The Forest Republican. (Tionesta, Pa.) 1869-1952, March 18, 1914, Image 1

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    THE FOREST REPUBLICAN
Published every Wednesday by
J. E. WENK.
Offloe in Smearbaugh k Wenk Building,
ILM STBEKT, JIOlflSTA, VA.
Tamil 91 AO A Year, Strictly la Ktum,
Entered ai second-class .matter at tbe
post-offloe at Tloneala.
No subscription reoelved for a shorter
period than three month.
Correspondnnce aollolted, but no notloe
will be taken of anonymous communica
tions. Always give your name.
RATES OF ADVERTISING!
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Legal advertisements ten cent per line
each Insertion.
We do fine Job Printing of every de
scription at reasonable rates, but it's cash
on delivery.
Vttta
'J TRY TP AM
-VOL. XL VII. NO. 4.
TIONESTA, PA., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18, 19U.
$1.00 PER ANNUM.
, BOROUGH OFFICERS.
Surges!. 8. D. Irwin,
Justice vflht Peace O. A. Randall, D.
W. Clark.
Oounctimen.J. W. Landers, O. B. Rob
Inson, K. J. Hopkins, O. K. Watson, U.
W. Uoleman, J. U. Muse, Charles Clark.
Constable h. L. Zuver,
Collector W. U. Hood.
School Directors W. O. Imel, J. K.
Clark, S. M. Henry, Q. Jamieson, D. H.
Blum.
FOREST COUNTY OFFICERS.
Member of Congress Vt. J. Hullngs.
Member of Senate J. K. P. Hall.
Assembly K. R. MnohltnK.
President Judge W. D. U Inckley.
Aetoexate Judges Samuel Aul, Joseph
M. Morgan.
Prothonotary, Register & Recorder, -te.
-8. R. Maxwell.
Sheriff Wm. H. Hood.
Treasurer Vt. H. Brazee.
Commissioners -Win, H. Harrison, J.
. 0. Boowden, II. H. MoClellan.
District Attorney M. A. Carringer.
Jury Commissioners J. B. Eden, A.M.
Moore.
Coroner Dr. M. C Kerr.
County auditors-George H. Warden,
A. C. Gregg and 8. V. Shields.
County Surveyor Roy S. Braden.
County Superintendent-J. O. Caraon. '
Kasalar Term mt Caart.
Third Monday of February.
Third Monday of May.
, . Third Monday of September,
. Third Monday of November.
, Regular Meetings of County Commis
sioners lHt and 8d Tuesday a of month.
, Caarca aaa Haaaala Hekwl.
Presbyterian Sabbath School at 9:45 a.
m. i M. U. Sabbath School at 10:00 a. m.
Preaching in M. E. Church every Bab
L bath evening by Rev. U. L. Uunlavey.
Preaching in the F. M. Church every
Bsbbath evening at the usual hour. Rev.
M. E. Woloott, Pastor.
Preaching in the Presbyterian church
every Sabbath at 11:00 a. m. and 7:80 p.
m. Rev. H. A. Bailey, Pa.-tor.
The regular meetings of the W. O. T.
Care held at the headquarters on the
. aeoond and fourth Tuesdays of each
month.
BU8INE8S DIRECTORY.
TV . f. ESTA LODU E, No. 869, 1. 0. 0. F.
Meets every Tuesday evening, in Odd
Fellows' Hall, Partridge building.
CAPT. GEORGE STOW POST, No. 274
G. A. R. Meeta 1st Tuesday after
noon of each month at 3 o'clock.
CAPT. GEORGE STOW CORPS, No.
137, W. K. C, meets first and third
Wednesday evening of each month.
TF. RITCHEY,
. ATTORN EY-AT-L AW,
Tionesta, Pa,
MA. CARRINGER,
Attorney and Counsellor-at-Law.
Offloe over Forest County National
Bank Building, TIONESTA, PA.
CURTIS M. 8HAWKEY,
ATTORN EY-AT-LA W,
Warren, Pa.
Practice in Forest Co.
AO BROWN,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW
Offloe in Arner Building, Cor. Elm
and Bridge Sta., Tionesta, Pa.
FRANK 8. HUNTER, D. D. 8.
Rnnma nvnr fMtiEAna Nat. Bank.
HON ESTA, PA.
