The Scranton tribune. (Scranton, Pa.) 1891-1910, August 16, 1895, Image 1

Below is the OCR text representation for this newspapers page. It is also available as plain text as well as XML.

    EIGHT PAGES 5 (J COLUMNS.
JSCK ANTON, PA., FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST 16, 1895. ,
TWO CENTOS A COPY.
1
sir
HPMCES
SHOULD RESt'LT FROM THE EX
CEEDINGLY LOW FIGURES WE
QUOTE BELOW. OF COURSE.
YOUR EVES WILL BE'YOUR MER
CHANT. AND BEYOND SAYING
THAT THE PRICES QUOTED ARE
THE LOWEST ON RECORD. WK
WILL SAV NOTHING FURTHER
.'TILL YOU SEE THEM.
WE OFFER A VERY ATTRACTIVE
LINE OF ALL WOOL. 8EED EF
FECT. COVERT CLOTHS. 30 INCHES
WIDE. AND VERY ATTRACTIVE
.COLORINGS. HAVE BEEN 45c.
40-INCH ALL WOOL JACQUARD
SUITINGS IN GREY. GARNET. EM
ERALD, BROWN. WOOD. NAVY
AND MYRTLE. THESE ARE WITH
' IN A FRACTION OF HALF PRICE.
It 4SC,
40-INCH SEED EFFECT. .FANCY
JACQUARD SUITINGS rN THE FOL
LOWING COLORINGS: SLATE,
GARNET, NAVY. GREEN. TAN AND
BROWN. NOT MANY PIECES, BUT
THEY'RE WORTH QUITE 75c.
A CAPITAL ASSORTMENT OF
SMALL IRIDESCENT CHECK
, STUFFS, TWO SIZES, LOVELY
'COMBINATIONS, AND A CLOTH
THAT WILL STAND THE ROUGH
EST SERVICE AND ALWAYS LOOK
' WELL. THESE ARB WORTH
l'l FULLY 65c AND ARE MATCHLESS
' FOR SCHOOL DRESSES.
S PIECES ONLY, E4-INCH ALL
WOOL STORM SEROE, IN NAVY
ONLY, AND GUARANTEED WORTH
75c. NO MORE AFTER THESE ARE
GONE, AT GOo.
' t CA8ES WHITE GROUND CORDED
DIMITIES, STRIPES, FIGURES AND
DOTS. AND WORTH DOUBLE
WHAT WE ASK FOR THEM.
At 2Sc.
U
' At 35c.
At 45c
At : 50c.
EXTRA
; uuivau ruvc urjv
4 CASE CREPONETTES, A LOVELY,
FLOSSY FABRIC IN STRIPES,
PLAIDS AND DOTS. HAS BEEN
. . SOLD AT 10c. THIS SEASON.
. r; ' ,v-;- iasv van r i ivc tw
''V ' . :
MSIKJMIB M
Senator. Quay's forces Take to the
Woods In Wild Disorder.
RESULT OP THE CONVENTION
Atraospherle Strength of tho Administra
tion' Opposition IMnsolvca I'poa a
, Test Vote-Cold Way for the
Man from Itoaver.
York. Pa., Au. 15. Th York county
Republicans had the greatest conven
tion in their experience. Notwith
standing ail doubts over predictions, it
was a Hastings nnd Gilkeson conven
tion throughout. The courrty ticket was
nominated first and separate from the
state convention delegates, notwith
standing a hot tight on the part of the
Quay men.
The county chairman called the con
vention to order at 10.20, with a full
delegation of 182 present. lr. V. H.
McCurUy. of Delta, was chosen con
vention chairman and the preliminary
work was disposed of. The resolutions
endorsed the administration, called for
sound money, a safe foreign, policy, etc.
County Chairman James G. Ulessner
was re-elected for the fourth time. The
county ticket named is as follows:
Hon. James W. Latimer was unani
mously renominated for president
Judge. For sheriff, O. W. S. Loucks,
the present mayor of York: for regis
ter of wills, E. K..Seltz; for clerk to the
commissioners. Albert Hoff; for county
surveyor. Zach T. Shaw: for director
of the poor. F.llas Strayer. Then came
the naming of the state delegates. An
other hot argument arose on the man
ner of voting for them. The Hastings
followers wanted a vlve voce vote,
while the Quay people wanted a secret
ballot. The Hastings people won their
point. '
The following wore named, the first
five being the Hastings candidates:
The vote is also appended. H. Klster
Free. 13; Captain O. W. Mullen. 133;
Robert M. Wirt. K9: George V. Holtx
inger. 123: Christopher Schrleder. l'Jt;
Joseph A. Kugler. 4S: William H. Wlttn.
