The Scranton tribune. (Scranton, Pa.) 1891-1910, May 15, 1895, Page 4, Image 4

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    THE SCBAT5TTON .TRIBUNE "WEDNESDAY MORNING. MAY 15, 1895.
Dally and Woelily. No Sunday Edition.
Published at Bcrnntrm, Pit , by The Tribune Pub
lishing (tompunv.
New York Office: Trlliuiia Huttdlng, Frank &
Gray, Uanngcr,
. . KINOSBURV, Pirn. hb Ocn'i. Man.
t. H. RIPPLC, mo T.
LIVV S. RICHARD, Eoito.
W. W. DAVIS, Busikk Mimiii.
W. W. YOUNG, Aov. Mui'ik
CUTEIltD AT Till rO3T0rrlCl AT BCRANTON, PA., AS
OIOOHD-CLiOS MAIL UATTER.
Trintoni' Ink," Ihe recosnkcd Jnurtml (at ndver
iImts, ralm Tim Scuaxton Tiiiiiuns im On- brat
iitlviriiHlnjr medium In NortlictuHeru l'eousylvap
l,lu. "l'rlulcra' Ink" kuons.
TnR Wkkkly TnniUHK, Iwtiort Every Saturday,
Conmluft Twolvo HandKonie I'tiK. with un Abun
clan of New, Klillon. and WellKHItod Miami
lany. For Threw Who Cannot Take Tiim Daily
Tkibi'NK, tbo Weekly la lUvnm mewled lie the
Beat ilarguln Uolnjr. Only (1 a Year, in Advance,
Tux Tribune la for Bale Pally nt the D , L. and W.
button at lluboken.
kUNIONi
fcCRANTON, MAY 15, 18'J5.
"Tho Amcricnn pcoplo, from 1 mil it ion
and Interest, l-'AVOU IllMKTAI.US.M, nnd
the Republican party demands the use of
ItOTIl GOLD ANUSILVCK AS STANDARD
AtONKY, with such restrictions nnd un
der such provisions, to bo determined by
Icgislutlon, ns will secure tho rnnlntcn
once of the parity of values of the two
rtictnlH, sn that the purchasing nnd debt
pnjing power of tho dollnr, whether of
silver, gold or paper, shall be at all times
Ciiial."--Kcptiblictin National plat form,
Juno 7, 1802.
Tap the Idle Reserve Fund.
We do not believe that either Senator
Quay or Governor IlnstlnKS really fa
vors the proposition to talte $1,000,000
from the public school appropriation
nnd transfer It to the chirlile bill. At
a time when there Is between $1,000,000
nnd $4,000,000 cf surplus state money ly
ing Idle In a number of Kinks, stt-h a,
rurtnllment of the school funils would
undoubtedly be vlowcl by the public
with marked disfavor. T!? people
would readily approve th reduction of
this Idle reserve fund, If neerrrrtry; but
we are quite certain that they wou'd
resent any adjustment of the expendi
tures, however -well Intended, which
would result In cramping the free pub
lic schools.
It Is well known that by reason of tho
general depression the revenues of the
commonwealth are Jurt now below
their normal level; and It Is also a fact
of general' knowledge that the appro
priation bills Introduced nt this session
would, If passed In their original form,
eat up those revenues from three to
four times over. These circumstances
explain why, In the desire to please the
greatest number of legislators, It Is
proposed In some quarters to cut clown
the school appropriations for two years.
T!ut the proposition Is none the less i
mischievous one, which, !" assented to,
would brlns upon the Republican party
perious and Immediate disfavor. The
school fund may he Increased, but It
must not be decreased. Public pentl
ment upon that point will no doubt
quickly and emphatically assert Itself.