OR, F. J. BOVARD,
Phvainlan A HliriTMOn.
TIONEdTA, PA.
Eyea Tested and Glasses Fitted.
D
R, J. B. BIGGINS.
Phvaic an and Murireon.
OIL CITY, PA.
HOTEL WEAVER,
8. E. PIERCE. Proprietor,
Modern and up-to-date in all Its ap
pointments. Every convenience and
oomfort provided for tbe traveling puouo.
CENTRAL HOUSE,
R. a. FULTON. ProDrletor
Tlnnwta Pa. This la thn most central lv
located hotel in the place, and baa all the
modern improvements. No pains will
be spared to make it a pleaxaut stopping
piaoe lor tne traveling puouo.
DHIL. EMERT
FANCY BOOT 4 SHOEMAKER.
Shop over R. L. Uaslet's grocery store
on Elm street. Is prepared to do all
ln. rf Ai.at'im wnrk trnm tha fiflAAt to
the ooarsest and guarantees his work to
give periect saiisiaouon. rroiupv anou-
lion given to menuiug, auu pnuw rw
aonaoie.
successfully
for 34 years-
KtuwtSAU p5rrrotDrNr0oa3
4246 Fifth AvlPittsburgh.Pa.
CHICHESTER S PILLS
Wafr v TUB WIAMONU HRANIt. A
Irr-Uararliet.
DIAMOND llltANIt IMM.A. for Kb
ycsrs known as Best, Safest, Always RellaM
SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERE
so viaat' ixpiaitNci. uur chsrcss aas
TMl LOWIST. Bend lutxkl. photo or BkeU h for
expert mnb and free it port on patentability.
INFRINQIMINT mill conducted before aU
courtn. I'atwiu obtained throuKh m, OVI.
TISIO and SOLD, frwe. TRAOI-MARKS, PIN
SIONS and COPYSIOHTS quickly obtained.
Opposite U. S. Patent Offloe,
WAHIWOTVW, Li. V.
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy
. Carta Colds, Croup and Wbuopuig Cough.
used
l'SdN'M Auu J out vrucriH lor A
( hl-rhoavtrp's Diamond "rd
Mils in Krd aad 4. old mcUlllcW
ealel with Bio KlUwa, V
Take ti other. Bur f yoar v
A.kfarC Hl- IIKH.TFRS
NOTED INVENTOR
TAKENBY DEATH
George Westingtiouse Is Victim
ol Heart Disease
INDUSTRIES NOT AFFECTED
Will Drawn and Affairs Arranged So
That Confusion .Cannot Injure Oper-
, ation , of u Different . Enterprises.
George Westlnghouse, engineer and
Inventor of the airbrake that htii
"3aved more lives than Napoleon lost
in all his battles," died ol heart did
ease in his apartment in the Langham.
Central Tark west, New York city. He
was. lu bin HUty.-eiglith year.
His death hud . been expected foi
some days, for his ailment was getting,
worse. He had been 111 for eighteen
months, but his mental .alertness re
malned unimpaired to the end. W1M)
him when death came was his wii'e
and his only son, George, Jr., and hit
brother, Herman H.
.The remains, were laid away in
Woodlawn ceWtery, New York.
Eight veteran employes of the West
inghouse Airbrake company in Wll
merdlng, Pa., one of them the first em
ploye of Mr-WestlugUouae, were pall
bearers, and twenty-seven other veter
ans attPd as a guard of honor to the
funpral cortege.
Tlia participation of the veteran em
ployes In the funeral service was a
deference to the groat personal inter
est always, nianlfestel by Mr. West-
Jnghouse la the older employes of his
companies.
., George Westlnghouse was perhaps
best known as the Inventor of the air
brake which bears his name and rev
olutionized railroading In this country.
The airbrake which he invented is
used throughout the civilized world
and In almost every part of the globe
are great plants wIiItH he founded.
. He was born at Central Bridge, N.
Y and received his early education
in the common schools. He served in
the Civil war. At his death he was
the. president of nearly thirty corpora
tlons.
. Some months ago Mr. Westlnghouse
had prepared and executed a will In
which he appointed as his executors
his brother, H. H. Westlnghouse,
Charles A. Terry of New York, a
friend of long standing, and W. P.
ITptegraff of Pittsburi:, who has had
charge of his finances for many years.
