The Pittsburgh gazette. (Pittsburgh, Pa.) 1866-1877, June 15, 1869, Image 7

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    H
E
rbtg littslntrO Gaidts.
t-FARK9 GARDEN AND HOUSEHOLD
FARMING THAT PAYS.
.. .
We find in the Chicago Post the follow
ing report of successful farming in Min.
riesota. It supports the idea that capital
and science may derive from agricrilture
profits quite equal to those yielded by
other stadard employments: '
Mr. Da rymple is a native of Western
r) ,
Pennsylv nia, and grew up among the
sterile hilts of that region. Being a man
of energy and ambition and sharing the
common aversion against a farmer's life,
he studied law and came to Minnesota and
I settled about the year 1857. Acquirin
cdmpetence rapidly in his prr`
I health became impaired, *wilt
i his attention to farming. 'A
'rience upon a moderate scale
I vinced him that a measure of
energy and sagacity requisi
pursuits would be at least equi
• 1 ful in agriculture, especially
cupon a a liberal scale. He.
I immediately commenced ei
i operations by purchasingitwi
rtracts within convenient 4bitt
;with his Original purchase,' hi
• IspectivelY the "Grant," "ShL
i "Sheridan'', farms. These comprised in
t„ the aggregate about 2,000 acres, of which
about 1,700 were allotted to wheat.
' His first' crop_ in so extended an area
was produced in the year 1867. The yield
i
was an average of 21 bushels per acre, or
a total of 35,700 bushels. He contracted
for the'transportation of his crop in bulk
ito Milwaukee for 21 cents per bushel,
where he realized from $1,60 to $1,85 per
bushel, netting about $1,50 per bushel, or
lan aggregate of $53,550. In consequence
&cif the extremely high prices which had
ruled the preceding year—seed wheat
• t costing $2,50. with corresponding dis
.ibursements for first breaking and other
expensek —the net profits were somewhat
A less than . one-third of the total receipts;
Ant a clear profit was realized of about
;-$14,500.
- • The crop of: the foliowing year, 1868,
averaged about 23 bushels per acre, or an
1 -aggregate of
. 39,000 bushels, which he
g was both wise and lucky enough to sell
• '' from the' harvest field before the decline
. •, in grain, by which movement prices were
• lc btained which made an average of $3O
: • i per acre. The total cost of production,
• ncluding interest on qapital, amounted to
,
per
r 8 pe ee r re a , cre e , r lea a vi t n e g u . d a c e l f ea t r 2 p o r , o 4 fi w t . T
of s h l2 e
.
.f. original coat pf the land averaged about
•:.•: .$l2 per acre; so that after allowing amply
t ps
:• for expenses of building, fencing and
f . 7 .
.4..: other improvements, the net profits on
! !' two years' crops were more than suffi.
1; .•i tient to cover the whole, while the mar
;.: ket value of thi land and improvements
'.-:.., is to-day nearly or quite three times Its
fi
!:...! rat cost.
Mr. Dalrymple, I learn, has still
~.1 .
*..- further extended his operations the pres
ent season, and if the present propitious
•••• weather continues, greater results will be
' 1
• produced than anything yet realized.
,1.
* - is field of operations is about twenty
_!..miles southeast of St. Paul, in the beauti
i
urand fertile region known as "Cottage
-• - " Grove," so called from a belt of oak dm
' • ber half a mile wide in which the farmers
i r
••• ale built their houses, while their fields
*• • run out on the adjacent prairie. It is a
... arrow strip of country with an undulat
• 'rig surface ,
limestone,a warm friable soil, under,
: aid with and bounded by the
. i .
:•- • , ississippi and St. Croix rivers, by
!- - hich rare facilities are afforded for the
. .4
lshipment of grain.
*. 1 Mr. Dalrymplepurchases his supplies
y wholesale, keeping an eye wisely up
. n the markets, obtains his laborers by
*:••• beral advertising, pays them amply, and
• : irides and directs their labor turough
l i.
~ .', he aid of a competent foreman, with
• •something of military precision. He
, tudies and uses all the well-attested. im
, rovements in machinery, especially for
' athering and handling grain, and in
.... ' hqrt has illustrated the splendid results
lto i
`be expected 'of "large farming" in
- innesota when directed by a union of
mple means and business-like- energy
.. d sagacity.
Gov. Marshall's experiment is not yet
,*pufficiently developed to afford any re
" nits. He owns, in company with Maj.
-:- .
H. Donaldson, 2,200 acres in Windom
‘ ownship, Mower county, of which-1,000
. cres are now in wheat with a very
romising appearance.
A Mr. roster, formerly of Plainview,
abasha county, now of Winona, cul
- irated for ' several years, about 1,400
res with very remunerative results.
. .
Mr. Jenkins, of Lakeville, Dakota
• • '.
unty, has a farm of 700 - acres; Mr.
endall, of Eyota, Olmsted county, one
' .
t the same size; while Capt. W. F.
. ayidson; President of the Northwestern
•-• aeket Company, has recently purchased
tract of several thousand acres with a
':. • iew to the prosecution of farming op
ation on a large scale.
' '..•-
wnzic TO CUT GRASS.
We find - the following, given in the
. :achusetts Agricultural Report, as
he views of Dr. Fisher with reference to
.e proper time to cut grass. We think
• the has put the time a little too early,
o secure the best 'results in quantity and
-* 'quality, but in the main he is correct:
:• "Grass should be cut just at the time
• hen cattle like it best, and that is long
. -fore it is in flower. If you will give
ttle th,eir choice, you will - find that they.
'lltake invariably the earlier and shorter
•
-a, before it throws up its flower stem.