58: W. A. McMullen. 60: William Llcht
enberger, 54; X. Sargent Ross, 60.
Resolutions were adopted Instructing
the delegates to vote for Hastings for
permanent chairman of tine state con
vention and Gilkeson chairman of the
state committee. The convention
closed amidst the wildest excitement.
QUAY TIBXEI) DOWN.
Chairman Gilkeson Will Establish No
Precedents in Making l'p tho Conven
tion Roll.
Philadelphia, Aug. 15. Governor
Hastings came to Philadelphia today
from ilarrlsbui g and a consultation of
the administration leaders was held.
The result of the consultation is prob
ably seen In the following letter from
Mr. Gilkeson to Senator Quay, in reply
to the -la Item's request that Uie state
committee tie called together to make
up the roll of the state convention. The
letter follows: ;
August, IS, 1895.
Hon. M. S. Quay, Beaver, Pa.
Dear Sir I beg to acknowledge the re
ceipts of your letter of the 13th requesting
me to convene the state committee at
Harlsburg on the 20th Inst., for the purpose
of preparing the roll of the state conven
tion called for the 28th Inst.
In reply thereto I have to say that the
duty of preparing the roll ha heretofore
always devolved upon the state chairman,
and I am aware of no reason why a new
precedent should now be established.
In the performance of this duty I shall
follow the well-settled practice of placing
upon the roll only the names of delegates
duly certified by the regular organizations
in the various counties, leaving absolutely
to the state convention the duty of set
tling the question of contested seats. In
the preparation of the roll, I will, under
no circumstances whatever, depart from
the regular, orderly and well established
precedent set by my predecessors. Youfs
truly, B. F. Gllkespn, Chairman.
TO SAVE DURANT.
A Mysterious Attempt Said to Have Bien
Made to llrihA Itirnrs
Bsn Francisco. Aug. 15. 'Another sen
sation has developed in the Durant
case. Whether It Is a case of Jury brib
ing or a bold attempt at blackmail the
police and others 'Who have In vest gated
the matter are unwilling and probably
una'ble to state with pofltlveness. The
fact remains that Mrs. Durant, mother
of the young man who Is accused of
murdering Minnie Wllllaims and
Blanche Lamont, was approached re
cently by a mysterious woman, whose
desire was to sell something of ex
treme Importance to the safety of Theo
dore Durant. It ma Intimated that at
least three of the Jurors' already ac
cepted could be Influenced to vote for
an acquittal. But coin would be re
quired to get these vote.
Mrs. Durant not only spurned the
offer, ibut Informed the attorneys for
hr son and alio notified the police of
the nature of the offer made to her.
The woman Is Mrs. Sarah Groger,
who resides at 516 Leavenworth street.
While she denies having offered any
Jurors for sale, the admits having vis
ited Mrs. Durant and offering for
money to bring about the accomplish
ment of something which would be in
valuable to the defenre of Theodore
Durant. Mrs. Oroger says she only
acted as an agent of a third party and
did so Innocently.
MURDERESS RESPITED.
The Governor of Georgia Gives Mrs.
Nobles a Cfaanoe for Her Life.
Atlanta, Oa., Aug. 15. The case of
Mrs. Elizabeth Kobies, which has at
tracted as much interest in this section
as has the case of Marie Barberl In
New York, was given a temporary set
tlement today by Governor Atkinson,
who granted a respite until Oct. 12.
The merits of the case were not gone
Into at all by the governor, the appli
cation on the woman's behalf being
simply that a sufficient respite be
granted to permit a motion for a new
trial to be made at the next term of
Twiggs county court.
This Is an extraordinary motion for a
new trial, the woman's counsel having
abandoned her after her trial and mak
ing no effort to secure a new trial for
her. The governor granted a similar
stay in the case of Ous Faubles, the
negro who was her accomplice, though
no motion was made In his behalf. They
killed iMrs. Nobles' husband. .
WORKMEN COOKED ALIVE. "
Two Employes of the Fort Orange Paper
Company, Near Csstletnn, Killed.
