The press. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1857-1880, August 07, 1857, Image 4

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    £fOf tWf'7——'-; '• •;-'
&?:-''-'I THE V
>And’eulQgizedihetixeUmgbluef-’/V 1 •=
Have laid tßolir fancy on the rack, , "
•;.; i. v Tdoelebrafce.eaoh varied b00t....
'--’V . But riotoussingle worcbthey.say;: ' x ; S
_ "Abontthe pleasing eye of igtejT'-'. ..
- v I likeiie mlld'grey .
a ; v 'WhiQbanostTloved hadWs Qf. ; greyy ; >;.•
v And if each glanoe emifcf,no blazes, .
Aa tbpse orWaok/I know that they;.,....
.Boas«?jE“oh&nath|toWßtthdue.:.,,, ... *
- Hearta th&t Withstood both black,ap|:b\ae; ‘
, Tho faceisfeir, with oyea of black—
-' :. With eyesofgray is still more fair, .
For what fcholsSt In Ufemiy'lack/ ’ . /'
■ t .cr { Is m&denp. by the Bofter air;. /■
. Imparted ; tdthe lovGlsfaee? ; '' '. - 1
Th&t'greyabd.bluasonltongraces. - o :r‘
The black maypierce the gazor through,
A&4 inake the lightest spirits dance—' ■
Our souls may melt before the .blue, v "
■: Ordleaway inpleakpre’s trance;. »
Sat I still my homage pay * ;
„ Tothe ehbhantihg'eyhofgrey.. . v
. - The eye that kindlybeama on me,.' le >,
" ... Shall always meet a return; ; .
Audi will bend the roady knee,
Where’er those glances melt or. hum,
And idolize the lovely hue, • 11 ’ 71 ;
;. Whether of grey* orblaok, or blue.
August4;lm: v • «-
'* (Front Fratetfs-Mig^ite,•> .>•
A DAY AT BEACONSFIELb.
I? /, • One of, the branches, ,of; the
Railway has brotight an'.intorestipg epot iu
: . Buckinghamshire within the limits of a moru
. Ini’s excursion. The little. towifof Beacons
. field' is npw/within' a distahcejof-ahout'twb
; ■ miles from one, of the‘stations of the wcy
,' oombe line; and, a picturesque walk through
. shady lanjesj'anl oyer opqhjhree%'flelds,leads,
•to'the church within which repose the remains
orEdnnmd Burko. ■ At* -short distance from
the village are the ruins of what wasoncp tiie
country-house of the' iHristriburi 'statesman';'
the farm which he cultivated, contiguous.
.. To: these retreats,'.which must he forever sab
ered in tile eyes’of Englishmen,. he retired,'at
the close of his great public career, to medi
‘ tate in solitude on the instability; of human in
stitutions,,to mourn for a.short period his'pri
vate sorrows, and—to die ■
On a bright, summer day in June, alighting
at the 'W'obnnTGreen Station,'we directed,our
steps'over the intervening country toward the
little spire of Beaconfleld church, Which just
rose above the surrounding woods.- A gentle'
breeze ailed the air with the fragrance of the
bean blossblhV and ; wafted ■ the scent/of, the
• .Woodbine’and the wild .rose'over , the .neigh
boring fields,;,The distant hills, sharply de
- ,:flned, —, ,Y,.. .< :
‘tin dearest air ascending, showed far off
A surface dappled o’er with shadows flung . .
From brooding cloud,/shad ovr/ that l;iy in spots
Determined and unmoved, with' Steady beams
-, ' The neigtl^rhood of Beaconsfleld,,possesses
‘ 5 no features, of striking beauty, but it is not de
' ficieat in certain sural .charms.., It,is,, richly
. cultivated, undulating, and well timbered; and
the coppice and other, woods are sufficiently
extensive to be imposlug withont monotony,
and sufficiently broken into' masses <to giye
variety and richness: to/the landscape; ,Neat'
Rums,: qniet' ..homesteads,. and/ malt-booses,
scattered in every direction, give ian,air Of com
petence and comfort to the district ;_and know
ing Burke’s'taste' for agriculture, and his ap
preciation of country life,'we ' cart understand
that the features' which strike, Or; perhaps fqil
*tp, strike,' a casual observer, were; fohim/ilecu-'
- liarly pleasing, and made’the.neighborhood of
Beaconsfield wel) suited to his desire at once
. for congenial occupationandfor the indulgence'
of occasional retirement. , ,- ~,'
The little town presepts nothing of Interest;
but at the distance of about a mile*on. a rood
leading in; a northerly direction, stands; a ;d;-:
lapidated gateway, opening upon a /road; now
. overgrown, with turf, and the wheel-track only
feintly visible. This, road passes . through a
- small park studded with well-grown, trees,, and
leads to the spot on which once : stqod a man
•* sion of some pretensionjarid which; miirit jufr®
been well protected on three sides by .sbejter
, ■ ing woods. Of the house nothing remains.
> It was totally destroyed‘byfirb/ih-1814).add,
f'T not a scorched or biackened/brick' 1 remains .to
tell of its former; ex.istericcV./lttrßfte is only
. marked by an excavation—-the space dime oc
cupied by the ceilars dnd undergrrirind offices,,
. and a well of the purest water..-,/The, whole is
now covered with turf, and- a- few sheep were
quietly cropping the grass-which has grown
over the. ruins.. A> range of, stabling Still ex
ists, but in a dilapidated state; and a belfry o ver’
the coach-house still marks the place as having
been once a gentleman’s Residence. ~ The
. farm-house called c <triegories,”/as.in Burke’s
time, is in, good preservation; and the estato
which once owned the care of ohe of the most
practical dfagriculturists'andgreatestdf then,
is now in the occupation of a Buckinghamshire
yeoman, i- ■/
This domain Burke became possessed of in
the year 1768. In a letter to. an early friend,
he writes: “I have just made a push With ail
T could eoUeet.offfiy own, andthe aid of my
, friends, to cast a little root in this country. I
, have purchased a honse,.with an estate of about
six hundred acres of land; in Buckinghamshire,
' twenty-four miles from London. . It, is a place
exceedingly pleasapt arid, I God
wrilUsg, to become a farmer in good -earnest.”
Many conjectures have been, formed as to
the sourcefromwhich Burke derived the money
; to pay for so considerable a property. It has
been more than insinuated that the,Binds were
the wages of corruptloni/He-Was known to
be a poor man, and he. was-suddenly;, trans;
formed into a landed proprietor, with a park
and mansion,’ entertaining/his. friends, with:’
liberality, and able 'to lake , his position with'
the aristocracy of the county. Johnson-was
one of his first friends who visited him' at his:
country seat; and on surveying his flue estate
and well-appointed establishment; exclaimed,
" katti tquiiem iaviieo, miror magis.” Car
ing little for country life.he viewed hid friend's
seat, nevertheless, withpridi/'mixed,undoubt.
ediy with a Utile astonishment; but As knew
him too well to suppose that such a change of
fortune could have afisenfrom any , sacrifice of
personal or political integrity. . - , , - .
•An explanation of ,-this rather mysterious
change in Burke's position has been supplied
by the correspondence published by Earl Fits,-,
william. ' Burke was at the time of this pur
chase private secretary to the Marquis,of Rock
ingham, and they .were; op’terms,’,of'the
strictest friendship. -The Marquis early ac
quire,■* 3 knowiedge.of the, (Jreat qualities'of
Burke’s mind.and character.’, The. State
Papers which Burke wrote for the use of the
Whig party marked Win oiit as its guiding anti
governing Bpirit. Lord Rockingham felt him
self under the deepest 1 obligations to bis able
and brilliant secretary; and hi) determined to
-requite hlmin a waythatwonldsecure utonce
his , private and political independence, and
give him a statue In social life, that, should W
.in some degree proportionate to the dignity.of
his character and his grert -intellectual pre
eminence. He advanced him a considerable
tpum, and took, a: bond for its repayment. In.
fom.it was aloan, in/ substance a gift; and so
it was deubtiess understood ihy both: It was
a transaction which only, great ( and .noble
minds could participate' in ’ and ’comprehend.
On the death of the Marquis the bond; was
found cancelled among his'’papers;’ ait act
which was probably performed by the generous
peer before the ,ink had dried bn the Signature.
Near the' spot where Burke’s mansion,
, stood ia.-ari extensive wo rid ’ ‘or grove," with
walks cut. through., it in,various directions.
..It formed.a part of the pleasure/grounds,
. . and was, evidently iaip ’otat'with- an' we to'
beauty and .effect, It is .now,.a, tangled wil
derness, choked with nettles and bverrun with
briars with which the IroCe still struggles in.
wild unregulated groWth/arid/where fragrant,
creepers climb ;the, tallest ,frees, ..arid, year
after year put’ forth arid shed their flowers
in. unheeded profusion. Laurels/that have
long since' ceased to feel the restraining hand
- of man throw 'their ■ sturdy' ■ brkhchea; acrosi
dunp, untrodden paths and the dense /and
sombre foliage scarcely permits a sunbeam, to
penetrate the gloomy wood. In this once
neautiful. hut now desolate and oppressive re
treat, the great statesman .was accustomed to
walk, and rejoico In his temporary escape from
the hot atmosphere-of- politics and the vexa
tions of public life' taking, doubtless, occa
sionally a complacent survey of his well-biiiti-'
vated fields through openings in . the. surrouiid
: Ing trees. Here was probably the birthplace
Of many of those grand thoughts and imperish
able truths that. jnake his .works the property,
not of one age and. country only, but of all
. .-iages and all countries, //Her? he held friendly
... intercourse with those whoiri he honored with
-1 bis confidence; and here he poured • forth, bis
soul in passionate arid exhausting grief for the
loss of MS; only son. / Here, -top,'in happier
days, before the terfibie convulsion? of,Eu
rope had troubled his spirit .and private sor
rows had almost bowed it to the dust, would
assemble the celebrated characterapf the day,
its choicest Wits arid greatest Spirits'. Here—,
“t/ndertbeloftyroof
Laurenoe, ' aid Boaucleic, ' arid Garrick 1 , arid
Fox, and RTyndham, and Kcppel, frequently
met in, gonial eompaniotishif); ‘.Here "Sir
Joshua” .would discuss.. with his admiring
ho,st the highest principles of his .art, gain
. . ing rather than imparting .instruction in his
own peculiar 'profession. Here, .Johnson,
-With his uncouth form and awkward gait,
~ indifferent., to. tbe beauty arotind hiin, would
//; utter W» sententious - periods -of make- tho
- . grrive eebe .with'his.sbnrirouii laugh. Here,'
too; Jjori 'Cffia discussed the in-
Of ihe-State, cbmplgceritly
survey the happiness around him/ ’No visitor
left Burke’s abode without; him
■' delightful r’ecbliectibns bfthecj'asslpgroyp in
which he walkeit i with/the .pbUpplipme
sts/tesman arid listened to his instructive diS*
■■■. course. ; -rv.