S t may be that if you cut the grass at that
me you get but a very small crop, but it
just as much better as it is smaller. I
I. avo been experimenting upon this sub- -
ect for some years, and I have concluded
• at the best time to cut herds'.grass, if I
• n have my choice, Is when the seed
m just begins to show itself, and when
e grass averages from ten inches to a
oot in height. At that time the grass
!contains more nutriment than it does af..
terwards, because as it goes on it changes
to woody fibre very muck faster than it
increases the soluble Ingredients which
.serve for the nourishment of the animal.
therefore intend to cut my grass at that
time. , .
used to make the sane mistake that
almost everybody does. I did not begin
to cut my grass;until my first field was
ripe, and the consequence Was„ when I
ended. my last grass wa&spolled, which
is the case with a, great many farmers. - It
is important to cut all the grass when it is
in good condition, and the only way we
can get along with it is to cut the first too
dearly. I watched my grass this year
daily, and I came to the conclusion that
if I had cut it all on the 15th day of June
It would have been worth more money to
me than it cut later. I began about the
St.ti of dine and finished on the Sd of
=
July. I cut my lierds'-grass before !time!
shown a blossom, and I should he willing
to put that hay before cattle beside of any
other hay, and if they dill not choose
mine in preference to any other I should
be very muckinistaken.
"Then there is another thing to be con-
sidered. You get a second crop, which
is large and equally good quality. It
does not disturb the digestion of animals,
as rowen often does, and certainly two
crops are worth more than can be got off
the land. The effect of this upon cattle is
just like grass* It is dried grass; it is not
chips and'shavings, as a great part of our
hay is. A great portion of it is soluble,
and animals thrive well upon it. It takes
less to keep them; they will give more
milk, make better looking butter, and
more of it."
CULTURE OF. SMALL FRUITS.
A correspondent of the New York Fruit
Growers' Club lately asked the following
questions :
- 1. Will it do to continue pinching back
the young shoots all through the growing
season until frost, or should we stop in
the fall? If so, at what time? 2. How
long will blackberry and raspberry plan
tation last? I understand that some grow
ers recommend taking up the old
plants every four or five years, and set-
ting out new plants in their place. I hear
that the Antwerp raspberry is failing at
Milton on the Hudson river. 3. I have
seen it recommended to plow or furrow
up to the plants in the fall. Now, should
the soil be left during the next summer,
or taken away?
To these questions, Mr. A. S. Fuller
replied as follows:
It is difficult to give directions that will
suit all localities and soils. In regard to
pinching back the young canes of rasher
ries, my practice is to pinch back black
berries but once or twice in the season,
according to the strength of the plants,
and then only the main cane is checked,
as, I prefer to let the side shoots grow
their whole length, and prune them back
in winter or early in the spring. I usu
ally commence pinching off the main cane
early in July, and if the upper buds start
and grow too strong, I cneck them again
in August, but never later than the first
of September. Late summer pinching or
pruning is always injurious, particularly
if the plants are growing very vigorously,
because they are very . likely to produce
new shoots which will be killed by the
frost Besides this, the fruit buds which
are relid upon for the next season's
crop; will sometimes start in the fall, and,
of course, be destroyed by the first frost.
I haVe never found it necessary to check
the growth of rasberry plants in summer,
and I doubt if it is ever beneficial. The
duration; of raspberry and blackberry
Plantations will depend entirely upon the
soil and care given them. Probably
about five years is the average duration,
but I have known some to be as good at .
Afteen years, as they were at three and
and four years. Plowing the soil up to
the plants in the fall is certainly to be re
commended for both raspberries and
blackberries, but the soil should be made
level again in the spring.
DIGGING BETWEEN THE ROWS OF STRAW
A writer in the Gardner's Magazilit
says there is a diversity of opinion
among gardners as to the injury or bene: r
fit which is derived from digging between
the rows of strawberries. The late Mr.
Keen of Isleworth, the originator 'of
Keen's Seedling, was an advocate for
shallow digging. It is just possible that
his soil was rather light, and that; as the
strawberry delights to gr•vt In a tena
cious or good loamy soil, he objected
deep digging, for fear of loosening the
subsoil. In the neighborhood of Enfield,
whence the London markets are supplied
annually with large quantities of fruit,
the ground between the rows is deeply
dug, and allowed to remain rather rough,
so that the soil thus disturbed, may de
rive benefit from the influence of the at
mosphere penetrating it. Bosides this,
the constant treading between the rows,
tho they may derive nourishment from
the manure that may be applied, and to
admit the spring and early summer rains,
or any water that may be given to them
during their bearing season.
To destroy insects on the leavei of
your roses, an experienced gardener tells
us the following remedy, which we are
assured never fails, and the exp - ense is in
considerable. Take about two !ounces of
quaffs - Fa, which is cheap and can be pro
cured at any drug store, and put it in a
gallon of water, which boil twenty min
utes. When coldi wash the leaves of the
bushes with it. Many florists have lately
.been complaining of a little green insect,
- and they will do well to try the receipt.
To stop bees from robbing each other's
hives, put a small piece of camphor inside
the entrance of the hive which is plun
dered;
The public has yet to , learn the full ad
advantage of keeping - Oultry. Few seem
to appreciate what they may .do among
trees in an orchard. Let any one try
them in an orchard of a quarter of an acre,
where they may be kept by the picket
fence four or five feet high, putting in,
say one hundred and twenty-five fowls,
and observe the result. It will avoid the
annoyances in the garden, of which so
many complain, while - they will work
among the trees, doing just what is
needed, and destroying everything that
can Injure the fruit trees, in the
shape of bugs, worms or other
insects, and lay a large number
of eggs, which are a cash article,
to say nothing of the chickens, which
pay well enough for raising at the pres
ent time. I have tried it and know it is
so. I have about one hundred fowls,
`which have worked admirably among my
trees, keeping the ground in good condi
tion, keeping off the insects and promot
ing-the growth of the orchard. I am
satistied.that we have yet to learn the full
benefits which may be derived from the
proper =management of fowls, and it is
quite poisible that the method I have
suggested-may offer the best way of get
ting ottr apple orchards into bearing con
dition.
Numier Oite.—One 'hour lost in the
morning by laying in bed, will put back
-ell the business of the day.
One hour gained by rising early, is
worth one month in the year.
One in the fence will coi
e - t ten time.
as much as it will to Snit at' once.
One diseased sheep will opal a flock.
One drunkard will keep a family
_poor
and make them miserable.
One husband that is penurious or lazy,
and deprives his family of necessary
comforts, such as their neighbors enjoy,
is not such a husband as he ought to be.
One good newspaper , is one good thing
in every family, and—
One who don't take a good paper, and
pay for it, is an unworthy citizen, and
disregards the best interests of his
~~~
-7 ?.`" , :%N.q?•;74;',474:47-W" .
