The Scranton tribune. (Scranton, Pa.) 1891-1910, December 27, 1894, Page 7, Image 7

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    TIIE SCRANTON TRIBUNE THURSDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 27, 1894.
V
LUCE BROS.'
CASH. STORES,
122 N. MAIN AVENUE, SCRANTON, PA.
3Q3 MAIN STREET, TAYLOR, PA.
25C
IS.
f,
m M.
FiQS, PEI k
We baVe a large assortment of Can
dies at prices that will please you.
ON OTHER SIDEOF CHANNEL
Passing Events of the Day on the
' West Side of the City Noted.
DEATH OF HEPFKAN T. DAYIES
Hod Many Friends In This Port of tlio
City-Robert Morris Lodge of Ivorltes
Will Entertain Tonight-Guests
at Bortrce Residence.
At a few minutes before 5 o'clock yes
terday morning, Heffram T. Davles, an
aged and much respected resident of
the West Side, died at the home of
Police Officer Hezeklah Peters, on Price
street, -where he had been a boarder
for the past eighteen years. The cause
of death -was miners' asthma, with
which Mr. Daviea had been troubled for
many years. Deceased was born in
Wales, and earns to this country about
twentv-flve vears ao. residing in
Scranton since his arrival.
He was well known, and his manly
qualities won for him numerous friends.
Mr. Davles was employed previous to
KIs death in the Capouse mines. He
was a member of the Capousa Mine Ac
cidental fund. The funeral will take
place tomorrow afternoon from Mr
Peters' home. Interment will be made
In the Washburn Street cemetery. .
i Brief Notes . of Interest.
Miss Sarah Post, of Towanda, Is vlS'
Jtlng friends In thl3 city.
Rev.' D. C. Hugos and wife, of Wash'
burn Street, are In New York.
Charles Mansfield, of Chestnut street,
Is visiting friends in Nantlcoke.
Miss Pauline Richards, of Montdale,
has returned home from a Visit with
relatives here.
Miss Sarah Dandow, of Pottsvllle, is
visiting Mr. and Mrs. John R. Hughes,
on Washburn street.
Miss Mary Reynolds, of Brooklyn, X
Y.. Is 'Visiting her Bister, Mrs. Helen
Pawling, of Swetland street.
Daniel J. Evans and daughter, Miss
JVUa P. .Evajis, of .South Hyde Eark
avenue, spent Christmas with friends
In Qibson.
Samuel D. Pettlt, a former resident
of this side, but now of Nova Scotia,
is the guest of his mother, on North
Rebecca avenue.
John Edwards and Charles As tor, of
Wllkes-rsarre, returned home yester
day, after spending Christmas with
friends on this side.
A meeting of Robert Morris lodge,
No. 58, Order of American True Ivorltes,
will be held this evening at 7 o'clock
sharp, for election of oillcera.
Mrs. Mary Parkes died on Tuesday
afternoon. She Is survived by several
sons and daughters. The funeral "will
take place tomorrow afternoon.
W. S. Hughes and R. S. Dalies, have
ODened a hams' factory on North
Main avenue, for the purpose of manu
facturlng names for the mines. The
works adjoin that of Hughes' Mine
and Safety Lamp company.
Robert Morris lodge, Order of Amer
ican True Ivorites, will hold a book SO'
clal this evening In their lodge rooms
on South Main avenue. The purpose is
t secure a library for the benefit of
thff odge members. Refreshments will
be' served.
W. G. Bortree, of Price street, enter
talned the following at his home on
Christmas Day: Mr. and Mrs. C. P,
Flak, of Wallsvllle; Miss Nora Stones,
of Craig; Mr. and Mrs. Frank Flsk, of
South Main avenue; Mr; and Mrs. Dan
lei Lee, of Green Ridge; Mr. and Mrs,
Smith, of Ninth street; Miss B. L. Free,
C. P. Flsk, of Wallsvllle, took the hon
ors at progressive euchre.
' . BARGAINS. j
Men's rubber boots at cost.
Boys' rubber boots at cost.
Ladles' rubber boots at cost.
Children's rubber boots at cost.
All kinds rubber shoes at cost.
jose:ph a. mears,
West Side Business Directory.
PHOTOGRAPHER Cabinet Photos, J1.40
. per dozen. Tney are jimi loveiy. ton
vlnce yourself by calling at Starner
Photo Parlors, 101 and 103 South Mai
avenue.
HORSESHOEING N. Bush, practical
horsenhocr. Work uone only in a nrsi
' class manner and' guaranteed Batlsfac'
tory. Shop, Trice street, clone to North
1 Main avenue.
GROCERIES Revere Standard Jnv
' Coffee Is unexcelled. The leading coff
of the dav. For sale only nt F. W. M.-v
son & Co. Fine Groceries, 116 South
Main avenue. .
