Daily patriot and union. (Harrisburg, Pa.) 1858-1868, November 01, 1860, Image 3

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    25014;, NE WS-
Tn DAILY PAM“ AND Exxon may be had at
Jack's Book Store, corner of Third and Market
Hiram- A —¢~ '--~
A. M. STODDARD Wm Open, on Thursday, Novem
her hat, an assortment of Fall and Winter Milli.
nary. 3t.
0m” or Tamar—Mayor Kepner has been absent
from the city for a. day or two, but will be at hi:
p 055 again to-dayw
Since the erection of the first Methodist church
in America, in 1760, them have been 14,000
erected—an average of three a. week.
In Towxr—Onr former fellow-citizens, Captain
Sam Wilt and Samuel Rhinehart, Esq., are here
on a visit. Both of the ducks are looking remark
ably well. ‘ ‘
Boon Gum—A notorious negro rowdy, known
by the name of J aok Fayettes, was bound over by
Alderman Kline, yesterday, for carrying concealed
deadly weapons and threatening to shoot some
person.
ABBESTED-—ofiicer Essig yesterday arrested a
negro named William Watkins on a charge of stri
king one O’Rourke, nn Irishman. Mr. O’Rourke
failed to margin the charge, and Watkins was dis
charged. ‘
Gamma Dxnoan'flc Manner—The German
Democrats will meet at the Hotel of Daniel Wag—
ner, comm- of Second and Chesnut streets, at, 7
o’clock. Let there be a- goneral turn out! By
order.
AN Emoa.——Onr reporter pro tem. was slightly
in error yesterday in regard to the Eintracht party.
No disturbance took place till the party was ended,
Nearly all the ladies had left, and the musicians
had packed up preparatory to going, when a. fight
occurred between two persons in no way connected
with the Society.
Gaunt Dmrocm'nc Magnum—Our German
Democratic friends held a very enthusiastic meet
ing on Tuesday night, at Barnherd’s Hotel, pas
sing resolutions adopting the Bending Electoral
tioket, and appointing a. meeting on this (Thurs
day) evening, at D. Wagner’s Hotel, and a. great
mass meeting on Saturday evening at the Court
House.
“ HALLOW Evn.”-—-Last night was “hallow e'en,”
the time when rowdies are disposed to indulge in
innocent recreation. To what extent they carried
their waggish propensities last evening, we are not
prepared to say at the time we write this. The
custom used to be to throw grains of corn against
.exposed windows, pelt doors "with cabbage stalks,
and remove portable property. This always was
amstom “ more honored in the breach than the
observance,” and we are pleased to notice that it
has fallen into disuse, as an old fogy relic of the
fast men of a, past age. '
Arrommxr BY 3mm Mu‘oa.—lsaac S. Water
bury to be Chief of Police, vice Geo. H. Morgan,
resigned?
The above appointment cannot fail to give entire
satisfaction to the community. Mr. W. distin
guished himself in the Mexican war, and although
he is what is commonly denominated a “shorty,” he
is pluck, and the roughs will find him an ugly cus
tomer to deal with. There is no question but what
Isaac will make an attentive and faithful oficer.
This appointment dates from to—day.
Ammu- u-o Baum JAIL.—At a. late hour on
Tuesday evening Martin Wolf, an insane man con
fined in our prison, made an attempt to escape,
which came very near being successful. When
discovered, he had made a considerable opening
in the wall of [his cell. He was removed to another
apartment and heavily ironed... Wolf has been very
troublesome, and exceedingly noisy during the en
tire summer, and several unsuccessful efi'orts have
been made to have him removed to the Insane Asy
lum.
Fssmomem: Snares roa LADlES.——There are
several novelties in this department of the toilette
this fall. There is a shoe with lappels that may
he turned down from the delicate ankle for the
house, or may closely enease it for the street.
There is a quilted carriage shoe of all colors, bound
with velvet. Balmoral boots, that lace, maintain
their hold upon the nfi'eetion, and are universally
worn. 0f toilette slippers there is an infinite
variety. Bridal slippers of kid and satin, with
rosettes that alone are worth $1 .25, are largely sold
in New York at $lO the pair.
Hm: ro Alumnus TELEGRAPH Communa—
The Hagnetie Telegraph Company of Great Britain
are ‘o' issuing smallradhesive stamps for frank
ing messages throughout their lines in the United
Kingdom. The system is precisely similar to the
postage stamp system. A message can be written
wherever-convenient, and after afiixing the neces
sary stamp, it can he sent: either by post. or mes
senger to the nearest magnetic telegraph station,
and thence forwarded to its destination. There is
said to. beg liberal discount on these stamps, in
order to assist in bringing them into general use.
Drum or Du. J ems W. Conan—lt grieves us
much, says the Greensbnrg Democrat, to have to
announce the death on Friday morning Inst of Dr.
John W. Conlter, of Latrobe. Dr. Goulter was a
young men of mnoh promise, a. pleasant companion
and award friend. He represented this District
in the Legislature in the session of 1860, and was
re-nolninnted by a. unanimous vote of the Demo
oratie County Convention in June iast, for a second
term. In health, however, compelled him to do
cline a few weeks before the election, and he is
now numbered with the silent dead. His disease
wee of n pulmonary unture, and his death was:
doubtless, in some measure hastened by his atten
tion to his duties while a. member of Assembly.
Hie remains were brought to this place on Setur.
dry night, and on Sunday were interred in the
Cemetery grounds, to which they were followed by
the Loyalhanna. Ind Phihnthropy Lodges of Me.-
eons, and e. large concourse of people.
I=CC=l
Wnu is the moa‘ famous thing new in Amer
iu? DIXII ! The forests of Atostook and the
gamma of California are equally familiar with its
jingle; by the shorés of the Chenpnke, and by
“:0 Pictured rocks of Luke Superior it soundeth.—-
Listen to this :
"An am‘l‘ainz anecdote is told, which happened
legal; ,1“ Minnie theatre. The orchestra played
Iplne when. the curtain rose, and the play began.
