sixteen partridges, six phea
sants, and two rabbits, which, we take it, is a
pretty fair day’s work.
Confirmation.—Bishop Bowman, ot' the Protest
ant Episcopal Church, assifited by Rev. M. Lee
cock, of Harrisburg, was expected to administer
the rite of confirmation to several persons in this
place, last evening. -
A mule was killed by being jammed between
two cars in the Short Mountain mines, on Friday
est.
A deer was wounded on the mountains near town
on Tuesday of last Week.
VERY Tana—The editor of the Boston Post in
dulges in more truth than poetry. The following
are a. few of his last “ wise saws and modern in
stances :”
. _ as he
A dentist is not, necessarily: mad becau
shows his teeth . an
The most sucécsaful progress 15 things: :fiebg'lore
who rolls the wheelbarrow, for he ca"
him.
The British v 1, .
Maid and Muggifiuycgfg—fitgeggd ’alf.
$3 “apop‘fl” :929taple among sai'lors—Leeks.
e o‘7" or 0. Virginiacnn do what he pleases
but we wonl_d aduge all who love the Union In t t ,
Go and do nae Wl3O. ° °
An unlucky day—The Day of Algiere. '
LETTER FROM ALTOONA
._._.._.__._
Correspondence of the Patnot and Union
Mnssns Enrrons:—A coal mining company in
the Allegheny coal region have for years been in
the habit of paying their laborers in goods, of which
frequent complaint has been made by the miners.
Previous to the late State electlon, they, the la
borers, were promised that if they would vote for
Curtin they should thereafter he paid half money
and half 900118. The proposition was accepted,
but the firm failing to pay any money, a strike was
the consequence—and a riot being anticipated this
(Tuesday) morning, two volunteer companies, ac
companied by the sherifi‘ of Blair county, proceeded
to the mines to quell the anticipated riot. UD till
now (10 o’clock, p. m.) we have hen-rd no news from
the seat of war. Is comment necessary? If so:
you may make it. I will not; but it. is easy to see
by this what base means were resorted to in order
to carry the election for the Black Republicans.
Yours,
==El=l
New Plum wu‘u TIIE oxl—cuLomoE on Zisc.—
Prof. Dussmnce gives an account of a new econom
ical paint with the oxLehloride of zine. There are
two ways to manufacture it. First, take chloride
of zine prepared by the ordinary process, and free
of acid, concentrating the solution so that when
cold it morks fifty-eight degrees Benurne. Then
prepare a solution containing, for three gallons,
four and one—half pounds carbonate of soda; mix
the two solutions in the proportion of nine ports of
the first for three gallons of the second. This
liquid so prepared€ is mixed with the white of
zinc, to form a. paint of the ordinary consistence,
which is applied immediately. Analysis 'shows
that in the above proportion there is one equiva
lent of chloride of zinc for one equivalent of ex ido.
If the sulphate of zinc be used, it must be a solu
tion marking 40 degrees Beoumo, adding for every
gallon one ounce of borate of soda. These solu
tions could be kept for a longtime, but the white
of zinc must he added only when ready for use,
and there must be prepared only the quantity suf
ficient to work one hour. This paint gives a very
fine white, and it covers as well as oil painting.—
It is very adhesive and solid ,- its price is half that
of the oxide of zinc; it is without smell, and may
be applied on wood, iron or cloth. It does not,
however, mix well with coloring matters, and must
be applied only as white paint. I
Tun SUBTLETY or Parsons—At a. recent discus
sion before the Society of Arts in London, on the
detection of arsenical poisoning, Dr. Letheby
traced the progress of toxicological research from
the trial of Donald, in 1815, up to the present time.
A little while before that period, ten grains of ar
senic were required to make a. metallic, test satis—
factory in a court of law. Afterwards Dr. Black
improved the process till he could detect the poison
if he had one grain to operate upon. It was then
thought a marvel of texicological skill when Dr.
Christison said he only required the 16th of a
grain; but now we can trace the presence of the
250,000,000 th of a grain of arsenic! It is to be
feared that the detection of this particular poison
has reached an almost dangerous degree of deli
cacy, and extreme caution is necessaay in examin
ation for its criminal administration. We live sur'
rounded by means of unconsciously absorbing
traces of arsenic; we breathe arsenicated dust from
_the green wall papers of our rooms; the confec
tioners supply it wholesale in their cake ornaments
and sweetmeats ; the very drugs prescribed for our
relief are tainted with erscnic; nay, more, even
our vegetable food, as Prof. Davy has lately poin
ted out, may be contaminated with arsenic; and
there is probably no drinking water containing
iron without a trace of arsenic as wall. The poi
son may thus be stored up in the system till, in
the course of yenrs,the amount becomes appre
ciable.