The powers granted to these executors
are the fullest possible and will en
able them to carry on his estate In
the manner outlined by him.
His -mental alertness and activity
remained unimpaired to the end. It
is officially stated that his death will
not cause any change of policy or
operation in connection with any of
the Westlnghouse Industries.
A plan which long r.go he had care
fully thought out for their continu
ance and direction goes Immediately
into effect with the aid of able and
experienced lieutenants.
, George Westlnghouse, was the
founder ot many. Industrial, establish
ments In this country, in Canada and
Europe, which .gave .employment to'
about 50,000 people. The capitaliza
tion of the companies which he con
trolled amounted, approximately to
$200,000,000.
Besides inventing and developing
the airbrake he made advances in the
science of railroad signaling and
fathered In this country the develop
ment of alternating current system for
electric lighting an1 electric power.
He Invented devices tor the safety and
economically conveying of natural gas
over., long - distances and making It
available for industrial purposes.
Owing to his man achievements In
mechanics, electricity, steam and gin
his name was known the world over
and he has had many honorable dis
tinctions conferred upon him for his
Inventive achievements and in recog
nition of the services he rendered o
the various branches ot engineering.
Although he always considered Pitta
burg as his home lu spent consider
able time in New York and in his resi
dence in Lenox, Mas., and Washing
ton. Westlnghouse Plants Closed.
Twenty-five . thousand . employes of
the Westlnghouse Industries in and
near Pittsburg did not work Saturday.
The shops closed out of respect to the
memory of the late Inventor, whoite
funeral took place in New York that
day.
In addition to the East Pittsburg
shops of the Westlnghouse Electric
company all the subsidiary plants In
the United States were closed. They
Include the foundri is In Allegheny,
works in Cleveland, Newark and other
New Jersey cities, works In New York
and in Bridgeport, Conn. Canadian
works also were closed and abroad the
observance of the funeral affected
plants in . .London .jnd Manchester,
England, In Belgium' and in Paris and
Havre, France, and in Hanover, Rn
sia, Austria and Italv.
Dry For Fourth Time.
Judge -William E. Porter refused all
applicants for liquor, licenses In Law
rence county, Pa., and as a rtsult thai
county will again be dry for the fourth
successlveyear.
Sixteen Lose; Sixty-eight Get License.
The Somerset county (Pa.) liquor
license dechlons were handed down.
Sixtepn applications were refused and
iixty-elgbt granted.
TWO REGIMENTS;
SENT: TO-ORDER
Force Along Mexican Boundary
I B3 Strengthened
INVASIONS FEARED BY TEXANS
Huerta "Recruits" Street Army Men
In Suburbs of Mexico City Are
Grabbed, Uniformed, Sent to Front,
The Ninth infantry now at Fort
Thomas, Ky. and Fort , Logan II
Roots, Ark., and thy Seventeenth in
fantry regiment at Fort McPherson.
Ga., have been ordered to be In readi
ness to proceed to Laredo and Eagie
Pass, Tex., to strengthen the Mexican
border patrol.
The orders were prepared by Secre
tary Garrison for the approval ol
President Wilson. The explanation ol
the move was that it was desirable to
strengthen the border patrol.
On their arrival iUk total numbet
of troops engaged In patroling the
Mexican border will he about 6,500. In
addition there are 12 000 troops con
centrated at Galveston and Texas Cily
organized as a division.
Secretary Garrison's official an
nouncement of the detailing of the
troops was:
"To allay as far as possible the fears
of the people on the border the presi
dent took up with me the question oi
sending some additional troops. I have
ordered the Ninth an l Seventeenth in
fantry sent there. They will be sta
tioned at present at Eagle Pass and
at J.aredo and the troops now at these
places will be relieved for more ex
tended border work."
. Many Men "Enlist."
The federal army is being recruited
again and President Huerta Is prac
ticing his old conscription tactics.
Hundreds of men wt;re seized in the
streets and locked up until they could
be provided with uniforms and rifles.
They were then pronounced "soldiers"
and sent to Cuernavnca, where Zapa
tistas were reported to be operating.
Huerta also impressed 1,000 men
from the Mxlco City prison.
TRADE REPORTS CONFLICT
Banks Not Doing So Much, While
Steel Bookings Increase.