IfcWiUe": contemplating ih.e, scountry : ratber
v poblic jlifej.o/ Bttrtej.we-cannot
omit to guaw-it W* nu»l .occupational: Mti
dull eee tneiinin l-wno could Influence the
• policy of the.fitate by
% aubduc tbe 'senate' bls .iites.ytiblelbtitoty,
. or »Oarioto a ibe'l|ighei(t regions ofpbfloaophy,
* atoop to thy. minuted detuilaof agriculture,
11 and lts. ordinary ope-
i'-f . r„ j(l-';ai^,
“ Farming'witli him (says Lord Fitzwilliam)
could hardly bo Called,a relaxation,, for ho
jfQuld. enter into tho-business with all the
eagertiasSj’arid more' tliaii the usual informa
,tion, of those who practice it for a rnainte
,nance.' He was seldom more intent on any
subject than when discussing questions of ag
riculture wlth practical farmers in his neigh
borhood, walking over their lands and winning
their respect and regard, as 'veil by the know
ledge" he displayed of all the details of tlieir
'profession, us by tho plainness and courtesy
of his manners.”
f “’l have been a farmer (Bnrko himself
wriies) for twenty-seven years, and it .is a
tradothe most precarious in its advantages,
the most liable to losses, and the least profit
able of any that is Carried’on."' It requires
ten times' more of labor, of vigilance, of at
fention, of skill,' and, let me add, of good
fortjme; also, to carry on the business with
success, than what belongs to any other
trade,”* ‘
He’was an .experimental as well as a practi
cal farmer, and like others of that class, aome
times failed in his experiments. He corres
ponded with Arthur. Young; discussed with
him the merits of deep ploughing and of drill
cultivation; Inquired why he had failed in an
attempt to fatten pigs on carrots, with which
vegetable; however, lie was more successful in
Covent-gardeh market,’ whither he sent two
wagon loads, “of amost aromatic smell,firm,,
and admirably tasted;” for which he realized
six pounds fifteen shillings, paying him bettor
than the. finest crop oi wheat, and the back
carriage of coal ashes paying expenses! In
explaining at a particular crisis the cause of a
general rise in the price of commodities, he
writes: . ■ „
,< “Ais to the lesser articles, they are like the
greater; they have followed the fortune of, the
season.' 'Why are fowls.so dear ? I sold tVom
iiiy yard to a jobber, six young lean fowls for
four-and-tWenty shillings— fowlsfor which, two
years ago, the same map would not have given
a shilling a-pieco. He sold them afterwards at
Uxbridge, and they were taken to London to
receive the last hand W
Biirko was. one ,of. the earliest of political
economists. Ho. appears to have had. an in
tuitive . perception of the truth of the great
principles .of tho science, aud he embraced
every opportunity of illustrating and enforcing
them, |lt is recorded of Adam Smith, that on
his, return to Scotland froma visit to London,
he declared’.that Burkeydf aUthfepublic men
with whom'he conversed, was the only pne |
who could' comprehend, or be Induced to
iako .the slightest interest ih, his theories.
We cannot resist the inclination to transcribe,
In' illustration of this remark, an admirable
passage from the paper to which we have be
fore referred, in which ho proves the interests
of the farmer and the laborer to be Identical:
“In the case of i the farmer,and the laborer,
their.' interests are alwaya the same, and it is
absolutely'impossible that their free contracts
cpn.be i onerous to either party.. It is the in
terest'of the farmer that his work should be
done with .effect and celerity; and that can
not be unless the laborer is well fed, and
otherwise found with such necessaries of
animali life, according to his habitudes, as
may, keep the body in full force,, and the
fail'd gay and cheerftil. For of all the
instruments of liis, trade, the labor of man
(what the ancient writers, have called , the
instrumentum vocah) is that one on which he
is most to rely for tho repayment of his capi
tal., The other two, the semivocale in this
ancient classification—-that is, the working
stock of cattle-rand the iristrumentum niutum,
BUCh as carts, ploughs, spades, and so forth,
though not at all inconsiderable .themselves,
.are very much inferior in utility or in expense;
or,, without a given portion of tho first are
nothing at all. For in all things whatever,
tho mind is the most valuable and most im
portant ;• and in this scale the whole of agri
culture! is in a natural and just order: the
boast is as an informing principle to the plough
and cari > the laborer is as reason to tho bcaßt;
and the fanner ia aa a thinking and presiding
principle to the laborer an attempt to break
this chain "of subordination in any, part Is
equally absurd; but the absurdity is mostmis
chievoiis in practical operation, where it is the
most easy—that is, the most subject to an er
roneous judgment.
. “It Is plainly more the farmer’s interest that
his men should' thrive, than that his horses
should be .well fod,. slick, plump, and fit for
use, or than that bis wagon and ploughs should
be strong, ih good repair, and fit for service.
“ On the other hand, if the farmer cease
to profit of the laborer and that his capital
is not'continually manured and fructified, it is
impossible that he should continue that abun
dant nutriment and . clothing and lodging pro
per for the protection of tho instruments he
employs.
“.It Is therefore tho first aud fundamental
interest of the laborer that the farmer should
have a full incoming proflt.of Ms labor. The
proposition is, self-evident, and nothing but
the malignity, perverseness, and ill-governed
passions of mankind, and particularly tho envy
i they bqar to. each other’B prosperity, could
prevent their seeing and acknowledging it,
with thankfiilness to the wise and benign Dis
poser of all things, who obliges men, whether
they will or not, in pursuing their own selfish
interests, to connect the general good with
their own individual success..
There ate still a few' old people living at
Beaconsfleld who remember Mr., or Squire
Burke, as he is traditionally spoken of there.
His poorer neighbors knew him. only as the
country gentleman,' the indulgent landlord,
the sympathizing friend, .the generous bene
factor. , There was something peculiarly
grateful to, Burke in frequent Intercourse
with tfie poor. It enlarged his knowledge
of human - character, and enabled him to
speak with authority, on many questions af
fecting tho interests of . the humbler, classes;
and he never lost an opportunity of probing
their minds, or hesitated “to survey the man
sions of sorrow and pain—to take.tho gunge
aud dimensions of misery, depression and con
tempt.” The simple people of his neighbor
hood appear to have but a faint conception of
the greatness of the man who so familiarly
conversed with them.' They often heard in
deed that he received “ great people” in his
hpusebut who or what Mr. Burke was be
yond the limits of.Beaconsfleld, they little
cared to know or to Inquire. No knowledge
of his fame could have increased tlici>- attach
ment to his person, and his importance in
their estimation was sufficiently symbolized in
thecarriage and fonr horses” by which he
sometiniestook his journeys to the metropolis.
' Early in the year 1797, Burke removed fi'om
Beaconsfleld to Bath, for the benefit of tho
waters; but the hand of death was then upon
hiin, and lie returned to his sent in May
only-to dio. The toils and contentions of
public’ life had. long shattered his health,
and Ms spirits never recovered the shock
which they sustained by the death of his son.
“The storm,” ho says, In the agony of his
grief,« has gone over me, and ,1 lie like one
of those oaks which tho late hurricane has
scattered about me. I am stripped of all my
honors, I am torn up by the roots, and lie
prostrate on the earth!” Bcaconsfleld was to
him no more the delightful abode of cheerful
moss and rural cares, but “an obscure and
melancholy retreat,” in which, “a- desolate
old man,” ho wished to hide himself from the
world and dio. “ I have Been,” he wrote with
touching pathos, “at Bath these four months
to no purpose, and am therefore to be re
moved to my own houso at Beaconsflold to.
morrow, to ; be nearer to ft habitation more
permanent; humbly and fearfnlly hoping that
my better part may find abettermansioii.” lie
expired on July 9tli. “His end,” said Dr. Lau
rence, “was suited to the simple greatness of
,his mind Which ho displayed through life. Ho
appeared neither to wish nor dread, but patient
ly and placjdly to await the appointed hour of
his dissolution,” Ho prohibited by his will
all posthumous Honors; assigning as a reason j
that ho had had in his lifetime, “too mueli of
noise and compliment.” Fox, to his honor,
proposed a public, fbneral, which would have
been unanimously voted by the House of Com
mons but for the, injunction of tho departed
statesman. He had requested to bo buried in
■ tba church of Bcaconsfleld, close to the bodies
of. his son and brother.
On a calm summer afternoon, when the slant
ing rays of the declining sun were gilding tho
little spite of Bcaconsfleld church, nnd pouring
a'mild radiance over the surrounding country;
a walking procession moved slowly through the
village. The remains of tho great statesman
had been taken the evening before from his
seat to tlie town,'for the convenience of the
attendants. Seventy members of (lie benefit
society which he patronized, clad In mourning,
led tho way. The pall wus borne by some of tho
; most illustrious men of the day, in the list of
whom, however, we discover with pain tho
omission of the name of Fox. Laborers from
' far and wide crowded the churchyard and Its
approaches, and tho grief of tho poor was au
• dibly' expressed; and' amidst the profound
sorrowof all classes, the body of tho greatest
man of that, or perhaps of any age, Was con
signed to the tomb.
Burke had further expressed in his will a
desire, that no public monument should be
erected to his memory, bnt that only a plain
' tablet aud inscription should mark the place
pf his interment. It was characteristic of the
: nobility of his mind, and of the unaffected
simplicity of his nature. We cannot, how
-1 ever, admit that tlie nation Is bound in per
i petulty to defer tho expressed wishes of any
i public man on the question of, public honors.
. Great -political characters; as they are the
i guide-posts and land.marks of the State while
i living, become, when dead, by inheritance,'
emphatically the property of the people; and
’ they had a right to require that tho reputation
■ which has been gained in' their service, and
i the fame which they have awarded, , shall be
i perpetuated ina manner ■ moH fa accordance
1 .witn.iheir feelings' and' their, instincts. ‘ The
- mind of Burke is imperisliably enshrined in his
1 Works ;butwe ask, and we shall not ask Invain,
• that ourselves and our posterity shall be por
i mltted to scan the features of the great orator as
a wrought fa the, pale' marble,’and to worship
: at the.visible shrine bfsnch lofty intellects and
[. almoitunprecedented excellencies. -We know
not whether a' statue is designed for Burke fa
• ibe palace of Westminster, bnt the Abbey Is
1 t*( e OT°PC r Place for his earthly canonization.
■ If public honors have been too’ often awarded
C partial »n
.sr'l}' ,c.'!>j i V.rd
meii,
giving a of
—if ephemeral p6Hticians, ihe'foint lights of
their, day, now extinguished forever, viewed
through a deceptive medium, have had their
proportions exaggerated and belied,—if men
marked by no originality of geuius, or grandeur
or elevation of mind, have been exalted into
national bcppfactors and endowed with a facti
tious immortality,—what honors can bo felt
sufficient to mark and perpetuate our admira
tion of that great luminary that even yet warms
the political atmosphere with the rays of his
departed glory, and whoso light will never be
come totally extinct but with that of civilization
and freedom.
The peculiarity of' Burke’s genius has been
too often discussed to need any additional elu-;
delation; and it is not our intention to enter
here upon a subject so thoroughly exhausted.
Notwithstanding the vast superiority of his
knowledge, his laborious life, and eminent
public services, he never attained, as is well
known, a seat iu the Cabinet; and when Ins
party acquired for a short time possession of
power, ho was placed in a subordinate office in
the Government. The unbending rectitude of
his mind and the loftiness of his character un
fitted him for co-operating cordially with ordi
nary men. Ho was doubtless regarded as
«impracticable;?* a term of peculiar signifi
cance and reproach among certain politicians.
« Too fond of the right to pursue the expe
dient/’ he would have disdained the compro
mises to which public men are oftet/obliged to
resort to maintain themselves iu power, and
even to carry on the ordinary operations of
government. It is the nature of repre
sentative institutions to lower in a con
siderable degree the standard of political
morality; and in the conflict of parties and
the struggles for pre-eminence in a popular
assembly, the interest of the State and the
object <jf government itself too often appear
to be cast aside or forgotten. History teems
with examples of the selfishness of party
spirit' and its unprincipled combinations, and
wo have too often seen in our own day that
the virus of faction is constantly working in
even tho best of consiitutions, and threaten
ing it either with chronic disease or to bring
it to premature decay. We see no remedy
but In tho greater diffusion of political know
ledge, in interesting larger portions of the
community in the concerns of the State, and
perhaps in extending tho franchise, and thus
enlarging the tribunal to which public men
are responsible for their conduct and their
votes.
A study of the character of Burke would
be one of the bbst correctives of the infirmi
ties and short-comings of public men. His
political writings abound in wisdom clothed
in all the splendor of eloquence, they are
stamped with true greatness of soul, and the
highest minds will forever draw’ from them
their noblest thoughts, their purest princi
ples, their profouudest convictions. Thus
genius if it too often fails in its conflict with
tho present, asserts its dominion over the fu
ture. To it belongs the task of forming tho
mind of unborn generations, of extending its
influence into distant ages, and perhaps con
tributing at somo ftiture period to form a
legislature that will submit itself entirely to
the guidance of principle, and thus vindicate
for itself the groat prerogative of “teaching
the nations how to live.”