Bu} .fll’fl “lawn“ Would not listen. The cry of
‘Dleo ren through the house from pit to gellery,
completely 3‘9"““13 the voice of the aetor.‘ He
mede eeveralmefieemal attempts to be heard, and
left the stage. The old manager appeared; flushed
with anger; and: "I an excited voice, exclaimed,
‘Gentlemell, what mean: allrlhis ill-mannered eon—
fusion? What do you {3“} 5' Immediately a. hnn-.
dred voices cried out ‘DIXIE.’ ‘Well, you can’t have
it. You’ve had ‘Dixie’ 0““ “flight. and You’ll
have ‘Dixie’ no more.’ .He rented to the green
room, end the actor again appeared: But it “a
no use. A deafening shout for‘ine’ met him
from the audience, and, after stammeung and stut—
tering for a few moments, he left the Stage: The
curtain dropped, the orehestre played ‘Dxxxef and
the play progressed without further interruption."
That bored reporter who heard “Dixie” at a fair,
at a. concert, in the street, in I club room, in “119‘
atre, and at last was awakened by its strains till
-3198 a midnight serenade, ought to have been
among this St. Louis audience during their whim
sey.
Emeuxr Tnhvnn—lrs Plenum: humans.—
The travel of emigrants to the West, over the
Pennsylvania Railroul, says the Philadelphia. Led
ger, has been much greater the present year than
for several years past, the trains from Dock street
averaging daily from 75 to 100 passengers. For
several months past a large number of Philadel—
phia mechanics have purchased tickets for New 01'-
leans, intending to make that city their future
home. A great majority of those who have left
are carpenters. A few years back, the Germfl-fl
emigrants encumbered the trains with large
amounts of baggage, consisting often of {IO-“59130”
utensils, and other things necessary for hung 1n "-
wild country; but the extra. expen.“ necessary to
cohvey this baggage to its destination has Induced
the emigrant. agents in this ecu”! ‘O‘Wme 'lO the
old country, giving instructions to bring only the
necessary articles of wearing apparel, as. almost
everything else can be purchased near their futufe
homes, as in their own country. iNearly all that
have passed over the Pennsylvania Reilrontl the
present year have been well. supplied vvrth 'menns,
and their destination has been Illinors, Mlssoun,
lowa. and Wisconsin.
The present Superintendent of this line, Mr.
Funk, has given great attention to the emigrant
business, and so familiar has he become with the
class who use this road, that he professes to tell
from what portion of the old country the emigrant
comes, mainly by looking at his baggage. Accor
ding to his observation, more money and the hen
viest baggage, which generally denotes the well
ado emigrant, comes from the northern part of Ger
many, while from the more southern portions those
less blessed with creature comforts generally come.
Alarge number of wealthy Germans are natives of
Alsace, Wirtemberg, £713., and the great majority
go directly West for the purpose of farming, many
of them having been engaged in agricultural pur
suits at their old homes. They are thrifty, soon
gain wealth, and in a. few years large settlements
spring up in the wilds selected by them. In our
own city and throughout the State, many of the
Germans, from the same portions of the country
referred to, may he found with well cultivated
farms and doing an excellent business generally.
The wealthiest of the Irish emigrants come from
the northern part of Ireland; their trunks when
seen at the depot, are substantial and very heavy,
containing as they do a. large amount of clothing,
linen, (to. The trunks of those from the southern
portions of Ireland are generally of a. cheap char
acter, and not very heavy. These peculiarities in
reference to emigrant travelers can be only known
to any degree by those coming in daily contact with
them, and Mr. Funk can almost read their charac
ters and dispositions By their trunks, as well al
most as a. phrenologist could do by the bumps on
their heads. -
IM2:111
Tm: Honmnarsnuue Baum—Mr. MacDowell is l
absent, and of course cannot reply to the perambn- i
lating renegade who presides over the columns of 1
the Telegraph, and for a fixed price combats the
principles he advocated a. few years ago 5 but if the
Swiss mercenery can derive any comfort from the
fact, we can tell him plainly what influence it was
that collapsed the Hollidayshnrg Bank. So long
as Mr. MaeDowell was its President, every dollar
of its issues was redeemed in gold or silver, every
depositor could have his money in per funds when,
he called for it, and the stock was not, under his ad
ministration of the affairs of the bank, ever thrust
into the market. A dead set was made against
the bank by certain interested parties who could
‘ not dip just as deep into the institution as they
wished to, and ahne and cry was raised against it,
under the pretext that it, was under the central of
Philadelphia financiers, who were irresponsible.
Under such an outside pressure it was diflicnlt to
establish confidence, and the company owning the
charter, sold it to a set of responsible Centre conn ty
financiers, who at once established confidence, and
their notes were considored better than gold.
Eventually, after issuing a large amount of money,
when Col. MacDowell was no longer a. resident of
Hollidaysbnrg. these honest Centre county finan
ciers closed their doors, and left the note-holders
and depositors to whistle for their dues. Let it be
\ understood that the leading spirits in this swindle
; were Dr. Underwood, a smooth, pseudo Quaker,
‘ Price, the Cashier, and Wilson, the President. The
two former were LEADING Rspvnmuxs in Centre
county, and we are much mistaken if Wilson does
not belong to the some school of honest politicians.
These facts are patent to everybody residing in
Hollidaysburg, and as the editor of the Telegraph
himself was putting in time in the vicinity of
Bellefonte when these occurrences took place, he
must be well aware of the influence that caused the
Hollidayshurg Bank to collapse. If he does really
got, know the cause, we presume Price and Under
wood, and some of the financiers of the Tyrone
and Lock Haven Railroad Company, would on-
lighten him on that, and several other obscure
points.