Tan PRINCE or WALES AND J UDGE Voxnansmrm.
We clip the following interview between the Prince
of Wales and Judge Vondersmith at the Eastern
Penitentiary, from one of our Philadelphia. ex_
changes: .
“The Royal party arrived at the prison about 1
o’clock on Wednesday, in company with his Honor,
Mayor Henry, Hon. Richard Vaux, and a number
of the other city oflicials. When the party arrived
at the entrance, there was an unusual number of
persons gathered in front of the prison in order to
get a sight of the future King of England. 0n the
arrival of the Prince and suit at the institution, the
party was put in charge of the' warden, John Pu .
Holloway, Esq ~ who accompanied them hastily
through the building. The Prince expressed a great
deal of satisfaction. The Prince and party were
then conducted to the cell of Judge Vondersmith—
the only inmate ot‘ the institution that he visited.
When the Prince entered the cell he took the Judge
by the hand and received him very kindly, and ex
pressed muoh sympathy for him. The Prince spied
upon the walls of his cell annmher of dried flowers,
which the Judge had very artistically arranged upon
drawing paper. The Prince examined them and
appeared much interested in the flowers. The Duke
of Newcastle and suite were standing at the door
of the cell when the Prince requested the Duke to
enter; he was then introduced to the Judge by the
Prince. They spent about fifteen minutes in con
versation with him. After the interview, the Prince
and Duke expressed great sympathy for the Judge
to the oflicers of the institution, and hoped that the
Executive would extend his clemency in his case
when application is made for his liberation. Every
person was surprised to hear the general sympathy
of the Royal party for the Judge, and several of
them remarked, ‘ what a pity for such a noble-look
ing man." '3‘ a I believe. that the sympathy is
general throughout the community for Judge Von
dersmith’s liberation. Ido hope that an efi'ort will
be made soon for his liberation by his friends in
Lao caster."
THERE is an old proverb which declares that
none can tell where the shoe pinches save he that
wears it. The maxim has a thousand applications.
A husband who appears to have found his wife a.
good deal less of an angel than he had imagined
in the days of his courtship, lets out some domes
tic secrets in the following graphic manner:
I own that she has charming locks
That on her shoulders fall;
What would you say to see the box:
In which she keeps them all ?
Her taper fingers, it is true,
Are dificult to match;
I wish, my friend, you only knew
How terribly they scratch!
New Goons! New Goons !—Ha.ving returned
from New York, I have received now a. large lot of
goods, allof which I bought at auction. One hun
dred pieces of beautiful Set Flower De Laines, the
best quality, which generally sells for 25 cents, at
20 cents; 50 pieces Unbleached Muslin, the best in
town, at 10 cents; 150 pieces of Cassinetts, Sati
netts and Cussimeres, from 2.5 cents up to $1.25 a
yard ; 25 pieces of White Flannel, cotton mixed, at
15 cents; 25 dozen of White Merino Stockings at
15 centS; 50 dozen of Gent’s \Vool Socks, 20 cents
1 pair; 10 dozen Gent’s All-Linen Pocket Hund
kercbiefs With Colored. Borders, very fine, 31
cents; good Merino Undershirts and Drawers, 9.1265
and 75 cents a piece. Alot of beautiful Traveling
Baskets. Best Calicoes,lo cents, warranted fast
colors.
Please call at anr’s, at {he old-stand of John
Rhoads, Esq., deceased. if.
DYOTTVILLE GLASS WORKS,
PHILADELPHIA:
“sumo-runs
CARBOYS,- DEMIJOHNS,
WINE. PORTER, MINERAL WATER, PICKLE AND
PRESERVE BOTTLES
OF Ivan? nsscxxrnox.
H. B. & G. W. BENNERS,
"19.-11 y 27 South Front steret, Philadelphia.
ALTOONA, Oct. 30, 1360
J. k
fin floutmttm'fi.
ARMY SUPPLIES—LEATHER.
ARMY CLOTHING AND EQUIPAGE OFFICE, g
Puxumgm-uu, October 27, 1860.
SEALED PROPOSALS are invited, and will be received
at this oflice untiluz o’clock. M., of Monday, the nine
teenth of November next, for furnishing, by contract,
Leather of the best quality and kind, as hereinafter-spe
cified; to he delivered at the U. S. Army Clothing and
Equipage Depot, (Schuylkill Arscnnlr) in quantities as
may hfl r-‘quiwd.