Nor is there anything, in the private life of
Burke, as in those of,- some of his illustrious
cotemporaries, to' ''qualify the sentiment
with which wc must regard him. His home
was the abode of every virtue, and while
pacing with thoughtful steps the paths so
familiar to him at Beaconsfield, we feel that
no more political greatness apart from moral
superiority could exercise such a permanent
influence upon the minds of men, —it is tho
purity ot his character, combined with his in
tellect and knowldege, that enchains our affec
tions and excites our admiration; and if any
Sepator who lias drawn lessons of conduct
from tho pages of Burke, or meditated in his
career, escaping from tho stifling atmosphere
of ’Westminster and the din of debate, should
seek for a few hours on tho shades of Beacons
fleld, and hold in spirit brief communion with
tho mighty dead, he will return with his sym
pathies enlarged, his motives purified, and his
nerves braced for the discharge of every duty
which his country may require of him. H. T.
FOREIGN ITEMS.
The gross public income and expenditure
returns pf the United Kingdom of Great Britain
and Ireland in the year ended the 30th day of
June, 1857, shows that the income from tho differ
entitems makes a grand total of £72.007.821 19a.-
sd. Tho total of tne expenditure was £71,756,710-
12a. JOd. The excess of income over expenditure
in tho year was theroforo £311,111 6s. 7a.
A high Parliamentary functionary may be
said to •bo in difficulties. The House of Com
mons is not at nil crushed by its Speaker, There
have been too frequent occasions of late whon
Parliamentary managers havo been heard to mur
mur, “Oh for an hour of gh&w Lefovro l” But it
is not every man that has an unimpeachable chest,
which is’the grand point of departure in tho gov-
A ermaent of bodies at men.
It was lately declared in the British Parlia
ment that 1851 to 1857, a period of undoubted
prosperity, the population of Ireland hnd de
creased, principally by emigration, 754.334.
Distrust of Lord Palmerston—The Morn
ing Btak London journal) speaking of a public
‘meeting‘nbout the Jew question, says : “Of ono
thing,'Eowor or, thoro was a very unmiafcakeable
demonstration, namely, that the meeting had a
most thorough distrust of Lord Palmerston’s sin
cerity as a reformer; for when Sir. Morley, who
has on many oooosions shown that ho, at least, is
not a more tame conventional Whig, but a man of
earnest ifnd independontconviotions, declared that
‘ he did i ot believo Lord Palmerston wasslncero
in anything,’ ho was interrupted by a loud and
ringing dhcer, which was renewed again and again,
with tno utmost vehemence. Lord John Russell
hardly fared any bettor. A genoral feeling seem
ed to prevail that both tbeso statesmen were play
ing a re-arranged farce, by which thoy might keep
up tho appearance of redeeming their liberal pro
mises, hut without the smallest intention of gird
ing their loins for a serious confliet with tho Lords.”
It adds: ** Wo have no sort of doubt that Lord
Palmerston will jockoy them, (the public) and
that they will meekly submit to bo jockied.”
It appears, by an advertisement in the Lon
don papors, that a Imus natural is exciting won
dor there. Her naiuo is Julia Pustruva, and she is
thus desoribod“ This young lady, tho wonder of
the world, supposed by eminent naturalists and
physicians to bo a hybrid, wboroin. the nature of
woman predominates ovor the ournng-outangs, is
very singular; her pose, forehead, and entire face,
shoulders, armfc, Ac., are covered with thick black
hair. She has no pupil apparent in tbo eye, no
cartiluge In the nose, with double gums in the
upper and lower jaw, and only ono row of front
teeth. Tho lower jaw is much extended, and the
angle of the face is very singular. Miss Julio
speaks and sings in English and Spanish, and
dances the Highland Fling, the Sohottisohc, Ac.,
Ac., and* has decidedly tho prettiest little hands,
feet and ankles, in London. Miss Julia is pleased
when tho ladies and gentlemen ask her questions,
and examine her pretty whiskers, of which she is
very proud.” * l *
Whilst in Egypt, Sir Moses Monterlloro was
entrusted by his Highness, tho Viceroy, with the
care of his only ohild, Toussan Ascher, now four
years old. Tho young prince has been sont to
Europe for tho benefit of bis health. Ho is accom
panied by hifi physician, nurse, and several at
tendants.
Breach of Promise.— I The Illnstruicd Lon
don New* says: “ Another of those repulsive ac
tions, founded on tho pecuniary value of woman,
has boon tried within the lost few days. This,
however, was not ono of tho most oflensivo class,
wherein, as has been cleverly said, ‘ when a wo
man censes to be good sho becomes goods,’ but a
breach of promise case. At ono picnic, among tho
Olent hills, a Jady, meets a lover, thoy become on
gaged, and sho borrows his monoy in tbo most
alTeoUonatd and confiding way At another picnic,
in Habborley Valley, she moots another lover, and
prefers hun to tho first. The first is incensed,
calls on hor, uses bad language, and tears from her
neck a watch and chain, aa scourlty for his debt
making her .hands bleed in tho struggle. She ro-
Jiays him his money, and marries Tier second ad
mirer. Tbo first brings his action, and has hor
letters read in court But courts look vory coldly
on such proceedings now-a-daya, and Mr. Baron
Bramwol! summed up in a way which showed his
opinion of actions of that kind, and of this ono in
particular. Tho jury found a verdict for the de
fendants, tho lady and her husband.”
Sultanas and their Guardians.—A letter
from Constantinople says:—“A gravo affair oe
ourred yesterday in tho high street of Peru. M.
Uuarraocino, brother of an English consul, hap
pened to bo standing at tho doorof a confectioner’s
shop, when a enrriage occupied by sultanas, and
escorted by several eunuchs, camo up Tbo Turk
ish ladies are such coquettes that, in spito of thoir
veils, thoy allow themselves to be seen, and even
by thoir glances excite admiration. Whether
they gavo M. Uuurraccino n glanco or not I do not
know, but certain it is that ho appronohed too
close to the carriage and looked into it with too
much cariosity to please the ounuchs, undone of
them struck him with a whip. M. (luarracoino,
in return, struck the man with his cane, and the
latter drew his sword', tho former endeavored to
wrest it from him, and both of them out their fin
gers On this the other ounuchs, sword in hand,
rushed on M. Quarrnccino, and ho was obliged to
take to flight; in running ho fell, nnd tho ounuchs
coming up, slabbed him several times in tho back.
The eunuchs then continued thoir route, but not
until after they had given their names to tho po
lice.' M. Guarrnccino was takon into a house,
where his wounds wore dressed, and It wus found
that he was not in dangor. As he is an English
subject, it is not doubted that tho English embassy,
which has never let much sorious attacks of this
kind go unavenged, will demand redress.”
An Extraordinary Batch of Convicts.—
Notice has beon given at Lloyd’s, that tho British
government required a ship immediately to carry
tour hundred male convicts from England to Froe
lnantle, Western Australia. Perhaps a more re
markable 301 of convicts never loft tho country at
ono time than will go out in this ship. Amongst
the four hundred willbe found Sir John Dean Paul,
Strahamapd Bates, tho fraudulent bankers; Rob
son, the uryatal Palace forger; Rcdpath, who com
mitted tho forgeries on the Great Northern Rail
way Company; *nd Agar, who committed tho
great gold robbery on the Southeastern Railway,
Tho notorious bank forger, Barrister Saward,a/»<z*
Jem the Penman, tho putter-up of ail the great
robberies in the metropolis for the lost twenty
years, also goes out in this ship.
. DRAMATIC AND MUSICAL.
’ The Baronesd yigier, who, as Sophie Cru
velll/ pade go great a sensation in the musical
world, gang at a concert given at Vannes the other
day.for the poor, which produced 40OOf.
Meyerbeer is daily expected in Paris, for the
purpos'd Of making arrangements for the produc
tion of-his long-looked for opera, “ L’Afrioaine.”
An English paper says that Lord Ward is
about to marry Mademoiselle Plccolomini.
5 Mdlle.'Ortolapi has been re-engaged at her
Jdajosty’fl Shoatre (or three /rare,
THEfHESS-.P|p^
, It is repprted'at Brussels tfaafc Queen Victo
ria, after visiting'the Emperor and Empress of the
French early in September, will prooeed to Brus
sels, where hor Majesty will remain For a tow days,
on a visit to King Leopold.
Tiie Saiiawak Chinese.— lt appears that
tho Dutch have given protection to the Ohineso
who attempted tho massacre of tho Europeans at
Sarawak. A Java paper says: “On the 28th
of Maroh, 1,200 Chinoso. men, women, find chil
dren, arrived atSambus, nnvingfled from Sarawak.
Permission was given them to reside at Siminis
and Pnmangkat ” ,
Delhi— The Phantom Kino. —ln ppge 272
of “ ludian MtagovoriiMeut,” tho groatNEpier re
eommondod that the phantom king should bo re
moved from Dolhi to Futtynoor, “ns Within its
palace ho forms a mcra rallying point, round
whieh gather tho dreams of discontented princes
feeding upon prophecioa,” and he flniphod his
memorandum with these remarkable wo<ds:—“l
can have no other motive to influence me than
that which has all along guided me—tho 1 interest
of tho East India Company, and early preparation
for that storm which may some day burst, upon Its
possessions.” ’
Shaicsfeahe’s House. —lt is proposed that
somo portions of tho houso whero Shakspdare was
born, which nro palpably of recent date,|shall be
removed ; that certain restorations shall ie made,
but in materials that will clearly distinguish them
from tho fabrio ; that tho whole shall bo covered
with glass to proteot it from tlio weather; that a
house for a custodian shall be erected; and finally,
that a museum and library shall he formed
Lord Palmerston's speech on the Isthmus
of Suez question has raised a perfect storini of op
position on tho part of tho French Government
journals. They express a confident belief that
public opinion in England will compel tho Pre
mier to abandon the position ho has assumed.
i The Turkish Government lias resolved to
send several engineers toWiddin to complete the
construction of tho external works. In filter to
provent tho Danube from constantly undermining
tho principal rampart, massive constructions will
bo built to proteot the works. The guns for arm
ing tho batteries hnvo alroady arrived at Widdin,
and there are among them several mortars of a
very largo calibre.
The Russian papers announce the discovery
of extensive fields of gold and strata of jfon in
various parts of tho empire. The last reported are
in the Crimea. Iron oro has been discovered near
Kertch, whioh yields 35 per cont.
Railways are extending rapidly in Switzer
land. Tho following sections have boon.opened
within the last three months: On April 15, that
from 'Winterthur to Schanhausen, twentv-nine
kilom, (eighteen and a half miles) in lengthen the
course of tho same month, that from tho Sissach to
Laufelfingon, nine kilom. (flvo and a tlalftj&les;}
on May 16, that Herzoeeiumchsoo to Biel, thirty
seven kilom. (twenty-three and a half miles;) on
Juno 10. from Villeneuvo to Bex, seventeen kilom.
(ton and a half miles;) und on Juno 15, the section
from Ilorzogeulmohsee to the plain of Wyller, near
Berne, thirty kilom. (twenty-five miles.)
A convention has been signed betvfcdb-fo'o
Emnoror of tho French and the King of Holland,
authorizing tho Eastern of Franco Railway Com
pany to continue the Metz and ThiouvUlo lino to
tho Grand Duchy of Luxembourg, to meet a branch
of tho Luxembourg Railway.
The Progress of the Great Eastern.—
Thi results of tho labor of wore than l,oQtjaQn,
continuously employed upon tho Great Eastern,'
aro showing themselves more evidently every day.
Tho arrangements lor launohingtho Great Eastern
are also rapidly progressing, and it Is now oxpoet
cd that this important ovent will take place dur
ing the spring tides of October.
Ia pursuance of a remonstrance on the part
of tho Duke of Cambridge, relativo to tho high
play at tho Army and Navy Club, tho committee
propose to redueo the stakes and points of eearto,
lansquenet, Ac., to a maxmum of ss.
