The Scranton tribune. (Scranton, Pa.) 1891-1910, April 15, 1896, Page 4, Image 4

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    'THE 8CBANTON TIlIBUNE-WEDNESDAy "MOONING, AFBUi 15, 1806.'
$e gtxattton ZxiBx
Betty and Weekly. No Sunday UU
lBhuh4 at Scranton. Pa., by The 1
uajiin tompaar.
mww aw vnor triouav jwiu
UtV, Manager.,
nuk a
K. . KINOtaUMV, Pan.
GlM't Mas.
B. N. NIPPlC. Wv
Tacts.
uvva.ni
CeiTea. 1
m. w. DAVI
atisiaeee Ma.
' w,
ounoj.
UTU1S AT THI 1
on:c at acRAima. .. ai
tcos
IMAJtKATTM.
.TJf Ji," the reewrnlatd Journal lor aevee-
"PI run 8CBASITOS TaiMUNS u Ui bert
!i ..' mwllun la Nortaeaaura -euiaylv
TUlare 1US" iLoovra.
i WnBLT Tbibokb, Issued Everr Haturdny,
f dance of News, Fiction, and WnU-Kdltrd Mlwel
laov. For Tboaa Wbo Cannot Take Tub Daily
.main. Twelve liandioma invM. wan aa a ohu-
TaiacnK, Uia Weekly la llrromuKnileit aa the
mm nargam uowg. muy f i a i ear, in jtuvawx
Tsa Taucai la for Salt Dally at the IX, L. and W.
tttaUea at Hebukea,
SCRANTON, APRIL 15, 1896.
The Tribune is tho only Republleou
dally ta Lackawanna County.
' REPUBLICAN STATE CONVENTION.
To the Republican elector of Pennsylva-
The Republicans of Pennsylvania, by
their duly chosen representative, will
meet In stato convention Thursday. April
23. 1S96. at 10 o'clock a. m., In the opera
house, city of HurrUburg. for the pur
pose of .lomlnatlng two candidates tor
repreaentative-at-large in congress ana
thirty-two candidates for presidential
electors, the selection or eigm
at-largo to the Republican national con
vention, and for tho transaction or sum
other business aa may be presemeu.
By order ot the state commHt euljr
Attest:- ' Chairman,
Jere B. Rex,
W. R. Andrews,
Secretaries.
'A week from tomorrow is the flarrls
tmrg convention, and all Is yet as quiet
aa the grave.
Why Cleveland Hesitates.
'An interesting explanation of tha ad
ministration's hesitancy in taking for
ward action on the Cuban question is
advanced conjecturally by a gentleman
whom the Washington Post describes
as thoroughly versed in International
law and experienced in diplomacy. In
his Judgment anything like an aggres
sive course by the executive in behalf
of the Cubans would precipitate a war
with Spain, but it is not that alone
which causes Mr. Cleveland to move
cautiously. A war with Spain, would
be bad enough, especially If provoked
needlessly; but this diplomatist fore
sees that In the event ot such a com
plication Oreat Britain would Imme
diately recur to her Venezuela tan
trums, and we should be confronted
with the unpleasant predicament ot
having to fight Spain and England sim
ultaneously, with perhaps Austria,
Italy and Germany thrown In for
England has. It Is reported, just com
pleted an alliance with the drlcbund
or else of having to abandon the Mon
roe doctrine incontinently, swallowing
all the emphasis in the president's Ven
ezuelan message.
The gentleman in point continues:
"American newspapers, as well as Eng
lish, newspapers, have. been so filled
vith rumors of negotiations In regard
to the Venezuelan , controversy that
they have given the impression that the
whole matter has reached a satisfac
tory conclusion. No such thing is true.
Of course there have been negotiations.
Great Britain has submitted her case,
but she has not taken one step toward
the recognition of the Monroe doctrine
as laid down by President Cleveland,
and she has not given the slightest
Intimation that she expects to do other
than maintain her present position in
Venezuela. There is no matter which
gives this government more concern
than the stolid and indifferent posi
tion which Great Britain has taken in
regard to our Monroe doctrine. Public
men here seem actually to have for
gotten that if the present position of
Great Britain continues, that if the
Venezuelan commission finds that
Great Britain has a poor case, as it
probably will, this nation may be com
pelled to declare war on Great Britain
or else back down. England has done
absolutely nothing which would lead
to the idea that she intends to give up
one inch of her claim in Venezuela."