Inxponnm RAILROAD Cum—The cast of Wil-
liam Frazier versus the Pennsylvania Railroad Con: ‘
pany was argued on Tuesday in the Supreme Court, ‘
at Pittsburg, by Hon. Henry D. Foster and H. P. ‘
Laird, Easy, for defendant in error, and General
Wm. A. Stokes for the Company. Frazier was a
hrakesman in the employ of the Pennsylvania Rail
road Company, and on the 7th of July, 1856, a
freight train, on which he was acting in that ca
pacity, was run into by mhallaet train coming west
ward, near Irwin’s Station, resulting in the break
ing of one of Frazier-’3 legs. 0f the former train
Henry Sehaefi'er was conductor, and Frezier’e coun—
sel allege that by virtue of the contract of hiring
it was the duty of the Company to furnish a skill
ful, prudent, careful and trustworthy conductor, to
have charge of the starting, stopping and speed of
the train of which he was hrskesmnn, so that the
sameVshould not run in advance of the time ache
dule prescribed by the said Company, or at a higher
rate of speed, and such other duties of safety as
appertain to a conductor on a through freight and
emigrant train. Also, that the Company, in disre
gard of their duty, carelessly and wronéfally put
on the train of which Frazier was brakesrnan, one
Sehnefi'er to act as conductor—that Shaefi'er was
careless, reckless and unskilful—that defendants
knew this. or mighthave ascertained it—that the
collision by which plaintifi' was injured was by
the train he was on being ahead of time five to ten
minutes, and that this was consequent on the care
lessncss of the conductor, Schaefi'er. The West
moreland county jury who-tried the case found a
verdict for Frazier in the sum of $5,775, for which
amount judgment was entered,
' Gen. Stokes made a most eloquent, logical and
powerful argument, but it was of enormous length
; and related chiefly to questions of law. It is im
‘ possible for us to present even a synopsis. Gen.
‘ Foster and Mr. Laird also made able speeches.—
The case occupied almost the entire session of the
Court. An opinion will be rendered at an early
day. '
IMPROMPTIJ 0:: THE Wm: AWAKES.—
The other night I saw a small procession.
Which like a. row of street lamps broke loose appeared,
Brilliant at first, but bad beyond expression,
Its nauseous fumes, which only daylight cleared.
I'm-Imps, however, we may read the moral,
3v hick. if we do, we certainly can jok’e—
With ‘5l Ide Awakes we’ll surely never quarrel,
If,hke their shows, their projects and in smoke.
The Wigle Awnkea, whenever they turn out,
Carr): 011 him?" that flame and smoke about,
Leavxng dark smudges over hands Ind face ;
But We for this reason well may trace:
Loviflg ”‘5 “Mk man better than all other,
They black themsel-u..,,- uuu they may call him banks:
THE New York Observer has an excellent article
against ministerial financial speculations. It can
cludes as follows : '
When ministers are successful in speculffions:
they are not better men for it! It is not 113 the
order of God’s Providence or grace that ministers
of the Gospel should be immersed in the world;
where the treasure is, there is the heart; and if
ministers are making money, they find that money
making turns away their though ts from their work-
Prudence dictates that they provide for old £520:
and sickness, and a, dependent family, and this
may be done by the ordinary, safe and legitimate
investments that never disturb the mind, but pra
mise permanent security. Speculation is akin to
gambling, often leads .to it, always excites the
mind, often proves disastrous, and in nine cases
out of ten, if not in ninety-nine cases out of every
hundred, where clergyman have gone into it, they
have came out. of it like the priest. in the house that
J not: built, “ ull shaver: and shorn.” '
Dev. Dr. John McDowell, in his semi~centenary
sermon, makes the following statement :
The Presbyterian church was divided in 1838,
since which time there have been two general as
semblies. Borh assemblies should be taken into
the account, in comparing the Presbyterian church
as it new is with what it was fifty years ago. In
the general assembly of 1807, the first I attended,
the number of delegates in attendance was 54; the
number in the two assemblies which met last spring
was 467. The number of synods when I entered
the ministery was 7; the number new, as reported
to the last assemblies, is 51. The number of Pres
byteries when I commenced my ministry was 31;
now it is 254. The number of ministers in the
Presbyterian church then was 370; now it is 3,765.
The number of churches then was 674; now it is
4,637; and the number 9f communicents then was
17,871 ; now it is 366,881 ; according to this state
ment the synods have been multiplied seven times;
the Presbyteries eight times,- the ministers ten
times; the churches seven times, and the commu
nieants twenty times.
Axo'mm Fondant—The following appeared
among the telegraphic dispatches in the daily
papers of yesterday morning:
LEXINGTON, Ky., Oct. 30, 1860
Vice President Breckinridge authorizes the an
nouncement. that the letter published over his sig
nature, purporting to be addressed to Dr. J. 'l‘. P.
Cohoon, Elizabeth City, N. 0., under date of the
sth inst, is a. forgery. He has written no such
letter.
With this dispatch staring him in the face, the
renegade of the Telegraph writes an article just as
emphatic as if he had never seen the dispatch an
nouncing the letter as a forgery! We shall see
whether he has enough of the commodity known
as conscience 10ft. to correct the statement, or
whether he will persist in it that Mr. Breckinridge
did write such a. letter. A
Aer; or In Honsn AND Mssunmsn.—ln these
times of table-turning, spirit-rapping, and mes
merism, we may be excused for the following ex
tract from the Giornale tI-z' Jlediciua Veterinarz'a,
Torine, 1859 :
To know the age of the horse without inspecting
the teeth,pull a hair out of the mane of the animal
of which you wish to ascertain the age, pass it
through a. plain gold ring,'of a certain substance,
hold the two ends of the heir between the thumb
and forefinger, suspend it in this manner in the
centre of a. tumbler, taking care that the latter is
perfeetly level, and that the hair is long enough to
allow the ring to reach the side of the glass. Hold
in g it very steady in this position, in a. few minutes,
or even seconds, a slight oscillation of the ring is
perceived, which soon increases, and the ring
airikee the side of the glass as many times as the
horse is years old. (?) .