SECOND HAND FURNITURE - Cash
for anvth nir you have to pell. Furnl
ture. Stoves, Tools, eto. Call and see
the stock of J. C. King, 1024 and 1U-G
Jackson street.
WALL, PAPER-Go to Fred Reynolds
206 North Main avenue, and see his
romnlete line of Wall Paper. Paint
and Window Shades. Just opened with
new stock. .
PLUMBING William D. Grimths, 113
North Main avenue, does flrst-clnsa
; Plumbing, Steam Heat and (Jns Fitting.
Satisfaction Is strictly guarantees
OYRTERSj-R. E. Davis' market homo,
Dealer In Foreign and Domestic iruns.
Oysters served In every stylei 810 North
Main avenue, next to Clarke's.
Picture Framing at Grlflln's new studio,
209 Wyoming avenue.
Beautiful Juvenile Books.
PRATT'S BOOK STORE.
Those
There's
No Better
Holiday
Present
Queer
Pe
JOpleJ iJulOnes.
; v All parts on sale now at The
Tribune business office.
IX LOCAL THEATERS.
Of Chauncey Olcott, who appears at
th ArmriVmv of Mimln tnniirVit In "The
Irish Artist," the New York Recorder
says: - unauncey vjjicotr, tne sweei-
volced singer and comedian, has made a
hit of large proportions at the Four
teenth Street theatre as Maurice Cronln
In 'The Irish Artist.' and is drawing
the largest audiences knows at this
house in a long time. At the opening
performance people were turned away
from the box office, unable to secure
seats, and since that tlmo the same
state of affairs has existed. 'The Irish
Artist' is u picturesque play, and the
singing of Mr. Olcott is one of its
strongest features. His songs are en
cored over and over again at every per
formance."
II II II
The Sans Soucl Concert hall, with
Tom Gould himself on the stage, is one
the most attractive scenes in the
great moral melodrama by Edmund E.
Price, entitled "In the Tenderloin.
This is perhaps because music and
dancing are predominant. Some clever
ocal specialties are presented by that
favorite mlnptrel comedian, Frank
Cushman; some marvelous, dancing,
etc., is executed by Miss Gussle Hart,
hose impersonation of a quick-witted
colored girl 1b remarkably , life-like;
Mr. Dick Qullter, late of Harrlgan's
forces, also contributes his share to the
festivities, and Mr. John Page Is ex
ceedingly happy In his selections, rang
ing from the sentiment of "The Last
Lullaby," to the break-neck excitement
of an acrobatic song and danoe. In the
purely dramatic portion Mr.. Frederick
Bryton as the leading character is
superb. "In the Tenderloin" will be at
the Frothlngham this evening.
Clever comedians of the Joe Ott
school are as rare as June roses in Jan
uary. This ideal entertainer scored a
great success In "The Star Gazer," his
new play that made such a hit when
presented at the Academy a 'couple of
weeks ago, so much so that he has been
secured for a . return date at the
Academy tomorrow night. He will bo
assisted by the same clever company,
including his two clever brothers, Matt
and Phil, and the other clever capables
who ably assisted In the merriment that
reigned supreme throughout the entire
production.
-
The Colonel and I" will be produced
at Davis' "theater today, tomorrow and
Saturday, both afternoons and even
ings.
II II II . ,
W. II. Power's famous play. "The Ivy
Leaf," will be presented at the Froth
lngham Friday and Saturday evenings
and Saturday matinee. "The Ivy Leaf"
has been seen in this city on previous
occasions, and is a great favorite with
Scranton' theatre-goers. The interest
in the play Is strong and is well sus
tained throughout the three nets. The
flight of the eagle across the stage and
the revolving tower are sensational
features of "The Ivy Leaf." ,
II II II
"Hand and Glove" will be given Sat
urday evening at the Academy of MubIc
by the Standard Dramatic company of
this city, as a benefit for the St. Paul's
Pioneer corps.
Dl'NUOBE DOINGS.
Miss Katie Clark Is visiting In Provi
dence.
Miss Eva Montgomery la visiting
friends In Plymouth.
Miss Nellie Qulnn, of Plymouth, spent
Christmas with her parents, on Drinker
street..
Professor George Curwen, of Oly
phanl, is stopping for a few days at the
Dunmore hotel.
George J. Gilford, the genial clerk
In O. S. Johnson's store, Is spending
vacation In New Jersey.
John Johnson, of Webster avenue,
has resigned his position as foreman
at the Scranton Cash store.