Castleton, N. T., Aug. IS. A fearful
boiler eiplorslon took place at the plant
of the Fort Orange Paper company,
about a mile from this place, at 2.10
o'clock this morning, resulting In the
loss of 'two lives. This Is the com
pany 'that has the contract for the
printing of the , postal cards- for the
government. A force of fifteen men
has been employed nights la the paper
mlM. , . '
One of the sit boilers fifteen feet long
fid five feet In diameter, with a pre-
sure of 78 pounds to the Inch, exploded,
burying 'beneath the debris James Law
ton, of Schodack Depot, aged 50 years,
and William Johnson, of 107 Clinton
avenue, Albany, aged 33. Before they
were taken from the ruins they were
literally cooked alive by eteain and
water. Lawton Iwaa taken out dead.
Johnson remained conscious until 8.50,
when he died at the Albany City hos
pital. The boUer house iwaa wrecked and
the plant was compelled to shut down.
The direct cause of the explosion is
not known. The 'boiler gauge showed
the presence of plenty of 'water, it is
said. The property damage is about
$3,000.
CHILD BURNED TO DEATH.
Shocking Kesnlts Follow the F.iploaioa of
a Lamp.
SfcKeesport, Pa.. Aug. 15. At 4
o'clock this morning, while the family
o George Allen, a miner, at Industry,
were at breakfast, the lighted lamp on
the table exploded, throwing blazing
oil in all directions,'
Beatrice, a 5-year-old child, was cov
ered with the burning fluid and burned
to death in a fnw minutes. Mr. Allen's
arms were so badly burned in his ef
forts to save his daughter that am
putation may be necessary.
DR. TANNER SUSPENDED.
Lively Seene in the British Parliament.
Tnrbulont Member tjectcd from House
of Commons..
London, Aug. 15. In the house of
commons this evening John Redmond,
the Parnelllte leader, moved the amend
ment to the address In reply to the
queen's speech of which he had previ
ously given notice, calling upon the
government to declare tthetr policy in
regard to home rule for Ireland, The
reform of the land law, the compulsory
purchase of land, evicted tenants and
the Industrial condition of the country.
John Dillon spoke in support of Mr.
Redmond's amendment, tilr: Dillon ad
mitted that there was utn ominous
silence In America regarding the Irish
question, which, he confessed, he did
not like. It was a sign, he said, tlhat
the mighty work effected by Parnell in
leading the people there to believe that
Ireland's cause would be won by con
stitutional agitation in parliament had
been destroyed.
Timothy Harrington. In support of
the amendment, referred to the attitude
of the LUeral party toward home rule
during the lust election as unknown,
when a member whojc identity was not
discovered, exclaimed: "They ran away
trom it."
At this Dr. Charles D. Tanner,' antl
Parnellite. cried out: "They did not.
That's a He." Amid calls for order the
speaker directed Dr. Tanner to with
draw the expression he made use of and
to apologize for having used It.
Dr. Tanner refused, and the speaker
then named Dr. Tanner for gross dis
obedience of the chair and for wilful
disorder.
Dr. Tanner responded:
"On the contrary, sir, anything that
comes to me from the chair I am only
too happy, to do, but I cannot tell an
untruth." Joseph Chamberlain then
moved that Dr. Tanner be suspended,
and amid cheers the speaker put the
question. The responses were loud
"aves" and a few "noes."
The peaikert announcement of the re
sult of tlhe vote was challenged and the
usual course pursued. When the tellers
were a'sked the result of the division by
th speaker 'Dr. ITanner exclaimed:
"I II tell myself."
The sneaker declared the motion car
ried and ordered Dr. Tanner to with
draw, 'but the latter did not move.
Thereupon the speaker directed the
pergeant-at-arms to remove him. Dr.
Tanner at once rose from .his seat,
bowed to the chair and marched down
the ganewlay. Turning he said: "I
have greater pleasure In leaving than
I ever had In entering this dirty house."
He pointed at IMr. Chamberlain and
he also shook his first and shouted:
"Judlas." Four times before he reached
the door did Dr. Tanner turn and Te
peat the epithet. The nst words the
members heard were: "You wont try
any nonsense with me."
Dr. Tanner's suspension is for a week.
NO NEW BOND ISSUE.
General Alexander Brown Snye the Situa
tion Is Not Alarming.