Another Account—ll Signor Piazza, Veterinary
Surgeon, was in company with a rich proprietor,
who assured him that he always used this method
to know the age of horses, snd,.to prove it, went
‘ into the stable, and pulled e. hair out of the mane
‘ of a. seven year-old horse, and one from a. colt,
i thirty months old ; then going into the drawing—
} room, he asked for a. glass half full of water, and
also procured his wife’s plain gold ring. Then
i passing one of the hairs through the ring , he held
1 the two ends between his forefinger and thumb,
‘ dipped the ring in the water, then suspended it in
1 the middle of the glass, just below the rim; in less
i than half a. minute, the ring struck the glass seven
times. The same was done with the other hair,
and the glass was struck twice for thr colt. He ef
terwurds asked for a hair of his wife, and proceeded
in the same manner, when thirty-five strokes were
heard, and the register proved that her age was
thirty—five years. " All this,” the writer says, “ I
saw with my own eyes, and whoever likes, can try
the experiment, which may be repeated as often as
you like, but always taking a fresh hair from the
mana, es the one that has been once used will have
no further effect.” This phenomenon is ascribed
to mesmerism, or, perhaps, may depend on the
physiology of the hair, based on the microscopic
anatomy of the same. (2')
w M. N. WIARD is out in a long article in the Lou
isville Courier, in which he discusses at length the
causes and remedies of boiler explosions, and
claims to have discovered the great secret why so
many accidents by explosion occur. Mr. Wiard
assumes that suspended steam may rest on the un
ruflied surface of water without necessarily impart
ing its temperature to it, and that the moment it
can gel: at the water, by reason of its disturbed
surface, it instantly rarifies it into steam, with the
force and rapidity of ignited powder, without the
steam gusge or safety valve indicating any undue
pressure of steam. Mr. Wisrd’s remedy for explo
sions from this cause is given by himself as fol
lows:
A thermometer. with its bulb inserted in the
steam, and then in the water, would indicate the
difi'erenee of the temperature and the danger. A
fusible plug, or a plug of metal fusible at the high
est safe temperature inserted, and exposed to the
heat of the steam in a. dry pipe, or pipe passing
through the steam room, with a number of small
holes perforating the upper or all sides of the pipe
its whole length, would allow the escape of this
dangerous superheated steam without producing a.
wave or ripple on the surface of the water, as in
the ease of the throttle valve being opened or the
motion given by starting. Or, in n dry pipe can
be placed a brass rod that expands more than the
expansion of the pipe, may move a valve inserted
inside of another valve, moved (bye graduated
motion) by the pressure, so that when the temper
ature increases faster than the pressure, the valve
would separate and allow the escape of the super
heated steam as before from the dry pipe. The
thermometers, however, would in most cases be
enfioient, as this dangerous state of things does
not happen every day, and when indieeted could
be avoided by carefully putting out. the fire and
cooling of the boiler by throwing water on the
outside to carry off the heat, or by waiting (with
out motion) for a radiation from the surfeee.
I give notice that I intend to secure letters pet
ent for this invention and discovery, but feel that
it is of too much importen'ee to be kept from the
public, except so for as my rights in the invention
are concerned.
le Oman—Mr. Knoehe hu now on exhibi
tion and for sale, at his music store, a remarkably
fined toned organ of medium size, suitable for n
parlor or small church. Its capacity is from CC to
f with one stop diapuson and flute. It. in for nio
very cheap, and is worthy the tttention of those
who are looking for an Irt—ieio of the kind. 1'
New Goons! New Goons l—Having returned
from New York,l hove received now a large lot of
goods, all of which I bought at auction. Ono laun
dred pieces of beautiful Set Flower De Loines, the
best quality, which generally sells for 25 cents, at
20 cents; 50 pieces Unbleached Muslin, the best in
town, at 1“ cents; 150 pieces of Cassinetts, Sati
netts and Cassimeres, from 25 cents up to $1.25 a
yard; 25 pieces of White Flannel, cotton mixed, at
15 cents; 25 dozen of White Merino Stockings at
15 cents; 50 dozen of Gent’s Wool Socks, 20 cents
Ipoir; 10 dozen Gent’s All-Linen‘Pot’ket Hand
kerchiefs With Colored Borders, very fine, 31
cents; good Merino Undershirts and Drawers, at 65
and 75 cents a piece. A lot of beautiful Traveling
Baskets. Best Calicoes, 10 cents, warranted fest
colors. ‘
Pleas. 63.11 at LEW\"B, at the 0M stand of John
Rhoda, Esq., deceased. tf.
for gal: 86 Em Rent.
RARE CHANCE FOR INVESMENT.‘
”u , :3
-
SA L E 0 F
VALUABLE HOTEL PROPERTY
IN THE CITY OF HARRISBURG.
'lélfium well-known and valuable hotel property known
as c
“SUSQUEHANNA HOUSE,”
now in the occupancy of Wm. Mocherman, situate on
the east- end of Market street, and immediately opposite
the Pennsylvania Railroad Depot, will be olfered at
PRIVATE SALE until the 4th of December next, and
if not sold before that time, will be put up at Public
Auction on that day.
This is the most desirable propertyinfhe cityol' Hal'—
risburg for hotel business. Its proximity to the Penn
sylvania. Railroad Depot, and 12113 depot of all the rail
roads centreingnt Harrisburg, makes it more convenient
and accessible to the traveling public than any other
Hotel in the city.
Further information in regard to this property and as
to the terms of sale, may he had by applying to
WM. H. MILLER, Attorney-at—Law,
North corner Market Square, (Wyeth's Building,) second
story front. octfi-dficwta
N OTIGE T 0 SPEOULATORS 1
VALUABLE BUILDING LOTS FOR SALE!
‘ A number of large size BUILDING LOTS, adjoining
the Round House and Work Shops of the Pennsyl'mnia.
Railroad Company, will he sold low and on reasonable
terms. Apply to au29-d6m JOHN W . HALL.
NOTICE—A parochlal reSldence belng
about to be erected with St. Patrick’s Church, the
Rev. 1?. Maker offers for sale the place wherein he re
sides . Application to Rev. P. MAHEBor Major BRADY.
May 3, 1860.—my4-dtf
FOR RENT—A Commodious Two-Story
- DWELLING HOUSE, (in Second street, below Pine»
with wide Hall, large Back Building, Marble Mantels in
Parlors, Gas in six rooms, all the rooms just papered and
painted. The second story divided into seven rooms
one of which is a. Bath. This, in connection with the few;
that the house has just been placed inthe most thorough
,repair, makes it one of the most desirable houses in the
'city. Enquire of E. M. POLLOCK,
84119 Market Square, Harrisburg.
FOR SALE—A Vacant Lot of Ground,
situated in the borough of Harrisburg, adjoining the
corner lot of the northwest corner of Second and State
streets. The lot has a. front of 56 feet. For particulars
enquire of [jan2o-dtf] E. G. WILLIAMS.