Dun's Review of Trade says this
week:
"Considerable irregularity still char
acterizes the business situation and
statistics of trade movements are con
flicting. As measured by bank clear
ings the volume of transactions con
tinues smaller than a year ago, there
being a loss this -week of 1.9 per cent,
while gross earnings of railroads re
porting for February were 7.8 per cent
smaller than in the corresponding
period of 1913.
"On the other hand, a further sub
stantial reduction occurred In the num
ber of idle freight tars, the gain In
unfilled tonnage of th principal Iron
and steel Interest last month sur
passed expectations, nnd there was a
decrease in surplus stocks of copper.
Current reports from leading centers,
however, are lacking in uniformity
and Indicate that tho effects of the
recent storms have not entirely dis
appeared." "BOILED" TOO MUCH
Ambassador Page Thus Explains Hit
Canal Speech.
Ambassador Walter Hines Page In
London received from Secretary of
State Bryan notification of the resolu
tion of the United States senate In re
gard to his speeches on the Panama
canal and Monroe doctrine delivered
there before the Association of Cham
bers of Commerce on Wednesday.
The secretary of state requested the
ambassador to cable an explanation of
the speech and Mr. Page Immediately
began preparing his reply.
His remarks, the iimbassador de
clared, had been too greatly con
densed. When referring to the Panama
canal he had said that Great Britain
would profit most from the canal be
cause Bhe owned the great bulk of the
world's shipping.
CONGRESS
Say Eight-Hour Law Fails.
The burdens of the La Folletto
working women's eight hour law in the
capital already have been shifted to
the consumers and employes, several
witnesses told the senate labor com
mittee, supporting Senator Kenyon's
bill for an investigation of the cost of
living here. Wages have been reduced
and prices have been raised, the wit
nesses said.
Bureau of Labor Safety Craated.
A bill creating a bureau of labor
afety in the department of labor
passed the house by a unanimous vote.
The bill is a composite measuro
formed of a union of I wo bills, one In-'
troduced by Leader Mann of Illinois
and the other by tho late Represent
ative Hremner of New Jersey.
Special Pen For Alaska Bill.
The pen" with Whhii Speaker Champ
Clark signed the Alaska railroad bl'.l
was made ol Alaska gold and was held
In an ivory nenholdur made from the
tusk of a mastodon that roamed in
Alaska more than 50.000 years ago.
EXPRESS FIRM
QUITSJUSINESS
United States Company Hurt by
: Parcel Post
ITS DISSGLUTION ORDERED
Directors Vote to Liquidate Company's
Affairs as Soon as Possible Severe
Slump in Business Suffered by Firm.
Directors of the United States Ex
press company voted to wind up its
affairs and have it go out of business.
The first direct result of the gov
ernment's competition and the reduc
tion of 16 per cent in express rates
therefore will be to have thrown 13,
000 employes of this company out of
work by the time its liquidation is
completed. There are about 2,000 em
ployes of the company in New York
city. Its yearly pay roll is about ?i3,
000,000. The precise means to be adopted
for realizing on the company's assets
were not disclosed, but It is thought
likely that a syndicate will be formed
to take them over so that they may be
disposed of to the best advantage.
There have been various estimates
of the company's assets, but persons
familiar with their value declare that
the return to the shareholders will oe
between $90 and $100 a share. There
is considerable real estate of value,
as well as costly equipment and out
standing contracts with railroads,
which, it Is expected, will be trans
ferred to other express companies at
a fair profit.
The success of the parcel poRt and
the recent order of the Interstate com
merce commission, resulting In a 10
per cent reduction In express charges
are held directly responsible for the
company's retirement from business
after sixty years of continuous opera
tion over some of the leading railroads
of the country.
Earnings of the company for the
five months of the fiscal year so far
reported showed steady declines, with
a deficit of $32,000 for November. Holt-
day business was fairly large, but
earnings continued to dwindle until
some of the more Influential interests
became outspoken for liquidation.
The late Thomas C. Piatt and his
family for years were the dominant
Interests In United States express. In
fact, their control was so complete
that they succeeded in warding off
numerous demands and protests on
the part of minority interests and foi
many years practically nothing was
known by the public ci the affairs ol
the company, no meeting of the stock
holders having been held In fifty years.
The result of the closing up of the
express company will be far reaching,
according to the belief of Wall street.
99,607 ASK NO LICENSE
Remonstrances Piled Up Against Alle
gheny County Saloons.