The authorities at tho Horse Guards have
determined that no women or childron aro to ac
company the regimonts.now under orders to leave
this country for India. , .
The estimated outlay required to complete
the several lines of Indian Railways is £30.231.-
000. ami the total amount of capital issuod with
tho sanction of tho company iH £20.314.000. Tho
amount rocoived on account of the several rail
ways 3s £14.147.030, and tho amount paid £U.-
162,742.
The Emperor of the French has imported
several oargocs of negroes into Cayenne.
Four Persians havo been initiated as Free
masons in tho Bonnparto Lodge, at Paris.
The Pope has sanctioned tho sale of the
ocolosiasllcal properties in Spain made previous to
tho recent arrangement.
The Piedmontese Gazette publishes a law au
thorising tho Government to make the necessary
repairs and alterations on tho Castello Vnlontlno,
near Turin, in order to adapt it to tho periodical
exhibition of tho manufactured produce of the
kingdom. The next exhibition of this kind is to bo
opened on the 10th of May, and to last until tho
20th of June.
The Prince of Wales is now established at
Konigswinter, in tho Hotel do l’Europe which has
beon taken for him and his suite until tho ond of
August. lie passes under tho titlo of Baron Ren
frew; and tourists on tho Rhino, who now pay
more attention than ever to Drachonfels, in tho
neighborhood of which tho Prince is staying, havo
all something to relate of his assiduity in climbing
rocks, Ac.
r The Prince of Syracuse, brother to the
King of Naples, has boon on a visit to Paris in
cognito. Ho had an interview with Count Wa
lewski, however.
A Paris letter says j “Tho Emperor amuses
himself much at Plombicres. Amongst the ladies
whom ho most distinguishes with his notice are
Madame Labedoyere, tho wife of (Jenoral Lounnel,
arid a Polish lady of great beauty. His Majesty
walks much during tho day, and dances in tho
evening.
The mountain house, capon
SPRINGS, YIRGINIA, all! Ijo opened for the re
ception of visitors on MONDAY, 22d JUNE, and will
remain open until the Ist OCTOBER.
Through Ticket* can he obtained at Baltimore,‘Wash
ington, Richmond and Alexandria.
Passengers leaviug Baltimore in the early morning
train, via Alexandria iid Manassas Gan Railroad to
Strasmirg, roach tho Springs from 5 to C o’clock saw*
evening, and those from' Kaltlmoro and the West, via
Harper’s for ry and Winchester, from Bto9P. M.
aul-2w J. N. BUCK, Proprietor.
Mountain house,
Capon Springs, July 22d,15&7.
A CARD.—Tho subscriber having understood that
reports are iu circulation in Baltimore that he Intends
closing the Jlountain House for the season, takes this
method of contradicting them, and saying, while the
company is not quite so largo as usual, still it Is fair,
considering the lateness of the seasou. with daily ac*
cessions and a prospect of a much later aeasou than
usual. It will bo KEPT OPEN TIED THE FIRST OP
OCTOBER, and longer, ii necessary.
sul-2vv JOHN N. BUCK.
CALEDONIA COLD SPRINGS, ADAMS
COUNTY, I*A.—‘Those Springs Rro located at a
very high elevation in Adams county, Pennsylvania.—
They will be OPEN for the reception of visitors on the
16tli of JUNE, under tho »uj»oriiitendenco of WILLIAM
11. IJAMB, of Baltimore, with nu efficient corps of
attendants. Tho distanco from Baltimore, by a smooth
turnpike, is about 05 miles. Visitors leaving Baltimore
In the morning train via the Northern Control and Cum
berland Valley Railroad, will arrive at tho Springs tho
same evening for tea. by omnibuses from Chamber
burg. Tho distanco from CJiambersburg Is 16 wiles
over a smooth turnpike road
oul-lOfc*
CEA BATUING, NATIONAL HALL,
k 3 CAPK MAY, CAPE ISLAND—This large and
splendid Hotel is now OPEN for visitors. It Is fitted up
*lth gaß, and in distinguished for comfort, locality and
superior accommodations, with ample room for 200
porsons.
NATIONAL HALL occupies a »quaro of high ground
near tho Surf, enjoying the pure sea breeze, and unob
structed view of tho Ocean.
Terms moderate.
nul-Gt#
CJEA BATHING—PHILADELPHIA
HOUSE, CAPE MAY.—This uell-kuown and fa
vorite House is now open for tho reception of Boarders.
It is Jltuated in tlio middle of tho Island, and close to
the Sea, and its accommodations equal to any of tho
largo Hotels, combined with tho comforts of homo; and
no pains will be spared by tho Proprietors in giving sat
isfaction to all who may pay them n visit.
JAMES KELLY, (Successor to William
Curtin) Regnlia, Books, Jewels, Emblems, Masonic
and Encampment Charts, Ac. Odd Follows’ llall.
NORTH SIXTH STREET, below Race, PIRU&JbMs.
Orders from uny part of tho country, addressed to
James Kelly, promptly uttondod to. an 1-1"
SILVER WAKE.—WM. WILSON & SON,
K 3 Manufacturers of Silver Ware, 8. W. corner of
FIFTH and CHERRY STREETS. Established in 1812,
Silver Ware of every description on hand or made to
order to match any pattern desired. Importers of Fine
English Plated Ware. au 1-lw
CIIAKLES TETE, COMMISSION MSR
OIIANT and Importer of HAVANA BBGAttS.'
(New) 138 Walnut street, second story. aul-ly
JOHN N. REEVES, CARPENTER AND
BUILDER, PASSYUNK HOAD, opposite County
Prison.
Orders for Jobbing promptly attended to. aul-lra
Give hufty’s American manu
factured STEEL PEN a trial. 407 CHEST
NUT Btreot, above Fourth. $1 per gross. aul-lm
JOSEPH BLACKj Banner, Sign, Dccora
tivo and General ORNAMENTAL PAINTER, N.
E. corner FOURTH and WALNUT Streets, entrance on
Fourth street.
AIso—PORTRAITS, the size of life, painted from
Daguerreotypes. aul-dlui
Harness, saddles and trunks,
LACEY A PHILLIPS. Nos. 14 and lft South
SEVENTH street, above CHESTNUT, ha>e manufac
tured, expressly for tho FALL TRADE, a larger stock
of superior Harness. Saddle* and Trunks, than any
other house in their line, and having reduced tho uiodo
of manufacturing to such a perfect system, they aro be
yond all competition for quality, stylo and price.
I*. B.—Country Harness maker* cau bo supplied
cheaper thnu they can manufacture. aul-lm
rniIOMAS E. BAXTER.-HARDWARE,
X CUTLERY AND TOOLS, No WO MARKET ST J
above Ninth, south side, Philadelphia. au 1-Gm
JACKSON, JOB PRINTER, MERCHANT
STREET.
CHECKS, NOTES, DRAFTS, ,
HILL HEADS. CIRCULARS,
And JOB PRINTING generally, at shortest notice
and fair price*. aul-lm
WC. BRIDGES, GENI
• No. 6 LODGE STREET, Pi
AU business confidentially, horn
attended to.
REFERS TO
Messrs. P R. Howard Sc Co ,
Messrs. Harris St Co.,
C. Henry Fisher, Esq.,
8. 11. U&rcroft, Esq.,
Charles S. lioker, Esq.,
Wm. M, Swain. Esq.,
Wm. Badger, Esq.,
tml-7trp*
THE ADAMS EXPRESS CO., OFFICE,
320 CHESTNUT STREET, forward! PARCELS
PACKAGES, MERCHANDIZE, BANK NOTES am!
SPECIE, either by Its own LINES, or tn connection
with other EXPRESS COMPANIES, to all the principal
TOWNS and CITIES of the United States,
E. S. BANDFORD,
General Snperinteudcnt.
Notice— the business op twells
Sc CO., and J. W, GABKILL Sc 00., wiil hereafter
bo conducted under the style of TWELLS, GASKILL &
GALVIN, ai No. A and 0 8. Whams, and No. $23 N.
WbWTes, tu4-lia
Summer llcsortc
THE rnOPRIETOKS.
AARON GARRETSON,
Proprietor,
H. D. STUARD, > n „ . .
S. It. SI’MNGUB, j Proprietor*.
iUiscciinncouo.
ERAL AGENT,
'IIILADSLinU.
lostly, a u d promptly
Philadelphia.
r,.,r FJJD)Ai!« AUGUST 7, : . 1857. ■
ittarl)inirg oni JJron,
Richard norris & son, locomo
tive
STEAM ENGINE BUILDERS,
SEVENTEENTH BTBEET, HAMILTON, VAIRYJBW ANl>
SrJUNO GARDEN STREETS,
PHILADELPHIA.
Engaged exclusively in the mannfacture of
LOCOMOTIVE STEAM ENGINES
Manufacture to order Locomotives of any arrange
mont; weight or capacity, for the use of Wood or Coke ,
or Bituminous Coal in ifj crude state, or
ANTHRACITE COAL,
WITHOUT S SOTTING SMOKE, QAS OR FIRE.
In design, material and workmanship, the Locomo
tives produced at these Works are equal to, and not ex
celled by any. The materials used in construction aro
mado on the spot, and insure the best quality and most
reliable stock. The largo extent of Shops, and Com
plete Equipment of Machinery and Tools, euable
them to execute the
BEST OF WORK WITH GREAT DESPATCH,
OP ANY ARRANGEMENT REQUIRED.
CHILLED CAR WHEELS, HAMMERED AXLES,
With Forcings of any nice or form,
IRON AND BRASS CASTINGS,
And MACHINE WORK generally.
BICnARD NORRIS. HENRY LATIMER NORRIS
aul-ly ‘
PEN N STEAM ENGINE AND BOIL
ER WORKS.
REANEY, NEAFIE & CO.,
PRACTICAL AND THEORETICAL ENGINEERS,
MACHINISTS, BOILER-MAKERS, BLACK
SMITHS AND FOUNDERS.
Having for many years beon in successful operation,
and been exclusively engaged In building and repairing
Marine And River Engines, high and low pressure, Irou
Boats, Water Tauks. Propellers, &c., Ac., respectfully
offer their services th the public, as being fully prepared
to contract for Engines of all sizes, Marine, River, and
Stationary. Having seta of patterns of different sixes,
are prepared to execute orders with quick despatch.
Every description of Pattern-making made at the
shortest notice. High and Low Pressure, Flue, Tubu
lar uud Cylinder Boilers, of the best Pennsylvania char
coal iron. Forgings of all sizes and klndft; Iron and
Brass Castings of all descriptions; Roll Turning, Screw
Cutting, and all other work connected with the above
business.
Drawings and specifications for all work done at their
establishment free of charge, and work guaranteed.
The subscribers have ample wharf dock room for re
pairs of boats, where they can lay in perfect safety, and
aro provided with shears, blocks, falls, Ac., Ac., for
raising heavy or light weights.
THOMAS RHANKY,
JACOB G. NEAFIE,
JOHN P. LEVY,
aul-y BEACH and PALMER Btreets, Kensington.
Handy & morris—
MANUFACTURERS OF
CUMBERLAND WROUGHT IRON TUBES
: FOR GAS, STEAM OR WATER.
1 ALSO,
GENERAL IRON COMMISSION MERCHT'S.
Warehouse 8. U. corner FRONT and WALNUT.
aul-3tn %
iFire proof Safes.
Evans & Batson's Philadel
phia manufactured salamander safes,
No. 20 South FOURTn Street, Philadelphia.—TßUTH
IS MIGHTY, AND MUST PREVAIL!
Report of the Committed appointed to Superintend the
Burning of the Iron Safes at Reading, February
27th, 2857 : Rkading, March 4th.
The undersigned, members of the committee, do re
•ipeotfully report, that we saw the two Safes originally
agrned upon by Parrels Sc Herring and Evans A Watson,
placed side by side in a furnace, vis: the Safe in uso by
the Paymaster of the Philadelphia and Reading Rail
road Company, In his office at Reading, manufactured
by Farrols & Herring, and the Safe in use byH. A.