Baltimore. Aug. 15. General Alexan
der Brown,- who formed the sub-syndicate
In Baltimore to co-operate with
the Morgan-Uelmont syndicate In furn
ishing the gold for tbe last Issue of
tionds, ccmmen'Mng on the gold export,
'ays: "There Is not the slightest cause
for alarm. The syndicate has the sit
uaUon well In riand and will keep the
treasury gold reserve Intact. Com
mercial Mils -are beginning to appear
in the market, and they .will furnish
abundant exchange and will effectively
check the outflow of gold.
"A regards the talk of another bond
4ssue, I do not think there Is the slight
est foundation or It. The rates for
exchange are already beginning to
weaken, and I firmly believe that the
gold shipments are nearing an end."
DREAM CAUSED HIS DEATH.
Druggist la Id lev Mortally Wounded
Whllo Cleaning Ills Revolver.
Charleston, W. Va Aug. 15. Last
night Percy W. Laldley, a druggist,
dreamed burglars were trying to get
Into his house. iHls dream Impressed
him so that he told It at the drug store
this morning and took his revolver out
of a drawer and began cleaning It for
use.
A few minutes later the pistol was
discharged, the ball entering his left
breast near the heart and passing en
tirely through the body. Imbedded itself
In the wall. He was taken home, where
he died In an hour.
MANY DIE OF SMALLPOX.
Negroes Confined at Eagle Pass Are Af-.
flletcd with the Pest.
San Antonio, Tex., Aug. 15. Of the
340 negroes confined In the government
quarantine camp at Eagle Pass 120 are
afflicted with smallpox.
The deaths average abou four dally.
The balance of the 1.500 rations fur
nished by the United States govern
ment to Consul Sparks for the use of
the refugees has been turned over to
Dr. Evans, state quarantine officer of
the quarantine camp, for. use there. It
being found Impracticable to forward
them to the starving negroes In Mexico.
Artist Rothermel Dead. - -Pottstown,
Pa., Aug. 15. P. F. Rother
mel, the art 1st, who has been slowly dying
for some time past from a cancer In the
mouth, breathed his last at his home near
here tonight. Mr. Rothermel's most cele
brated picture ! the "Battle of Gettys
burg.' The work Js a mammoth one and
was painted for the state of Pennsylvania
and now hangs Is the state library at Har
risburg. . - Government Reeelpts.
Washington. Aug. 15. The government
receipts for the first half of August ended
today aggregated 114,292,18, and the ex
penditure for the same period $21,47170.
The deficit for the month to date Is I7.1U,.
00 and for the fiscal year to date, tws
and one-halt awaths, tlCM.M.
THE SILVER COSFEREKCE
Details of lias of Organization Is
Outlined.
C0.HHITTECMCS APPOINTED
The Country Will He Divided Into Sections
and Each Member Will Be til vena
Section in Whla to Labor as
a Sliver Mhtaioaary.
Washington, Aug. 15. The silver con
ference adjourned this afternoon after
adopting an address to the people and
outlining the details of a plan of or
ganization. The plan provides for a
national comnlttee of Democrats who
are In favor of both gold and silver
money to be composed of one Demo
crat from each state. These members
shall be chosen by an executive commit
tee consisting of Senator Harris ,of
Tennessee; Jones, of Arkansas, and
Tui'ple. of Indiana, and tlons. W. J.
Stone, of Missouri, and W. JI. Henrlch
sen, of Illinois. National committee
man from each state Is to look after
the perfection of an urgltnlsatlon In his
state and tho organization of bime
tallic Democratic clubs In every county
and election district.
After the adjournment of the confer
ence the executive cemmlttee provided
for In the plan of organisation held a
two hours' session, at which means of
obtaining an elllcient national commit
tee were fully discussed. It was finally
decided to divide the county Into sec
tions and to give each member of the
executive a section in whlith to corre
spond, with a view to getting the best
men to advance the cause outlined by
the convention. Jt was found neces
sary to take this step, as all the stages
were not represented at the conference,
and the delegates of many of those rep
resented did not wish to name men for
the national committee before consult
ing their friends at home.
The executive committee, before
separating, named the following
members of the national committee:
Ex-Senator Walrih, of Augusta, Ua.;
J. H. (Dennis, of Reno, Nev.; C. 8.
Thomas, of Colorado; G. Alnslee, of
Idaho: J. H. Head, of 'Nashville, Ternn.;
Land C. Armstrong, of Arkansas.
The committee anjourneu to meet
again at the call of the chairman, Sena
tor Harris, of Tennessee.