This, to be sure, is only one man's
opinion. It is, however, somewhat
plausible, No one familiar with Lord
Salisbury's characteristics can readily
believe that he has been suddenly in
fluenced by mere newspaper dtsousslon
to recede far from his original position
with reference to the Guiana boundary
line or that he Is the kind of man to
relish a compulsory dose ofl American
fed crow. At the same time, it is un
deniable that publio opinion in Great
Britain has since President Cleveland's
spirited message moved conspicuously
forward, and would now tolerate a war
with the United States only upon in
dubitable moral grounds. Taking all
these facts into consideration, we are
inclined to doubt whether a war with
Spain, reached without fault on our
part, would necessarily mean a war
also with Great Britain. But if such
a double misfortune should in any con
tingency befall, It would by no means
appall our people. They would in such
an emergency rise to the critical occa
sion and meet it like brave men.
Since 1824, no cabinet officer has
Stepped from the cabinet chamber in
to the presidency. Let the Carllsle-Ol-ney
shouters be warned In time. ; , '
The Flag Question.
Not conUvat with requiring publio
school buildings to fly the American
.flag; tha Illinois legislature has mode
It exhibition also mandatory on pri
vate and parochial schools. Wt doubt
If this action will be construed as con
stitutional by the courts.. It seems to
us that a state legislature has no. right
to soy what shall be done in a private
or sectarian building,. . It could not
make every private" cltiaen fly a flag
on hta housetop! and wherein does tha
owner of a private school, or, for that
matter, of a sectarian school, occupy
before the law a different footing from
that of a private citizen? '. ' ' -
It would be a good thing if every
school of every kind in the United
States should honor American institu
tions enough tq display, conspicuously
and with proper respect, the national
emblem. Too much honor cannot be
paid to the American flag. In this day
when there Is much to criticize In the
condition of our national morals and
when a good many people ore Inclined
to crow restless under the salutory
restraint, of law and order, there Is a
significance in the seemly display ot the
Stars and Stripes which cannot be too
highly prized. Especially Is it desirable
that the young, whether trained In
public, in private or In church schools,
Khoull be made acquainted with the
meaning of Old Glory and should be
taught to venerate the great principles
over which that emblem stands guard.
Tint it would be madness to try to
inculcate such a feeling of patriotism
by force. Suasion wl'I beat force any
day. When there Is a private school or
a parochial school which does not fly
the flag. It would be proper to request
that tne omission be corrected. In few
coses would such a request If cour
teously preferred, be Ignored. In those
coses, the thing to do is not to get
angry and raise a row, but to set to
work among the patrons of those
schools quiet Influences favorable to
tle de3lred reform. This is the plain
common sense of the matter. In con
trast with which the action of the Il
linois law-makers look foolish in the
extreme.
Bright boys In New York have formed
an anti-cigarette league. Here U a
hint to bright toys In Scranton.
Abolish the Bonding System.
There is an adage which says that no
problem is solved permanently until It
is solved correctly. This is signally
true of what Is known to shippers as
the bonding system, by means of which
cars of merchandise shipped from Bos
ton or New York to Chicago or San
Francisco are permitted, under con
sular seal, to pass part of the way over
Canadian railroads out and In the coun
try without customs Inspection. It has
recently been brought out In the course
of an Investigation at Washington that
last year over GOO.000 cars of freight
were shipped from American to Ameri
can points via Canadian lines, repre
senting $37,500,000 in freight chares,
more than half of which would be kept
in this country and go into the coffers
of American railroads if the consular
sealing system were abolished. How
much money we have lost through
smuggling in this way, by means of
broken seals and substituted goods, It
would be difficult to tell, but the aggre
gate Is believed to be great.
This bonding privilege was provided
for In the treaty of 1871, before the Ca
nadian Pacific road was built. It was
Intended simply to facilitate transpor
tation between the North Atlantic sea
board and Chicago, and was expected
to be of reciprocal benefit. It has, how
ever, since been broadened until it em
braces American trade with the Ori
ent. As Senator Elklns recently said,
on this subject, with special reference
to the Canadian Pacific railroad, which
is today the chief beneficiary of tne
bonding system: "It violates our in
terstate commerce law with compla
cent indifference. .It cuts rates and
takes freight from our Pacific roads, in
which the United States has a direct
interest, it hauls more cheaply from
Sit Louis "and other Interior -points of
this country, by way of Canada, to Ore
gon and San Francisco, than the Pacific
roads can do, though the distance lit
much shorter. It is a sharp .competi
tion now for all business with all the
roads to and from California. For 2,000
miles the Canadian Pacific traverses a
non-producing country, one not able to
support a railroad, and lives off its sub
ventions and the business it takes from
the railroads ot the United States."