-•k•-• c •
C`.k."~.a.L~ ~ ~r.4cY.
=I
MEW
BERRY PLANTS
FOWLS IN ORCHARDS
'.E.11113111 . 004 1 ,,:qAP1 . 04 . -.: : :-TVEPAT," • .:SiltrY . l.s,. 186 i
SPEOL4L
ar SCHENCK'S JP VL MIONIC
bllt UP. SEAWEED TONIC AND
MANDRAKE PILLS will cure Consumption,
Liver Complaint sad Dyspepsia, If taken accord
lug todliections. They are all three to be taken
at the same time. They cleanse the siomach, re
lax the liver and put it to work; the o the aPPetllle
becomes good; the four digests and mattes good
blood; the patient begins to grow in flesh; the
diseased matter ripens into the lungs, and the
patient outgrows toe disease and gets welt.. This
is the only way to cure consnMption.
To these three medicines Dr. J H. S,.henek, of
Phil. delphia, owes his unrivaled success in the
treatment of pulmonary Consumption. The PM.
morale Syrup rip, n, the morbid matter in the
mugs, nil, ure throws It off by au ea expectora
tion, for when the phlegm or matter is ripe a
Misfit cough e ill throw it off. and the patient has
rest and the lungs begin to heal.
T do this, the Nmerei d sonlc.ant Mandrake
Pills must be ire My used to cleanse the stomach
and liver. so that the Yulmonlc byrup and the
food will make good blood.
Schenck 's Mandrake Pills act upon the liver,
'minoring all obstructions. relax the sums of lb'
gall bladder, the bile starts freely, and the live
Is noon relieved; the stools will show what tit
Pills can do; noth it has ever been invented ex
cept calomel (a deadly po'son w. ich Is very den
germ's to use no ass with start are,
unlock the - gall blailder'andthe secretions
of the liver - like Schenck's Mandrake Pills.
Liver Complaint is one of tLe nlost prom!nent
causes of Consumption.
Schenck's Seaweed
then Tol e is a gentle stimulant
and alterative. and alkali In the seaweed;
which this preparation is Hassle ot, assets the
stomach to turosv out the gastric juice to dissolve
the food with the Puim onle Syrup, and it is made
into Food b ood without fermentation or souring
in the stomach. .
'X he great reason why physiclaes - do not cure
Consumption is, they try to do too much; they
give medicine to stop the cough, to stop chills,to
stop night sweats, hectic fever and by so doing
they di range the whole digestive Dower s, lock
ing up thwecret.ons, and eventually the patient
sinks saddles. •
Dr. Schenck, In his treatment, does not try to
stop a cough, night 'sweats, chills or fever. Re
move the cause, and teey will all stop of their
owe accord. ).o one can be cured of Consump
tion, giver Complaint, Dyrpepsia, Catarrh,
'Canker, Ulcerated Throat, unless the liver and
stomach are made healthy.
If a person has consumption, of course the
lungs in sOme way are diseased, either tubercles,
abcesses, bronchial Irritation, pleura adhesion,
or the lungs are a mass of inflammation and rut
decaying. IA such cases what must be dowel' It
is not only the lungs Inez are wasting, but it is
the whole laxly. The stomach and liver have lost
their power tomake blood out of fo d • Now the
only chance is to take Dr. Schenck's three medi
cines, which will bring up a tone to the stomach,
the patient will begin to want food, It will digest
easily and make good blood; then the patient be
gins to gain in flesh, and as coon as the body be
gins to grow, the lungs commence to heal up. -
and the patient gets Ile shy aud well. This in toe
only way to cure Consumption.
Wheu there is no lung disease and only Liver
Complaint and Dyspepsia, bchenck ' s Seaweed
Tonic aud Mandr a ke Pills are sufficient, a lthout
the Putmonic Syrup. Take the Mane rake Pins
freely In LI pillions complaints,as tbsy are per
fectly harmless. -
Dr. Scheuck, who has enjoyed uninterrupted
health for msny years past, and now weighs 215
pounds. was wasted away to a mere skeleton, In
the very last stage in Pulmonary , COMUMptiOo,
hi. phy.letaus having pronounced his case hope-.
less and abandoned 12. m to his tate. He was cured
by this aforesaid men !eines; and since his recove
ry many thousands similarly •llllctesi have used
Dr. eschews's 's preparation wi•h the same re
markable success. Full directions accompany.
each making it not absolutely necessary ter-per- •
soualis see Dr. Sebenck. unless patients wish
their lungs examined, and for this ourpose he is
prefessios ally at his Principal tifflee„Philadel.
pills, every Saturday. where all letters for advice
must be addressed. Reis also -professlonally at
No. 33 Bond street. New York, every other
Tuesday, and at No. 35 Hanover street, Boston
every other Wednesday., be gives ads ice fret:.
but for a thorough examination with his Respi
rometer the price is Ou.ce hours at each city
from 0 A. M. to 3 P.
Price of the Pelmpute Syrup and Seaweed Ton
ic esch *1.50 per nettle, t,r $2,50 a belt dozen.
Mandrake Pills I 5 cents a bust. For sale by all
druggists. myl9:lsl.d&F
ligr . DOCTOR WHITTIER CON
TINUES TO TREAT ALL PRIVATE
DISEASES. That numerous class of cases
resulting from self - abuse, producing un
manliness, nervous debility, Irritability; min
. (sons, seminal emissions, siMi finally Int
' potency. permanently cured. Persons Millet
ed wl.h fielicate, intricate and long nand
lug constitutional complaints are politelyinvited
to call for consultation; which costs nothing, -
Experience, the best of teachers. has ensiled
him to perfect retnedies at once efficient, safe,
permanent, and which In most cases c in be used
without hincrance to business. Medicines pre.
pared in the establishment, which embraces of
fice, reception and wa, Ing rooms: also, scanting
sno sleeping spans. eat for
for patient, requiring
da'iy personal attention, and vapor and chemi
cal baths, thus concentr ating the rented mineral
springs. No matter who' have failed. state your
case. Read what he mys In his pamphlet of fifty
bases, sent to ant address for two stamps In seal
ed enve ope. Thousands of cases treated aunu
ails, at office and all over the country Consul
tation free, personally or by mail. (Mice No. 9
Wylie street, (near Court. House) Pittsburgh,
Pa. Hours 9 A. M. to M P. M. Sundays 19 at.