FLED IN MulIT GEAR.
Summit House Destroyed by Fire -People
from Rival Hotels Had to Lend the
Victims Clothing.
Shelter Island, L. I., Aug. 15. A Are
broke out early this morning in the
Summit House at this place. The build
ing was a frame structure and was used
as a summer hotel. The flames spread
so rapidly that the guests had hardly
time to escape in their night clothe
They lost all their personal effects.
The building, with Its contents, was
destroyed, involving a loss bf about
$15,000. This Is partially covered by in
surance. The tire Is supposed to have
originated In the kitchen. The guests
at the other hotels were awakened by
the noise and many of them helped in
extinguishing the flames.
The excitement In the neighborhood
was tremendous. Pew of the guests had
more than their night gear on, and as
this was the leading hotel In town,
every room had been filled with sum
mer boarders, many of whom were
from the vicinity of Brooklyn. They
had much difficulty In getting clothing,
though the guests In other hotels right
gallantly came to the rescue and lent
what they could to the unfortunates.
It Is considered a miracle that no one
was hurt.
FAILURE OF A BIG MINE.
Bear's Nest In Alaska Found to Be De
void of Pay Rock.
San Francisco, Aug. IB. A few
months ago 'With a great flourish of
trumpets It was announced that- the
Ht-ar's Nest mine, adjoining the fa
mous Treadiwell mine, on Douglass Is
land, Alaska, (had 'been sold by Tread
well to a German and TCngHsh syndi
cate for $1,000,000. Now comes news
from Alaska that the mine 'has failed
and that the outcroppings, which made
experts declare It fully equal to the
Treadwcll, were merely surfnee Indica
tions and developments show the ore
In the body of the mine Is too low grade
to pay working.
Charges of fraud and bad manage
ment have been piled up against those
who surd and operated the mine, but
nature appears to be to blame for the
non-turning up of pay rock. It Is safe
to say the capitalists were more to
blame for their' Ignorance than their
Inability to select competent experts.
As the Dear's Nest adjoined tlhe Tread
weH, th syndicate believed they could
reach pay rock by drifting toward the
Treadwell, but 4n this they failed, be
cause the Treadwell Is a buge pocket
produced during the age or volcanic
eruptions.
STARVATION BEFORE THEM.
No More Work for Strikers at Michigan
Ore Mines This Year.
Ishpemlng, Mich., Aug. 15. It Is
rumored that at least one of the big
Ishpemlng mines has shipped Its last
ore for 1X95, and It is believed by many
that the mining companies are not
averse to having thepresent strike con
tinue until the close of navigation. The
ore now mined and stocked will bring
fifty cents or one dollar more per ton
next season than this year. There are
750,000 tons of Ishpemlng stock piles,
with enough In the country to bring the
figures up to an even million tons.
'There 4s already much want among
the strikers anf their families, and now
that stores wlll'sell for oash only, abso
lute starvation wHI face hundreds of
families within a few weeks.
STOCK CERTIFICATE THEFT.
A Pspel Worth $S,000 Stolen from a Cash
Box.
PlttsbV. P-V Aug. 15. The discov
ery has been made that between the
time covered between last Saturday
afternoon and Tuesday morning, the
la w offices of William McKennan and
John D. McKennan, No. 110 Diamond
street, had been robbed of a cash box
containing valuable papers. So far as
at present known the loss Is confined to
a Northern Pacific stock certificate,
valued t $5,000, which was unregistered
and negotiable.
The theft iwss dlscovered-by a negro
porter engaged In cleaning out the
vault In the buHdlng. William McKen
nan Is aibsent from the city. :
TROUBLEsIn TURKEY.
Ceiasat Jewel t Ordered to Demand the Me
. leave of an American I Prison,
- Washington, 4ug 15. The state de
partment ha received a report from
Minister Terrell at Constantinople stat
ing that a naturalised American oltl
en, who had been a student at the
American college at Massouan, Ar
menia, had been arrested bjr tht Turk
ish officials for alleged complicity In the
murder of an Armenian Christian. The
minister stated that he had Instructed
Mr. Jewett, the United States consul
there, to demand the release of the pris
oner, whose name was not given, if he
had been Imprisoned on mere suspicion
or because his acquirement of Ameri
can citizenship was construed as an
offense.