FO R RE N T—Two BRICK TWO
STORY HOUSES on Pine street, between Second
and Third; also, Mrs. Gline’s COTTAGE and several
FRAME HOUSES. Enquire of
MRS. MURRAY,
janl'mltf] Corner of Second and Pine streets.
O R SAL E—One Teamster’s Wagon,
two Coal Outs, one large Cart, suitable for farming
purposes. Apply to ,
mylB JAMES M. WHEELER.
IT \VILL PAY YOU
READ THIS.
[IT WILL PAY YOU
OBSERVE WHAT I SAY !
IT WILL PAY YOU
FOR A VISIT T 0
HARRISBURG! ! !
TO SEE AND MAKE YOUR PURCHASES
FROM THE LARGE, HANDSOME
AND FASHIONABLE STOCK 0F
READY MADE CLOTHING, CLOTH,
CASSIMERES, VESTINGS AND
GENTS’ FURNISHING GOODS
NOW EXPOSED AT THE WELL
KNOWN ARCADE, ND. 3 JONES ROW
AVAILING MYSELF OF THE
ADVANTAGES WHICH READY
CASH PRESENTS, I OFFER ALL
GOODS AT 10 PER CENT. CHEAPER
THAN ANY OTHER HOUSES.
CHAS. S. SEGELBAUM.
P. S.-——IIAVING SECURED
A FIRST RATE CUTTER AND TAILOR,
I AM NOW READY TO MAKE
CLOTHING TO ORDER IN THE
MOST FASHIONABLE STYLE.
I WARRANT A FIT OR- NO SALE.
oct6-d4m
{IP T O W N!
' PATENT WEIGH 0151's
For the convenience of my numerous up town custom
ers, I have established, in connection with my old yard,
3, Branch Coal Yard opposite North street, in a line with
the Pennsylvania. canal, having the oflice formerlyoccu
pied by Mr. R. Harris. where consumers of Coal in that
vicinity and Verbeketown can receive their 00:11 by the
PATENT WEIGH 03.12.18,-
WITHOUT EXTRA CHARGE FOR HAULING,
And in any quantity they msy desire, as low as can he
purchased anywhere.
FIVE THOUSAND TONS COAL 0N HAND,
of LYKENS VALLEY Ind WILKESBARRE, all sizes.
fij’Williug to maintain fair prices, but unwilling
to be undersald by any panics.
3TH] Goal forked up and delivered clean and free
from :11 impurities, and the best article minbd.
Orders received at either Yard will be promptly filled,
ml :11 Goal delivered by the Patent Weigh Carts.
0051 sold by Boat; Ou- load, single, half or third of
tons, and by the bushel. ‘
. JAMES M. WHEELER.
Harrisburg, October 13, 1860.—0ct15
CHOICE SAUCES!
woncnsmnsmnn.
LUCKNOW canny,
CONTINENTAL,
son-ms sunnm,
ATHENEUM,
LONDON CLUB, .
sm 303 nm Imm,
Inn 303?, ‘
READING swan,
ENGLISH pnppnn swan.
WM. nocx, .73., a: co.
For snle by
mle
DYOTTVILLE GLASS WORKS,
PIIILADELPHIII,
‘ xmuuurum-z v
CAR-BOYS, DEMIJOHNS,
WISE, PORTER, MINERAL WATER, PICKLE AND
'PRESERVE BOTTLES
- 7' or man! nlscnmxox.
11. B. 55 G. W. BENNERS,
ocl9-411___~27 South Front steret, Philadelphia.
INSTRUCTION IN MUSIC.
1!. W. WEBER, nephew and taught by the well re
memberad late F. W. Weber, of Harrisburg, is prepared
to give lessons in music upon the PIANO, VIOLIN
OELLO, VIOLIN and FLUTE. He will give lessons at
his residenne, corner of Locust street and River alley
at at, the homes of pupils. 3112541611:
Ho 1 BOYS AND GIRLS " BALLS 1
[-00k t 0 your interest. You can buy Bat and Parlo:
“usage: five cents, at
no
‘
YKENS VALLEY NUT GOAL.—
Just received, afull supply of S. M. 0033 LYKENS
vALLEY NUT COAL. For sale by -'
max-7 JAMES M. WHEELER
WEDDING and Visiting Cards,
Anna’s Bookstore.
K ELLER’S DRUG STOREhe place
. ta buibnmastic Medicines
KELLER’S DRUG STORE is the place
to find the bent assortment of Pom Monnnies. _
KELLER’S DRUG STORE is the place
to ‘ind anything in 11.. way of Perfumery.
TO
TO
KELLER‘S Drug Store
filehiml.
name
MRS. WINSIM_V,
An expemheed Nurse and Female Physicmn, presents
to the attention of mothers, her
SOOTHING SRUP,
FOR. CHILDREN TEETHING, -
which greatly facilitates the process of teething, by
softening the gums, reducing all inflammation—will
allay ALL 1’ AIN and spasmodic action, and is
SURE TO REGULATE THE BOWELS.
Depend upon it mothers, it will give rest to yourselves, 3
and v ~
RELIEF AND HEALTH TO YOUR INFANTS.
We have put up and soldthis article for over ten years,
and CAN SAY, IN CONFIDENCE AND TRUTH of it,
what we have never been able to any of any other medi—
cine—NEVEß HAS IT FAILED, IN A SINGLE IN
STANCE, TO EFFECT A CURE, when timely used.
Never did we know an instance of dissatisfaction by any
one who used it. On the contrary, all are delighted with
its operations. and speak in terms of commendation of
its magical effects and medical virtues. We speak in
this matte): “ WHAT WE DO KNOW,” after ten year-57
experience, AND PLEDGE OUR REPUTATION FOR
THE FULFILLMENT OF WHAT WE HERE DE
CLARE. In almost every instance where the infant is
suffering from pain and exhaustion. relief will be found
in fitt'lteen or twenty minutes after the syrup is adminis
ere .