That this is not an exaggeration will
readily be conceded by American rail
road officials. As Walter Wellman,
writing from Washington to the Chi
cago Times-Herald on this subject,
says:
All this is true, and more. The Can
adian Pacltlc road is the most richly sub-
sidizea transportation line in the world.
It has had in all J1S5,OOU,000 in cash und
bonds from the dominion government, it
has corrupted the politics and the public
life of the dominion to an extent that
Is not understood In the United Status,
but which la well known in Canudu. to
have formed one of the most llaxrant
chapters of governmental history in the
annuls or. tne world, it would do inter
esting to know to what extent the eome
system ot corruption or, of improper intlu
ence has been employed In the city ot
Washington, certain it is mat tne Can
adian Pacific has its friends In every cor
ridor of tho capitol. They are numerous
on the lloor of the senate and house,
They are In high places and executive de
partments. It is common gossip here that
the smartest and most successful legis
lative agents In the American capital are
In the employ of the subsidized Canmllun
line. They -boast that they have a power
here which makes It Impossible to strike
down their precious -bonding privileges.
Six or seven years ago we narrowly es
caped a big Bcandal when the dominion
line played too strong a hand In tho elec
tion of a speaker of the house. Prom that
day to this Its Influence has been fel:
in our politics and our legislation.
In view of the fact that the Cana
dians now propose to complete a chain
of subsidized railroad and boat ship
ping lines until English manufacturers
con, under the bonding system, ship
directly to Asia through the United
States at cheaper rates than Ameri
cans themselves can get, Senator Elklns
has introduced a bill repealing that ob
noxious system and Imposing a 10 per
cent, discriminating 'duty on goods
shipped via Canadian lines under- con
sular seal. . "This matter Is of more
importance to our people," says he,
"than a dispute about a boundary line
down in South America. To protect
the interests of the United States
against this encroachment Is the kind
ot a Monroe doctrine I am In favor of."
We guess he is pretty near right.
The Philadelphia Inquirer la a stanch,
almost a rabid, advocate of the gold
single standard, yet It has the frank
ness to say: "It will certainly cause
serious alarm if there is to be any
further .contraction of tho currency.
In spite of the steady Increase In our
population, there Is less money In circu
lation by 3lCO,00O,0C0 than there was two
years ago, and tho proposal to reduce
the amount still further is one that
a.
cannot fail to do mischief.' This con
traction has gone far enough. The
repeal of the Sherman act cut oft the
only source of Increase, for none of the
gold production gets into circulation,
and the National bank system is so
cumbersome that It affords no relief
where relief is wanted." What does
the Inquirer propose to do about It?
We trust it is not true that Senator
Quay has decided to pass Northeastern
Pennsylvania by In the selection of na
tional delegates-at-large. The candi
dacy of Hon. Charles A. Miner, ot
Wtlkes-Burre, for this honor, which Is
now, wo believe, unopposed, fully mer
its success, and can probably command
it if the delegates from this rectlon will
unite In a recommendation to Senator
Quay that a Northeastern Pennsyi-
vunian be chosen.
Elbrtdge T. Gerry, th. Tcv York re
former.was recently asked what he con
sidered the thief Influei v which leads
boys to commit robberies and fire fiats.
Imperilling the lives of hundreds. He
said: "More hnrm Is done to the ehll
dren by the newspapers which print
crlowlnc descriptions of crimes and
criminals than by any other moans."
It Is pleasant to note that there are
none of that class of newa;iaper3 In,
Scranton.
According to Bradstreet, the presont
per capita circulation, which Is J21.R3,
is loss by $1.26 than the per capita cir
culation one year ago. With the popu
lation growing and the volume of
money decreasing It Is no wonder we
hnve hard times. Do the relators of
the Sherman law, we wonder, tVel en
tirely satisfied with their work?
The Philadelphia Record is very
proud because sli:ce the Wilson tar; it
went Into eflc'. American exports of
manufacturers .k ve Increase-! 3.2,' .r
cent. Why docan't It In fairness ex
plain that our manufacturers had to soil
more of their goods to foreigners, nt a
loss, because Democracy had In the
meantime disrupted the home market?