Mr. and Mrs. II. L. Crlppen spent
Christmas with Mrs. Crlppen's mother,
Mrs. Von Storch, In Providence.
Mrs. George Dainty Is slowly improv
ing at the home of her mother, Mrs,
Edward Angwln, on Blakely street.
Misses Lottie and Edith Ripley, of
Monroe avenue, entertained a few of
their friends at their home last even
lng.
The trainmen's ball, held at Odd Fel
lows hall Christmas night, was very
largely attended. Supper was served
for twenty-five couples at the Dunmore
hotel.
A pleasant Christmas party was held
at the home of George Schrank, on
Collins street. The guests present were;
Mrs. James JoneR, John Jones, Miss
Bradley, Mr. and Mrs. Beckendorf, all
of Pittston.
The funeral of Reuben Mowery, of
Blakely street, who died suddenly
Christmas morning, will be held from
the Methodist Episcopal church Friday
afternoon at 2 o'clock. Services will be
conducted by Rev. J. C. Leacock. Dun
more lodge of Odd Fellows will attend
In a hody and will meet at the hall at
1.30 o'clock.
Rev. Fred Drcyer lt-f t home Tuesday
evening on hla long Journey to China
where he will enter the mission field.
Mr. Dreyer will go to Toronto, Canada
and hold some meetings there, end
later he will spend a. few days in Chi
cago. Mr. Dreyer expects to sail from
Tacoma, Wash., Jan.' 1C. Ills friends
and neighbors rnnde up a Christmas
purse for him amounting to $35.
kortITknd notes.
Miss Margaret Reese, of Plymouth, Is
visiting her aunt, Miss Anna Reese, of
William street.
The Christmas 'trre entertainment of
the Park Place Methodist Episcopal
Sunday school will be held tonight.
The Keystone Social club is itHmmlng
Company H armory for their first grand
social, which will be held there to
night. Complote arrangements have
been made for the Teceixtkm and enter
tainment of their guests. The music
will be furnished by Bauer's full or
chestra.
Josejih F. Hangl's class In the Green
Ridge Presbyterian Sunday school
agreeably surprised ihlm by gathering
a.t his home, on Dickson avenue, on
Christmas night and presenting him
wlbh a ihandsome 'teachers' edition of
the Oxford Bible. Among those pres
ent was Martin La Bar, of Hacketts-
town, N. J. '
Fine assortment of calendars, 1895.
PRATT'S BOOK STORE.
Music lloxcs Exclusively.
Best made. Play any desired number of
tunes. GautBchi & Bona, manufacturers,
1K cnestnut street, r nnnueinhta. Won.
derful orchestral organs, only 15 and tin,
Specialty: om muila boxes carefully re-
paired ana improved witn new tunes.
Rare Collection of Books 1n Holiday
Bindings.
PRATT'S BOOK STORK.
I am prepared to receive a limited num
ber of piano pupils. For terms, etc., ad
dress .... Richard F. Lindsay,
821 Mulberry street.
Or at Powell's muhIo Store.
Rocking
Sizes und
Horses and Shooflles of all
Styles.
PRATT 8 BOOK STORE.
NEWS OF THE SOUTH SIDE
Happy
Children at Hickory
Presbyterian Church.
Street
THEY HAD A CHK1STMAS TREE
Funeral of George Stangllne from Ills
Late Home on Crown Avenue - Clin ties
Stone Is a Candidate for Council.
Other News Items.
Children's happy faces were numer
ous last night at the Hickory Street
Presbyterian church. The occasion was
the entertainment of the Sunday school
and the younger folks of 'the congrega
tion. The ohureh was decorated with
festoons of bunting and palms. Large
Christmas trees were ranged along the
walls and were laden with Santa Claus'
most favorite gifts. The pastor, Rev.
August Langei welcomed the little ones
with a most pleasant address and after
ward the children sang Christmas
carols from a programme of tuneful
anthems selected by Rev. Mr. Lange
for the occasion.
The entertainment concluded with the
distribution of the Christmas tree gifts
among the children, ami each one re
ceived something in the shape of to-3
and story books that gladdened his or
her youthful breast. At 9.45 In charge
of their parents and older brothers and
slaters the little one reluctantly de
parted for their homes well pleased.
Funeral of George Slangliue.
The last earthly tribute of respect to
the memory of an upright citizen was
paid by a very large number of friends
and acquaintances of George Stangllne
at his funeral yesterday morning. At 9
o'clock the remains were borne from his
late homo on Crownavenue and brought
to St. Mary's German Catholic church
on River street. A high mass of requiem
was sung by Rev. Father Stopper and
after the mass he preached a touching
sermon on death and referred with
words of praise to the character of the
deceased. The remains were interred
in the Twentieth Ward cemetery. The
pall bearers were Charles Grof, Max
Werly, Charles Altman, John Schneid
er, John Baker and John Scharf.