On the last day for filing remon
strances agnlnst liquor license applica
tions Attorney William A. Wilson, rep
resenting the Ministerial union and
the Anti-Saloon league, filed remon
strances against all the wholesalers
and retailers in Allegheny county, Pa.,
asking the court to grant no licenses
on the grounds that saloons and the
sale of liquor are a menace to the
community.
These remonstrances are signed of
ficially by Rev. Dr. George W. Slielton
as president of the Ministerial union,
and Rev. Dr. J. K. McClurkln, chair
man of the Anti-Saloon league, and
contain the names in separate bundles
of 61,097 men and 48,510 women.
These names are on Ellps that were
taken from house to house and passed
around In churches recently.
SUGGESTS TEST FOR ULSTER
Asquith Would Exclude Unionist Coun
ties From Home Rule.
The British government's plan for
the conciliation of the Unionists of
Ulster in connection with the Irish
home rule bill was laid before the
house of commons.
U met with a cool reception from
the Unionists.
The terms of Premier Asqulth's of
fer were that a poll should be taken
ot the parliamentary electors of each
county of Ulster to decide whether
they should be excluded from the
operation of the bill for a period of
six years from the first meeting of tho
new Irish parliament.
Premier Asquith i: admitting that
all negotiations for a settlement had
left the party leaders as far apart as
before said the government had adopt
ed the proposed plan as the price of
peace.
IACK DRIVEN FROM SWEDEN
Colored Pugilist Johnson Insulta
Ladles and Riot Ensues.
Jack Johnson, the negro pugilist,
has been driven out of Sweden. The
big negro caused disgust and anger
by his alleged indecent overtures to
two ladies and when ho appeared at a
sparring match there was a riot.
.Jackson, .Johnson's manager, at
tempted to calm the people, but ws
himself threatened wl'.h revolvers and
knives. Johnson and Jackson were
compelled to flee. They were followed
by a crowd which polled them with
rotten eggs until the police Interfered.
Half an 'hrur later Johnson was en
route to Denmark.
100 LEADING MEN
ENDORSEPENROSE
Remarkable Statement Issued
by Penna. Protective Union.
Moat Prominent Manufacturers l
Philadelphia Unite In Stirring Ap
peal For Re-election of the Seniot
Senator.
Philadelphia, March 16. The cam
paign of United States Senator Boies
Penrose received a new Impetus to
day, when the Pennsylvania Protec
tive .Union put out a statement In
his favor, signed by one hundred ol
the most representative manufacturers
and business men in Philadelphia and
Its vicinity.
This organization was recently form
ed and has opened headquarters in
the Real Estate Trust building. Jaraei
Dobson is president; Charlemagne
Tower, former United States ambassa
dor to Germany, is one of the vlc
presidents. Every name on the lis!
of officers and executive committee
stands high in Philadelphia.
Some of the signers were ardent
Roosevelt supporters In 1912. Others
have been frequently arrayed against
tho Republican organization In local
controversies and even in state cam
paigns, but all are emphatic In theli
declaration for the protection of busi
ness in all Its phases agricultural,
manufacturing and commercial.
Following is the statement in full,
with the names of the men and firms
endorsing it:
In accordance with the spirit of th
new state-wide primary law providing
for the direct nomination of United
States senators we, the undersigned
individuals and firms, desire to go on
record before the people as to out
preference for the nomination and
election of the Hon. Boies Penrose tc
succeed himself and our reasons foi
that preference.
We regard this as one of the critical
periods in American history, perhaps
not less so than the epoch which was
marked by the birth of the Republican
party, the death of slavery and the
emancipation of American industry
from the baneful influence of world
competition, with Its tendency to de
generate the wage standards of all
peoples to the level of the wage stand
ards of the lowest of the peoples.
The great constructive policy of pro
tection is hanging in the balance. The
entering wedge of free trade has al
ready been driven Into our economic
system by the so-called Underwood
tariff law which has compelled all in
dustries, with the exception of a fa
fored few In the Democratic south, tc
face competition from the cheap laboi
markets of Europe and Asia previous
ly held at bay by the bulwark of pro
tection. If we believed that American busi
ness could soon or ultimately adjust
Itself to foreign prices and practices
without losing every advantage it now
possesses, prudence and self Interest
would dictate that we should bear with
minor evils in the hope of preserving
stability of government. But we are
convinced that no such adjustment it
possible. We feel that the Democratic
party has been false and unfair In its
treatment of the wage earner. It has
endeavored to make him think that
the amount of an employer's profits
has no legitimate bearing upon his
possible outlay for labor. It has as
sumed to prove that capital will be as
active with a prospect of poor divi
dends or no dividend as It has been
with a prospect of adequate reward
for Industrial enterprise and business
risk.