That la a queer story which comes
from Allrntown to the effect that the
recent ri:crt of a war on Lelsenring
In Luzerne was ln:itU,'atd by Frank
Wlll'ng Lcarh with a view to heading
off the Lelsenring gubernatorial boom.
We should like to see the evidence In
the case.
The F.vraruse Courier commemorates
the anniversary of Thomas Jefferson's
birthday by printing a r.omewhnt ne
bulous editorial entitled "Democracy's
Fundamental?." The only fundamen
tal in present evidence seems to be
Its phenomenal capacity for blundering,
Judge Clayton, of Delaware, the man
who stepped down from the bench to
engage in a scramble for the position
of national delegate, and who at the
time declared for Quay, has flopped to
McKlnley. MeKlnley Is welcome.
It was rough on Brother Hniolley to
be denied admission Into the Century
club of New York. But somehow the
American people cannot get over their
prejudice against renegades.
Those Democrats who are disposed to
credit Mayor Bailey with wishing to
give them the marble heart should re
member that such -gifts are common
In politics.
According to Chairman Harrity, c.v
Oovernur Pattlson "docs not seek the
Democratic nominal 1-jn." He only
stands under the tree with his apron
outspread. . .
. An authoritative denial Is: made by
Sptaker Reed that he 'expects to retire
from" piiblTc life. Tho only change he
hankers after Is toward the white
house.
Representative Aldrich is evidently
of the belief that flpires, under certain
circumstances, can be made to strain
the truth.
Hill, Brlco and Gorman each predict
McKinley's nomination. But then they
are something of protectionists them
selves. THE HYPNOTIZED UGP0RTKR.
Luzerne papers announce that "All The
News," a Wl Ikes-Hal re publication which
died several weeks ai;o on account of the
luck of nourishment in the way of patron
age, has been resurrected and will iitfiin
shine tn the milky way of Wllkcs-Uarre
journalism. "All The News" at the time
of its former appearance on earth had a
lirlcr but exc-ltlna- careor and landed its
editor In Jnll while the paper was In the
zenith of its glory. Notwithstanding tho
experience of tho former mnn at tho
helm another enterprising spirit has faith
In his own ability to 111) a lout felt want
and "All The News" is on deck again, but
probably somewhat modified in the lino of
news published. In conducting a publi
cation of tha character of the former
VVilkcs-Harro enterprise an editor la In
thu position of the grent financlnr. He Is
balanced between success and the .mil.
It is a sad commentary upon the tastes
of people of northeastern Pennsylvania
who can read thnt financial success often
crowns the efforts of publishers who un
der the avowed purpose of printing all
the news pander to the wants of patrons
who dellRht in perusing fake yarm,
filthy scandal and libellous tales gen
erally, ll Is to be regretted thai decent
people will encourage the alleged newspa
per whose columns smoke with so-called
"hot stuff;" with real or Imaginary sen
sational storiis that should cauee the ar
rost of the publisher for mlsue of tha
malls. But the fact that such blots upon
journalism can exist at all Is evidence
thnt there is a demand for the assafoetlda
paper. So long r.s the editor and publish
er can keep out of prison tha publication
usually grows fat upon Its feast upon
carrion. a (
Some time ago I heard of an agitation on
part of the Slate K'iltoi-Iul association or
some association of the kind, with a view
to havlnK the libel laws modllied. I con
fess that I wns surprised at the support
the movemont received from honest news
papers. It was astounding that good men
in newspaper work would advocate meai
ures calculated to place the public man
nnd the private cltlien more completely
lit the merry of th numberless hordo o'f
literary jackal whoso barking is heard
IhroitRhoiit the land, than they are at
present. Kven now there la scarcaly any
protection from tho attacks of unscrupu
lous scribblers who pulnt honesty, virtus
and Innocence with the green slime i f
calumny! the mental nnd moral lepers
who would tulnl the world It possible with
their own purification. It Is only tin
occasional conviction and Imprisonment
of some of these specimens that keeps
army or ouasards in cnecs.
!llr-k ....