Charles Stone for Councilman.
Tn the coming muii'dpil election
Charles Stone, of South Wyoming ave
nue and Maple street, will be a candi
date for common council on the Re
publican ticket from the Eleventh ward.
The present ilncumbent, Robert Robin
son, has made a very creditable record
In the lower branch and on account of
ill 'health his friends say that he wi'i
not be a candidate for re-election. Mr.
Stone, who announces himself as a
candidate, Is one of the best known
business men of ithe South Side. Ah a
citizen he stands promlnen-t In an Intel
lectual sense and possesses a solid busi
ness education.
Shorter Paragraphs.
Joseph .P. Kelley, iof IMInooka, a
student at St. Michael's college, Toron
to. Is home for the Christmas.
Miss Mary Pbllbln, of New York city.
returned home yesterday after spending
the Christmas with Conductor P. J.
Kelley, of Locmvt street.
Harry C. Haak, of Cedar avenue, re
turned to his duty as munager of L. D.
Power's drug business, after spending
the Christmas wilth his parents at Pine
Grove, Schuylkill county.
The funeral of Frederick Rons, sr.,
of Cherry street, was largely attended
yesterday afternoon. Burial services
were read at the Cedar Avenue Method
ist Episcopal church by Rev. E. L. San-
tee, and Interment was made In Pitts
ton Avenue cemetery.
LETTERS FROM TIIE PEOPLE
(Under this heading Bhort letters of In
terest will bo published when accompa
nied, for publication,- by the writer's
name. The Tribune will not be held re
sponsible for opinions here expressed.)
Statement of Mr. Cobb.
Editor of The Tribune.
Sir Please allow me a little space In
your valuable paper in order that I may
contradict purt ot un urtlcie lieuile.l,
"Those Dismissed Pupils," In your issue
of Dec. 21. The purt 1 wish to contradk t
Is that portion of Miss Holce's report
which says that Catherine Cobb, together
with others named, were dismissed on
Dec. 1:1, when In fact my daughter liu.it
left school four weeks previously and hud
accepted a clerkship In the city. Her
retirement was caused solely by tho Im
partiality shown among pupils. This in
Itself puts Miss Holce's statement in the
light of a fulsehood and Is, of course, the
one thing thut prompts me to take this
means to set my UuuKhter rlfht bt-foro
the public. Yours respectfully,
Bum uk 1 s. cotib.
Green Ridge, Dec. 2.
$0.00 to California
Is the prlco of double berth In Tourist
Sllcplng Car from ChlcuRo on are fumons
Phllllps-Uock Island Tourist Excursions.
Through cars on runt trains leave Chi
cago Tuesdays via Port Worth und El
Paso, and Thursdays via Scenic Route.
Write for particulars to A. Phillips & Co.,
Ill South Ninth street, Philadelphia.
JOHN SEBASTIAN, G.P.A., .Chicago.
A Voluntary Statement.
Mrs. Ella R. Nolan, of tM Stute street.
Auburn, N. Y., says:
For the past seven years I have been a
great sufTerer from rheumatism and rheu
matic gout. My ankles, feet, wrists and
hands were swollen to an enormous size,
and 1 was unable to bend n Joint of them.
I was compelled to crawl on my hands nnd
knees. A great part ot uie lime 1 was
confined to my bed, unable to help my
self In the least. I hud the best medk-iil
attendance, but obtained only temporary
relief. One day a gentleman culling upon
some business, seeing my helpless comll
tlon, suld:
'If you wll get some or Dr. Potter'n
Rheumatic Pills, I think they will cure
you.
1 did not nave mucn iattn, out I wus In
such a helpless uondltlon, could scarcely
move about, could not close my hands at
all, got tip and down stairs sideways, that
I thought I would try tile pills. Accord
ingly, I got two boxes of Dr. Potter's
Rheumatic Pills, and arter taking them
three days, the pain all left me and has
never returned even In the dampest
weather. Of course I was encouraged and
kept on taking them, and am entirely
cured. I have now takon six boxes, and
can do all my -own housework without the
least pain. The swelling Is all gone, can
move my Joints naturally und feel as well
as ever I did. 1 cannot say tob much In
praise of Dr. Poller's Rheumatic Pills
and will gladly see any one who will call
at niy houae, 'M State street, and verify
the truth of this statement. I heartily
recommend Dr. Potter's Rheumatic Pills
to all who suffer from rheumatism.