6,000 Sides of Wax uppnr Leather, on]: tanned, from
sluuzhter hides. shaved, per Square l'Wt
-100:0” pounds of Sole Leather, oak tanned. from Buenos
Ayn-es or La Plats Hides, per pound.
7.000 pounds Welt Leather, oak tanned, from slaughter
hides, per pound.
1,000 Sides. Black Bridle Leather, oak tanned, from
slaughter hides, shaved, per square foot.
100 Sides Russet Bridle Leather, of the same kind and
description, per square fout.
1,500 feet of Viznr Leather, japannud on both sides—-
one black the other green—per square foot.
200 feet of China. Strap heather, japunned black on
the grain side, fier square foot. _ _
100 skins of Goat Morocco, heavy Tampico; black kul
finish, each,
800 Skins Sheep Morocco, black, each.
100 Buck Skins, dressed yellow. each.
1,600 pounds split Leather, finished without blanking,
per pound.
1,500 feet Stock Leather, dres‘scd by the Morocco pro
cess, usual thickness, per square foot,
Samples 01' the quadity of the above can be examined
at this office.
Proposals will be received for each kind of Leather
separately ; and for any portion of the Upper, Sole, Welt
and Black Bridle Leutlflr, not less than one-fourthof the
uantity.
q Contracts will be awarded to the lowest reslmiisible
biddvr who shall furnish the requisite security for the
performance. thereof.
The privilege is reserved by the United States of in
creasing the quantity from one-fourth to onahall‘, at any
time prior to the completion of the contract, by giving
the contractor thirty days’ notice of such desired in
crease; and of rejecting any proposal which may be con.
sidered extravagant. .
Bidders will state in their proposals their place nf busi
ness, with the names, address and responsibility of two
persons oll‘ered as security, with the acknowledgments
of said persons that they will be such security, or will be
responsible that good security be furnished in case a con
tract is obtained ’
Forms of proposals and guarranty will be furnished
upon application to this oflice, and none will be consid
erEd that do not conform thereto.
Deliveries to commence on the tenth day of December,
and to be continued in semi-monthly proportions until
the quantity contracted for be delivered, by the first of
Marc'h, 1861. . .
It is to be distinctlv understood that contracts are not
transferable without the consent of the proper author
ity ; and that any sale, assignment or transfer, without
such consent having been obtained, (except under a. pro
cess of lung) will be regarded as an abandonment of the
contract, and the contractor and his securities will be
held responsible for all loss or damage to the United
States which may arise therefrom.
Payments will be made on each delivery. Ten per cent.
of the amount of eachdelivery will be retained until the
contract shall be eompleted, which will be forfeited to
the United States in case of defamation on the part of
the contractor. in fulfilling the contract.
Proposals will be endorsed‘fl’maposls for furnishing
Army Supplies,” and be addressed to
COL. CHARLES THOMAS,
oct3o—tuthrstNl7. A. Q. M. Geu’l U. 8. Army
fix? ”fififsffi £211?
RARE CHANGE FOR- INVESMEN 'l‘.
Eli n
SA L E O F »
VALUABLE HOTEL PROPERTY
IN THE CITY OF HARRISBURG.
That well-known and valuable hotel property known
as the
' “SUSQUEHANNA HOUSE,”
now in the occupancy of Wm. Mocherman, situate on
the east end of Market street, and immediately opposite
the Pennsylvania Railroad Depot, will. be ofl'ered at
PRIVATE SALE until the 4th of December next, and
if not sold before that time, will be put up at Public
Auction on that day. ..
This is the most desirable property in the city of Har
risburg for hotel business. Its proximity to the Penn
sylvania Railroad Depot, and the depot of all the rail
roads centreingnt Harrisburg, makes it more convenient
and accessible to the traveling public than any other
Hotel in the city.
Further information in regard to this property and as
to the terms of sale, may be had by applying to
WM. H. MILLER, Attorney-at-Daw,
North corner Market Square, (Wyeth’s Building) second
story front. , octz-dkn’ts
NOTEUE TO SPECULATORS 1
VALUABLE BUILDING LOTS FOR SALE!
A number of large size BUILDING- LO’l‘S, adjoining
the Round House and Work Shops of the Pennsylvania.
Railroad Company, will be sold low and on reasonable
terms. Apply to .au29-d6m JOHN W. HALL.
NOTICE—A parochlal resulence bemg
about to be erected with St. Patrick’s Church, the
Rev. P. Mallet olfers for sale the place wherein he re
sides. Application to Rev 1" . MAHER or Major BRADY.