Rxcent In rare lnatunca a'fterm In nrlftan
always has a wholesome eftect upon the
not aiun- editor.. A case similar to tna
one mentioned above la called to mind
In which an ambitious young editor
thought to freshen ui a dull locality wih
some real, live, exclusive matter, llo
succeeded eeyond all expectation, but
lifter serving a sentence of seven months
In Jull lost all ambition to pose as a red
hot journalist. Hi uewspaper work from
that time has been of a conservative
character and he has been content to pub
lish what respectable people could read
without a blush and has never sought to
mm i ue cnaracier or friend or foe ty
scandalous assertion or insinuation. In
my humble opinion the newspaper men
who desire the modification of libel laws
should confine their efforts toward mak
inv lh penalties more severe. Of course
there are Instances In which editors hava
been Imposed upon by fake stories and in
which It seems hard that proprietors of a
pn;ier should be made to stand the conse
quences of an Imposition whero they are
iiinm-em 01 intent to no wronn. nut
where there Is one case of this kind. It ta
saf.i to wager that there are u ilosen
where the evil-minded scandal-monger has
escaped justice hy taking advantage of
technicalities and sllmiinir out of a tlcht
place by the plea of ignorance and the
oeniai oi maiiclcus Intent. The reputable,
decent newspaper, be It daily or week
ly, docs not require ny change in the
libel laws. With proper caution It la not
often that they are Imposed upon. For
the unscrupulous scribe from whom the
living unci tne dead receive no Quarter-
the blear-eyed basilisk whose breath
causes Innocence and virtue to wither and
die let more stringent laws be passed in
mi- uueifdi ui nuuianuy;
LET I S HAVE PEACE.
From the Altoona Tribune.
There Is not the slightest evidence that
Major McKlnley Is In any way concerned
over the factional differences that hnve
cropped out amonir certain nromlnant Re.
publican politicians In Pennsylvania, or
mm ne would assist eitner raction to
tako tho scaln of the other. We Incline
to the belief that the real McKlnley peo
ple the men who are for the Ohio man
because he Is, In their opinion, the nat
ural presidential nominee of tho Repub
lican party would receive Mr. Quay's
ndvances very cordially If he were to make
them. This thing of Republicans going
about with clubs In their hands and mal
ice in their hearts analnst each other Is
the hehrht of folly. It ouirht to be stnnnr.ri
at onco. Those who will not heed the
voice or remonstrance which comes from
the rank and lllo should be sent to the
rear.
DON'T WOKRY.
From the Kastnn Free Press.
Presumably Scranton will know Itself
by nigh tf nil on May 2tl, but, If after hav
ing the Knights Templar parade, Bar
num's parade, and a hanging all In one
nay, ine town la a little groggy and dated,
ik w lit lie ciuunuuie.
TOLD BY THE STARS.
Pally lluroscnpo Drawn by AJaeohna Ths
l rlr-iino Astrologer.
Astrolabe cast: 3.14 a. m., for Wednesday,
fist
Anrll IS.
A child born on this dav will notice that
the Scranton Republican seeds failed to
sprout in tne mountain towns of the
iiiiru legislative district yesterday.
Today ye hopeful fishermen
Bring creel and tackle out,
And seek ye brooks in rocky glen
Where sport ye festive trout.
If the saying is true that "he who hesi
tates is lost," a searching party should be
orKaiuzeu ior -Mayor iiauey at once.
Itesults of elections In the AhlncrMn
territory yesterday would indicate that
i.oru uyron ureen nau taken a vacation,
Ajncchus' Advice.
To the girls Do not let young men
frighten. you at the beginning of the sea
son with tuberculosis stories. It Is Im
possible for the germs to exist In Ice
cream.
HILL & CONNELL,
131 AND 133 N. WASHINGTON AVE.
Builders
AND
Makers
OF
AND
OFFICE
SUPPLIES
13! AND 133 N. WASHINGTON AVE.
VE HAVE NOW OPEN FOR INSPECTION
TT a larva and handafimj, Unm f muu
CARRIAGES. Ilvau .n . Crrl...
baby sec our line and get prices. Ws coa
suit you.
THS
i
422 LACKAWANNA AVf.
' THIS MAN
ri SPi liReadlnglheStartllng
fO Confession of
TlTtf' SB lh
si!
The Notorious Multi
Murderer. For Sale by
BEIDLEMAN. THE BOOKMAN,
- (Under ths Gay Awning.)
447 f prvct St., Opp. Th Commonwealth."
I
Hons
GOLDSMITH'S
ALWAYS
SOMETHING
Hardlj a day passes without our truckman tamping Into our recelvins room loads of cases.