They are a radical Cure for rheumatism,
Inflammatory rheumatism , gout, rheu
matic gout, both acute and chronic, and
all diseases depending upon and having
their origin In the uric diathesis. I'rlce,
11.00 a box. For sain by Matthews Bros.,
wholesale and retail, bcranton, ra.
Vhen Baby was nick, we gate her Clitoris.
When die was a Child, she cried tor Outorls.
Whoa she became MlM, (be clung to CaitorU.
tVheaihs - tiulr&, she gave Uwa OuitorU
HER FAMOUS FIFTY-THREE.
.Massachusetts Worthies Selected for a
Special Honor.
Th,e names of the fifty-three cele
brated sons of Massachusetts have been
selected by the State House Commis
sioners, and are Inscribed around the
base of the dome of the new chamber
of the House of Representatives. They
are Morse, Morton, Bell, Bancroft,
Prescott, Motley, Park man, Emerson,
Hawthorne, Holmes, Bryant, Longfel
low, Lowell, Whlttler, Copley, Hunt,
Edwards, Channlng, Brooks, Carver,
Bradford, Endlcott, Winthrop, Vane,
Pickering, Knox, Lincoln, John Adams,
Dane, Qulncy, J. Q. Adams, Webster,
Sumner, Wilson, Andrew, Choate, Par
sons, Shaw, Story, Everett, Phillips,
Garrison, Mann, Howe, Allen, Devens,
Burtlott, Putnam, Franklin, Bowditch,
Pierce, Agassiz and Bulflueli.
Boll, the Inventor of the telephone, Is
the only man still living who has been
Included. Morton was the discoverer of
anaesthesia, Knox and Lincoln were
the Revolutionary major-generals.
Dane drafted the ordinance of 1787, and
originated the clause In the constitution
fiubldding the Impairment of the obll
galton of contiacts. Qulncy was the
president of Harvard. Allen was an
eminent Judge. Howe was a tutor of
Laura Brldgman and the revolutionis
ing of the methods of teaching the blind.
Putnam settled the Northwest Terri
tory. THE POET OF THE S01T1I.
aomcuiing About Frank I.. Stanton, tho
Southern Writer of I'opulur Verse, Who
Is a Genuine Genius.
Having lost his father at a very early
age, says the Philadelphia Times, Frank
Stanton Bpent the three years of his
life, from 9 to 12 years, sawing wood
for a living. From then on for a num
ber of years he worked in the fields un
der the hot Southern sun, gaining his
knowledge of books from his voracious
application to them after the sun had
gone down on his field of duilv labor.
It is to this period of his life that the
poet has recourse for the materials of
his "Songs of the Soil," but it Is to the
mullowlng, Idealizing intervention of
years that tho inspiration Is due. As
he himself says, a man who is in daily
contact with a plow doesn't wax poet
ical on the subject.
When about 9 years old the poet was,
ror a little while, office "imp" on the
Savanahi Morning News, und wlUle
there It was a part of his duty to sweep
the office of a slim young news reporter
by the name of Joel Chandler Harris,
"Uncle Remus" had not then been born
into the world of stories, and Mr. Hai
rls was employing his spare moments
in writing verses. From the News office
their paths led apart, and each passed
out of the other's memory till very re
cent yearsbrought them together again.
From farm labor Mr. Stanton went
into the newspaper office, drifting about
through South Carolina and Georgia as
a typesetter and printer, all the time
scattering his verses like flowers along
the way. A good Providence kept the
youth In the fields till his heart was
bound to nature, and from thence led
him Into circumstances where he might
pour out on the hearts of men the sun
shine that had been garnered In his
own.
From printer and contributor he be
came an editor. While at the head of a
little paper called the Smlthvllle News,
he received a letter from Joel Chandler
Harris asking for poetical contributions
to the Constitution. Little did Mr. Har
ris suspect that the verses, which were
charming people far and near," were
from the pen of tho little black-eyed
chup who had played the "devil" In his
office In Savanah.
In a short time came the offer of a
reportoriul position on the Constitution
from Henry W. Grady. 'This Mr. Stan
ton declined, and it was not until the
death of Mr. Grady that he accepted,
through the Influence of Mr. Harris, nn
editorial position on that paper. From
then on his popularity has been on the
Increuse, till he Is known and read in
two hemispheres. Though our poet is
by no means without honor in his own
country, It Is from distant places that
the most flattering testimonials come.