And why should not the reserve fund
b? used In this emergency? It per
forms no useful public service at pres
ent, except In a passive sense. It sim
ply' lies idle in the banks. If funds ate
pcarce, why not put a portion of this
Bum to more active u.te? No one will
claim that the revenues of a state like
our own will long remain as scant ns
they are today. Improvement In tho
general business situation will speedily
reflect Itself In tho condition of the
state treasurer's cash book. Rather,
therefore, than run any risk of crip
pling the state's magnificent free public
school system, which Is justly Its pride,
why should the legislature hesitate to
draw on the commonwealth's surplus
until such time as the current receipts
will be adequate to cover the essen
tial expenditures?
This Is the common sense way out of
the present dilemma; and a much mora
satisfactory one, It occurs to us, than
the proposed cheese-paring policy to
ward the public schools.
Bimetallism Is Our True Policy.
Professor Lawrence Laughlin, tho
ablest champion of gold monometallism
in the United States, and, as a matter
of fact, the only one on that side who
has yet realized the necessity of dis
carding epithet for Impersonal argu
ment, makes the point that there is an
abundance of cold In the world, with
which to do the business of tho world.
Upon the authority of Dr. Soetbeer
and the present director of the Ameri
can mint, he estimates the production
of gold and silver to be substantially as
follows:
' Gold. Silver.
JflM-lSM $3,314,6.r3,000 $ 7,878,450,000
li51-l93 6,484,473,750 3.381,027,700
Total $8,799,020,750 $10,753,477,700
He' estimates that all of the $5,484,473,
750 produced since 1850 is yet In exist
ence, and suspects that of the preced
ing amount $2,000,000,000 has come down
to us, thus making the world's present
supply of gold as large as $7,500,000,000.
But in the light of this claim, what
becomes of the favorite contention of
the gold monometalllsts that sliver
-was virtually although not technical
lydemonetized along about 3850 by
the leading commercial nations because
it had become so abundant? The same
loglo, applied to Professor Laughlln's
figures, -would suggest the present ad
visability of demonetizing gold, lest It
should become too cheap and common,
Yet it is a fact of common experience
that gold is almost wholly confined to
the great financial centers, and is Bel
dom seen out among the masses of the
people. To put the entire burden of
redemption upon gold money alone
would be to place Into the hands of the
great "money princes" even more enor
mous power than they now possess;
and the only escape from this tremend
ous centralization lles In the interna
tional restoration of bimetallism.
It is because the United States Iras of
late apparently lagged In its efforts to
secure international bimetallism that
the movement Is developing In this
country in favor of aittemptlng bi
metallism alone.
A Reaction Toward Silver.
It Is believed by many that an ad
justment of the coinage problem which
would, for fthe present, restore the
monthly purchases of silver discon
tinued at the repeal of the Sherman
act, thus leaving in abeyance the ques
tion of an international bimetallic
agreement, would satisfy a large per
centage of those persons who are dis
satisfied with the present arrangement
of our finances, and who are, from
principle, unalterably opposed to the
monetary extinction of silver. It is
among the possibilities that the clearly
Inevitable compromise will take this
form. That would not be a final settle
ment, but It would at least afford an
other breathing spell, during which the
people could with more care consider
the respective claims of gold mono
metallism vs. bimetallism.
Another point of significance In this
connection Is the recent tendency of sil
ver bullion to appreciate in value. Tho
quotations, as yet, are merely flutter
ing upward; but It Is plausibly argued
that the considerable curtailment In
the output of the sliver mines of the
world during the recent years of
marked depression, amounting for the
year ISM almost to 50 per cent., as com
pared with the output of 1891 and 1892,
will eventually have a tendency to
bring the commercial price of silver
back to somewhere near the figure
which Its scarcity as a precious metal
assigned to It before Its general de
monetization. A recovery of only nine
points would, It Is claimed, make profit
able the reopening of the suspended
placer mines of Colorado and Nevada;
and this recovery may be reached with
in two years.