Whea these yield up their contests, there ever stands contessed something new, popular
and desirable. The faces of our clerks are the only familiar objects that meet the eyes
of our customers. Not to see our cons tantiy changing attractions U to deciare-4! yon
are in our place that jou are blind of one eye and nnable to see out of the other one,
FOR EXAMPLE :
Those Beautiful Ladies' Sweaters, at $1.73.
40 styles of French Organdies, in floral and conventional designs;
Exclusive Styles of Finest Scotch and American Dimities, beginning at o
cents and ranging upwards. . '
Exquisite Laces, Chiffons and Collarettes to blend harmoniously with Waists
and Dresses of the day.
Our Cloak and Suit Department
Brocaded Silk Capes, Lace Trimmed and Changeable Silk Lining, at $3.98.
Quaint, Original Conceptions in Children's and Misses' Jackets and Dresses.
THE NEW
WOMAN'S SHOE
I
ul vllm in
i ul m iu
The Most Perfect Fitting Shoe Made. Al Full
Line in All Widths at
BANISTER'S
AN INSPIRATION
Is almost lost when Tour oen
catches and your iok spreads on
your paper.
Good Stationery
Is one of the necessaries of civili
sation that is indispensable. A
favorite location for all classes
is that of Kejnolds Brothers,
where a fine assortment of every
thing In Orst-class Stationery and
Office Supplies. Students, law
yers, commercial men and society
in general get their supplies here,
as everyone can be suited, both
in price and quality.
Stationers and Engravers.
Hotel Jermyn Building, Scranton. Pa.
CONRAD
HAS THEM IN ALL GRADES,
BROWN OR BLACK
HE CAN SUIT YOU.
MERCHANT TAILORING
f prlng and Bummer, from 120 up. Troaaar-Ins-H
and ov.rcoats. foreign and domsetio
tuBrle, mad to order to ault tha moat fa
tldlou In price, fit and workmanship.
D. BECK, 337 Afans Ave.
REYNOLDS
BROTHERS
NEW 3 '
dl flnnnrft
B
dl nmiL
D
BALDWIN'S
THE BEST IN THE MARKET
GREAT VARIETY OF SIZES.
THE
T CONNELL CO,,
43UICKIWANM AVENUE.
Seek the Best
Have Nothing Else.
It Pays. . .
Write ths Principal of the State
Normal School at Bloomsburg, Pa.,
for information about that excel,
lent and popular school.
$500 in Scholarship Prizes Just Offered
326 Washington Am,
SCRANTON, PA.
TELEPHONE 555.
Schools.
SCHOOL OF THE LACKAWANNA.
riiiwiwdi rm., prepares ooys ana gins
for college or buslneas: thoroughly
trains young children. Catalogue at re
quest. Opens September 9.
8E.Y'.-T,HOMA9 M- CANN,
naiiiisn tl. BUELL.
MISS WORCESTER'S KINDERGARTEN
ana ocnooi, Adams avenue. Spring
term April 13. Kindergarten $10 per term.
Wire SrcciiH.
JOS. KUETTEL, REAR Ul LACKA.
wanna avenue, Scranton, Pa., manufac
turer of Wire Bore ens.
Hotels and Restaurants.
THU ELK CAFE, 12S and 127 FRANK,
lin avenue. Rates reasonable.
P. ZBIOLE R, Proprietor.
SCRANTON HOUSE, NEAR D L. W.
passenger depot. Conducted on the
jBuropean plan. VICTOR KOCH. Prop,
WESTMINSTER HOTiiL,
Cor. Sixteenth St, aud IrvlngPlace,
Rate, 13.50 per day and upwards. WAmerl.
can plan). - B.N. ANABLB,
i Proprietor.
II
nil
HUM
HI !.
PROFESSIONAL . CARDS;
AMM'MVWWVajMMwaaa
Dentists.
'o WILLI4M TAFT' PORCELAW.
Bridge and Crown work. Office. OS
Washington tvenua.
C C. LAUBACH BURGEON DENTIST.
R M. STRATTON. OFFICE COAI. EX
chant. Physicians and Surgeons.
DR. A. TRAPOLD, SPECIALIST IN
Dlaeaiea of Women, corner Wyoming
avenue and Spruce itreet, Scranton. ON
nse hour. Thursday and Saturday.
I a. m. to e t. m.
DR,,.I5A7 ? PE.NN AVE.: 1 to t P. u7.
call Met Dl. of women, obatretrlc and
and all dl. of call
DR. W. E. ALLEN, eu North Waahlnftoa
avenue.