.to A P. M. Pamphlet sent to any address for two
stamps.
.ELECTRICITY AS A CURA
TIVE —Dr. A. B. SiEVENS has been
.uslng Electricity as a SPECIAL REMEDY In curing
'chronic as well Ai acute condi , lons wiTnOtiT
,AtEuICINE. for more than TEN YEARS,. with
bounded success. A PAMPHLET, including all
part'culars, with certificates and reliable refer
ences, will be sent to any Inquirer.
A few furnisted rooms vacant. for boardfngrai
tients In the Doctor's faml y. if applied for soon.
Office and recidenec . 51.001 ARCH. S CREPT.=
PHILADELPHIA. myla:j!Li
rar BATCH ELOWS HAM DYE
This splendid Hair Dye la the beat in the worldJ
the only true and perfect Dye; harmless, 'relia
ble, Instantaneous; no disappointment; no rl
dlculona 'tints; remedies the 111 effects of ba
dyes; invigorates and leaves the Hair soft an
beautiful. 'black or brown. Sold by nil Draggis
and Perfumers; and properly applied at Bate
1-Wa Wig Factory, No. 16 Bond street. nevi
York. nit 21:A2
farEPILEPSY CAN BE CIIRE#
—Those baying friends aMicted are e
nestly solicited toLsend for a Circular Letter of
References and Tat - Monists, which will cons
Nines the most skeptical of the curability of the
diaease. Address Van. BUREN LOCKROW,
M. D.. 38 Great Jones stree:, blew York.
=blew29A.4F
TILE MARRIAGE BING.
EBB 'Minn the EILI:OltS OF YOUTH, and
the -VOW Ss OF AGE, In regard to SOCIAL
EVILS, with certain nein for the erring and un
tot tuuate. Scot In sealed letter envelopeg, free
n( charge. Address. HOWARD AS.oet ATI. iN,
Box P, Philadelphia, ra. my2l:Jr,3•d&F
WINES. LIQUORS, &C.
SCHMIDT & FRIDAY,
IHPORTERS OP
WINES, BRANDIES, GIN, &G.,
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
PURE RYE WIIISKIES,
409 PENN STREET.
nave Removed to
NOS. 384 AND 386 PENN,
Car. Eleventh St., (formerly Canal.)
JOSEPH 8. FINCH & CO., •
Hos. UM 1147.189. 191, 198 :and 195 0
• MIST. STREET. PITTSBURGH.
NANOTAOTIIIME:I3 OP
Copper Distilled Pure Rye Whiskey.
AWN dealers in FOREIGN WINES and LI.
OIIORA HOPS. &a. mhZt.iracy
DISSOLUTION.
DU3SOLIII'ION;
The partnership between the subscribers as
Boiler Makers, to., under the name of Md.
BARNHILL & CO., was dissolved by agreement
on May Bth, 1800. The books and debts airing
to the late arm will be settled and collected only
by Hr. GEO. N. ARMSTRONG, at the omee of
the late Arm, No, 20 Penn street, who . Is there.
unto duly authorlsed.and claims against the nun
will be presented it:. him.
. • LEVI BEENNEILtE.
PITTEIBURGHoTnnt3 3. MEL 3e4 k 27
E LIME .- 800 barrels
.13.1%
J 8.1%41 LDS
#'~`~.'~:ix ~.4~ft+i ri ~E~:+'~s".»~:'s"asin-.~:d.:~u~:_- e~~. t .~.
=
, NOTIOES.
OF.TICIC PII7B. & CONICELLSVILLE R• CO
PITTS/WIWI, June Bth, 1860.
gy-INOTICE TO BONDHOLD
ER&
Notice M berebygiven that Coupon No.9,Pitta.
burgh Cannellaville Railroad Company Find
Mortgage Bonds, will be paid on and after JULY
Ist N r.XT uo n premonition •n nelivety at the
Merchants National Bank of Baltimore.
JOHN H:PAOE, Jr., Treasurer,
jelO:k4B•virsv
PENNSYLVANIA RAIL..
ROAD COMPANY. •
THICAAVREWS DEPARTMENT.
PHILADELPHIA. 34,(v 3,1, 1869.
NOTICE d OCKIIOL Ugtin.
The RoareforDlreetors 'Jae° his duT deriared
a seint•annual (Heinen(' air let YE L'Ele CP NT. on
the capital moor of the etlnt,any. cl.ar of Na
tional and State Huts, imyttele to cash ou and af
ter 51(iy 30. 1869. •
- • .
Blank powers of attorn ev for collecting divi
dends can be had at the office of the Company,
No.
~3 8" 8. Third street.
Th oeiee will be opened at 8 A. M. and closed
at 4- . at. from blAy 30 to Jour 5, for the pay
ment of dividends, and after teat date from 9
A. M. to 3 r.
THOMAS T. FIRTH, Treasurer.
NOTL—The Third Instalmeut on New Stock, of
ISSS[Ie due and payable on or before Juue
myS:l9B
Cr PEN NSYLV ANIA
ROAD CO.
TREASIDIER'S DEPARTMENT.
PIIILADN.LPIIIA. PA., April Al, 1869.
TO THE STOCKHOLDERS OF THE PENN
SYLVANIA RAILROAD COMPANY.
All Stockholders, as registered on the Books of
this Company on the 30th day of Apcll. 1869,
will be entitled to subscribe for TWENTY-FIVE
PER CENT. of task. respective Interests In New .
Stook, at par. as follows:
?fret. Fifty per cdnt. at the time of subscrip
tion, betweeu the 15th day of May, 1889; and
the 30th day or June, 1869.
Second. Fifty per cent. between the 15th day
of November. 1809. and the 31st day of Decem
' her, 1889; or, If Stockholders should prefer, the
whole amount may be paid up at the time of sub
scription. and each instalment so paid up shah be
entitled to a pro rata of the Dividend that may
i be declared on full shares.
Third. That every Stockholder, holding less
thou.-four allure, shall be entitled to subscribe
for one share; and those holding more than a
multiple of four shares shall be entitled to sub.
iferibe for an additional share.