It Is, of course, claimed by blmetall-
Ists that the re-openlng of the leading
mints of the world to silver upon terms
of equality with gold would so equalize
the demand for the two metals (the
supply being already approximately
equalized) that the commercial ratio
would in a short time vary but little
from the coinage ratio. Such a result,
If It could be realized, would end all
controversy, and unquestionably give
such an Impetus to business prosperity
as has not hitherto been known dur
ing the present century. But In the
meantime, It Is pleasant to observe
symptoms of a commercial recovery in
sliver, entirely independent of mone
tary legislation. Maybe the leading
nations of the world are beginning at
last simultaneously to awaken to the
utter folly and harm of their own
course In concertedly demonetizing the
metal, which, until they threw it
overboard, faithfully and efficiently,
under bimetallism, measured one-half
their values.
Such a reaction would be most wel
come.
Some Demands of Labor.
The various labor organizations of
Monroe county, New York, recently as
sembled together at Rochester for the
purpose of outlining a policy of action.
After much discussion they adopted
twenty-one resolutions, six having
reference to political and fifteen to so
cial demands. The political demands
were as follows:
1. The people to have the right to pro-
noso laws nnd to vote upon all measures
of Importance, according to the referen
dum principle.
2. Abolition of tho veto power or tne ex
ecutive (national, stato and municipal)
wherever It exists.
3. Municipal self .government.
4. Direct vote arid secret ballots In all
elections. Universal and equal right of
suffrage, without regard to color, creed or
sex. Hlection days to be legal holidays.
5. All public officers to be subject to re
call by their respective constituencies.
6. Uniform civil and criminal law
throughout tho United States. Adminis
tration of Justice to be free of charge.
Abolition of capital punishment.
The social demands are as follows:
1. Reduction of tho hours of labor In pro
portion to the progress of production.
2. The United States shall obtain posses
sion of tho railroads, canals, telegraphs,
telephones and all other means of public
transportation and communication, but no
employe shell bo discharged for political
reasons.
X Tho municipalities to obtain posses
sion of tho local railroads, ferries, water
works, gas works, electric plants and all
industries requiring municipal franchises;
but no employe shall be discharged for
political reasons.
4. Tho public lands to be declnred In
alienable. Revocation of all land grants
to corporations or Individuals, the condi
tions of whlcX, have not been compiled
with.
5. LegaV Incorporation by the states of
local trade unions which have no national
organization.
6. The United States to have the exclu
sive right to Issue money.
7. Congressional legislation providing for
the scientific management of forests and
waterways and prohibiting the waste of
the natural resources of the country.
8. Inventions to be froe to all; tho In
ventors to be remunerated by the nation.
9. Progressive Income tax and tax on In'
herltances; the smuller Incomes to be ex
empt. 10. School education of air-children under
16 years of age to be compulsory, gratuit
ous and accessible to all by public as
sistance In meals, clothing, books, etc.,
where necessary.
11. Repeal of all pauper, tramp, conspir
acy and sumptuary laws. Unabridged
right of combination.
12. Official statistics concerning the con
dition of labor. Prohibition of the employ
ment of children of school ago and the em
ployment of female labor in occupations
detrimental to the health or morality.
Abolition of tho convict labor contract
system.
' 13. Employment of the unemployed by
the publlo authorities (county, city, state
and nation).
14. All wages to be paid In lawful money
equalization of the woman's wages with
those of men, where equal service Is per
formed.
' 15. Laws for trie protection of life andtl
limb in all occupations, and an efficient
employers' liability law.
At a time when both the old political
parties appear to be somewhat uncer
tain as to their Immediate future, and
hence hesitant to take up new issues,
this kind of specific announcement of
principles by the labor interests pos
sesses at least the pleasant merit of
novelty, and it is a fact to be grate
fully noted that fully three out of every
four of these declarations are wise and
desirable, whereas tt is fair to believe
that the more socialistic of the de
mandssuch, for Instance, as the in
come tax and tho government owner
ship of public works will in time ex
pire through the sheer force of spread
ing Intelligence among the laboring
masses.
An Unfounded Hope.