May 3, 1860.—my4-(ltf
FOR RENT—A Commodlous Two-Story
DWELLING HOUSE, En Second street, below Pine,)
with wide Hall, large Bac Building, Marble Mantels in
Parlors, Gas in six rooms, all the rooms just papered and
painted. The second story divided into seven rooms,
one of which is a. Bath. This, in connection with the fact
that the house has just been placed in the most thorough
repair, makes it one of the most desirable houses in the
city. Enquire of E. M. POLLOGK,
apl9 , Market Square. Harrisburg .
FOR SALE—A Vacant Lot of Ground,
situated in the borough of Hmisburg, adjoining the
corner lot of the northwest corner of Second and State
streets. The lot has a. front of 56 feet. For particulars
enquire of [janZO-dtf] E. 0. WILLIAMS.
F 0 R RE N T—Two BRICK TWO
STORY HOUSES on Pine street, between Second
and Third; also. Mrs. Ofine’s COTTAGE and several
FRAME HOUSES. Enquire of _ _ ‘_ _ A
MRS . MURRAY,
Corner of Sedond and Pine streets
jaan-dtf]
O R SAL E—One Tcamster’s Wagon,
two Coal Carts, one large Cart, suitable for farming
purposes. Apply to
mylB JAMES M. WHEELER.
IT WILL PAY YOU
TO
READ THIS.
IT. WILL PAY YOU:
OBSERVE WHAT I. SAY ! !
IT WILL PAY YOU
FOR A VISIT T 0 ‘
HARRISBURG! ! !
TO SEE AND MAKE YOUR PURCHASES
FROM THE LARGE, HANDSOME
AND FASHIONABLE STOCK 0F
READY anDE CLOTHING, CLOTH,
CQ'ASSIMERES, VESTINGS AND
G-ENTS’ FURNISHING GOODS
NOW EXPOSED AT THE WELL
KNOWN ARCADE, NO. 3 JONES ROW.
AVAILING MYSELF OF THE ’
ADVANTAGES WHICH READY
CASH’ PRESENTS, I OFFER ALL
GOODS AT 10 PER CENT. CHEAPER
THAN ANY OTHER HOUSES.
CHAS. S. SEGELBAUM.
P. s.—HAVING SECURED
A FIRST RATE CUTTER AND TAILOR,
I AM NOW READY TO MAKE
CLOTHING- TO ORDER IN THE
MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE.
I “’ARRANT .A FIT OR NO SALE.
oct6-d4m
LYKEN S VALLEY NUT COAL.—
Just received, a. full supply of s. M. 0035 LYKENS
VALLEY NUT COAL. For sale by
mar? JAMES M. WHEELER
TO
fllzhiml.
.17.;7 ~ , ”,7 5/5. x -“ 'g' -';-. H
31C? "I'2 :. ’LBRE
L: 'f' :J“, ft”: 1:. V
.:- 1a- ~ .
~.\.m.1 L {1;
MRS. WINSLMV,
An Experienced Nurse and Female Physician 7 presents
to the attention of mothers, her
SOOTHING SYRUP,
FOR CHILDREN TEETHING.
which greatly facilitates the process of teething, by
softening the gums, reducing a“ inflammation—will
allay ALL PAIN and Spasmodic action. and is
SURE TO REGULATE THE BOWELS.
Degend. upon it mothers, it will give rest to yourselves,
an
RELIEF AND HEALTH TO YOUR INFANTS
We have put up and Hold this article for over tenyem‘s,
rmtl CAN 54A]?7 IN CONFIDENCE AND TRUTH of it,
wlmt we have never been able to my of_a.ny other medi
cine—NEVEß. HAS IT FAILED, IN A SINGLE IN
STANCE, T 0 EFFECT A CURE‘ when timely used.
Never did we know an instance of dissatisfaction by any
one who used it. On the contrary, all me delighted with
its operations. and speak in terms of commendation of
its magical effects and medical virtues. We speak in
this matter -’= WHAT WE DO KNOW,” after ten years’
experience, AND PLEDGE OUR REPUTATION FOR
THE FULFILLMENT OF WHAT WE HERE DE
CLARE. In almost every instance where the infant is
sufl‘ering from pain and exhaustion, relief will be found
in figmen or twenty minutes after the syrup is adminis
ere .
This valuable preparation is the prescription of one of
the most EXPERIENCED and SKILLFUL NURSES in
New England, and has been used with NEVER FAIL
ING SUCCESS in
THOUSANDS OF GASES.