A proposition to bring down prices
and wages together might be defend
ed upon the ground that the world
standards of value in commodities
and labor are the natural standards;
but a proposition to bring down prices
without affecting wages Is a prepos
terous fraud.
Although the Underwood tariff luw
has been gradually going into effect
since Oct. 3, none of the benefits prom
ised as a result of it has materialized.
It has disorganized the markets of the
manufacturer and has exposed the
farmer to virtually unrestricted world
competition, lowering the prices he re
ceives for his products without remov
ing a penny from the prices paid by
the consumer; afflicting agriculture
and all other forms of Industry wltU
the uncertainty and doubt and the un
willingness to attempt any line of de
velopment which are the first symp
toms of general business paralysis.
Believing that a law which does no
good must inevitably do harm, we
submit to the voters of Pennsylvania
a vast majority of whom have been for
more than half a century firm In
their adherence to the principles ol
protection that it Is high time they
were rallying to the support of a cause
too much and too long obscured by
minor Issues.
Therefore, the undersigned repre
sentatlves of manufacturers and busi
ness men In this commonwealth, as
sociated together under the name oi
the Pennsylvania Protective Union,
have determined to use our best ef
forts for the correction of a serious
economic mistake before It Is too late
and to adjure the voters to weigh well
the services and worth of our seniot
senator, the Hou. Boles Penrose, with
a view of! making a united and vigor
ous effort to secure'hls re-election,
Mr. Penrose, Although still a com
paratively young mini, has been a rep
resentative of tho people lor thirty
years. He is the scion of a distin
guished family which has been promi
nent in the affairs of Philadelphia and
Pennsylvania since the days of Wil
liam Penn. By birth, education, tem
perament, environment and practical
training, he is pre-eminently the best
fitted man In the commonwealth for
the post he now occupies.
An honor graduate of Harvard, he
rose Instantly in the practice of law
and later in the counsels of the state
legislature at Harrisburg. Ills election
to the United States senate at the age
of thirty-six years was a recognition
of political ability and natural leader
ship which seldom comes to men of
that age.
During his novitiate as the Junior
member from this state In the upper
branch of congress, his Intelligence,
his indomitable energy and his re
markable grasp of big national prob
lems, coupled with his still more re
markable understanding of tbe multi
tudinous details which enter into
those problems, made him the most
useful and influential Junior member
in the senate.
Entering the halls of congress on
th6 same day that William McKinley
took possession of the White House,
Mr. Penrose was impressed at the
very outset ot his senatorial career
by the necessity of making our indus
trial protection real and effective.
In the drafting of the Dingley tariff
bill which transformed the United
States from a commercial slough of
despond into the busiest and most
prosperous nation on the globe, it was
Senator Penrose who looked after the
industries of the Keystone State. To
his patient Investigations and indefati
gable energy were largely due those
favorable conditions which doubled the
Industries of Pennsylvania in a single
decade, Increasing wages and the num
ber of wage earners In like proportion
and greatly augmenting our popula
tion. His record is a stirring story of
achievement for the people of his
state and nation. He has been of in
estimable service to his vast constit
uency through his masterly direction
of the committee on postodlces and
post roads and of the still more im
portant committee on finance, of
which he was chairman and is now
the ranking Republican member.
Too much cannot be said of the Im
portance of tills committee member
ship. Tariff laws are approved or dis
approved In the finance committee
All matters touching the revenues of
the country are finally disposed of
there.
As chairman of that committee
and In the event of the Republican
party's return to power, no other
chairman could be elected under the
established rules Senator Penrose
would wield for Pennsylvania the de
cisive Influence in every economic
question to be submitted to congress.
Such Influence is nof exercised by
senators from comparatively unim
portant southern states which early
recognized the advantage of retulning
in the upper branch able men who
might augment ability with the tre
mendous power of seniority.