This vofible preparation is the prescription of one of
the most EXPERIENCED and SKILLFUL NURSES in
New England, and has been used with NEVER FAIL
ING SUCCESS in ‘
THOUSANDS OF CASES.
It not only relieves the child from pain, but invigo
rates the stomach and bowels, corrects aéidity. and
gives tone and energy to the whole system. It will al
most instontly relieve
1 GRIPING IN THE BOWELS. AND WIND COLIC,
and overcome convulsions, which. if not speedily reme
died, end indenth. We believe it theBEST and SUREST
REMEDY IN THE WORLD, in all cases of DYSEN—
TERY and DIARRWEA IN CHILDREN, whether it
arises from teething,or from any other cause. We would
say to every mother who has a. child suffering from any
of the foregoing complaints—Do NOT LET YOUR PRE
JUDIOES, NOB. THE PREJUDICES OF OTHERS, stand
between you and your sulferlng child, and the relief that
will be SURE—yes, ABSOLUTELY SURE—to follow the
use of this medicine, if timely used. Full directions for
using will accomgany each bottle. None genuine unless
the fac-simile o CURTIS sh PERKINS, New York, is
on the outside wrapper.
Sold by Druggists throughout the world.
ancrmt OFFICE, 13 Comm Srnnnr, New YORK.
PRICE ONLY 25 CENTS PER BOTTLE.
sep29-d&.wly
I m I
Wat?“ ”I? 1%
ya?) W“ ’3
J 4
A SUPE BLATIVE
gomcmunmcé
A! 1“
CQPL§PF£O
INYIBBRATINB. CflBDIAI.
TO THE CITIgEJYgHQE _Nggv‘ JERSEY AND
ms VANIA.
APOTHEGARIES, DRGGISTS, GROCERS AND
PR IVA MLIIES.
WOLFE’S PURE COGNAC BRANDY.
WOLFE’S PURE MADEIRA, SHERRY AND PORT
WINE.
WOLFE’S PURE JAMAICA AND ST. CROIX BUM.
WOLFE’S PURE SCOTCH AND IRISH WHISKY.
ALL IN BOTTLES.
I beg 160.78 to can the attention of the citizens of the
United States to the above WINES and LlQuons, im
ported by Unonrno Wows, of New York, whose name
is familiar in every part of this country for the purity
of his celebrated Scmmun Susan’s. Mr. Wol.rn,in
his letter to me, speaking of the purity of his WISES
and motions, says: “I will stake my reputation as a.
man, my standing as a. merchant of thirty years’ resi
dence in the City of New York, that all the 311.1 an and
WINES which I bottle are pure as imported, and of the
best quality, and can be relied upon by every purchaser.”
Every bottle has the proprietor-’5 name on the wax, and
ame simile of his signature on the certificate. The
public are respectfully invited to call and examine for
themselves. For sale at RETAIL by all Apotheceries and
Grocers in' Philadelphia
GEORGE 11. ASHTON,
No. 832 Market street, Philadelphia,
_ Sqlg Agent forfhjladglphia
Read the following from the New York Courier :
Exonnous Busmsss run one New Your: Msaonssr._
We are happy to inform our fellow-citizens that there is
one place in our city where the physician, apothecary,
and country merchant, can go and purchase pure Wines
and Liquors, as pure as imported, and of the best quality.
We do not intend to give an elaborate description of this
merchant’s extensive business, although it will well re
pay any stranger or citizen to visit Unonrno Wonsn’s
extensive warehouse, Nos. 18, 20 and 22, Beaver street,
and Nos 11', 19 and 21, Marketfield street. His stock of
schnapps on hand ready for shipment could not have
been less than thirty thousand cases; the Brandy, some
ten thousand cases—Vintages of 1836 to 1856; and ten
thousand cases of Madeira, Sherry and Port Wines,
Scotch and Irish Whisky, J amaica and St. Croix Rum,
some very old and equal to any in this country. He also
had three large cellars, filled with Brandy, Wines, &c.,
in asks, under Custom—House key, ready for bottling.
Mr. Woum’s sales of Schnapps last year amounted to
one hundred and eighty thousand dozen, and we hope in
less than two years he may be equally succeasf mth
his Brendies and Wines.
His business merits the patronage of every lover of
his species. Private families who wish pure Wines and
Liquors for medical use should send their orders direct
to Mr. WOLFE, until every Apothecary in the land make
up their minds to discard the poisonous stud from their
shelves, and replace it with Wosrs’s pure Wines and
lagoons.
We understand Mr. WOLFE, for the accommodation of
small dealers in the country, puts up assorted cases of
Wines and Liquors. Such a man, and such a merchant,
should be sustained against his tens of thousands of op
ponents in the United States, who sell nothing but imi
tations, ruinous alike to human health and happiness.
For sale by 0. K. KELLER, Druggist, sole agent for
Harrisburg. seps—d&w6m
SANFORD’S
LIVER INVIGflRATOR,
NEVER DEBILITATES
I is campaundpd entirely from Gums, and he.
become m establuhed fact, I standard Medimnofinown
um! approved by All thlt
.Igrted to with anildonoe
i isnuommend .
It has cured thousand! ' within the hat two year!
who lluatil‘gidven wlltlgpes B at relief, as thenfimmerou
um ic co 'on in my possession ow.
The dose mutbeuhpted 4 to the temperamental the
2di?dm:l takiag gs, 31116 m used in such quantities as
u: :1 you a we a.
“1%: “2%: w ° llama“ m
use a e 1 - 0 and it
will cure Liver Cum 2 final-ta, Billi’ul At
tack» Drspc p I i ml chronic Diarrhoea,
Sum mar Co m— b lplainu, Joy-emc
ry,Drol:s y, S on I" IStomach, H bitual
Co ui veneu Club, 2 10, Cholera, Chole
ra Marlins, Cholern' l-I lain-tum, F l au
‘ “1.3:“ “£333.,“ fim‘;.l’.: 3‘5""
as my c- c r un
fiy’iiiai‘nkiéhgedi- m mine. Itwillzngc s 10:
- amends an 1'
twenty minutes: (a! H ’two or “no: yi'Lial:
menial. u. taken! > it commencement or at
£11; £llO In it Ircll a shy“ their tooth-way
1 vor.