It not only relieves the child firom pain, but invigo
rates the stomach and bowels, con-eats acidity, and
gives tone and energy to the whole system. It will :11-
most instantly relieve
GRIPING IN THE BOWELS. AND WIND COLIC,
and Overcome convulsions, which, if not speedily reme
died, end in death. We believe it the BEST and SUBEST
REMEDY IN THE WORLD, in 8.11 cases of DYSEN
TERY and DIARRHCEA IN CHILDREN, whether it
arises from teething, or from any other cause. We would
say to every mother who has a. child suffering from any
of the foregoing complaints—Do NOT LET YOUR PRE
JUDICES, NOB THE PREJUDICES 0F OTHERS, stand
between you and your sufl'ering child, and the relief that
will be SURE—yes, ABSOLUTELY SURE—to follow the
use of this medicine, if timely used. Full directions for
using will accompany each bottle. None genuine unless
the fue-simile o CURTIS it PERKINS, New York, is
on the outside wrapper.
Sold by Druggists throughout the world.
PRINCIPAL OFFICE, 13 Cums STREET, New Yong.
PRICE ONLY 25 CENTS PER. BOTTLE.
sep29—dBcwly
s§flg§gggpw
Ngg‘fi“.
A SUPERLATWE
gowcmluntncfi,
‘éfiflmm‘g
WIWRATINfi CDHDIAI.
TO THE CITIZENS OF NEW JERSEY AND
PENNSYLVAIIA _, 7
APOTHEASCRIE, JJMJGrSGITaGROQRS AND
PRIVATE
WOLFE’S PURE COGNAC BRANDY.
WOLFE’S PURE MADEIRA, SHERRY AND PORT
WINE. , , , 7 ~ , , , ,
WOLFE’S PURE JAMAICA. AND ST. CROIX RUM
WOLF E’S PURE EGOI‘GII AND IRISH WHISKY.
ALL IN BOTTLES.
I beg leave to call the attention of the citizens of the
United States to the above ans and Liquons, im
ported by UDOLPEO WOLFE, of New York, whose name
is familiar in every part of this country for the purity
of his celebrated Scamp»! SCHAPPS. Mr. WOLFE, in
his letter to me, speaking of the purity of his WINES
and nations, says: “ I will stake my reputation as a.
man, my standing as a merchant of thirty years’ resi
dence in the City of New York, that all the BRANDY and
WINES which I bnttle are pure as imported, and of the
best quality, and can be relied upon by every purchaserv ”
Every bottle has the proprietor’s name on the wax, and
ahe simile of his signature on the certificate. The
public are respectfully invited to call and examine for
themselves. For sale at RETAIL by all Apothecaries and
Grocers in Philadelphia.
GEORGE 11. ASHTON,
No. 832 Market street, Philadelphia,
_ Sale Agenzjbr Plziladglphia
Read the following from the New York Courier
Exommus BUSINESS FOR ONE NEW YORK )lERCHANT.
We are happy to inform our fellow-citizens that there is
one place in our city where the physician, apothecary,
and country merchant, can go and purchase pure Wines
and Liquors, as pure as imported, and of the best quality.
W'e do not intend to give an elaborate description of this
merchant’s extensive business, although it will well re
pay any stranger or citizen to visit UDOLFHO WOLI-‘E’s
extensive warehouse, Nos. 18, 20 and 3, Beaver street
and Nos 17, 19 and 21, Marketfield street. His stock oi'
Schnapps on hand ready for shipment could not have
been less than thirty thousand cases; the Brandy, some
ten thousand cases—Vintages of 1836 to 1856; and ten
thousand cases of Madeira, Sherry and Port Wines,
Scotch and Irish Whisky, J amsica. and St. Croix Rum,
some very old and equal to anyin this country. He also
had three large cellars, filled with Brandy, Wines, &c.,
in casks, under Custom-House key, ready for bottling.
Mr. WOLFE’S sales of Schnapps last year amounted to
one hundred and eighty thousand dozen, and we hope in.
less than two years he may be equally successf With
his Brandies and Wines.
His business merits the patronage of every lover of
his species. Private families who wish pure Wines and
Liquors for medical use should send their orders direct
to Mr. Wonrn, until every Apothecary in the land make
up their minds to discard the poisonous stuff from their
shelves, and replace it with WOLFE ’3 pure Wines and
LIQUOBS. __ .
We understand Mr. WOLFE, for the accommodation of
small dealers in the country, puts up assorted cases of
Wines and Liquors. Such a man, and such a. merchant,
should be sustained against his tens of thousands of op
ponents in the United States, who sell nothing but imi
tations, ruinous alike to human health and happiness.