If, as has been announced as a set
tled fact, Senator Oliver should retire
at the expiration ot his present term,
and if that retirement were to be ac
companied by the withdrawal of our
senior senator, Pennsylvania's voice
In the senate would be hushed for
years to come. No new Republican,
however pble, could fight our battles,
and no new Democrat, regardless of
intellectual qualifications, could break
through the barriers of procedure be
hind which the veteran Democrats of
the south are entrenched, even though
he were sufficiently In sympathy with
Pennsylvania's long-established and
oft-retterated policies to wish to do so.
There Is a special fitness in the an
nouncement of Senator Tenrose that
he will become a candidate before the
voters of his party under the provis
ions of the now popular primary net.
This law, revolutionizing our method
of choosing United States senators as
well as state candidates, was cheer
fully acquiesced In by him nnd Is one
of many proofs of his undiminished
aggressiveness In behalf of good gov
ernment and of his desire to safe
guard the supremacy of the electo
rate. His Is a record not of words but of
deeds; an honest record; a brilliant
record; a faithful record; a record for
industry; a record for courteous at
tention to all those who have needed
assistance in Washington, whether
high or low, rich or poor; a record for
constant and easy accessibility to his
constituents; a record for Bimity; a
record for patriotism; n record for
the broadest and best statesmanship
which has been exemplified by any
representative of the commonwealth In
half a century.
On behalf of stilled enterprise,
throttled Industry, halting business
and an apprehensive public-, we pledge
ourselves to the support of Senator
Penrose, believing his re-election to
be the best possible method of under
writing the continued industrial pre
eminence of Pennsylvania and the fu
ture prosperity of her 8,0U0,0n0 inhab
itants. (Signed)
JAMES DOP.SO.V,
John & James Dobson, Inc.
CHARLEMAGNE TOWER,
NATHAN T. EOI.WEM.,
Folweli liro. & Co.. Inc.
WM. M. COATES,
Coates Ilros.
JOHN PITCAIKN,
C. H . Wheeler Mfg. Co.
WM. DISSTON,
Henry Dlsston & Sons.
ROBERT DO UN AN,
Dornan Rrothers.
JUSTUS II. SC1IWACKE,
William Sellers Co., Inc.
GEO. E. It'ARTOI,,
Dexter Portland Cement Co.
HOWARD B. FRENCH.
Samuel H. French & Co.
WILLIAM P. WORTH,
Worth Rrothers, Co., Coatesvllle.
II. B. ROSENGARTEN,
Powers-Weightman-Rosengarten Co.
THEODORE JUSTICE,
C. T. WETHERILL,
Geo. D. Wetherill & Co.
ERNEST T. TRIGG,
Jno. Lucas & Co., Inc.
JNO. H. BROMLEY,
Jno. Bromley & Sons.
THOMAS DEVELON, JR.,
Thomas Develon's Sons.
ROY A. HATFIELD,
Hatfield & llilles.
GEO. R. BOWER,
Henry Bower Chemical Company.
JNO. E. HANIFEN,
Jno. E. Hanifen & Co.
MICHAEL G. PRICE,
McNeely & Price.
ALFRED E. BURK,
Burk Brothers.
LOUIS BURK,
THOMAS DEVUN,
Thomas Devlin Mfg. Co.
C. L. ANDERSON,
Bristol Patent Leather Co., Bristol.
SAMUEL BELL, JR.,
Quaker City Flour Mills.
JOS. R. GRUNDY,
Wm. H. Grundy & Co, Bristol.
CHARLES J. WEBB,
Charles J. Webb & Co.
JOS. 11. BROMLEY,
Quaker Lace Co.
LOUIS II. AYRES,
William Ayres & Sons.
M. H. MASLAND.
C. H. Masland & Sons.
W. 1'AliK MOOKE,
llrown Knitting Co.
H. II. BOSWORTH.
Delaine Mills, Inc.
WILSON II. BROWN,
Continental Eiderdown Co., Inc.
THEO. F. MILLER,
Stead & Miller Co.
WALTER H. ROSSMASSLER,
Sauquoit Silk Mfg. Co.
GEO. C. HETZEL,
Geo. C. Hetzel Co., Chester.
HORACE A. BEALE,
Parkesburg Iron Co., Parkesburg.
H. K. MULFORD,
II. K. Mullord Co.
FRANK SCHOBI.E,
Frank Schoble & Co.