Mr. Terrell said in his dispatch that
the present Jdassouan troubles arose
from notices sent sixteen persons that
they would be killed unless they co
operated with the Armenian revolu
tionists. Two of these wer President
Tracy and Professor Rlggs, of Mas
souan college, both Americans. Two
others of the sixteen have been assassi
nated. lAt IMr. Terrell's request a Turk
ish guard has been furnished to protect
the American families from the assassins.
SIBLEY'S SILVER SPEECH.
During Its Delivery the Speaker's Re
spects Are Paid Secretary Carlisle and
John Sherman.
Raleigh, N. C, Aug. 15.-J. C. Sibley,
of Pennsylvania, addressed an audience
of 2.000 people at Cary today. Heavy
rain Interfered with the attendance.
The speaker largely con lined himself to
the silver question. His plea was for
unity of action. "We have nine mil
lion votes," 'he said, "but partisanship
weakens our .forces. We must win in
1.S96 or we will never win. If we fail
rheti the future offers only repudiation
or revolution."
The speaker paid his respects to Sec
retary Carlisle. He read from, a copy
of the secretary's speech Utot part
which referred to a conspiracy formed
In Kngland to demonetize from the
sevenths to one-half of the metallic
money of the people, and which would
produce greater disaster thani all the
wars, pestilences and famines.
"Ye. Mr. tiecretary." said he. "you
then had a prophetic eye, but now you
are sent over the country to teach the
doctrine of Clevelandism. Glare of
gold has dimmed your vision. The yel
lowhalo of Rothschilds hovers just over
your head, and you seek It for a crown.
Did I say his vision was obscured?
Ixok at the prophesy ot the 'greater
disaster than pestilence and famine
made nearly two years ago. Then look
at the conditions of today. Has not
that prophesy beeii literally fulfilled
and does the course of the secretary
today Indicate that he realizes the truth
of what he said then?"
In his references to the course of
Senator iSherman on the financial ques
tion, Mr. Sibley spared not, and said:
"When the genius of all evil shall call
from the vast deep the spirits of the
traitors and agents of disaster among
mankind to paps in grand review there
will be among them Judas Iscarlot,
Benedict Arnold and John Sherman.
What shall be their pka? Judas Is
carlot will be able to say: 'I had the
grace to return to the eorruptionists
the price of my treachery; I had the
grace to expiate my crime by going out
and hanging myself,' and the others
will have a plea of like character, but
none can be offered by John Sherman,
and all the spirits of evil will give way
to him, for his only plea can be the
working of disaster to his country
without having the example of Judas
Iscarlot or any one else."
FIVE OUTLAWS CAPTURED.
Men Who Esoapcd from Jail Monday Last
Placed I'ndcr Arrest.
Eufaula, I. T., Aug. 15. Five desper
ate outlaws, charged with fiavlng com
mitted almost every crime In the cal
endar, iwese captured In the center of
Rufuala at about noon today.
Heavily armed and appropriately
mounted, they rode bodily Into town,
apparently Intent on making a raid and
believing that they would receive but
little opposition. Their lack of alert
ness proved their misfortune, for they
were quickly surrounded by armed
deputies. The officers' drop on them
was a complete 'surprise, and the
quintet meekly gave up their arms and
submitted to arrest without making
the least effort to escape.
Composing the gang are Charles Wil
son, Kay Defence ugh, Joe Bock.
Charlie Moore and Coy Shehan. Each
Is charged with numerous crimes com
mitted In the territory and all are
known to be desperate men. Monday
last they escaped from the StIMwater
(O. T.) jail and ever since then have
ibeen closely pursued (by a determined
detachment of deputy marshals.
NEGROES BEG FOR AID.
They Issue, nn appeal to Be Saved from
the White Caps.
Paris, Texas, Aug. 15. The following
appeal 'has been .received from the ne
groes of Delta country: "To the clt
ixens of 'Lanwr county: We, the col
ored people of Delta county, are the
poorest and most worthless people in
the state of Texas, and we ilr not want
any trouble with anybody. We ask
the white people to protect us, and
wthen we do wrong to deal with ub as
the laws demand, and we mill ibe sat
isfied. "So please 'help us stop 'the white caps.
We are not guilty of the least crime
In Delta county, so please come to our
relief and we will be under lasting ob
ligations to you. At present we are
unable to go anywhere."
CHICAGO TO GET HOLMES.
The Alleged Murderer May Be Taken
There to stand Trial.