Lants, in his storo, manufactured by Evans A Watson,
und put in books and papers precisely alike.
The fire was started at 8& o’clock, A. SI., and kept
up until four cords of green hickory wood, two cords of
dry oak and half chestnut-top wood were entirely con
sumed. tlio whole under tho superintendence of the
subscribers, members of tho committee. The Safes
were then cooled off with water, after which they were
opened, and the books and papers taken out by the
committee ond sent to H. A. Lantz’s store, for public
examination, after they were first examined and marked
by the committee. The books and papers taken from
the Safe manufactured by Evans Sc Watson were but
slightly affected by the intense heat, while those taken
from the Safe manufactured by Parrels Sc Herring were,
in our judgment, damaged fully fifteen per cent, more
than those taken from Evans Sc Watson’s Safe.
Wo believe the above to have been & fair and impar
tial trial of the respective qualities of both Safes.
JACOB H. DYSHER,
DANIEL S. HUNTER.
Having been absent during the burning, we fully
coincide with the above statement of the condition of
the papers and books taken out of the respective fitfes.
G. A. NICOLLS,
H. H. MUHLENBERG,
JAMES MILHOLLAND.
PLEASE READ THE RESULT OF THE READING
TRIAL OF SAFES.
forty-nro SALAMANDER SAFES SOLD IN
READING SINCE THE TRIAL IN FEBRU-
ARY LAST, UP TO JULYI.
G. A. Nlcolls, 1 Leopold Hirsh, 1
R. R. Company, 2 11. A. Lantz, , 1
Reading R. H. Office, 1 Henry U. Mlssimer, ’ 2
Wm. Douahowor. 1 Geo. K. Levan, 3
W. C. Sc P. M. Ermen- Bullitt Co., 1
trout. 1 Frymire A Bro., 1
Ezra Miller, 1 Peter Spang. 1
V. Schollenberger, 1 John Schwartz, 1
Wm. King, 1 Kirk A Keister, 1
Jacob tichmucker, 1 W. llho&ds A Son, 1
J. B. AA. B. Wanner, 1 Dr. Wm. Moore, 1
James Jameson, 1 Levi J. Smith, 1
J. M. A Q. W. Hantvch, 1 High A Craig, 1
BlHmeyer.FoUmfcr ACo, 1 Win. Krlck, 1
Solomon Rhoads, 1 Kauffman A Bauui, 1
W. 11. Yerger, 1 Wm. McFarllo, 1
Samuel Fasig, I Isaac Ruth, 1
A. W. PotteTger, 1 Joseph Huyett, I
Geo. J. Eckert, 1 John A. Sheets, 1
Collins; Leo A Co., 1
SOLD SINCE THE TRIAL, IN PHILADELPHIA
AND OTHER PLAOES, 275!
Making in all 313 Safes, weighing over 400,000 lbs. GO
IT,PHILADELPHIAJ
EVANS A WATSON, No. 20 South Fourth Street,
Philadelphia, Pa., have now on hand a largo assort
went of the above Safes, together with Bank Vault
Doors, Bank Locks, Irou Shutters and Iron Doors for
making Fire-proof Buildings, on as good terms as any
other establlhhiuont iu the United States. PLEASE
GIVE US A CALL. aul-St
iltebicincs
Nineteenth centuryi—the
GREAT REMEDY OF THE NINETEENTH
CKNTUItY 18 TUK IMPKUIaL DEPUUATtVB
This is bow the great standard remedy for diseases of
the liloo.l, Stomach and Liver.
1{ you have * Cancerous or Scrofulous affection, at
once use the Imperial Depurative.
Tetter,—- Are you troubled with this obstinate and un
pleasant disease ? Use the Imperial Deptirativt, Try
but one bottle.
Haro you White Swelling, Hip Disease, or Glandular
Swellings? The Imperial Hriiuram-e will effect acme.
Try it.
For Pimples, Blotches and Eruptions of the Bkln gene
rally, you lia\ o a prompt and certain remedy in the Im
perial Depurative. One bottle will satisfy you of its
efficacy.
Use the Imperial Depuratire, if you would have a
clear, healthful, and beautiful complexion.
Use the Imperial Depurative for a diseased state of
the Liver or iitomaeh.
For females of a weak and debilitated habit and shat
tered nerves, the Imperial Depurative is just what is
required to rodnvigomto the frame and restore the ner
vous system to u healthy state.
We know the full value of this great remedy, as we
are using it everyday in an extensive practice, aud see
its great curative powers manifested In numerous cases.
We know It has no equal iu this country.
The careful preparation, great purity and strength of
the Imperial Depurative renders large doses or long
continued use of ft unnecessary. It acts directly upou
the diseased part, and it is not necessary to wait months
to discover the benefits to be gained.
If you wish to purify and erincA the Bloody and pre
vent disease, as well ns cure it at this Beason of the
year, use one or two bottles of the Imperial Depurative ,
uud we will guarantee its beneficial effects.
Prepared by Dr. LOUNBUERIIY A. CO., and for sale
at the Principal Office, No. GO North Fifth street, three
doors below Arch, where patients may consult Dr. L.
dAily, free of charge.
The Imperial Depurative is the great remedy of the
nineteenth century. aul-tf
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—The
great Liniment, cures Pains and Sprains.
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—Tho
groat Liniment, cures Wounds and Bruises.
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—The
great Liniment, cures Rheumatism.
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—The
great Liniment, cures Neuralgia.
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—Tho
great Liniment, cures Frosted Limbs.
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—The
great Liniment, cures Swellings.
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—The
great Liniment, cures Chapped Hands.
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—The
great Linimeut, cures Tooth Ache.
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—Tho
great Linlmont, cures Sore Throat.
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—The
great Liniment, cures Galls and Bruises.
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION-Tho
great Liniment, cures Burns and Scalds.
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—Tho
great Liniment, cures Lumbago.
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—Tho
great Liniment, cures Croup.
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—Tho
great Liniment, cures Cramps.
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—The
great Liniment, cures Lumps ami Tumors
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—Tho
great Liniment, is the best Liniment known for
the llohsr, and cures him of all outer affections that
requires an application of Strong Liniment,
BENNETT’S EMBROCATION—Tho
great'Liniment, is for salo by all Druggists, and
rcspectablo storekeeper# throughout the United StAtes
ami Canada, and the advice to all is not to suffer, but to
USK BENNETT’S EMBROCATION, THE GREAT
LINIMENT. aul-Gt*
®oluuco mtb Cigmrs.
Havana cigak
imyit, auch as
Figaro, Partagas,
Cabana 3, Sultana,
Olorla, Jupiter,
Coloso, Convcrciantes,
Torroy Lopez, Union Americana,
Orojon, Flora Cubans, Ac., Ac,,
Ac ,in ,y, 1-5 and 1-10 >oxos, of ail sizes and quali
ties, In store and constantly recoMng, and for Bate low,
by CHAIILKS TETH,
(uew) 138 WALNUT StreoV,
aul-ly below Second, secondly/
F' pau s
HKtMItS—A choice invoice of theso celebrated
brands on board brig “ New Fra,” daily expected from
Havana, and for sale low, by CHARLES TKTE,
(N%jy) 135 Walnut street, below Becc.nd,
ftU l Beeond ijtory.
>—A handsome assort
Boolb anb
No. 442, SOUTHEAST CORNER OP
MARKET and FIFTH Street'.
(tentloiueii'a Rest Patent Leather Gaiter Boots.
“ Calf do. do
“ Patent Leather Oxford Ties.
“ Calf do, do.
“ Patent Leather and Calf narrow
strap Shoes
Boys' and Youths’ Pateot Leather and Calf Skin
Gaiter Boots and Shoes
aul.tf For salo by
Fall stock op boots and shoes,
—JOSEPH H. THOMPSON & 00., No. 314 MAR.
KET Street, and Nos. 3 and 6 FRANKLIN PLACE,
have now in store ft Urge and weltassorted stock of
BOOTS and SHOES, of City and Eastern manufacture,
which they offer for sale on the best term* for Cash, or
on the usual credit.
Buyers are Invited to caU and examine their atock,
aul.dtf
Spirits bbu spirits
Turpentine, to arrive, for sale by
MARTIN A MACALISTBa,
aul 119 North Water Street.
CHARLES MAGARGE & 00.,
Wholesale Dealers in PAPER, BAGS, Ac., Ne.
3«B(rathgUXUgtwt,m»iJe]jjW#, wl-fm
Jnsnrancc (Eompcmus.
"PHILADELPHIA FIRE AND LIFE IN
, _ SURANCE COMPANY, incorporated bv tho State
in 1848, are now established in their
NEW OFiICE, No. 433 CHESTNUT Street, where they
are prenan-d to make ALL KINDS OF INSURANCE,
tfom LOSS BY FIRE, on property of every deacriptlon,
including PUBLIC BUILDINGS,
* stok EB, WAREHOUSES, FACTORIES
and MANUFACTORY, WORKSHOPS, VESSELS, Ac.
.I Jnn-! 1 M, Ci ! AN H 1 * n kinii »i stocks ok
8Tni?»?»v t " d ‘“ of coI7NTIIY STORES, (foods on
SikJAm OT V USSR’ STOCKS fOOtS of AK
ELIIY^ t «vi?,'i,JS l, ? UAK t ICS * .FURNITURE, JEW
rates 7 7 ’ &c., 4cc ,at moderate
T.fil vf lni ' om ' lor n, 'j' period of timo.
.„;rant O e n J I “'^ refo, '„ tl ’ tbelr P Mt as an ample
I nwvq t 7 ‘ lO I,ttOM!,T SETTLEMENT o! all their
ih»„, “ aro tl,is '"no no unsettled claims
against them, ROBERT V. KINO, Pres't
_ M. W. BALDWIN, Vico Pres’t.
Fhancis BLACKnnass, Sec’y aut-3m
mi(E PENNSYLVANIA COMPANY FOR
OTITIV? RANOBB 0N UVla ANL “ RRANTINU an-
Office No 304, Walout street, above Thtrd Open
$5OOOOO A M ’ f I ' , ' locli ’ P ' «■ Capital
This Company Insure Lives, grant Annuities, sell
Endowmcnta, purchase Interests, and m*ko contracts
in general, that depend upon the contingencies of life.
They act as Executors, Administrators,and Assi'Ernees'
also, as Trustees for Minors and Heirs. * ’
They receive MONEY on deposit, and allow interest
from date of deposit until called for. All sums being
repaid on DEMAND.
CHARLES DUTIUI, President.
WILLIAM B HILL, Actuary.
DIRECTORS.
William Kirkham,
Henry J. Williams,
John K. Mitchell, M. D.,
J. Pemberton Hutchinson,
Edwin M. Lewis,
F. Ilopkinson,
Life insurance and trust com
pany .-The PENN MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE
COMPANY, Southeast Corner of THIRD and DOCK
Streota. Capital, $612,725 03.
INSURES LIVES lor short terms, or for the whole
term of life—grants annuities and endowments—pur
chases life on interests in Real Estate, and makes all
contracts depending on the contingencies of Life.
They act aa Executors, Administrators, Assignees,
Trustees and Guardians.
MONEY RECEIVED ON DEPOSIT In any amount—
Five Per Cent. Interest allowed from date of deposit,
payable back on demnnd without notice.
ASSETS OF THE COMPANY, January Ist, 1857
Loans of the State of Pennsylvania, Phila
delphia City, Penn’a Hallroad, Camden
and Ainhoy Itallroad, and other Loans $179,835 38
Bonds, Mortgages and Ilea! Estate 317,137 39
Stocks in Banks, Insurance, Gas and Rail
road Companies
Premium Notes and Loans on Collaterals....
Cash in Bank, due from Agents, Inter
eat, &c 38,780 47
Guarantee Capital, Subscription Notes 100,000 00
$711,225 03
DANIEL L. MILLER, President.
SAMUEL E. STOKES, Vice Pres’t.