Prot& All shares upon which instalments are
yet, to be paid under Resolution of May 13,
1888, will be entitled to their allutment of the
Twenty-Moe per cent. at par, at though they
were paid la full.
m)8:118 THOMAS T. FIRTH. Treasurer.
GrNOTICE.
CITY TAXES, 1869.
In accordance with Section 6th, Page 28S of
City Digest,
NOTIJE IS UEREBY GIVEN
TO THE
. .
C TIZENS OF - PITTSBURGH,
. .
That the assessments for 1869 of City. City
Building, Special, Poor, Business. City School
and Ward School Taxes and City Water Bent
have been returned tome for coliset ion.
The above taxes are subject to a DEDUCTION
CF FIVE PER CRNTITMIf paid on or btfooWthe
FIRST DAY OF AUGUmT. and TWO ' PER
CENT UM If paid between the FIRST DAY Or
AUIIUST and the F.FTEENTH PA 1 OF•SEP
TEMBER.
sir No deduction will be allowed on taxes paid
between teptember fifteenth and October first.
.Q'•.n addition of dye pe• ern; um will be made
to all taxes unpaid October lirst. and an additional
five per cerium will be acidea-to all taxes re
maining unpaid on November first.
TlmState Mercantile Appraiser has returned to
" , ne for collection the avpnitsement for IHO9.
Sts e Mercantile ~ Icenses must be paid on or be•
zor .1 ul) Ist, 1809.
All
he
remaining unpaid at that da'e
whl he planed in the hands - of Aldermen for col
lection.
S HXIDYSIDE RESIDENCE
AT AUCTION.
On TIIURdDAY. JUNE 17th, at 33i o'clock,
will In 'old by anetioh on th. premises, the very
beautiful resid. nee of the late Orrin Newton.
Kam. at Ehady.ide M.llllOll, on the - line of tne
Pennsylvania Railroad, tune &ad t tied miles
from the Union drepot. The grminds, consist of
tear acres well improved and nighty ornamented
with fruit, shade and forest trees. shrubbery and
small fruits. That portion in front of ilk.' home
is a nett, tiful level lawn of nearly oud hundred
yartigsenare, fronting on Center avenue, while
that in the rear kiss 11 handsome gentle slope,•
fronting on the railway. The house is a two
ory double-frame, contalulug parlor. sitting
and dining rooms, with bolding doors, five bed
rooms, kitchen, wash. house s pantries, clmets and
other convenience.. here are MU bin mantles,
Boston range, bate-oven, boiler, pumps, spring
house, stale and carriage house. 1 here are
handsome front and side porches,and an observa
tory from & Lich exceedingly fine views of the
surrounding country is obtainable. Abundance
of Rood soft water on the premises.
The house is a very substantial structure, has
a very pleastnw appearance, and is aliosethsr a
first class residence. It a101,.e the residence of
Dr. Hussey, and Is encircled by th •se of Messrs.
Howard, sr licheock, Relish ow., Pitcairn, I ewts
and Oraham. It is near to church and school,
and but a few yards Vern mhadyside St etion.
'there are ten trains daily to any from the city—
eighteen minutes' ride. In %tew of the spaciona
and comfortable dwelling, the eligible and
agreeable situAtion, she easy travel : the good
neighborhood, and all the I.leasant surrounding's,
this property should commarri th especial at
tontion of business men desiring to procure s
besut.tut suburban home. If desired by intend
ing purchasers present at the sive, the property
will be sold in sections to suit. It will.however,
be firs offered entire. The premises are unoc
cupied. Immediate possession given. Nays to
Inspect can beltad at tlB Wood street.
Terms—One-third cash; balance in one and two
years. Train for sale leaves Union Depot at 3
o'cluck, city time.
A. LEGGATE. Auctioneer.
Jell IMO -Federal street, Allegheny.
FINE BUILDING LOT ON
LINCOLN AVENUE, ALLEGHENY,
On TUESTIAf. JUNE 15th, at 3 .o'clock, will
be scud on the premises, in one or two pieces. that
vacant property on Lincoln avenue, opposite the
new Orphan Asrlum.loo feet front and /40 feet
in depth. This is a first cotes slttia•lon. All the
dwellings erected on Lincoln avenue are of the
lir4 order, rendering it a most desirable place for
residence. Terms at sale.
..IcDIPOILTANT SALE OF HIGH
CLASS MODERN P VINTINGS, BY UNPIN-
G Ie•RED AMERICAN AND ICUROPEAN AR
TIB re.—TH a R iDAY AND PRID A.Y,Jonel7ll
and ltith, et 10 o'clock A. M. and S o'clock P. M.,
each day, will be solo on second floor• of Com
mercial Sales Rooms. 106 Smithfield street, (side
entrance also on PRO avenue, ‘. hove Smithfield.)'
a large collection of high clash Modern Paintings,
by distinguished American and European ar•
lists. Also several original pictures by the late
Pittsburgh artist; Btyttie. The sale comprises a
very, ch .ice Osbert , et . till Paintings. elected
with great cate and d'scrimination scorn the ate. .
dies of eminent and foreign art'fits. -mbracing
Landscapes, i igure Pieces. Marine Views, Still
Life, Ac.. the whole constituting a collection of
remsrkable beauty and value, to which the at
tention of connoisseurs and lovers of art is confi
dently invitaitas certain to bee- tue closest scru •
'tiny and most critical judgment. They are all
Mounted In elegant gilt frames, of the latest pat
trn ns and best workmanship, warranted gilt with
pure gold leaf. The paintings are now arranged
on Ire. exhibition, day and evening, until time
of Wee.. Descriptive catalogues ready for die
trib ton. Ladles and gentlemen specially in:
vited to examine the collection, as this sale it
particulaly deserting thelrattention.
Je.4_ A. hicit.Vir AIN R. Auctioneer.
ASSIONEE 'SALE OF THE
}Mkt E-TATE OF THE FALLSTON
uODEN WARE WORKS. FALLSYON BOR
OUGH. AEAVEK CO.—FRIDAY MORNING,
June 18th, at 10 o'clock. by order ot. W. A.