In Paris his genius has been recog.
nlzed and complimented, while In En
land he has made a place for himself In
the hearts of the people. Jerome's mag
azine copies his verses regularly, and
he often receives personal letters from
English readers who have heard the
echo of his songs across the seas. In a
recent meeting of London authors Mr,
Stanton s little ballad, "Clal .ite, was
read. Those who know the gem can
appreciate the reception It received
When, in reply to a question, the name
of the author was given, one of the
number exclalme enthusiastically
"Well, he has beaten Dobson on his own
grounds!" '
During the Columbian fair Mr. Stan
ton was once the honored guest at the
Forty Club In Chicago, and received
quite an ovation from Its members. So
far Mr. Stanton h-" been known chiefly
through current Ilu. 'ure, as only a
small collection of his' poems hus yet
apeared. Though this work passed
through several editions and -won a
success unhoped for by Its modest au
thor. he has allowed three years to pass
without coming before the public, again
except through periodicals.' That, ho
is eminently. a. song-writer Is attested
by the fact that na many as seventy of
his poems have been set to music In
England and America within tho past
year.
-
USE1TL DEAFNESS.
In This Instance, However, the Infirmity
cost a Quarter.;
From the Pittsburg Dispatch.
"There Is an advantage In being deaf
If von onlv know the exuet time not to
hear," said L. T. Sallgnac, of Philadel
i.l.in. vesterduv. "but the difficulty Is
to discriminate lust wnen mat time is.
I have a friend who made, or rather
tried to make, capital out of the mis
fortune nature had sent upon him, but
he was continually making mlstukea.
Being a politician, as any of that kin
knows, he met with plenty of Instances
where It was advisable not to hear.
My friend ran for governor of Mary
land once, and, while ho W. .1 defeated,
he was extremely popular nnd well
known all over the state, from the
urchin In the gutter to the millionaire
in his palace.
"I went fishing down In the Delaware
Bay one summer with him, and . the
boat made a landing at one of the
towns on our way down. He was no
sooner-soen than a chorus greeted him
from the wharf with 'Hallo, guvnor.
He acknowledged the compliment With
a cracef u Hip of the hat. As we wnlked
down the gangplank one fellow, a little
more obtrusive than the rest, pushed
his way up to the side of my friend
and bellowed out, knowing the falling
tn his hearing: 'Say, guvner, old man,
can't you loan me a quarter?'
'Of course, this was one of the occa
sions upon which my friend's auricular
organs failed to perform their duty. He
walked on as If he had not heard a
word, while to my Invitation to take a
drink, given in a moderate tone of
voice, he gave a ready assent. As wc
, walked on a little farther the man per-
Blsted. This time he came up to my
friend and shouted at the top of his
voice In his ear: 'Say, guvnor, can't 1
you loan me 50 cents'." My friend
turned, and in a quiet dignified man-
ner said, without a smile, as he tossed
him the half-dollar: 'Confound your
Impertinence; I should have heard you
the first time." '
BURGLARS AT GREEN RIDGE.
Forced an Entrance Into Storo at Dickson
Avenue and Grcon Kldge Street.
Tw
wo men forced an entrance into the
re of the Green Ridge Store com-
stor
pany at Dickson avenue and Green
Ridge street last evening at 8.30.
They removed a bar from the cellar
door in the rear of the building, but
were frightened away before securing
anything of value.
GRAIN AND BREAD.
Barley is one of the most ancient of
plants.
There are said to be over COO varieties of
wheat.
The first ancleht author to mention rye
was Pliny.
Fine flour composes about 80 tier cent.
of tho grain.
In India the cultivation of rice antedates
history.
Oats were not known to the Hebrews or
the Egyptiuns.
Millet Is pre-hlstoric In South EuroDe.
Egypt and Asia.
The carllst mention of oats in China Is
in A. 1). UI8.
Maize has been found In the most an
cient Peruvian tombs.
"Spurred rye" is one of the most deadly
poisons known.
The straw of rye Is often of far more
value than the grain.
Pliny mentions oatmeal as a favorite
rood ot the Germans.
Spelt undoubtedly stows wild on tho
piams ot Mesopotamia.
Spelt is a favorite grain in South Ger
many and Switzerland.
Every language is snld to have its own
name ror wheat.
Wheat Is believed to be an evolution from
a mountain grass.
Maize has probably more enemies than
any other species of grain.
Barley Is found mentioned on the earl
iest Egyptian monuments.
jne bwiss iJike Dwellers made more
use or Bpelt than of wheat.
"Starch-wheat." crown In Swltzer-
land, has two grains to each ear.
Rice Is said to be the stanle food of
nearly one-half of the human race.
It Is said that mules fed on corn that
has smut will lose their hoofs.
Some valunble use has been found for
every part of the maize plant.