An apologetic organ of the adminis
tration . announces that secretary
Gresham is very anxious to retain his
place, in the hope of being able yet to
pull the Cleveland administration out
of Its present hole. Realizing that the
greatest single element of the adminis
tration's present unpopularity is Its
lack of positive Americanism, It is said
that the secretary will endeavor to
bring about a condition wherein he can
assert himself vigorously, without
danger of getting hurt. The apologetic
organ does not Btate the case this way,
but that is what it means. It used the
following language:
oind as it would be of an opportunity to
win populur approval by demonstration of
Its national spirit, this administration Is
not weak enoUKh to be going about hunt
ing quarrels with our neighbors, nor to
take advantage of any potty rlpplo upon
the diplomatic waters to hoist sails and
rush toward war. The president and Sec
retary Gresham are strong enough to bo
patient and to meet every case upon its
merits without effort to make an opening
or to play a part for tho sake of a bit of
passing popularity. President Cleveland
Is not as clearly aware of the unpopular
ity of the administration's foreign policy
as Is Secretary Gresliam. In tho nature
of things ho does not keep in as close
touch with public opinion and is, beBliles,
somewhat hardened to criticism. But
even Mr. Cleveland perceives that the ona
misfortune in Hawaii has thrown a cloud
over tho whole, and he is human enough
to hope for better things in the future.
During the coming two years it Is not im
possible an opportunity will present itself
In tho natural order of things for the presi
dent and Secretary Greshnm to convince
the country that they are pretty good
Americans after all.
Honest repentence, coupled with sin
cere amendment, is at all times to be
encouraged; but It is possible that the
American people would be suspicious
of a Jingo policy adopted solely with an
eye to domestic party politics. The
time for Mr. Cleveland to have asserted
his "vigorous Americanism" was when
such an assertion was needed to pro
tect the honor and dignity of the Stars
and Stripes. His failure to do this re
vealed the true caliber of his states
manship; and a man once found want
ing by the practically unanimous ver
dict of his countrymen will hardly bo
so indiscreet as to try any new tricks.
What has become of the $3,000,000 of
state reserve money recently lying Idle
In selected banks? If the common
wealth Is otherwise too hard up to do
Its duty toward the public schools, why
doesn't it fall back on Its surplus?
Better cripple the surplus than cripple
the schools.
The Philadelphia Press charges that
In the matter of re-appontlonment "in
dividual Interests are allowed to take
precedence, and to put the party in an
Indefensible position." Our contem
porary may have the floor for the pur
pose of exposing the "Interests" thus
protected.
Did the Scranton Traction company
cease the sale of workingmen's commu
tation tickets because It could not af
ford to sell those tickets at the former
discount, or. simply through general
cussedness?
Before the state of Pennsylvania goes
Into any such foolish business as paring
down Its already economical approprla
tlons for free public schools, it should
put itself up at auction and sell out.
In his recent peregrinations we trust
that Hon. John Frost has not visited
disaster upon the tender presidential
boomlet of Don M. Dickinson.
New debt, is necessary; but no cur
tallment of popular education. That Is
one thing "which the people will not
tolerate.
The Cleveland administration's regu
lation of the weather bureau is another
addition to its list of monumental fail
ures. The failure of the "Greater New
York" movement need not necessarily
discourage the greater Olyphant.
PlttBburg Is In the throes of an antl
smoke nuisance agitation. Pittsburg
should use anthracite.
TOO LATE.
Always wus abusln' him
Rough and rougher usin' him,
Love an' alt refusln' him,
Though his tears 'ud fall; .
Didn't think of losln' him
Not at all.
He, poor fellow, he'd Jest sigh,
With a waterln' o' the eye
Say: "It's all my fault," an" try
T' stave 'em off awhile!
"Some day I'll lay down an' die,
Then they'll smile."
An' tie did. God's sometimes heap
Kinder to Ills poor, lost sheep
Than the ones 'at has their keepi
So, one lonesome day,
He Jest told him, "Go to sleep," ' '
In his own kind way.