Lawig. Est— Assignee of 13 slieY a McCandlets.
bankrupts, will he sold tat Commercial Rooms,
108 Omithfield street. the entire large real e..
I ate, situate in Falleum borough. Beaver county.
Pa., and known as the Fannon Wooden Ware
Works, including the grounds, buildings. ma
enine,7, in., necessary .or sammtacturing Wood.
en ware, together with 90 shares of power o the
Fallston Water Company. The machinery is of
the latest improvement. For other particulars
inquire of W. A. Lewis. iisq.c ILW
93 Diamond Bt.
A. McAINZ.
1013 , Auctioneer.
K==l
=II
Nom as.
STATE 11ERCANTILE LICENSES: -
A .1 COCHRAN,
CITY TREM I JRER, 4th AVEN UE.
PITTiBILTY.GLI, June 1, 18F9. Je,5:168.
AUCTION SALES.
BY A. LBGGATE.
AT AUCTION.
A. LEGGATE.
An Aloueer.
BY A. MiTLWLINB.
•
-
INSURANCE.
I IRE IRON CITY
MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO.
3 , Of Pennsylvania.
(dee, 757ederal St., Allegheny City.
DIRECTORS, 4
Hon. JAMES L. GRAHAM, '
Rev. J. B. CLARK. D. D.,
Capt. R. ROBINSON,
Rev. A. K. BELL. D.D"
Rev. S. N. 1 1 / 4 T. LLD.,
W. A. n}rEn. Cashier Allegheny Trust CO.
JACOB RUSH, Real Estate Agent, ,
SIMON DRUM. Mayor of Allegheny,
C. W. KEI.IN .1 , • Hatter.
A. S. BELL. Attorney-at-Law,
o'o L. PATTERSON, Lumber Merchant,
I). WOOER, Insurance Agent. I
Cape. ROBT. HO Bis c.oN. President.
Rtr
e.J. B. CLA nu., D. D., Vice President,
JACOB RUSH, Secretary,
C. W. BENNY. Treasurer.
; M. W. WHITE, MutircAL ADVISER. •
SWUGER, Genq Agent.
Thisls a name comnatty. conducted on the mutual
Principle, each policy holder receiving an equal
sharej of the profits ol the Company. Policies
will be issued on all the different plans of Life
Insurance, and being conducted on an economi
cal bit,is will afford a safe investmeat to each
policy holder. and thereby retain themoney at
hoineito encourage home industry. - sittiZigila
REN FRANKLIN
INSURANCE COMPANY,
OP ALLEGHENY, PA.
OFFICE IN FRANKLIN SAYINGS BANE
BUILDINGS,
NO. 41 Ohio st., Aileigheny.
wet , known
COMPANY, managed by Directors
wet , known to the community, who trust by fair
&alias to merit a share of your patronage. •
HURT IRW3N . . ... --President..
Ailrek D. H1DD1111......
.
DIRECTORS:
Henry Irwin
_ t fD. L. Patterson,
Geo. B. Biddle, !Jacob Franz,
!Baton Drum,l J. B. Smith,
Id
W. ' Stewart, Ch. P. Whiston,
Joe. lautner, H. J. Zlnkann.
R. E. 1
GENE
apid:o3s
O As" --
- • -
t .
INSURANCE COMPANY. •
I PIIEL AS NiS BUILDING.
No. SS Fifth AT l wine. Second Floor,
PITTSBURGH, PA.
t '
I Capital All 'Paid Up.
t, l
DI SECTORS.
N. J. 'llisley. 111.W.011ver, Jr, 'Capt.M.Bailey,
Dant M atiace, IS H. Hartman. A. Chambers,
Jake Hill. . IS. krtClurkttn. IJas. N. bailey.
Thomas Smith, Jno.S. Willock, ,
_ Ry, sERT H. \ KIR 0, President.
JO. O. F. JENNINGS, Vice President.
; JCS. T. JOHNSTON, Secretary.
1 Capt. R.; \ J. 'GRACE, Gen'l Agent.
1 ,
}insures on Liberal Terms on all Fire
and Marine Risks.
EMI
ICIENNEIYLVAIVLi
INSURANCE COMPANY. OF PITTTSBURGH,
OFFICE. No. 167% WOOD STREET, BANK
Or COMMERCE B U IL DING.
This is a Home Company, and insures against
lea. by Fire exelnsivelv.
LEONARD WALTER, - pie - sident.
C.iC. BOYLE, Vise President.
ROBERT PATRICK. Tresaurer.
HUGH hIcELHENY. Secretary.
Leonard Walter, • George Wilson,
C. P., Boyle Geo. W. .
Robert Patrick, J. C. Lappe,
Jacob Painter, J. C. Fleiner,
Josiah King John Voegtley,
Jas.lll. Hopkins, A. Ammon.
Henry Sproul, Jy4:
INDEMNITY
AGAINST LOSS BT FIRE,
FRANIU.IN INSURANCE CO, OF PHILADELPHIA,
OFFICE,43I , & 437 CHESTNUT ST., sear iTH.
DIliSClO}l6
Charles .V. Banker, Mordecai H. Lon '
Tobias Wagner, David S. Brown,
Samuel Grant, • Isaacies,
Jacob R. Smith, . _ Edward C. Dale,
weorge W. Richards, George Pales.
CHARLES G. BARCH -4 2, President.
EDW. C. DALE, Vice President.
W. C. STEELE, Secretary„wro ten. J. GARDNER COFfiN, Assert%
North West corner Third and Wood Streets.
nitt29:wlS
NATIONAL
INSURANCE COMPANY,
Cor. Federal St. and Diamond, Allegheny,
Office, In the SECOND NATIONAL BANE
BUILDING.
•
W. W...MAJVPIN, President,
JOHN BROWN, Ju., Vice President,
JAMES E. bTAVENSON. Secretary.
DULECTORS:
i
John A. Myler,lJas. Loethart. JOB. Myers,
Jas.L:Graham.lßobert Lea, C. C. Bolide,
Jun. Brown,Jr. George Beret, Jacob lump,
0.11 PIA idlams.Juo. Thompson J. hicNaugher.
apfl
WESTERN INSURANCE COM•
, PANY OP PITTSBURGH.
ALEXANDER NlhriCK. President.