Joitß W. llornor, Secretary. aul-ly
Atlantic mutual insurance
COMPANY, OF PHILADELPHIA. Office, at
EAST FIIONT OP TIIE FARMERS’ AND MECHANICS’
DANK BUILDING, opposite* the Ctißtom House.
MARINE INSURANCE on Vessels. Cargo and
Fright to nit parts of the* World
INLAND INSURANCE on Goods, by Rivers, Canals,
Railroads, Ac.
FIRE INSURANCE on Stores, Dwellings and Mer
chandise generally.
ASSETS OF THE COMPANY, November 1,1856.
Bonds, Mortgages, Philadelphia City, and)*.™ , 1T iw
other loans C^ 8 * 417 00
Stocks In Banks, Railroads and Canals . 114,835 15
Bills Receivable 12,000 00
Fremiums on Policies, recently issued, aud) , 0 A ,, „*
other Debts duo tho Company \ 1 “> 974 M
Cash on hand 4,761 48
John L. Linton,
Geo. W. Pomeroy,
James C. Finn,
Theo. C. Lewis,
Charles Tete,
Peter Maison,
JOHN L
Wm. B. Parker, Secretary.
American life insurance and
TRUST COMPANY.—lncorporated by the Legis
lature of Pennsylvania. Capital $500,000. Charter
perpetual. Office in tho Company’s Buildings, 8. E.
Corner of WALNUT and FOURTH Streets, Philadel
phia.
This Company Insures lives during the natural life,
or for short terms, at the usual mutual rates of other
Bound companies.
Stock rates about Twenty per cent, lower than above.
Premiums may be paid quarterly, half yearly or
yearly.
FIVE PER CENT. SAVINGS FUND.
Money received on deposit daily, by this old-estab
lished Institution, returnable in Gold, on demaud, with
five per ceut. interest added.
Office hours from 0 A. M. till 6 P. M., and on Mon
days till B P. 3f. ALEXANDER WJIILtDIN,
John 0. Simb, Sec’y. [aul-IOtJ President.
TVI’ANUFACTURERS* INSURANCE
ITJL COMPANY.—Charter Perpetual. Granted by
the State of Pennsylvania. Capital, $500,000. Fire,
Marine, and Inland Transportation.
Aaron 8. Lippincott, Charles Wise,
Win. A. Rhodes, Alfred Weeks,
Charles J. Field, James P. Smyth,
Wm. B. Thom&s, J. Rinaldo Sank,
Wm. Neal, John P. Simons,
AARON S. LIPPINCOTT, President.
WM. A. RHODES, Vice President.
ALFRED WEEKS. Secretary.
J. W. MAKTIEN, Surveyor.
This Company was organized with a cash capital, and
tho Directors havo determined to adapt the business to
its available resources—to observe prudence in conduct
ing its affairs, with a prompt adjustment of losses.
Office No. 10 Merchants’ Exchange, Philadelphia,
aul-dly
rpHE MERCANTILE MUTUAL INSU-
X RANGE COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA.—-Office
No. 222 WALNUT Street, opposite the Exchange. MA
RINE RISKS on Vessels, Cargoes, and Freights,. IN*
LAND TRANSPORTATION RISKS, per TtAilroads,
Canals, floats, and other carriages.
ALL THE PROFITS divided annually among the As
sured, and ample security in coses of loss,
DIKECTOHH
Edward Harris Miles,
John M. Odeuheimer,
Mftlilon WiUiauißon,
Samuel J. Sharpless,
Isaac Jeanes,
Henry Preaut,
Edward G. James,
William L. Springs,
FrauVliu C. Jones,
Daniel Haddock, Jr.,
William Taylor,
James Murphy,
Win. F. Smith,
A. J. Antelo,
Samuel L. C
EDWAItD UAI
AU-’UKD FASi
John 0. Keefes, Bccretan
Gikard fire AND MARINE INSUR
ANCE COMPANY, PHILADELPHIA—Office, No.
02 WALNUT street, west of THTKD
“ FIRE RISKS ONLY TAKEN.”
IHKKOTOBS.
Wm. M. Swain,
John Anspach, Jr ,
11. N. burroughs,
J. B. Ilugbes,
F. I>. Sherman,
Win, P. Hacker,
J. P. Steiner,
H. A. Shackelford,
lion. JOE [
lion. G. W. WOODWARD,
J so. 8.
Jambs n. Alvord, Assi'b!
CHARTER OAK FIRE AND MARINE
INSURANCE COMPANY o? HARTFORD. CONN.
C&fh Capital $300,000. Leases in Philadelphia and
vicinity adjusted at the Philadelphia Ojfice.
By leave we refer to
D. 8. lirown &. Co., Phiia. I Hon. Joel Jones, Phila.
Chaffees, Stout & Co., “ l lion. Rufua Choate, Boston
Hacker, Lea A Co., ‘ f I Hon. T.S. Williams, Hart'd
Wo have facilities for placing any amount of Insu*
ranee In the most reliable Companies.
PHILADELPHIA GENERAL INSURANCE
AGENCY, No 413 (old No. 145) CHESTNUT ST.
THOMPSON & ROOD,
aul-Om Agents.
COMMONWEALTH FIRE INSURANCE
COMPANY, OF THE STATE OF PENNSYLVA
NIA.—Office, N. W. Corner FOURTH and WALNUT
Streets, Philadelphia.—Subscribed Capital, $500,000.
Paid-Up Capital, $200,000.
DAVID JAYNE, M. D., President.
THOMAS S. STEWART, Vice l'rea’t.
Samuel 8. Moon, Secretary. aul-ly
SAVING FUND—FIVE PER CENT. IN
TEREST—NATIONAL SAFETY TRUST COM
PANY.—WALNUT STREET, SOUTH-WEST CORNER
OF THIRD,PHILADELPHIA.
Incorporated by the State op Pennsylvania.
Money is received in any sum, largo or small, and in
terest paid from the day of deposit to the day of with
drawal.
The offico is open every day from 9 o’clock in the
morning till 7 o’clock in the evening, and on Monday
and Thursday ovouiugs till 9 o’clock
All ouins, large or small, are paid back in gold on de
maud, without notice, to anv amount.
IION. HENRY L. BENNER, President.
ROBERT SELFRIDUE, Vice rreaideut.
Wm. J. Reed, Secretary.
directors:
Hon. Hcury L. Benner, C. Laudreth Munns,
En.ardL. Carter, F. Carroll Brewster,
Robert Selfridgo, Joseph B. Barry.
Sami. K. Ashton, Henry L. Churchman,
James B. Smith, Fraucia Lee.
This Company confines its business entirely to the
receiving of money on interest. The investments,
amounting to over
ONE MILLION AND A HALF OF DOLLARS,
aro made in conformity with the provision# of the
Charter, in REAL ESTATE MORTGAGES, GROUND
RENTS, and such first class securities a# will always in
jure perfect security to the depositor*, and which can
not fail to gho permanency and stability to this Insti
tution. aul-ly
QnX PENNY SAVINGS FUND, Comer of
FIFTH and WALNUT Streets Open daily, from
9 to 3, and on Tuesday and Friday Evenings, until 8
o’clock. Largo or small sums received, mid paid with
out notioe. with FIVE PER CENT. INTEREST, by
check or otherwise. JOHN THOMSON, l’res’t.
VICB PRESIDENTS.
THOS. T, TASKEK, EDWIN M. LEWIS.
SECRETARY AND TREASURER,
>VM. T. ELBERT.
TRUSTEES,
Win. C. Ludwig,
1). C. Levy,
Charles 11. Lux,
A Mlnkey,
Israel W Morns, Jr.,
Wra. Neal,
Thos. Neilsou,
Thomas ». Reed, M. D
J.lines UusseU,
Thos. I*. Sjiarhawk,
Oscar Thompson,
l’eter Williamson,
I°aiic S. Waterman,
Charles T Yerkeß.
John U Austin,
John K Addlcks,
S»l«rnou Alter,
M. W. Baldwin,
William Clark,
Ephraim Clark, Jr.,
Charles S. CnridturH,
.Hubert Clark,
A. J. Drcxel,
Charles Dutilh,
Wm. B. Foster,
Benjamin Gerhard,
John Jordan, Jr.,
Lewis Lewis, Jr.,
aul-3m
NO. 8a (241) DOCK STREET. FIVE
PKIt CENT. STATE SAVINGS FUND
NO. 83 (211) DOCK STREET. FIVE
PER CENT. STATE SAVINGS FUND
NO. 83 (241) DOCK STREET.
l'Klt CENT. STATE SAVINGS VEND
No. 88 (241) DOCK STREET.— FIVE
PERCENT STATE SAVINGS FUND. auMy
Five per cent, saving fund,
N. E. comer or CHESNUT and TENTH.
AUTHORIZED CAPITAL
Chartered by the State of Pennsylvania, 18oa.
Depoalts received dally from 0 to I, and paid on de
maud, with interest. .
Deposits received from merchants and others, payable
by checks on sight,
latere,t .Honed on
JOS TV. SOUDKR, Vice President
j. l. HUTCHINSON, Secretary. ftU _ m _
GEO. W. TAYLOR.
Charles p. caldwell—wholesale
and Retail WHIP and CANE Manufacturer, No. 4
North FOURTH Street.
Flooring boards—23,6Bo feet Caro
llna flooring boarda, afloat. Tor aale by
MARTIN * MAOALISTER
an, 119 North Water Street.
Joseph Swift,
Thomas Biddle,
William 11. Ilsrt,
Win. S Vaux,
Win. llannar,
J. B. Wucberer.
81,729 98
193,093 01
$173,887 98
DIRECTORS.
H. B. Atkins,
Joseph 0. Grubb,
Maurice A Warts,
Thomas A. Robinson,
Benjamin Orne,
Wiu. C. Milligan.
LISTOX, President.
aul-6t
VIRVCTOHS,
Thorons T. Butcher,
Algernon E. Ashburaer,
Alfred Fasiltt,
Thomas 3. Foster,
Gustavua English,
James 11. Stroup,
Alfred Slade,
A G.CatteU,
Charles 15. Q&ratalrs,
Samuel Robinson,
John 0. Kefler,
John I*. Steiner,
Henry Orambo,
I Wm.JCaner,
breiitzhorjf
.RKlS MILES, President
iSITT, Tic© President,
ry. aul-ly - t
Jer. Walker,
Jno. McClure,
Tho, Craveu,
A. S. Oillett,
Furman Sheppard,
Sami. Jones, M. I) ,
Joseph Klajip, M. D.
U JONES, President.
, Vice Presideut.
yioiiVLMS, Secretary,
jtant Secretary. aul*3m
Booings
- FIVE
■RESOLUTION, PROPOSING. AMEND-
M\ MENTB TO THE OONBTITUION OP THE COM
monwealth.
Resolved by the Senate and House of Representa
tives of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania im Gen
eral Assembly met: That the following amendments are
proposed to the Constitution of the Commonwaltb. In
accordance with the provisions of the tenth article
thereof.
first amendment,
There shall be an additional article to said Constitu
tion to be designated as article eleven, as follows
article XI.
OF PUBLIC DEBTS.
Section 1. The State may contract debts, to supply
casual deficit or failures In revenues, or to meet expen
ses not otherwise provided for, but the aggregate
amount of such debts direct and contingent, whether
contracted by virtue of one or more acts of the general
assembly, or at different periods of time.shall never ex
ceed seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars, and the
mouey arising from the creation of snch debts, shall be
applied to the purpose for which ItWM obtained, or to
repay the debts so contracted, and to no other purpose
whatever.
Section 2. to addition to the above limited power,
the State may contract debts to repel invasion, suppress
insurrection, defend the State In war, or to redeem the
present outstanding indebtedness of the State; but the
money arising from the contracting of such debts, shall
bo applied to the purpose for which it was robed, or to
repay such debts, and to no other purpose whatever.