Then the poor, sad, weary eyes
Smiled their thanks to God's own skies,
With a heart o' sweet surprise
With a kind o' sweet surprise
An' the heart growed Btill.
Bald one o' 'ctmt "Thar he lies;
It's God's own Willi" '
Always wus abusln' him
Rough an' rougher usin' him,
Love an' all refusln' him,
Though his tears 'ud fall;
Didn't think o' losln' him
, Not at sail -F. L. Btanton.
COMPULSORY EDUCATION.
The Fan- mil Soeurcs Reforms of tho First
Magnitude in Education and Ought to
llecome a Law Without Delay.
From the Philadelphia Press.
Tho Farr comtmlBory school attendance
bill as It has been put into final shape by
tho conference committee takes a great
step forward In tho educational legisla
tion of tills state. For tho first tlmo, in
this measure the state will recognise three
thliiKS. at least in principle first, the duty
of parents to send tholr children to school
under penalty; second, the necessity or oi
ftcers to compol this attendance, and,
third, the need of a school census.
Ab to attendance, tho requirement or tnts
bill is the most beggarly minimum with
which a Christian and civilised state
ought to be satlslled. From 8 to 13 each
child is required to have sixteen weeks of
schooling a year, llttlo enough In all con
science, but even this Is a great advance
on tho past. The stato permits two miles
distance from Bchool to bo sufficient ex
cuso for absence, any child "otherwise In
structed In tho common English branches
of learning for a like period of time" Is
exempt from compulsory attendance and
ample and easy appeals are granted for
release from tho lines Imposed on parents.
These provisions may need more stringent
regulation in the future; as it stands the
requirement of schooling for children of
sixteen weeks from 8 to 18 years of age is
a vast deul gained.
For the better enforcement" of this at
tendance school boards In citloB. boroughs
and townships may appoint "attendance
ollicers," who are to get not over $2 a day
and have power to look after, apprehend
and place In schools designated by their
parents children who dodge the minimum
of sixteen weeks of schooling In a year.
Truancy schools can be organized for such
chuldren; but these must bo in public
school buildings. Here, too, is a needed
reform not all that might be deslrod and
less than will be provided a few years
hence, but a great Improvement on the
present condition of affairs.
A school census has long Deem one or mo
needs of publlo education in this state.
The polleo take it in most cities. The
school authorities should bo empowered
to make it. Rut the Important thing is
that a school census should bo tuken. The
Farr bill provides that the assessors take
a school census In the spring, when they
register voters. For this work assessors
are to bo "paid a per diem compensation
equal to the compensation paid under ex
isting laws for1 assessors of election." This
practically gives un assessor another set
of questions to ask when he makes his
house to house visit In the spring. Once
begun and this is, after all, the Impor
tant matter this school census will im
prove and grow more accurate under the
pressure of public opinion, and from the
start it will show how Inadequate are
school accommodations and how irregular
Is school attendance.
This bill secures reforms of the first
magnitude in education and ought to be
come a law without delay.
Lcklcy ft. Coxe.
From the Philadelphia Inquirer.
He was a peculiar combination. Corn
with the means to avoid all toll, had he
been so inclined, he voluntarily elected to
pursue a career Imposing the severest kind
of labor. His whole life might have been
that of a trifler and none could have com
plained. He chose to be a worker. At
an ago when the average youth in his
circumstances was talking nonsense to
nonsensical girls, he was hard at work
upon a volume of mechanics that Is today
a text book In many scientific schools.
This was only tho start. The schools of
this city, the university here and at Troy
developed and enriched bis mind, but he
was not content with that. Parts ana
Freiburg added to his knowledge and then
It was that ho returned to this country to
begin that engineering career which made
him an authority upon all geological sub
jects, and which, with hlB indomitable will
and enterprise, made him the greatest in
dividual coal operator of his tlmo.
Put Pennsylvania to tho Front.
From tho Philadelphia Press.