JNO. F1SLER,
Yewdell, Jones Co.
JAS. H. GAY,
Jno. Gay Sons.
RICHARD CAMPION,
THOS. J. JEFFRIES,
Bradford Mills.
WM. S. LLOYD,
Stratford Knitting Mills.
WM. S. HALLOWELL,
Harrison Safety Boiler Works.
JNO. L. GAUMER CO.,
E. L. LANG WORTHY,
Adams & Westlake Co.
GOUVERNEUR CALDWALADER,
C're.ssoii-Morris Co.
CLEMENT R. HOOPES,
lloopes At Townsend Co.
ALEXANDER SELLERS,
Williaiu Sellers & Co., Inc.
FREDERICK LENNIG.
Chas. I.ennig Co., inc.
II. DANNENUAUM,
National Ammonia Co. of Penna.
CHARLES E. PETERSON,
llollinnswortii & Peterson.
GEO. P. MO KG AN,
Geo. P. Morgan & Co.
GRISWOI.I) WORSTED CO.,
Durby.
JOS. S. KAMUO,
Rainbo Ai Regar, Norrlstown.
II. B. TYSON,
Quaker City Mfg. Co., Norrlstown.
CHAS. F. WILLIAMS,
las. I.e's Co., Bridgeport.
J. EL WOOD LEE,
Lee Tire Ai Rubber Co., Consho
hocken. H. C. JONES,
II. C. Jones Mfg. Co., Conshohocken.
RICHARD V. M ATTlsON,
Keaslty &, Mattison, Ambler.
WM. F. READ, JK.
Win. F. Itead & Sons Co.
T. W. ANDREWS,
Pequea Mills.
WILLIS H.K1SHER,
Slielbourne Mills.
E. K. ItKEADY,
Girnrd Worsted Co.
ARTHUR W. (i HEAVES,
Greaves Brothers.
G. HENRY STETSON,
WALTER M. STEPPACHER,
Waller M. Steppacher & Bro.
CHARLES J." PILLING,
O. P. Pilling & Son Co.
MORRIS W. PHILLIPS.
Philadelphia Clay Co.
WM. H. RILEY,
William B. Riley & Co.
C. L. GILLILAND,
Ahertovle Mfg. Co., Chester.
F. QUITTNER,
Roosevelt Worsted Mills.
W. K. ROSSKAM,
Quaker City Chocolate and Con
fectionery Co.
F. H. GAYLEY,
G.-ivley A Lord Mfg. Co., Chester.
ROBERT LEWIS,
Robert Lewis Co.
ROBERT MEYER,
German-American Hosiery Co.
H. C. AHERI.E,
II. C. Aberlo Co.
ROBERT IILOOD,
.liihn lllood Co.
ROBERT PILLING,
l'llllnir Mndeley, Inc.
PAUL E. SUTRO,
E. Sulro Ai Son.
CYRUS BORGNER,
CvriiM Uorgner Co.
FREDERICK WOI.STENHOLME,
Thos. Wolstenholine Sons & Co.
W. F. BLAKEI.EY,
Arasaplia Mfs. Co., Chester.
CHAS. A. TURNER.
Chester I ace Mills, Chester.
C. A. EARNST,
Amerii-iin Viscose Co., Marcus Hook.
E. A. IRVING,
TrviiiK A l.elper Mfg. Co., Chester.
ALFRED WOI STENIIOLME,
WoNtenhnlme Clark.
JOS. FELDENHEIMEIt.
It oxford Knitting Co.
ROBERT CRANE,
Crane Ice Cream & Baking Co.
CHAS. E. CARPENTER,
llnll'-'htnn A Co.
EVERETT II. BROWN,
Wister Spinning Co.
HERBERT T. HOSKING.
Shule's I.aimdrv.
ELLIS 1 1 EY,
Rlrhar.l I lev & Sons.
IVM. M. SHARPI.ESS, JR.,
Wm. AV F. W. Sharpless.
CHAR. S. SCHELL,
Srhell ,S- I on us'reth.
ARTHUR J. FLEMING,
I'lilMn v. Co.
M. P. GLYNN.
Cannon Mills.
J. D. C. HENDERSON,
J. D. C. Henderson & Co.
F. I! VKESTRAW,
E. S. Hydo i. Co.