Sections. Except the debts above specified, in sec
tions one and two of this article, no debt whatever
shall be created by, or on behalf of the Btate
Section 4. To provide for the payment of the present
debt, and any additional debt contracted as aforesaid,
the legislature shall, at its first session, after the adop
t‘on °f this amendment, create a sinking fund, which
snail bo sufficient to pay the accruing interest on each
“”** Ri ' 4 annually to reduce the principal thereof by a
two hundred and fifty thousand dol-
! a Hl!!!!* Vv1 lnkm ? fund consist of the net anneal
incomeof t®* public works, from time to time owned by
the State, or the proceeds of the sale of the same, or
any part thereof, and of the income or proceeds of sale
of stocks owned by the state, together with other funds,
or resources, that may be designated by law. The said
sinking fund may be from time to time, by as
signing to it any part of the taxes, or other revenues of
the State, not required for the ordinary and current ex
ponses of government, and unless in case of war, inva
sion or insurrection, no part of the said sinking fund
shall be used or applied otherwise than In extinguish
ment of the public debt, until the amount of such debt
1b reduced below the sum of fire millions of dollars.
Section 5. The credit of the Commonwealth shall not
in any manner, or event, be pledged, or loaned to, any
individual, company, corporation, or association; nor
shall the Commonwealth hereafter become* joint owner,
or stockhold>r, in any company, association, or cor
poration.
Section 6. The Commonwealth shall not assume the
debt, or any part thereof, of any county, city, borongh,
or township; or of any corporation, or association; un
less such debt shall have been contracted to enable the
State to repel invasion, suppress domestic insurrection,
defend itself in time of war, or to assist the State in the
discharge of any portion of its present indebtedness.
The Legislature shall not authorize any
county, city, borough, township, nr incorporated dis
trict, by virtue of a vote of iU cluseas, or otherwise, to
become a stockholder in any company, association or
corporation J or to obtain money for. or loan its credit
to. any corporation, aisodation, institution or party.
SECOND AMENDMENT.
There shall be an additional article to said Constitu
tion, to be designated as article XII., as follows;
ARTICLE XU.
OF NEW COUNTIES.
No county shall be divided by a line cutting off over
oue-tenfh of its population, (either to form a new
county or otherwise,) without the express assent of
such county, by a vote of the electors thereof; nor
shall any new county be established, containing less
than four hundred square miles.
THIRD amendment.
From section two of the first article of the Constitu
tion strike out the words, a oftht city of Philadelphia,
and cif each county respectively:” from section five,
same article, strike out the words, “ofPhiladelphia
and of the several counties from section seven, same
article, strike out the words, “neither the city of Phi
ladelphia nor ony,” and insert in lieu thereof the
words, “and no/ 11 and strike out “section four , same
article,' 1 and in lieu thereof insert the following:
“ Section 4. In the year one thousand eighthundred
and sixty-four, and in every seventh year thereafter, re
presentatives to the number of one hundred, shall be
apportioned and distributed equally, throughout the
State, by districts, in proportion to the number of ***«-
ble inhabitants in the several parts thereof j except that
any county containing at least three thousand five
hundred taxables, may be allowed a separate represen
tation; but no more than three counties shall be joined,
and no county shall be divided, in the Formation of a
district Any city containing a sufficient number of
taxables to entitle it to at least two representatives,
shall have a separate representation assigned it, ana
shall be divided into convenient districts of contiguous
territory, of equal taxable population as near as may be.
each of which districts shall elect one representative. 5 ’
At the end of section seven, same article, insert these
words, “ the city of Philadelphia shall bt divided into
single senatorial districts, of contiguous territory as
nearly equal t'n taxable population as possible, but no
ward shall be divided in the formation thereof ."
The legislature, at its first session, after the adoption
of this amendment, shall divide the city of Philadelphia
into senatorial and representative districts, in the xnaa
; ner above provided; such districts to remain unchanged
until the apportionment in the year boa thousand eight
hundred and sixty-four.
FOURTH AMENDMENT.
There shall be ao additional section to the first article
of said Constitution, which shall be numbered and read
«s follows:
Section 26. The legislature shall have the,power to
alter, revoke, or annul, any charter of incorporation
hereafter conferred by, or under, any special, or general
law. whenever in their opinion it may be injurious
to the citizens of the Commonwealth; in such manner,
however, that no injustice shall be done to the corpora
tors. ——
In Senate, llareh 29,1857.
Resolved, That this resolution pass. On the first
amendment, yeas 24, nays 7; on the secondamecdment,
yeas 23, nays 8; on the third amendment, yeas 24, nays
4; on the fourth amerdment, yeas 23, nays 4.
[Extract from the Journal.]
GEO. W. HAMER&LY, Clerk.
In the House or Representatives, April 26,1857.
Resolved, That this resolution pass. On the first
amendment, yeas 78, nays 12; on the second amendment,
yeas 57, nays 34; on the third amendment, yeas 72, nays
22; on the fourth amendment, yeas 83, nays 7.
[Extract from the Journal.)
JACOB ZIEGLER, Clerk.
Filed in Secretary’s office, May 2,1857.
A. G CURTIN,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
gECBKTART‘B OFFICE.
IIiBBiSBCfiC, June 22,1857.
Pennsylvania a« .•
I ao certify that the above and foregoing is a true and
correct copy of the original ‘ ’Resolution proposing amend
ments to the Constitution of the Commonwealth,” with
the vote in each branch of the Legislature upon the
final passage thereof, as appears from the originals on
file in this office.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my
[LB-] hand and caused to be affixed the seal of the
Secretary’s Office, the day and year above
written. A. Q. CURTIN,
Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Is Sssat*, March 27,1857.
Thn resolution proposing amendments to the Consti
tution of the Commonwealth being under consideration,
On the question.
Will the Senate agree to the first amendment?
The jea* and nays aero taken agreeably to the pro
visions of the Constitution, And were**follow, uz:
Vsas —Messrs. Brewer, Browne. Coffey, Ely ? Brans,
Fetter, Flonmken. Frazer, Ingram, Jordan. Killing*!,
Kuox. Laubach, Lewis, Myer, Scofield, Sellers, Shu
man, Bteele, Straub, Welsh, Wilkins, Wright and Tag
gart, Speaker— 24.
Nats—Messrs. Crabb. Creaawell, Finney, Gregg,
Harris, Penrose and Souther—7.
So the question was determined in the affirmative.
On the question,
Will the Senate agree to the second amendment?
The yeas and nays were taken agreeably to the pro
visions of the Constitution, and were as follow, viz:
Yeah—Messrs. Brewer, Browne, Cress well, Ely,
Evans. Fetter, Finney, Flenniken, Ingram, Jordan,
Knox, Laubach, Lewis, Myer, Sellers, Shuman, Bouther,
Steele. Straub, Welsh, Wilkins, Wright and Taggart,
Speaker —23.
Nats—Messrs. Coffey, Crabb, Frazer, Gregg, Harris.
Killinger, Penrose and Scofield—£.
So the question was determined in the affirmative.
On the question,
Will the Senate agree to the third amendment ?
The yeas and nays were taken agreeably to the pro
visions of the Constitution, and were as follows, vis:
Ybab—Messrs. Brewer, Browno,Crabb,CressweU, Ely,
Evans, Flenniken, Frazer, Ingram, Jordan, Killinger,
Knox, Laubach, Lewis, Myer, Scofield, Sellers, Shaman,
Souther, Steele, Straub, Welsh, Wilkins, and Wright
—24.
Nays—Messrs. Coffey, Gregg, Harris and Penrose—4.
So the question was determined in the affirmative.
On the question,
Will the Senate agree to the fourth amendment ?
The yeas and nays were taken agreeably to the pro
visions of the Constitution, and were as follow, viz:
Yeas—Messrs. Brewer, Browne, Coffey, Creaawell, Ely,
Evans, Flenniken, Frazer, Ingram, Killinger, Knox,
Lauback J.ewis, Myer, Scofield, Sellers. Shuman, Souther,
Steele, Straub, Welsh, Wilkins and Wright—23.
Nays—Messrs. Crabb, Finney, Jordan and Penrose—4
So the question was determined in the affirmative.
In ths Horse of Rspbkssstavivbs. >
Apnl 29,1857. J
The resolution proposing amendments to the Consti
tution of the Commonwealth being nnder consideration,
On the question,
Will the House agree to the first amendment ?
The yeas and nays were taken agreeably to the provi
sions of the Constitution, and were as follow, Tiz:
Yeas—Messrs. Anderson, Arthur, Backhouse, Ball,
Beck. Bishop,Bower, Brown,Calhoun, Campbell,Chase,
Cleaver, Crawford, Dickey, Ent, Eyster.Faoßold. Foster,
Gibboney, Glides, Hamel, Harper. Heins, Hiestand,
Hill, Uulegas, Hoffman, (Berks. )Xmbrie, I ones, Jacobs,
Jenkins, Johns, Johnson, Kauffman, Kerr, Knight, Lei
senring, Longoker, Lovett, Maneor, Maugle, M’Oalmont,
M’Uvaln, Moorhead, Mamma, Musselman, Nichols,
Nicholson, Nuneraacher, Pearson, Peters, Petriken,
Pownall, Purcell, Ramsey, (Philsdolqhia.) Ramsey,
(York,) Reamer, Reed. Roberts, Rupp, Shaw, Sloan,
Smith, (Cambria.) Smith, (Centre,) Stevenson, Tolan,
Vail, Vanvoorhis, Vickers. Voeghley .Walter, Westbrook,
Wharton, Wiiliston, Witherow, Wright, Zimmerman
and Getz, Speaker —7B.
Nays—Messrs. Backus,Benson,Dock,Hamilton.Han
cock, Hine. Hoffman, (Lebanon,) Lebo, Strothers, Thors,
Warner and Wintrode—l2.
8o the question waa determined in the affirmative.
On the question,
Will the House agree to the second amendment ’
The yeas and nays were taken agreeably to the provi
sions of the Constitution, and were as follows, vis:
Ybae—Messrs. Anderson, Backhouse, Ball, Beck,
Bower, Calhoun, Campbell, Carty, Ent, Fatuold, Foster,
Qildea, Hamel, Harper, Hoins, Hiestand. Hillegaa, Hoff
man, (Berks,) Housekeeper, Imbrie, Innes, Jenkins,
Johns, Johnson, Kauffman, Knight, LelsenringerjLoiiga
ker, Lovett, Mnnear, Maugle, M’llvain, Moorhead, Mus
selman, Nichols, Nicholson. Nunemacher, Pearson, Pe
ters, Petriken, Pownall, Purcell, Ramsey, (Philadelphia)
Ramsey, (York,) Reamer, Roberta, Rupp, Shaw, Bloan,
Tolan. Vail, Voeghley, Walter, Westbrook, Wharton.
Zimmerman and Getz. Speedier —s 7,
Nays—Messrs. Arthur. Augustine, Backus, Benson
Bishop, Brown, Chase, Cleaver, Crawford, Kyster, Cib
boney, Hamilton, Hancock, HUI, Hine, Hoffman. (Leb
anon,) Jacobs, Kerr, Lebo, M’Calraont, Murania, Reed,
Smith, (Cambria,) Smith, (Centre,) Stevenson, Stroth
ers, Thoru, Vanvoorhis, Vickers, Wflgonseller, Warner,
Wintrode, Witherow and Wright—34.
So the question was determined in the affirmative.
On the question,
Will ihe House agree to the third amendment.
The yeas and nays were taken agreeably to the pro
visions of the Constitution, and were aa follows, viz:
Yeas—Meers. Audersou, Backhouse, Ball, Beck,
Benson, Bower, Brown, Calhoun, Campbell. . Canto,
Cleaver, Crawford, Dickey. Eul, Kyster. iausold, Fos
ter, Uihboney. Hamel, narperr, Heins, Hiestand, Hill,
IlilWa Ilofl'iunn. (Herts,) Hoffman, (Lebanon,)
Housekeeper, Imbrie, Ines, Jacobs, Johns, Johnson,
Kauffman, Kerr, Lebo, Longaker, Lovett, Maneir,
Maude. M’Calmont, Moorhead, Mumraa, Musselman,
ViclioN. Nicholson. Nunemacher, Pearson, Peters, Pet
riken, Pou nail, Purcell, Ramsey, (York,) Reamer,
]<ced, Rupp, Shaw, Sloan, Smith, (Cambria,) Smith,
(Centre,) Stevenson. Tolan, Vail, Vanvoorhis, Vickers,
voeghley, Wagonseller, Westbrook, Williston, With
eruw . Wright, Zimmermau and Getz, Speaker— 72.