ThdelKhth annual convention of the Re
publican National league will be held In
Cleveland on June 19, and delegates are
already being elected. In selecting rep
resentatives for Pennsylvania It Bhould
not he lost sight of that this is tho lead
ing Republican state and should have In
attendance as delegates men who are
known leaders in Republican thought.
President Warren, of the State league.
one ot the most earnest and cnergetio
young Republicans in tho country, real
izes that the occasion will be one of un
usual Interest nnd is anxious that Penn
sylvania shall have a representation sec
ond to that of no other state in promi
nence and ability. Those who are to par
ticipate In tho choice of delegates should
do their best to further this commendable
nurnoso nnd put Pennsylvania at tne
front, where she befongs.
Water Power aud Electricity.
From tho Philadelphia Inquirer.
anmA mnnitia nim n. New York engineer.
employed by a Pennsylvania board of
trade to estimate tho power mat couia no
rinuainniwi from the falls on the Wallen-
paupack river, at Hawley, In this state,
mado a careful examination oi tne stream
and its fall. His conclusion was that 14,
i hn-iinwpr could be developed for In
dustrial purposes. It Is now announced
that New York capitalists nave utKon an
option on the land fronting tho falls and
......oa tn oatnhllqh there a blunt for the
generation and transmission of electrlo
power. There can be no doubt that as
soon as the times Improve the attention of
experts and capitalists will bo turned to
tho possibilities that are to oe iouna in
our neglected water powers.
Quito n Pert Nation.
From a Washington Special.
According to the ofllclnl estimates of the
k.. r.r atfitiarirs. treiuiiirv deuartment.
the United States has started the month
of Mnv. 1893, with a population oi a round
70,0U0,(XK).
Let Us llopo Nuy.
Colonel Eugene Field's Column.
When "Trilby'' is called in oft tho road
the publlo will be regaled, we suppose,
with a dramatization of the book which
Grovcr Cleveland Is going to write.
IN LIGHTER VEIN.
Never mind the goblins, dear; they're only
make-believe;
The bogy-man Is something Just Invented
to docelve;
But it is very well to have It very widely
understood ,
That the trolley car will catch you if you
are not very good.
Bo don't play tag or rlng-around-a-rosy in
the street.
Keep close inside the nurs'ry; 'tis your
only safe retreat.
Give up your romping merriment, as little
children should,
For the trolley car will catch you if you
are not very good.
Washington Star.
A CHIP OF THE OLD BLOCK:
It Is one of Drown's weaknesses to try
to appear better than he really Is, and
his children are taught to follow In his
footsteps. The other day he took with
him his sharp little first-born, Johnny,
for a stroll In the park. Brown sat down
to read his paper, while the youngster
went to play with some other children. On
their way home Brown Inquired: "How
have you enjoyed yourself?".
"Very much, papa."
"What did you say to those other little
boys?"
"Just to keep up appearances I -didn't
tell them you was my father, but my foot
man." -Tit-Bits.
FOLLY AS IT FLIES: ,
Judge "Would you be "able to Identify
the coat the prisoner Is accused of having
stolen from you?" "Certainly I would."
"Now, Judge, you can see for yourself
what a Hair that man is. This coat I've
n i ta tha nrv nns." indignantly re
torted the prisoner. Texas Blftlngs.
If some people went as iar to ran meir
Kllla u a lhau .In in mant tmublfl. thtirfl
would not bo so much debt In the world.
Atchison Globe.
It's always the other man who hasn't
any excuse for being late. Whenever the
man hlmsoir is late he couian i neip it..
New York Recorder.
"I notice," said the tall, pale girl with
the high forehead, "that there is much
progress lielng made now in photograph
ing the stars." "Oh, yes," answered the
fluffy girl. "They use thom for cigarette
pictures."
Crummor Elchead is a very deep
thinker.
Ulllcland Yea, so deep that his ideas
never rise to the surface. Town Topics.