MIX WATER IN TEE MOUTH WITH THE INVIG
OMTOR, A.ND BWALLOW BOTH TOGETHER.
151% One Dollar per Bottle.
——ALBO—
SANFORD'S
CATHARTIG PILLS
COMPOUND!!!) FROM , GM“
Pure Vegetable Eztracte, 'and put 15,? 3mg;
Gases, Air Tight, and wall keep 171L425" gentle b;“
' The Family Cathnr- ' sic PIL_ I ,
sctive Cutlass-tic, which‘ m lthe 11133153! h" used up
his practice more than A i-t'anaamand from those
The constantly incress- guns, and the utilise
‘Y’m ‘l‘" 1"“ “s°“ fl-‘el F 1 {regard to their use, hll
hon Which in “pl-9:: :3! H within the reach of Ill
muced “”01”!“ ”,I that difl'ezent Gathufiel
The Professionwellkno Fl ofthe bowels.
“‘ ”I “were“ ”3","?! THABTIC mm. m.,
.The FAMILY” this' o well established fact, been
nth due referenes‘ "rio- W9f the purest V table
“mm“nded from t alike H on every pal-1:10! m sli-
Ext'mu'wh'fih efnd “9- good Ind late in all
mnfleffiadatharticis B needed, such as be
‘me' e m ell zs of the m Stomach. sleepiness,
iufilfi in the Back and Lotus, Cultiva
a rain Ind s“"- 1 ness over the whole
ness, sudden cold which frequently if ne
body, mi: in t 1011’ arse of lever I’.”- 01
5113211.; 2 Creeping N gensntion 0,! Co I d
.ver we bodvdlen- B lessneuJlnmon, or
nun-t mln Rpm, sll INFLAMMATOBY DlB
- Worms 1:: oth- then or Adults, Rheum
fim, ngreat P_URIPIE_B 4 offline BLOODsnd many
diseases“) winch flesh 1s hen, too numerous to
mention inthis “vertise- 0 meat. Dose, Ito 3-
Prlce Three Dimes. .
The Liver Invigorstm- and anily Oathsxho Pills are
retailed by Druggfits genes-guy, and sold wholesale by the
Tude in :11 the arge towns. .« 1
S. 'l‘. \V SANFORD, M. D., ;
Manufacturer and Proprietor, 2030Brcsdway, h. . .
j:7-d&wly .
Ihave used imam! is now M
in all the diseases forwhieb
FAMILY
112 mg of Giraud.
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD.
gm
.—._ l-a..~":—;
FIVE’I‘MINS DAILY T 0 85 FROM PHILADELPHIA.
The Bridge at Conewago having been re-built, the
Passenger Trains of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company
will resume their former route. On and after
MONDAY, OCTOBER 15m, 1860,
they will depart from and arrive at Harris‘surg and
Philadelphia as follows :
EASTWARD.
THROUGH EXPRESS TRAIN leaves Harrisburg a:
1.15 a. m., and arrives etWest Philadelphia at 5.10 a. m.
FAST LINE leaves Harrisburg at 6.15 a. 131., every
(13y except Monday, arrives at West Philadelphia. at
10.00 a. m. '
MAIL TRAIN leaves Harrisburg at 1.00 p. ma, ar
rives at West Philadelphia at 5.00 p. In.
These Trains make close Connection at Philadelphia
with the New York Lines.
MT. JOY ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, No. 1. leaves
5.50 El- 'll-. Mt. JOY at 8.02, and connects at Lancaster at
8.50 with LANCASTER TRAIN, arriving at West Phila—
delphis. at 12.10 p. m. '
HARRISBURG ACCOMMODATION TRAIN leaves at
at 3.50 p. m., Columbia. at 5.15, and arrives at West
‘ Philadelphia at 9.05 p. In.
‘ MT. JOY ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, No. 2, leave
at 4.00 p. m., Mt. Joy at 5.11, connects with HARRIS
BURG ACCOMMODATION TRAIN East at Dillerville
at 5.40, arriving at West Philadelphia at 0.05 I" m.
WESTWARD.
THROUGH EXPRESS TRAIN leaves Philadelphia at
10.45 p. m., arrives at Harrisburg at 2.55 a. m.
MAIL TRAIN leaves Philadelphia at 7.305. m., ar
rives at Harrisburg at 12.50 p. m.
FAST LINE leaves Philadelphia at n .50 s. m . , arrives
at Harrisburg at 4.00 p. 111.
MT. JOY ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, No. 1, leaves
Lancsster on arrival of MAIL TRAIN West, at 11.04 a.
m., leaves Mt. Joy at. 11.42, and arrives at Harrisburg
at 1.00 p. m.
HARRISBURG ACCOMMODATION TRAIN leaves
Philadelphia at 2.00 p. m., Columbia at 6.10, and arrives
at Harrisburg at. 7.35 p. 111.
MT. JOY ACCOMMODATION TRAIN, No. 2, leaves
Lancaster, on the arrival of LANCASTER TRAIN West.
at 7.54 p. 111., Mt. Joy at 8.30, and arrives at Harrisburg
at 9.42 p.lll.
Passengers leaving Philadelphia at 4.00 p. m ~ on LAN
CASTER TRAIN, connect at Lancaster with MT. JOY
ACCOMMODATION TRAIN No. 2, at 7.54, and arr-ire
at Harrisburg at 9.2-! p. m
SAMUEL D. YOUNG,
Supt. East. Di'u. Pgryfia Railraudl
0 ctlfi-dtf
NEW AIR LINE ROUTE
TO
NEW YonK.
'~-*"—-r—,—v-'l-- .-r ,‘ {l'l- ;T‘_ '
.a ‘ ; A; §=Laf>l
__ ~ @ :=,===s:
.‘- ; ’r-r . ‘ 43-5.;
Shortest in Distance and Quickest in Time-
BETWEEN THE TWO CITIES OF
NEW YORK ANvIiAHARRISBURG,
READING, ALLENTBWN AND EASTIIN}
MORNING EXPRESS, West, leaves New York at 6
a. m.,' arriving at Harrisburg at 12.45 noon, only 63;
hours between the two cities.