For sale by 0 . K. KELLER, Druggist, sole agent, for
Harrisburg. seps-ddzw6m
SANFORD’S
LIVER INVIEURATOR,
NEVER DEBILITA‘IES
IT is compounded entirely from 6mm, and In
become an eafabliahed fact, a. Standard Medicine, known
and approved by all tint ' ihave used it,andis new I'o
sorted to with confidence M fin all_thadineaaesforwhicb
it is recommended.
It has cured thousands
who had given up all hopes
unsolicited certificates in
The dose must be adapted
individual taking it, and
tonctgentlyon thebowels.
Let the dictates of your
use of the LIVER IN
will cure Liver Com
tacklfl! ylpepsin,
S u m m e 1- C o m
ry,Drop sy, Sour
C 0 st i v one” Chol
ru Morbus, Cholera
lence, Jnundicc,
cl, md may be used suc
ry, Family Medi-
HEADAC HE, (a!
twenty minutes, i f
Ipooniuls are taken
tuck. ‘
All who line it are‘
in its fnvor. ‘
MIX WATER IN mu MOUTH WITH Tm: INVIG
om'ron, AND SWALLOW BOTH TOGETHER.
Price One D 313: per Bottle.
__ 30—.
SANFORD-S
FAMILY
GATHARTIO PILLS.
COMPOUND“ FROM .
Pure Vegetable Extracts, and 1m! "P 1". Glut-9
Gases, Air Tight, and will keep m any clzmate.
The Family Cathur- ' It” 7'14“” ‘ gentle 5‘.“
active Outhnrtic, which a: the proprietor hu med 1»
his practice more than l 4 Ifwantyyesrs.
The constantly incress- {"33 demand from “1030
who have long used the I 4 PILLS; and the satisfie
tion which all express in “If!“ t° their use, has
induced me to place tbam H "i hm_the reach Of 811
TheProfessionwellkpflW a. that dlfi'erent Cathnrtiu
act on ailment Pom?” °f ““3 “W"
The FAMILY LA.- THAR'IIC PILL his,
with due reference to thlfl o well established fact,besn
compounded from a valjle- ty of the purest Vs table
nmactg, which .ctdnhke H on every part‘of ta sli
mentmy canal. 9'“ .8129 5' good and safe in ll]
caseswharea catharhels needed, such as De
r all ge m “I“ S g the m Stomach. Sleepineu,
pains i? ted melt and Loinl, Costlve
ness, PM“ as: Sore.- 4 nos: over the wholo
badgfi from st_l den cold, which frequently, if no
glec , end “2 I {OllB m course of Dover, Loss 0!
Appetite: a ”eel-mg Sensation o 1 Co l 4
over “13 body,Ren. lessnens,l[lmAanl ox
WEI!!!“ 1' “I Emma“ E'l INFLAMMATORY D’lfln
EASEB; Worms 1n Chi]. (keno;- Adulm, Rheum}.
h_sm, sgreat PURIFIEB 4 of helium!) and many
duseasesto winch flesh is heir, too numerous to
mention in this advertise-
Price Three Dimes.
The Liver Invigorator uni Family Oethu'tio .Pilll Are
retailed by Drnggsta generally, and sold wholesuo by the
Trade in all the ' rge towns.
5-. Tu “7 SANFORD, M. D.,
Manufacturer and Proprietor, 208‘Broadw2y, N. l“
jy7-d&wly
FAJIIILIES
within the last two you:
of relief, as the numerous
my possession show.
to the tempamment of the
used in such quantities as
,jn out guide you in the
Vgfimxron, Ind it
plain“, Billi us At
|Chronic Diarrhoea,
pl a! nu, Bysente-
Stomach, I! mum
ic, Cholera, Chole-
I nfantum, F 1 an:-
Femnle W eakn el
cemfully u an Ordina
cine. It will cure SICK
thousand: can teatify,) in
two or three Tea.
at commencement of at
giving their tntimony
men't. Bonelwl {o 3‘
fines of armed.
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD.
g”-
FIVE TRAINS DAILY T 0 55 FROM PHILADELPHIA.
The Bridge at Conewugo having been re-built, the
Passenger Trains of the Pennsylvaniallailroad Company
will resume their former route. 011 and after
MONDAY, OCTOBER 15m, 1800.
they will depart from and arrive at Harrisburg and
Philadelphia as follows :
EASTWARD
THROUGH EXPRESS TRAIN leaves Harrisburg at
1-15 ll.lm, and arrives atht Philadelphia at 5.10 a. m.