DIADEM IN VERSE:
Some stand and talk on woman's rights,
Expending time and zeal,
While others go ahead and get
Their bloomers and a wheel.
"Whoro are you going, my pretty maid?"
"Unto my wedding, kind sir," she Bald.
"And your name will be what, my pretty
maid?"
"Dennis, my parents think," Bhe Bald.
Buffalo Courier.
Thcy saw their wedding presents
With something of despair.
They'd thought to sell and get some cash,
But no duplicates were there.
Washington Post
FROM THE MOUTH OF BABES.
A little 8-year-old was dressing her
doll. For some reason everything did
not work to suit her, and she exclaimed:
"Oh, I am by-gustcd, this button won't
butt!"
"Why did God forbid Adam and Evo to
ent the forbidden fruit?" asked a Sunday
school teacher of one of her class. "For
fear they might fall out of the tree and
hurt themselves," replied Johnny Fizzle
top, who had his arm in a sling.
A lady had just been calling on Katie's
mumma. Katie liked to sit near the caller,
whoso dress wus well perfumed. Katie
had always been fond of cologne, and
when tho lady was gone, she Bald to mam
ma, "How nice her dress breathes!"
TOLD BY THE STARS.
Dally Horoscope Drawn by AJacchus, The
Tribuno Astrologer.
Astrolabe cast: 1.48 a. m. for Wednesday,
May 15, lt95.
Moon rises 1.29 a, m.
A little girl born at the dawn ot this day
Will lead an existence that's happy and
gay;
Through the journey of life she'll affection
command,
And sunshine will scatter with unstinted
hand.
In fact a child born on this day will
possess the amiability of a church quar
tette singer.
This is neither a lucky or an unlucky
birthday from a financial standpoint; and
success or failure, like the result of an
Eastern league ball game. Is not safe to
bet on.
In these days of rush for Industries that
enliven suburban localities, the protest
against Messrs. Hewitt's horse-cooking
enterprise nt Taylor must cause general
surprise. There is no question that a
horse-boiling establishment lends strength
and distinctness to a neighborhood.
AJucchus' Advice.
Spurn not galoches on this day.
Be not discouraged at tho temperature.
Remember that things are still very warm
down in Cuba.
REDUCTION IN
CHAMBER SUITS.
To close a few patterns of Chamber Suits,
which we are dropping from oar regular stock,
we offer Baits reduced as follows:
R1DU01D
vttrwt Wk
1 No. 742 Mahogany, $135 $110
725 190
100 Im. " 78
637 Curly Birch, 100
150
40
80
45
90
28
964
Oak,
65
1238
105
32
50
1217
U2VA
1226
202K
214
31.50 27
40 35
36 30
32 27
37 30
ii
The above Baits are first-elsas In workman
ship and finish, and are cheap at oar regular
prices.
Hill &
Connell,
iRDiaa
WASHINGTON AVE
Hammocks, White Hoantaln Ioe
Cream Freezers, Jewett's Patent
Charcoal Filled
Water Coolers and Filters.
Dinner Sets
We have now over sixty sets, all
different decorations and shapes to se
lect from; theso displayed in full on
tables, so you can see all the pieces.
We also have eight different decora
tions In open stock from which you
can select Just what piece yeu wish,
THE
LIMITED.
422 LACKAWANNA AVENUE.
THAT WONDERFUL
WEBEB
Tone is found only in the WEBER
Call and see these Pianos, and some fine sec
ond, band Pianos we have taken in exchange
for them.
GUERNSEY BROTHERS,
I
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3 O
mi
Ladies Cooking Match
J
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5
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SEE THE LADIES MAKING AND SERVING!
Stollwerk's Cbocolate, of Cologne, Germany.
Wilde's "OAXACA" Coffee, New York.
Golden Rod Table Jellies, New York.
Lang's Cake Frosting, Philadelphia.
Washburn's Flour, Minneapolis.
Cyclone Cake Pans, Brooklyn.
Spencer's Almond Paste.