According to Pliny, the Roman wheat
had ears with 100 grains each.
Millet Is sowed by tho Chinese emrieror
in u. soicmn ceremonial every year.
The Greeks had oats, Jl A. 200. but
used them only as food for their horses.
The rutlve home of wheat is supposed
to oe .o mountain regions of Armenia,
Ry contains from two to live per cent.
less of the nitrogenous principles than
wheat.
A fulr article of molasses can be made
from the stalks of the common maize.
The average wheat yield in England Is
said to be thirty-six bushels to the acre.
The China or tea wheat Is said to
have come from a grain found In a chest
of tea.
Japan has developed a variety of malzo
with leaves beautifully striped with white.
St. Louis Globe-Democrat.
Irrevocable Knmity.
From the Washington Star.
'Mrs. Rafferty Is very angry wld ye:
Mrs. Dolan."
"Ol know it."
'.'She says she won't spako till yez."
its worse nor thot. She wont aven
slnd her children over to borry from mo
any more.
Easily Answered.
From Fliegeinle Blaeter.
'Professor, why Is Pallas Athene con
sidered the gouiless of wisdom?"
"Shu was the only goddess who did not
marry.
An Altcrnutlvo.
From the Adams Freeman.
"You little Imp!" said tho father, "If I
catch you risking injury in a foot ball
game I'll break every bone In your body!"
Beecham's pills arc for bili-
AUCtlocc hi iniio h fa rl o rh n
dyspepsia, heartburn, torpid
liver, dizziness, sick headache,
bad taste in the mouth, coated
tongue, loss of appetite, sal-
lnw cViri ivhpn pnncprl Vnr rnn-
' J
stipation; and constipation is
the most frequent cause of all
of them.
Book free; pills 25c. At
drugstores, or write B. F. Al
len Co.. 36s Canal St., New
York. .
Instruments In every ien of the term
us appiieu to 1'ianos.
Exceptional In holding their original ful
ness or tone.
NEW YORK
WAREHOUSE, No.
Fifth avenue.
SOLD BY
E.C.RICKER&CO
1115 Adams Ave.,'New Telephone Bdg
A Decided Move In the Bkatea trade has Ret
In and It "111 imv vu to examine the Htock of
JURISUH'S. at 43J Spruce street. Fine lino of
superior Docket cutlorv. razors, etc.. for Holi
day trade. Guns and ammunition at bottom
Hirurcs. AHn Horn, aaconri hand' v heels at
prices that will astonish jou. Seeing ia bellevlug I
. Linn Allen
& Co.
STOCK BROKERS,
Duy and aell Stocks, Bonds and Grain
on New York Exchange and Chicago I
Hoard of Trade, either for cash or oe
margin.
412 Spruce Street.
local Stocks a specialty.
G. duB. DIMMICK, Manager.
ssn r.mi jh . '
Will
TELEPHONE 5,002.
Gilmore's Aromatic Wine
. r i j- Tr
A tOtllC lOf ladies. It VOU
are suffering from weakness,
and feel exhausted and ner-
vous; are getting thin and all
run down: uumore's Aro
matic Wine will bring roses
to your cheeks and restore
VOU to flesh and plUUipneSS.
if -1 U C
luuincia, use il tur your
daughters. It is the best
regulator and corrector for
ailments peculiar to woman
hood. It promotes digestion,
enriches the blood, and gives
lasting strength. Sold by
Matthews Bros., Scranton.
STEEL ROD,
SILVER flOUNTED,
LEATHER CASE
AND OTHER
GOOD STYLES
OP
UHBRELLAS
AT
CONRAD'S.
CHRISTMAS, 1894.
We Are Headquarters for
Dolls, Toys,
Sleds, Skin Horses,
Iron and Wood Toys,
Etc., Etc.,
For the Holidays.
BUYERS FOB TIIE
Trade,
Sunday Schools, Etc.
Should call early to secure prompt
service.
Our Line of Candy
18 THE LARGEST AND BEST
WE EVER BAD.
I D. WILLIAMS 5 BRO.
3IUACKAW!lNA AVENUE.
1
$3 SHOE
IS THE BEST.
N0 8QUEAKIN&
5. CORDOVAN,
i nuibngiciwiLLLVWUfi
4.J.5?FlNECAIf&lNaA!!0II
PP0LICE,3Soufc
LADIE3-
f?S02. I.B
&ZNU rUK lAIALUQUb
"J-- BSC
BROCKTON, MASS.