FAST LINE leaves Harrisburg at 6.15 a. m.. cvefy
any excem Monday, arrives at West. Philadelphia at
10.00 a. m.
MAIL TRAIN leaves Harrisburg at 1.00 p. m., at
rives at West Philadelphia at 5.00 p. m.
These Tminl make close connection at Philadelphia
with the New York Lines.
MT. JOY ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, No. 1, leaves
6.50 a. m., Mt. Joy at 8.02, and connects at Lapcnster at
8.50 with LANCASTER TRAIN, arriving at West Phila
delphia at 12.10 p. m.
HARRISBURG ACCOMMODATION TRAIN leaves at
at 3.50 p. 111., Columbia. at 5.15, and arrives at West
Philadelphia. at 9.05 p. m.
MT. JOY ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, No. 2, leave
at 4.00 p. m., Mt. Jay at 5.11, connects with HARRIS
BURG ACCOMMODATION TRAIN East at Dillervilla
at 5.41, arriving at West Philadelphia at 9.05 p. m.
WESTWARD
THROUGH EXPRESS TRAIN leaves Philadelphia at
-10.45 p. m., arrives at Harrisburg at 2.55 a. In.
MAIL TRAIN leaves Philadelphia at 7.30 a. m., ar~
river: at Harrisburg at 12.50 p. m.
FAST LINE leaves Philadelphia at 11 .50 a. m. , arrives
at Harrisburg at 4.00 p. m.
MT. JOY ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, No. 1, leaves
Lancaster on arrival nf MAIL TRAIN West, at 11.04 8..
m., leaves Mt. Joy at 11.42, and arrives at Harrisburg
at 1.00 p. m.
HARRISBURG ACCOMMODATION TRAIN leaves
Philadelphia at 2.001). m., Columbia. at 6.10, and arrives
at Harrisburg at 7.35 p. m.
MT. JOY ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, NO. 21 leaves-
Lmnunster, on the arrival of LAN (ULSTER TRAIN West,
at 7.54 p. m., Mt. Joy at 8.30, and arrives at Harrisburg
at 9.42 p. m.
Passengers leaving Philadelphia :11: 4.00 p. m . , on LAN
CASTER TRAIN, connect at Lancaster with MT. JOY
ACCOMMODATION TRAIN No. 2, at 7.54, and arrive
at Harrisburg at 9.24 p. m‘ . _ A ‘ _ _
SAMUEL D. YOUNG,
Supt East. Div. Penn’a Railroad
o cth-dtf
N EW
AIR LINE ROUTE
I‘o
NEW YORK.
$1.7; 3..—1 T“ ’5‘5'3’55“
Shortest in Distance and Quickest in Time
BETWEEN THE TWO CITIES 0F .
NEW YORK AND HARRISBURG,
V I A
READING, ALLENTOWN AND ElS’i‘flNg
MORNING EXPRESS, West, leaves New York at 6
a. m., arriving at Harrisburg at 12.45 noon, only 63‘
hours between the two cities.
MAIL LINE leaves New York at. 12.00 noon, and at}
rives at Harrisburg at 8.30 p. m.
MORNING- MAIL LINE, East, leaves Harrisburg at
8.00 a. m., arriving at New York at 4.30 p. m.
AFTERNOON EXPRESS LINE, East, leaves Harris
burg at 1.15 p. m., arriving at New York at 9.00 p. an.
Connections are made 2: :. Harrisburg at 1.00;). m. with
the Passenger Trains in euchdirection on the Pennsylva
nia, Cumberland Valley and Northern Centrui Railroads
All Traius connect at Reading with Trains for Potts.
ville and Philadelphia, and at Allentown for Munch
Chunk, Easton, I; c.
No change of Passenger Cars or Baggage between New
York and Harriaburg, by the 0.00 a. m. Line from New
York or the 1.15 p. m. from Harrisburg.
For beauty of scenery and speed, comfort and accom
modation, this Route presents superior inducements to
the traveling public.
Fare between New York andflarrisbnrg, FIVE DOLLARS .
For Tickets and other information apply to
J. J. CLYDE, General Agent, ‘
jel Harrisburg.
1860. 1860.
NORTHERN CENTRAL RAILWAY.
fig 1“
u . VFW—r
nfiwflufifim
: "i ’- : ’ v .
' NOTICE.
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE
ON AND AFTER SU NDA Y, MAY 27th, 1860,
the Passenger Train: of the Northern Central Railway
will leave Harrisburg as follows :
G 011 V 0’- S 0 UTII.