Phlladlphla, Aug. 15. It nas prac
tically been decided that H. H. Holmes,
the allieged murderer of Minnie and
Nannie Williams, B. P. Pletzel, and
half a dozen otihers, .will go to Chicago
for trral for the murder of the Williams
girls. This, It Is said, was the outcome
of a lengthy conference In this city to
day between W. A. Capps, of Fort
Worth, Tex., and IDistrlct Attorney
Graham.
After the conference' lawyer Capps
said that he had urged the district at
torney to lllow Holmes to go to Chi
cago and tWat Mr. Graham could hard
ly refuse to grant his request.
NEGROES LEAVE WINSTON.
Wholesale Indictments Cause Qrent Con
sternation Among the Blacks.
Winston, N. C. Aug. 15.-Arthur Tut
tle, the negro who shot and killed Po
liceman Vlckers last May, was today
sentence to twenty-five years Impris
onment. Mis counsel did not offer a
motion for a new trial. Fifty negroes
who participated In the riot last Sun
day night are In Jail.
. The grand Jury has returned over 100
true bills against parties connected
with the affair. It Is estimated that
2o negroes have left Winston since
the riot. ,
. Veterans Cross the Pond.
Chicago, Aug. lS.-Nearly (00 German
army veteran living here and In other
western cities departed In a body for Ho
boken, N. J where they will embark for
Hamburg. The purpose of their trip Is to
Join their fellow veterans and other Ger
man in celebrating the victory over the
French at Sedan and to present an addresi
to Prince Bismarck at Prlederlchsruhe.
Th chief celebration will be at Berlin
.M T .. 1
ILL-OMENED EXCURSION
An Engine Plunges Into a Loaded
Passenger Coach.
H0RK0KS OP THE COLLISION
Two Persons Are Killed and Dosenor
More Seriously Injured-Fire Adds
Its Terrors to the Wreck-The
Killed aad Wounded.
Camden, N. J., Aug. 15. A negro ex
cursion to Lakeside park today cost two
lives and the injury of a dozen people
or more. The ill-omened excursion
started from Camden this morning and
the first accident occurred at Haddon
Avenue station, when Charles Venable,
aged 23 years, In attempting to Jump on
the train while It was moving, was
thrown under the wheels and killed.
While the train was standing at the
Liberty Park station tonight allowing
passengers to alight, the fast mall
train from Atlantic City, due here at
7.42, crashed into the end of the rear
car.' The car was full of people and
as the engine plowed Its way Into It as
far as the second seat a terrible panic
ensued. Men, women and children
Jumped from the open windows and
seven or eight were severely injured In
this way. Fire added Its terrors to the
collision, and while the struggling peo
ple were endeavoring to force their, way
from the cars, the burning oil from the
shattered headlight of the engine Ig
nited the floor and the flames began to
lick the backs of the fleeing people.
Child Burned to a Crisp.
When all had succeeded in making
their escape from the cars It was dis
covered that Marshall Johnson, the 6-year-old
son of 'the Rev. Marshal John
son, of Suuth Camden, wias missing.
Subsequently the child's body was
found burned to a crisp In the charred
embers of the car. Maggie Cannon,
aged 12 years, of Camden, was 'fatally
hurt, but 'none of the other Injured are
In a dangerous condition. The respon
sibility for the col II son 4s In kubt. The
mail train was In charge of Engineer
Charles Ulendenrolng, who has been an
engineer on the road since 1854, and he
has never before met with aji accident.
Olendenning claims 'that, at Colllns
wood, the next station beyond the Lib
erty Park rtatlon, he received the clear
signtil denoting that h road was free.
The car that was run Into was burned
up and the engine of the mall train
was bady smashed.
WIMMERS BRUTE CA16IIT.
Oliver Perry, Who Assaulted a West Side
Uirl at Wiimnera, Caught Yesterday In
Jersey City.
Oliver Perry, the brutal fiend who
criminally assaulted a West lde girl
at (Wlmmers last 'Saturday, was cap
tured last night in Jersey City.
After the crime Perry, who Imagined
he was safe from Identification, went
to his home and was about his usual
work when a constable armed with a
warrant visited his house and Inquired
for him. He escaped by the back way
and went to the home of his sister, who
drove him twenty miles in the country
to where another slater lived. She
drove him to within seven miles of Port
Jervls and he walked the ret of the
distance, boarding a train at that place
for New York.