Whl. P. HERBERT. Secretary.
CA.PT. GEORGE NEELD, General Agent.
°Mee, 92 Water street, Spang & Co.'s Ware.
house; up stairs, Pittsburgh.
Will inmre against all kinds of Tire and Ma
rin. Risks. A home Institution, managed by Di
rectofk who are well known to the community,
aid Ivho art determined•by promptness and liber
ality :to maintain the character which they have
assumed, as offering the best protection to those
who desire to be Insured.
DELLICTORS:
Aleiander Minnick, John B. McCune,
R. Miller, Jr., Chas. J. Clarke,
James McAuley, William S. Evans,
Alexander Speer, . Joseph Kirkpatrick,
Andrew Acklen , Phillip Reymer,
David M. Long,, Win. Morrison, •
Ihmsen.noll
DIMPLES' L.NSeRANCE COM.
t FAN r..
opirioE, N. Z. CORNER WOOD & FIFTH Bm.
A. Hciale Company,taking Fire and Marine Mara
DIZZCTORB:
Capt. John L. Rhoads,
Samuel P. Shriver,
Charles Arbuckle,
Jared M. Brush.
Wm P. Lang,
Bamnel McCilckart
President.
0 President.
Beare ta Ly.
ON. sanest Arent.
WM. Phillips,
John Watt,
John E. Parks,
Capt. James Miller,
Wm. Van Kirk,
James D. Verner
WM. PHILLIPS,
JOHN
PT WATT ,_ EN VII
IW. F. GARD-M
diA. JAs.
EG MEN If INSURANCE
A t iCOMPARY OF P/TTSRURGIL
ICE,No. 37FIFT11 STREET,BArrn BLOWN
Insures against all kinds of Fire and Marine
Elam
JOHN IRWIN. Jn.. President.
T. J. HOSKINSON, Vice President.
O. DONN.ELL, Secretary.
!CAPT. WM. DEAN. General Agent.
DMECITOBB:
B. L. Fabnestock
W. H. Everson,
Robert H. Davis,
Francis Sellers,
Oant..T. T. !Rockdale.
T. H. Nevin. .
Jelin Irwin, Jr.,
T. J. Husk Melon,
O. U. Hussey,
Harvey Childs,
Charles Hays,
Capt. Win..Deark,
PIANOS. ORGANS, &O.
Bi I ZTTRELFATLANr EA P - Jie.
Schomacker's Gold Medal Piano,
AND ESTEY'S COTTAGE ORGAN.
The SOHONAOXEII PIANO oamltines all the
latest valuable Improvements known In the con-,
otruction of a ant clue Instrument. and has al
ways been awarded the •highest premium ex
hibited. „its tone le full, amorous and sweet. The
workmanship. for duraty and beautY. rural
all others. Prices from OA% to 11150, (according
to style and linish,) cheaper than all other /Or
called Ant clan Plano.
4 ESTET , ti OIYTTMIE ORGAN I
Stands at the head of all reed Instrum lpe_qualltyents, In
producing the most pect of tone
of any similar Instrume rf nt e Inthee United States&
It iselmple and compact in construction, and
not Italie to eet out 01 order. I
, CARPENTER'S PATENT "VOX HUNANA
TREMOLO" Is only to be found in this Oran
Price fromllloll to PllO. All guaranteed fOr eve
T
•11LRB, SNAKE & BIIETTLER,
No. Is ST. OLLIE EMMET.
CILLES.-96 barrels prime
lisklea ' "ig . • a. Be aanntra)
• •tIgX•••
Vii,-. e"'c m :. _,. ,c::;::.
1E1115212
ANEW OPERA ROUSE.
Lessee...
Manazer
WEDNEKDAT Jtine 16, complto
mentary Letteflt to
G. F. CON/KUM ,
The performance will commence with , the cele •
bretea drains of
ff DICK TURPIN.
Tom Kin g ' F. A. Tsmnehtll.
India. tub Exercl es by ifiesers. HAIIILL I .
CoUL LR, DIEItST Oq A BENSTEIN one oth
ers. riAVOL.A. IIIoiTHEItS, Ariel t•fo's and
Tumbll,Cloll , l ‘i,lligla.g, D.IFIST, GRAB.
KNOTS o . and 11011'. ,'
To co elude 'with the Bur:ctta of WIDOW'S.
VICTI3I •
XiirlSuSheet open Wednesday morning!__
161IIIICII . HOME 'FESTI
VAL.
The mum 1 sale of Fancy Articles and Re
freshments of this charitsble institution,' will
take place In the court yards and gardens of the
•'Chureh Home," in Lawrenceville, opposite, the
Arsenal Park, o-u-
Thaisday Afternoon and &ening.
Admission and dipper tickets can be obtained
at the enlrance gate.
arACADEMY or m usw.
TTJEtDAY EVENING: J'un6 15th
Duns OMIT PLAY OF CANILLIL
Miss HOISMER - - CAMILLE.
Box office open from V A. M. t 0.4
.P.
sea's can te- secured at Mellor 's inusle Biota,
Miner's book afore and Barr, Snake Beattlerr,
Sirh street
Wm, Cooper,
Gottleib Faits,
Jacob_ltush
Joseph Craig,
Jere.
3 RON,
Ad, AGENT.
IZ9"STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL
—The ladies of' Plymouth Church will
hold a btrawberry Festival In EXCELSIOR:
HALL, corner Federal and Lacock streets, Alle
gheny, on TVESD AY AND WEDNESDAY
EVES INC'S, 15th and 16th inst. The member
and 6 ie,•ds of the church are respectfully Invited
to be present. • • - jel2:lt3l
PITTSBURGH THE. THE.
R. W. WILLIAMS. Lessee and Manager.
To-td ht— Compl Imentry benefit to - MI6 LUCY
CLIFTON. Mr. E. cD -rmott, BarloNlr Broth
ers, and the great company In a superb olio and
the burlesque called TILE "WIT E" FAWN.
Lass Matinee of the season on Wecine..day.
igrFIFTIFI AVENUE HALL.-
No. 63 Fifth avenue, opposite the Opera
House, Pl. tsbcret. Pa. '4.