You enn save I
i money by purcbaitug H. Lm
unngias miocii,
advertised shoe in tbe world, aud euarnulce
the vnlue by stomping tne name ana price on
the bottom, which protects you against high
I nrir nnd th middleman' tit ofita. Our shoes
ten"
'VotbVrmau.1
at lower prices lor me trsiue given man
ler make. Take no substitute. If vour
deslcr cauuot supply you, we C4u. Bold by
E.J.LEONARD.
ELL
CO.,
MAKOTAcionicns' Agists roa
TRENTON IRON CIVS
WIRE ROPE.
VANALEN&COS
STEEL NAILS.
OXFORD IRON CO.S
HEftCHAHT m mort.
REVERE RUBBER COS
BELTING, PACKING AND HOSE.
FAYERWEATHER & LADEW'S
' "HOYT'S" LEATHER BELTING.
A. B. BONNEVILLE'S
' STAR" PORTLAND CEDENT.
AMERICAN BOILER C0.S
"ECONOMY' HOT AIR FURNACES.
GRIFFING IRON COS
BDKDY RADIATORS.
434 LACKAWANNA AVE.
Jill
Ill
jfvw ni nnininiTiin
y . DLHLAdt Do
, te!sSW
f . WITH b; j
Hold Fast . 1
W Steel Ccn ' jf a
y tered, Self- Jw , J
YV- Sharpening,
' Detachable . n-'uf U V
V,vY horse iSTw
-Jj SHOE lg?-W
CALKS Ni47
IUMN1L
Have now completed their arrangements
for the holidays, showing the largest and
most complete stock they have ever UU
pluyed, consisting of
WATCHES I
Which they have In great varloty. All
groailes In Gold, Silver and Gold Filled
Cases. Having had numerous concessions
from manufacturers, they have given
thcli- customers the full benefits of them,
making the prices of the best watches
nearly as low as ure asked by others for a
very Inferior quality.
DIAHONDS!
Having made our purchases before the
late rulse of 15 per cent. In tariff and hav
ing been VERY PARTICULAR In select
ing only perfect stones of a line color and
cut, we are sure we can satisfy the best of
Judges us to price or quality. We have
them mounted In Brooches, Rings, Eur-
rinss. Studs, Scarf Pins and In nearly all.
articles of Jewelry.
SILVER
Is now very cheap. We have It tn a
thousund shapes, from a cake basket to a
toothpick. A WONDERFUL varloty.
People ure ASTONISHED when prices
ure mentioned.
RICH CUT GLASS
A brilliant and dazzling display. Low
prices for labor and perfected machlnarj;
have done wonders with the price
FINE JEWELR"
The finest on earth.
Hundreds of styles ot
STONE RINOSI
New and beautiful.
.J
Opera Glasses.
Chains, Lockets
BANQUET LAMPS
And Onyx Top Tables. AH new and ele
gant designs. Art Porcelains, all brought
lu since the new tariff went In effect.
CLOCKS!
Porcelain, Onyx, Marble and Gilt. Wa
huve BIG BARGAINS In a lot of Marble
Clocks, Just received. Less than half
price. They aro fitted with the best Amer
ican Jeweled movements and are about us
cheap as a good common clock. They ara
well worth looking at.
All aro invited to look at our display,
whether purchasing or not. At the old
stand.
307 LACKAWANNA AVENUE.
OUR
The Great Blood Purifier and
Liver Regulator.
200 DAYS' TREATMENT, $1.00
COMPOSED OF
S, BARKS, ROOTS
And trill Positively cure all distinct trisinK
from IMPURE BLOOD, UCH AS
Rheumatism, Kidney Disorder,
Liver Complaint, Sick and N'erv
ouh Headache, Neuralgia, Dys
pepsia, Fever und Ague, Scrofu
la, Female Compluints, Erysipe
las, Nervous Affections, Catarrh, .
and all Syphilitic Diseases.
E. M. 1IETZEL, AGENT,
330 LACKAWANNA AVENUE.
Call and Gat Circulars.
IP
LAGER
BREWERY-
Manufacturers ot the Celebrated
PILSENER
LAGER SEER
CAPACITY 3
100,000 Barrels per Annum
NT. PLEASANT
COAL
AT RETAIL,
Coal ot tho best quality for domeitlg
tjso, and of all alien, delivered In any
part of the city at lowest price.
Orders left at my Offlc
NO. 113 WYOMING AVENUE,
Rear room, first lloor, Third National
Hunk, or Hunt by moll or telephone to tbe
tilne, will receive prompt attention.
Sjieelal contracts will bo madn for tlx
lale and delivery of Buckwheat Coal.
Wiyi. T. SMITH.
SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS.
Also a Full Line of
SUPPLIES.
(7
Ul
Scranton, Pa.
mm m
HERB
ION
IE