EXPRESS TRAIN will leave at. .. . . . . . .. . .1»!!! a. m.
ACCOMMODATION TRAIN will leaveut. 31.30 a. In.
MAIL TRAlN’willlenveat..."..... . .. 1.00p.m.
GOING NORTH.
MAIL TRAIN will leave an... .. ...». . . . 1.20 p. m.
EXPRESS TRAIN will leave at. . . . .... . "-9.32 p.lll.
The only trains leaving Harrisburg on Sunday will be
the EXPRESS TRAIN at 1.40 a. m., going South, and
the EXPRESS TRAIN at 9.32 f. m., going North.
For further information app y at the allies, in Penn
aylvania. Railroad Depot. J OHN‘W. HALL, Agent.
Harrisburg, May 26, 1860.—my28
PHILADELfHIA
AN
READING RAILROAD,
SUMMER ARRANGEMENT.
ON AND AFTER MAY 28, 1860,
TWO PASSENGER TRAINS LEAVE HARRISBURG
DAILY, (Sundays excaptedp at 8.00 A. M., and 1.15 P.
m., for Philadelphia, arriving there “1.25 P. M., and 6.16
P. M.
RETURNING, LEAVE PHILADELPHIA at 8.00 A.M.
and 3.80 P. m., arriving at Harrisburg at 12 45 noon and
8.30 P . M. .
[ARES :—'l‘o Philadelphia, No. 1 Cars, $3.25; No. B,
(in same train) $2.70.
I'ABES :—l‘o Reading $l.OO 1m! $1.30.
At Beading, connect with trains for Pottsvifira, Miners
ville, Tamaquu, Catarina, he.
FOUR TRAINS LEAVE READING FOR PHILADEL
PHIA DAILY, at oA. M.,10.§5 A. M.,12.30 noon and
3.43 P. M.
LEAVE PHILADELPHIA FOR READING at .0 .
IL, 1.00 P. IL, 3.30 P. M., 13:16.001’. M. 1
FARES2—Reading to Phihdelphia, $1.75 “(I $1.45.
THE MORNING TRAIN FROM HARRISBURG CON.
NEOTS AT READING with up train for Wilkeabu-re
Pittaton :nd Scranton .
For through tickets and other information apply to
J . J . CLYDE,
M;
my24-dtf
PHILADELPHIA
All!)
READING RAILROAD.
REDUCTION OF PASSENGER FARES,
ON AND AFTER MONDAY, APRIL 2, 1560
COMM UTA I'l 0N TICKETS,
With 26 Gou‘pous, will be issued between any points
desired, good or the holder and any member or his
family, in any Passenger train, and et any time—at 16
per cent. below the regular fares.
Parties having occasion to use the Road frequently on
buslness or pleasure, will find the above arrangement
convenient and economical; as Four Passenger train!
run daily each way between Reading and Philadelphia
and Two Trains daily between Beading, Pottsville and
Harrisburg. On Sundays, only one morning treln Down
and one sftemoon train Up,ru.us between Pottsville end
Philadelphia, and no Passenger train on the Lebanon
Valley Branch Railroad. _
For the above Tickets or any mformstxon relating
thereto, apply to sißmmlfoidi 13:01., greflfilgg‘i 51:11:22;
' ec ive ic e en son ,
phm’ t° the ”Sp 9. A. magma, General Eup’t.
March 21, 1860.—mar28-dtf
L. GODBOLD, PBAOTIGAL TUNER
. AND Rammnn or PIANOS, MELODEONS, due.
85c. Orders in future must be left at WM. KNOGHnag'
MUSIC STORE, 92 Market street, or at BUEHLEms
HOTEL. All orders left at the above-named place. will
meet with pmmpt attention.
First class PIANOS for sale
BENJAMIN PYNE,
. ARCHITECTURAL
W 0 0I) T U 11. N ER ,
BEAR OF 426 AND 428 WALNUT STREET,
PHILADELPHIA. .
Every deacri tion. of CARPENTEBS’ AND 33mm).
ERS‘ TURNINg executed with neatness and diapatch.
WINDOW, DOOR AND SASHCIRQULAR IMO ULD
INGS of‘every PATTERN, from {our Inchea_up to nine
feet_diunieter, TURNED to order, in the neatest style,
STABLE AND HITCHING POSTS, VENEER!!!) AND
PLAIN NEWELLS, STAIR BALUSTERS of every kind,
kept constantly on hand, and on the most reasonable
terms. nun-(l3m
mm