MAIL LINE leaves New York at 12.00 noon, and at]
rives at Harrisburg at 8.30 p. m.
MORNING MAIL LINE, East, leaves Harrisburg at
8.00 a. m , arriving at New York at 4.80 p. m.
AFTERNOON EXPRESS LINE, East, leaves Hun-ia
burg at 1.15 p. m., arriving at New York at 9.00 p. m.
Connections are made an Harrisburg at 1.00 p. m. with
the Passenger Trains in ear-h direction on the Pennsylva
nia, Cumberland Valley and Northern Central Ruilrosda
All Trains connect at Reading with Trains for Potts.
ville and. Philadelphia, and. at Allentown, for Mauch
Chunk, Easton, & c.
No change of Passenger Cars or Bagguge between New
York and Harrisburg, by the 6.00 a. nl. Line from New
York or the 1.15 p. m. from Harrisburg.
For beauty of sccnnry and speed, comfort and uccom
modation, this Route presents superior inducements to
the traveling public.
Fare between New York and Harrisburg, FIVE DOLLARS .
For Tickets and other information apply to
J . J . CLYDE, General Agent,
I'6l Harrisburg.
1860 . 1860.
NORTHERN CENTRAL RAILWAY.
.'_'.--“ fi-r‘ .-.
NOTI C E .
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
ON AND AFTER SUND A Y, MAY 27th, 1860,
the Passenger Trains of the Northern Central Elihu:
will leave Harrisburg as follows :
G 011 V 6‘ SO UTH.
EXPRESS TRAIN will leave at.”- .- .... "1.40 a. m.
ACCOMMODATION TRAIN will leave 5t..'1.30 a. m.
MAIL TRAIN wi111e5ve5t......... . .. 1.00 p.m.
GOING N ORTE
MAIL TRAIN will leave nt...-...__.... -_ - 1.20 p. m.
EXPRESS TRAIN will leave at. . . . ... . . . ~9.32 p, m.
The only trains leaving Harrisburg on Sunday will be
the EXPRESS TRAIN at 1.40 a. m., going South, and
the EXPRESS TRAIN M: 9.32 p. m., going North.
For further information apply at the ones, in Penn
sylvania. Railroad Depot. J OHN W. HALL, Agent. ~
Harrisburg, May 26, 1860.—my28
PHILADELPHIA
‘ AND
READING RAILROAD,
SUMMER ARRANGEMENT.
ON AND AFTER MAY 28, 1860,
TWO PASSENGER TRAINS LEAVE HARRISBURG
DAILY, (Sundays exceptedg at 8.00 A. M., and 1.16 2.
IL, for Philadelphia, Irrivingthere 3t 1 .25 P. 11., and 6.16
P. M.
RETURNING, LEAVE PHILADELPHIA at 8 .00 AM.
and 3.80 PAL, arriving 1t Hmisburg it 12 45 noon Ind
8.30 P. M.
lABESI—To Philadelphia, No. 1 Gus, 83.25; No. 2,
(in same train) $2.70.
Mm :—'X‘o Bending $2.60 and 81.30.
_ A: Reading, connect with trains for Pomviua, Minors
ville, Tamaqua, Catawiasa, kc.
FOUR TRAINS LEAVE READING FOR PHILADEL
pnn DAILY, at a A. m., 10.45 A. m., 12.30 noon and
3.43 P. u. ‘
DEAVE PHILADELPHIA FOR READING It .0 -
11., LOO P. IL, 3.30 P. IL, And 5.00 P. M. '
.rms:_naading to Philadelphia, 31.75 and $1.45.
THE MORNING TRAIN FROM HARRISBURG GON
NEC’I‘S AT READING with up train for Wilkalbure
Pittston uld Seaman.
For through tickata and oflier information up” ‘0
J. J. CLYDE,
“m 4“! General Agent.
PHILADELPHIA
READING
[REDUCTION OF PASSENGER lABES,
ON AND AEI¥SN9§BAXL駣m 9’ 155°
_cOMMUfIeTI ogv TICKETS,
With 26 Coupons. will be issued between my point.
desired, good for the holder and my member of his
family, in any Passenger trein,a.nd at any time—n as
per cent. below the regular fares.
Partial having occasion to ule the Reed frequently on
business or pleasure, will find the ebove arrangement
convenient and economical; M Four Passenger trains
run daily each way between Beading end Philedelphla’
end Two Trains daily between Beading, Potteville uni
Harrisburg. 0n Sundayamnlyone morning train Down
and one afternoon train Up, rune betweenPottavillenné
Philadelphia, and no Passenger lrnin on the Lehman
Velley Branch Railroad.
For the above Tickets or any Information relating
thereto, apply to 8. Bradford, Eeq., Treasurer Phlladel.
phin, to the respective Ticket Agents on the line, or to
G. A. NICOLLS, General Snp’t.
Much 27, 1860.—mama“
L. GODBOLD, PRACTICAL TUNER
- nu) Rummnn or PIANOS, MELODEONS, ac
m. Orders in future must be left at WM. KMGBE’E
MUSIC STORE, o‘] Market street, or at BUBBLER’S
HOTEL. All orders left at the above-named places ill!
meet with prompt Attention.
First class PIANOS for sale
BENJAMIN PYNE,
ARCHITECTURAL
W 001) TURNER,
mun or 426 AND 429 WALNUT 311 mm,, 1;
PHILADELPHIA. ..
Every description of CARPENTEBsi AND BUILD.
ERS’ TURNING- executed mth neatness nnd dispatch.
WINDOW, DOOR AND SASHCIRCULAR MO ULD.
INGS of every PATTERN, from four inches up to me
feet diameter. TURNED to order in the neatest style,
STABLE AND HITCHING Pos'fs, mummy]; IND
PLAIN NEWELLB, sum BALusTERs or every kind,
kept constantly on hand, and on the moat xuaaomble
“W's- mum
I=l
RAILROAD.
aepls-dly