Descriptions of him were sent out by
Chief Simpson, and officers and friends
of the outraged girl went to Jersey
City and New York to prosecute the
search for him. As a consequence the
police In those cities have been closely
watching for him, and as he was easily
Identified It was confidently believed
all along that he would be spotted.
The only particulars of the arrest
that could be learned were that Perry
denied his Identity and guilt. He said
his name was William H. Benlsto, aged
22 years and) without a home or occu
pation. He was very shabbily dressed
and wore a backwoods, gawklsh ap
pearance that would make him a mark
even In crowded, cosmopolitan Jersey
City.
Miss (Mamie Plebert, the unfortunate
victim, was out yesterday for the first
time. The young man to whom she
svas and Is engaged to be married was
the most vigorous in the search for the
villain. The day of the assault she re
ceived a letter from him and It was
while walking along through the
woods reading the letter that Perry at
tacked her.
Chief Simpson will today take the
formal steps necessary to extradite
Perry.
TO PRISON FOR LIFE.
The Murderers of T. I). Dlnklns Enter a
Plea of Gnl!t.
Jackson, Miss., (Aug. 16. A telegram
received here today from Brandon,
Miss., says that when Marshall, Cole
man and Fox were arraigned In court
this morning for the murder of T. D.
Dlnklns, a few days ago, all three en
tered a plea of guilty and were sen
tenced to the state penitentiary for
life. ,
Marshall was a candidate for state
senator on the Democratic ticket and
member of a prominent family. Dln
klns had accused him' of disgraceful
conduct, and, accompanied by his two
friends, Marshall attacked Dlnklns at
the railroad depot at 'Brandon. All
three opened Are and 'Dlnklns fell dead.
ENTOMUED EIGHT MEN.
A Brown Stone Building Collapses In
Peterson.
Paterson. Aug. 15. The old brown
stone building opposite the city hall
collapsed at 1 p. m. today, entombing
Contractor Jacob Steele and seven of
his workmen.
The structure was about to be torn
down to make way for a large addition
to a department store. It was three
stories high.
The workmen entombed were In a
pit in the cellar. All were cut and
bruised but were soved from fatal In
juries by. some timbers which fell hori
zontally across the pit and shielded
them to a great extent. They were
rescued by firemen and police.
-
Maryland Stnto Convention.
Cambridge, Mil., Aug. 15. The Republi
can state convention, which met here to
day, was a harmonious one. Hon. Lloyd
Lowndes, of Cumberland, was nominated
by acclamation for governor. Harry M.
Clabaugh, of Carroll county, was nomi
nated toy acclamation for attorney gen
eral, and Robert K. Oraham, of Wicomico,
easily won the nomination (or comptroller.
. . I'rquhert Surrendered.
Suffolk, Vs., Aug. 15,-Wllllam J. Urqu
hart, who shot and killed John E. Oay,
Nov.' II, 1870, was today sequenced to Im
prisonment for Ave years. After the
shooting Urquhart lied and after an ab
sence of nearly a quarter of a century
voluntarily returned and surrendered to
the authorities and asked for a trial.
WEATHER REPORT.
' Per eastern Pennsylvania, " generally
fair: continued high temperature; varl
able winds. , v . :
SOT O
Fiicys
BDdsam
er Sale
At prices reduced to
close out balance of
stock
MUSL1 UNDERWEAR
One lot Empire Gowns
98 cents, former price
$1.25. Four lots Cor
set Covers 25c., 39c.
50c, 75c, former
prices 38c to $1.25.
Skirts, Drawer j
Chemise, etc.
69c, 98c.. reduced
from 85c. and $1.19;
Boys' Kilt Suits.
LADIES' SILK WAISTS
$3.50, $5.00, $6.00,
$7.50, reduced from
$4.50, $6.50, $8.00
and $9.00. Ladle.
White Lawn Waists
at exactly half price.
FINLEVS
Agent for Charles A.
Schieren & Co.'s
Leather
Beltie!
The Very Best.
313 Spruce St., Scranton,
One of the Larsest and baetest Shoe Heassa
fn the United States, LI WIS, RKILLV
OA VIES, 114 and US Wyondag Avenue.
LATEST
NOVELTY
STERLING SILVER
i
9
Markers,
Call and get one for
your Bicycle. Only 75c'
with your name engraved
on It. :
eBsnssBSM-sn-nssM . ' '1 , -
W.Ji'Weichel
4C35crc:Stt . '
Bicycl
V-V' J.;',
:.::-v.'yv;