I.I
o
o
All Sorts of Cakes, Macaroons, Etc.
Choice Cake Receipts j You think you know how to make
... j.! r- ( the best Cup of Coffee and Choco.
and Instructions hree ( late ? Take in Our New Process.
FREE EXHIB S :ffi
SECOND FLOOR
" TUC QAMTCDQ "
I II L 0 H III I L II 0 J
ARE THE BEST COASTERS.
Consequently they must run easier
thau any other wheel. Call
and examine them.
C. M. FLOREY,
222 WYOMING AYENDE,
Y. H. C. A. BUILDING.
PUSHING A GOOD THING
h what we ro doing-. Wo push It along morn
ing, noon and night Borootlmss Its a Lawn
Mower and somttlmos Its our ontlr stock of
Hnrdwire. and it la Refrlgctrators, Osrden
Tools.Oardon Hos. Lawn Bced and House
hold Hardware all tho timet.
11
Washington Ave
The secret Is' out Not only do they
say we do wahsing for a living, but
that we do it well. So keet it going.
Tell everybody you Bee, bat tell them
not to tell. -EUREKA
.-. LAUNDRY,
332 Washington Ave.
CONE AND SEE THE
AT THE BAZAAR.
ITION
fijNB TOUCH OF NATURE
lyj makes all the world kin." The
little touches that fixings make cause
the boy to look well. It's a waist,
perhaps, of the right colorings may
be a jaunty cap likely a neck-dressing
or bow, that will go with com
plexion, and it can be in the style of
the suit. You can safely try us and
patiently experiment for these happy
results. Surely stock is large and
varied enough to gratify exacting
tastes.
ladles' Extra Long Scarfs for Shirt Waists, 60 Cents
SQUARE DEALING CLOTHIERS,
HATTERS AND FURNISHERS,
THIRD NATIONAL
BANK
OF 8CRANTON,
CAPITAL, - - $200,000
SURPLUS, - - 270,000
UNDIVIDED PROFITS, 60,000
Special Attention Given
to Business Accounts.
.Gil
Hatter,
Shirt Maker
AND
Men's
Outfitter.
412 SPRUCE STREET,
205 LACKAWANNA AVE.
SCRANTON, PA.
DR. HILL & SON
ALBANY
DENTISTS.
8et teeth. KM; best set, 18: for gold caps
and teeth without plates, called crown and
bridge work, call for prices and refer
ences. TONALGIA, for extracting- teetf
Without pain. No ether. , No gas.
. OVER FXBST NATIONAL BANK. ,
n
03
Q.
0)
m
go
o CD
o
m
0)
m
m
H
X
n
FREE
mm m a
TAKE ELEVATOR OR STAIRWAY
Fine
Stationery
Blank Books,
Office Supplies.
EDISON'S MIMEOGRAPH
And BnppliM,
TYPE WRITERS' SUPPLIES
IN ALL ITS BRANCHES.
REYNOLDS BROS.,
Stationers and Engravers,
217 LACKAWANNA AVE.
May 14, 1895.
We
Have Moved
to No. 121 North
Washington Avenue,
Next First
Presbyterian Church
New Store,
New Styles,
New Prices,
and
We Want
You for a
New Customer.
Kill
FURNITURE DEALERS.
SMS niWWVRSfflS'.
A dollar nd it a dollar tamtd." Jr
ThlAdles' Hollcl French Ikragola KldBirS.
(oat Boot delivered free .nywhorc. in the U.8j
reoslptofCart, Money Order,
. sTi tw ir.i h ei.Ao.
Eqnali c ery wT tte boots
.M In all retail atone for
An .f u'. b. ihla hues
oonerne, therefore we
and If any one is not auxfled
we will reruna u iy T
enaancHncirMr. up.
. Smi flL
width 0,D.B.fc KB,
leltee 1 to I and half
will
SlhrMM.
Uata
ruts
3 FEDERAL ST.,
100.
-V