DR. C. L. FRET, PRACTICE LIMITED,
dlieaie of the Eye, Ear, Noae and
Throat; office, 12! Wyoming- ave. Rel
t dence. 629 Vine trget
DR. L. it. GATES, US WASHINGTON
avenue. Office hours, I to 8 a. m., l.M
to i and 7 to I p. m. Residence 30 Madl
onayemi.
DR. J. C. BATEBON. TUESDAYS AND
Friday, at 60s Linden atreet. Office
hour 1 to t p. m.
DR. B. W. LAMEREAUX, A SPECIAL,
lat on chronlo dlaeasea ot the heart,
lungs, liver, kidney and a-enlto url
nary dlaeaie. will occupy the office ot
Dr. Roos. 283 Adam avenue. Office
hour 1 to B p. m.
Lawyers.
WARREN KNAPP, ATTORNEYS
and Counsellor at Law, Republican
building. Washing-ton avenue. Scran
ton, Pa. -
JRSSUP8 ft HAND, ATTORNEYS AND
Counsellor at Law, Commonwealth
building, Washington avenue.
W. H. JESSUP,
HORACE R. HAND,
; WH. JESSUP. JR.
PATTERSON WILCOX. ATTOR.
n.vi anil rtaiinsellor at Lew; office
and S Library building. Scranton, Pa,
ROSRWKLL H. PATTERSON.
WILLIAM A. WILCOX.
ALFRED HAND, WILLIAM J. HAND.
. Attorneys nnd Counsellors, Common
wealth building. Rooms 19. 70 and tl.
FRANK T. OKELL, ATTORNEY-AT.
Law, Room 6, Coal Exchange, Scran
ton, Ps,
JAMES W. OAKFORD, ATTORNEY.
at-Law, room ti, M and 65, Common
wealth building.
SAMUEL W. EDGAR. ATTORNEY-AT.
Law. Office, 817 Spruce at., Scranton. Pa.
L. A. WATERS, ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
423 Lackawanna ave., Scranton, Pa.
URIB TOWNSBND, ATTORNEY-AT-Law,
Dime Bank Building, Soranton.
Money to loan In large sums at i per
cent.
C. R. PITCHER. ATTORNEY-AT.
law, Commonwealth building, Scranton,
Pa.
H. C SMYTHS, ATTORNEY AT LAW,
400 Lackawanna avenue.
C. COMEOYS. 821 SPRUCE STREET.
D. B. REPLOGLE, ATTORNEY LOANS
negotiated on real estate security. 401
Spruce atreet
B. F. KILLAM, ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
120 Wyoming ave.. Scranton. Pa.
JAflTJ. H. HAMILTON, ATTORNEY-AT.
law, 46 Commonwealth bld'g. Scranton.
J. M. C. RANOK. 136 WYOMING AVB.
Architects.
EDWARD H. DAVIS, ARCHITECT,
Rooms 24, 25 and 28, Commonwealth
building. Scranton.
E. L. WALTER. ARCHITECT. OFFICH
?LMJn,nS?onX?nue:
LEWIS HANCOCK, JR, ARCHITECT,
435 1 Bpruce t, cor. Wash. ave.. Bcranton.
BROWN 4k MORRIS, ARCHITECTS,
Price building. 128 Washington avenue,
Scranton.
Loans.
THE REPUBLIC SAVINGS AND
Loan Association will loan you money;
on easier terms and pay you better oa
Investment than any othir association.
Call on 8. N. Callander. Dim Bank
building.
Seeds.
O. R. CLARK 4k CO., SEEDSMEN AND
Nurserymen; store 148 Washington ave.
nue; green house, 1330 North Main ave
nue; store telephone f81
Miscellaneous.
BAUER'S ORCHESTRA MUSIC FOR
ball, picnic, parties, receptions, wed.
ding and concert work furnished. For
term address R. J. Bauer, conductor,
117 Wyoming avenue, over Hulberf
muslo store
MEOARGEE BROTHERS, PRINTERS'
supplies, envelopes, paper bags, twine.
Warehouse, 130 Washington ave., Scran,
ton. Pa. T .
FRANK P. BROWN ft CO.. WHOLE,
ale dealer In Woodware, Cordage an4
Oil ClotluJjOWest LacKawanna ave.
THOMAS AUBREY, EXPERT AC
oountant and auditor. Rooms 19 and 20,
William. Building, opposite postoffiee.
Afoot tor the Rex Fire Extinguisher.