W. Hu STROUP Megiagen.
This house has one of the finest Hilliard Rooms
In the city. It is •ecl. edly the coolest sod most
inviting place. The tames are ad new and em•
brace all Ito' modern improvements. and offers
superior attractions to lovers at the game.
AN ORDINANCE
To Authoriae the Grading of Sarah
Street, from Union Avenue td Lity
Line.
SECTION 1. Be U ordained and enacted by the
Select and . Common Councils of the City of Alle
gheny, and it is hereby ordatmed and enacted by of the same, That they Committee
on streets be, and they are hereby authorized
and directed to invite and'receive proposals for
the grading of carah street as aforesaid, and to.
contract therefor with the lowest and beat bid
der or biddr rs.,at their discretion.
SEC. 2. That for the purpose of defraying
the cost and expense of eau' improvements, there
be. and is hetebv levied, a speelal tax. to be
equally assessed unon the several lots bounding
and abutting up,m the said Sarah street
respectively in proportion to the feet fcont in
them respectively comprised, and bounding and
abutting as aforesaid.
SEC. 3. That as soon as the cost and expenses
of said improvements shall be filly ascertained.
it shall be the duty of the Street Commits oner to
assess and apportion the same senoog the several
lots bounding and abutting upon said Sarah
street resnectivelY, according to the rule
above indicated. and thereupon proceed to matte
demand and collect the same, accoreing to the
provisions of the Act of the General Assembly of
the commonwealth of Pennsylvania, entitled
“An Act d. flnlog the manner of collecting the
expenses of grading and paving of the streets
and alleys of the City of Allegneny, and for other
puep 2 used psed the thirtieth city of March.
IEIS
SEC. 4. That co much of any ordinance as may
conflict with, or be supplied by the foregoing.
be and the same is hereoy reps aled.
Ordained and enaetPd into a law this the lekla
day of June, A. D. 1869. _
JAMES 31cBRIElt, •
President of she Select Council..
Attest: J. R. Oxm,
Citric of the Select Council.
' Alderr.El) SLACK..
President of the Common Council:
Attest: ROBERT intwoisTir,
Clerk of Common Council. sem
•
AN. ORDINANCE '
•
to Auths)rize the Grading and Pav
ing or Race alley, from Isabella
Street to Rose alley.
SEC.]. Be it ordained and enacted by Cut Seise*
and Common Councils of the (..qty of Allegheny,
and it is hereby enacted by the authority of the
same, That tile Comm itte on Streets be, au a they
are hereby authorized and directed to invite and
receive proposals tor the grading and paving of
Race alley as afore aid, and to contract therefor
with the lowest and best bidder or. bidders, at
their discretion.
. . . .
Sac. 2. That for the pnrpose of defraying the
cost and expenses of the said' improvements.
there be and is hereby levied a special tax. to be
equally assessed upon tae several lots bounding
and abutting upon the said Race alley re
spectively in proportion to the feet front In :hens
respectively comprised, and bounding and abut
ting as aforesaid.
SEC. 3. That as soon as the cost and expenses •
of said improvements shall be filly ascertained,
it small be the duty of the Street Commissioner to
assess and apportion the same among the sev
eral lots bounding and abutting upon said
pacealley respectively, according to ' the
rule a ve indicated, and ther, noon proceed to
maim emanu and collect the same, according to
the pr visions ol the. Act of the General Assem
bly of he Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, en
titled •An Act defining the manner of collecting
the ex enses of grading and paving of the streets
and al ys of Ihe City of Allegheny, and for other
pup o 8;" passed the thirtieth day of March,
152.
Sac. 3. That so muck of any ordinance as may .
cpnftie with or be supplied by the foregoing, De
and the same Is hereby rypealtd.
Ordained and enacted into a law this the lOth
day of June, A. ii. 1569. 1
JAMES MOWER,
President of Select Council.
Attest: TOSEPII E. (Wax,
Clerk of Select Council.
ALFRED SLACK.
President of Conwton Council.
Attest: ROBERT DILWOUTU,
Clef k of C , mmon ConnciL JelSt
AN ORDIN • CE
To. Authorize i e Coostruction of a
LaterrlSewe on lierron's alley.
1.
Sze. 1. Be it orda net and enacted by the Se
lect omit Common Councils er the Cityo/Alle
gheny, ad it is Atiesy enacted by the authority
(11 ad Can in e, That tee ;Sewerage Commission be,
and the.y re hereby euthorized and directed to
invite and receive Proposals for the construction
of a Newer, located as fottows: On Herron's al-
WY, commencing atMonteowery avenue, and ex
tending to nortu line or Denny property, and to
contract therefor with the lowest and best bidder
or bidders. at tbelr discretion.
Sao. A. That as soon as the cost and expenses
of said sewer shall be folly ascertained the 1111.1148 "
shell be levied, assessed and collected as pro.
Tided ler by an act of Assembly of toe Common
wealth of rendsylvania, entitled "a supplement
toe sUpplemeot of the fourth section of an act
ent.O.d an •Act relating to Allegheny. City,' Sp.
Droved Msreh 1809
lOW. 4. That so much of any ordinance as may
coned with, or be supplied by the foregoing, be, •
and the same is hereby repealed.
Ordained and eriacteei into a law this Jim 10th
day of June, Anno Domini one thousand eight
hundred cue sixty nine.
JAMES Mcßtuzir,
President of Select
Attest: J. R. OXLS.Y.
Clerk of SelectCottrell.
ALFRED SLACK,
President of Common Council .
Attest: R. DILWOUTiI.
Clerk. of Common Connell. ten
OFFICE OP CITY ENGINEER AND 13 17111FIFF011. t
PITTSBURGH., June 10, 1869.
NOTICE.—The Assessment for'
the Boardwalk on Cedar street, from Main
to Laurel street; is now reatly for examination,
and can be seen at Ills once until MONDAY,
June, 01st, when It will be returned to the Oltr
Treasurer s °Moe Tor colleutlon.
jelikkit IL J. MOORE.
gin Z 1410010%
~~ r ' _ PY7
IMM
AIaiIISEE=NTE.
WY. HINDI:880N*
..N. N. CANNING.
ORDINANCES .1
ALLEGHENti.
8
MEM
sh
I 7 • 1
JelX:k37