Nils—Messrs. Arthur, Augustine, Backus, Bishop,
Carty, Dock, (iilden, Hamilton. Hancock, Hine. Jen
kins, Knight, Lcbeiiriug, M’llvain, Ramsey, (Philadel
phia,) Strothers. Thorn, Walter, Warner,
Wharton and t\ introde—22.
So the question was determined in the affirmative.
On the question,
Will the House agree to the fourth amendment?
The yeas and nays were taken agreeably to the pro
visions of the Constitution, and were as follow, viz:
Yeas—Messrs. Andcrson,Arthur, Backhouse, Backus,
Ball, Beck, Benson, Bishop, Bower, Brown, Calhoun,
Campbell, Carty, Chase, Cleaver, Crawford, Dickey,
Ent, Kyster, Faußold, Poßter, Gibboney,Gtldea, Hamel,
Harper, Heins, Hiestand, Hill, Alleges, Hoffman,
(Berks,) Hoffman, (Lebauon.) Housekeeper, Imbrie,
Innes, Jacobs, Jenkins, Johns. Johnson, Kauffman,
Kerr, Lebo, Lelsenring Long&ker, Lovett, Maneir.
Maugle, M’Calmont, M’llvaine, Momma, Muß&elmaa,
Nichols, Nicholson, Nunemacher, Pearson. Peters, Pe
triken, Pownall Purcell, Ramsey, (Philadelphia,) Ram
sey, (York,) Reamer, Reed, Roberts, Rupp,Shaw, Sloan,
Smith, (Cambria.) Smith, (Centre,) Stevenson, Tolan,
Vail, Vanvoorhis, Vickers, Voeghley, Wagonseller,
Walter, Warner, Westbrook, Wharton, Williston,
Witherow, Zimmerman, and Getz. Speaker—B3.
Nays—Messrs. Dock, Hamilton, Hancock, Strothers,
Thorn, Wintrode nri Wright—7.
go the questiou was determined in the affirmative.
Secretary's 0/fic*.
HAftßissoao, Jane 22,1557.
Pennsyhatta, ss.
I df certify that the ftWY* Mri foregoing U »true wd
comet copy of the “-Ye** 5 ! and *< Stars” ttkenon the
resolution proposing amendtaends to ine Constitution of
the Commonwealths as the same appears on the Jour
nals of the two Houses of the Generri Asseubly of this
Commonwealth for the session of 1857.
fn. *.] Witness my hand andtheaehl of said office,
this twenty-second day of June, one thousand eight
bandred and fifty-seven. A. G. CURTIN.
au3-m3iu Secretary of the Commonwealth.
Hoilrcois.
PENNSYLVANIA SAILKOAD.—THE
GREAT CENTRAL ROUTS, connecting the At
lantic Cities with Western, North-western, and South
western States, by a continuous Railway direct- This
Road also connects at Pittsburgh with daily line of
steamers to all points on the Western Hirers, and at
Cleveland and Sandusky with Steamer* to all porta on
toe North- western Lakes; making the most DIRECT,
CHEAPEST and RELIABLE BOUTEby which freight
can to and from the GREAT WEST.
BATES BETWEEN PHILADELPHIA ANT) PITTS
BURGH.
Fiest Class—Boots. Shoes, Hats, and
Caps, Books, Dry Goods, (in box**
bales and trunks), Drugs, (in boxes
and hales) Feather*. Purs, Ac
gacoxD Class— Domestic Sheeting
Shirting and Ticking, (in original
hales), Dru'* (in casks), Hard rare,
Leather, (in roll* or boxes), Wool,
and Bhe*p Pelts. Eastward, Ac. per 100 lb.
Thibd Class— Anvils, Steel, Chains,
(in casks), Hemp, Bacon and Pork,
Salted, (loose or in sacks), Tobacco,
manufactured, (except Cigars or cut
Ac., Ac 59c., per 100 ib.
Pocaru Class—Coffee, Fish. Bacon,
Beef, and Pork, (in cask* or boxes
eastward), Lard andLardOil,Nails,
Soda Ash, German Clay, Tar, Pitch,
Rosin, Ac 40c. per 100 lb.
Floor— 7so. per bbl.. until farther notice.
Graiy—3se. per 300 lbe., until further notice.
In shipping Good* from any point East of Philadel
phia. be particular to Manx package 1 • rio Pen* <ylca*ta
Railroad.” AU Good* consigned to the Agent* of this
Road, at Philadelphia, or Pittsburgh, will be forwarded
without detention.
Fiiight AcrcxTg.—Harris, Wormier*:Co.,Memphis,
Tenn ; B. F. Baas fc Co., St. Louis. Mo.; J. S. Mitchell
* Son, ETansrille, lad.; Dame* nil, Bell * Murdock,
and Carpenter * Jewett, Louisville, Kr.: 8. C. Mel
. « m ’^ dl * on * Ind -5 u - W. Brown 4 Co., and Irwin
* Co., Cincinnati; N. \Y. Grahun 4. Co., Zanesville,
Ohio; Leech 4 Co., So. frt Kilby street, Boston; Leech
* Co., No. 2 Astor House, New York. So. 1 William st,
aud No. 8 Battery Place, New York; E. J. Sneeder,
Philadelphia; lUgraw <fc Kooas, Baltimore: D. a.
Stewart, Pittsburgh. ,
H. H. HOUSTON,
General Freight Agent, Philadelphia.
H. J. LOHBAEBT,
Superintendent, Altoona, Pa.
■j\TEW TORS LUTES.—THE CAMDEN
11 AND Ail BO X RAILROAD AND PHILADELPHIA
AND TRENTON RAILROAD COMPANY'S LINES.
FROM PHILADELPHIA TO NEW YORK, AND WAT
Leare as iollowa, rU:
At 1 A. SI., from Kensington Depot, via Jersey
Citj, Mail *2 25
it 6 A. M.» Tia Camden and Jersey City, New Jer
sey Acc0mm0dati0n............ 2 25
At 6 A. M., via Camden and Amboy, Accommoda
tion 2 25
At 7 A. &!., ria Camden and Jersey City. Morning
Mail 7? $OO
At 10 A.M., by steamboat Trenton, via Tacos/
and Jersey City, Morning Express 3 QO
At 2 P. M., via Camden and Amboy, 0. and A. Ex
press. 3 qo
At 5 P. M. Tia Camden and Jersey City. Eyening
Mail .V.... 777!; 3 00
At 3 P. M., Tia Camden and Amboy, Accommoda
tion, Ist Class 2 00
At 3 P. 11., Tia Camden and Amboy, Accommoda
tion,2nd Class 1 53
At 6 P. M., via Camden and Amboy, Accommoda
tion, Ist Class 3
At 3 P. M., ria Camden and Amboy, Accommoda
tion, 2nd Class I 75
The 5 P. M. line runs daily, all others Sundays ex
cepted.
Express Lines stop at the principal stations only.
For Belridere, Easton, Flemington, 4c., at 6A. M
and 4P. 31., from “Walnut street wharf..
For Water Gap, Stroudsburg, Scranton, Wilke*barre,
Montrose, Great Bend, &c., at 6 A.M., Tia Delaware,
Lackawanna at Western Bailroad.
For Freehold, at 6 A. 31. and 3 P. M-
For Slount Holly at ? A. M., and 2K and 5 P. M.
WAY LIKES
For Bristol, Trenton. Ae., at 2# and 4 P. 11.
WAY LIKE
For Palmyra. Baoeocas, BeTerly, Burlington, Borden'
town 4c , at 3 P-M.
WAY LIKE
For Mount Holly, Burlington and Way Stations, at &
P. M.
Steamboat &ICHABZ) STOCK TOK for Burlington
firUtol at 8# A. If., and for Borden town and ustermr.
(Bate places at 2 JfP. M.
Steamboat TRENTOK for Tacony at 10 and 11JY A.
11., and 4 p, M„ and for Burlington and Bristol at 4P.
All lines, except 1 A. M., lent Wninnt street
wharf.
Hr fittr pounds of baggage only allowed each pas
senger. Pasaeugers are prohibited from taking any
thing as baggage but their wearing apparel. Aft bag
gage ©Ter fifty pounds to be paid for extra. The Com
pany limit thoir responsibility for baggage to one dollar
per pound, and will not be liable for any amount be
yond |lOO, except by special contract.
WSI. H. GATZMEB, Agent
C. k A. E. B. CO.
B. B. MOBRELL, Agent
Phila.. Tr. B. B. Co.
CHANGE OF HOOKS.—PHILA DEL
\J PHIA, WILMINGTON AND BALTIMORE RAIL
ROAD.
On and after Thursday, July 2d, 1847,
PASSENGER. TRAINS LEAVE PHILADELPHIA
For Baltimore at 8 A. M.. 1 P. M., (Express.) and 11
P.M.
For Wilmington at 8 A. M.« 1, 4J5 and 11 P. M.
For New Castle at S A. M., 1 and 4.15 P. M.
For Middletown at 8 A. M. and 4.14 P. M.
For Dover at 8 A. M. and 415 P. M.
For Seaford at 8 A; U. and 4.14 P. M.
TRAIN'S FOR PHILADELPHIA
Leave Baltimore at 8.64, Express, 11 A. IL, and 8 25
P. H.
Leave Wilmington at 9 40 and 11.54 A. M,, and 2.38
and 9.65 P. M.
Leave New Castle at 6.20 and 1103 A. SI., and 9.04
P.M. ’
Leav« JluLll*tow» at 10.00 A. U. and 3.04 P. M.
Leave DoT«r at 6 60 A. M. and T P.- M.
Leave Seaford at 7.00 A. M. and 4.00 P. M.
TRAINS FOR BALTIMORE
Leave Wilmington at 9.15 A. M., 2P.M. and 12AT
AM
SUNDAYS only at 11 P. M. from Philadelphia to
Baltimore.
do. 6.25 P. M. from Baltimore to
Philadelphia.
BALTIMORE AND HAVRE DE GRACE ACCOMHO
RATION TRAIN
Leaves Havre de Grace at 6.50 A. M.
Leaves Baltimore at 4.00 P. M.
Freight Train, with Passenger Car attached, will run
as follows:
Leave Philadelphia for PerryvlUe intermediate
places at 6.00 P.M.
LeaTe Wilmington for do. do. 800 P. M.
Leave Wilmington for Philadelphia at 6 00 P. M
aul-Iy S. M. FELTON, President.
SPRING ARRANGEMENT.—PENN
SYLVANIA CENTRAL RAILROAD.—Running ia
direct connection with the
PITTSBURGH, FORT WAYNE AND CHICAGO RAIL-
ROAD.
For Cincinnati, St. Louis, lowa City,
Louisville. New Orleans, St. Pauls,*
Indianapolis, Cleveland; Kansas.
Terre Haute, Chicago, ' Nebraska.
In advance of all other routes out of Philadelphia,
fbrmtng dose connection wit* all the Greni West
ern Railroads,
THROUGH ff RAINS
Leave Philadelphia, for Pittsburgh and western cities,
from the Pennsylvania Railroad Passenger Station,
south-east corner of ELEVENTH and MARKET streets,
(entrance on Eleventh street.) as follows :
Mail Train at 7—. A. M.
Fast Line..., at 12 ss, P. SI.
Express Hail at 11 00. Night.
Colombia R. R. Line leaves for Harrisburg at 2.30, P.
M., Lancaster Accommodation,} at 4.20, P. 31.
The Express Mail runs dailr, the other trains, Sun
days exempted.
For further particulars see hand-bills, at the different
starting-points. Passengers from the West will find this
the shortest and most expeditions route to Philadelphia,
Baltimore, New Turk or Boston.
THOMAS MOORE. Agent,
Passenger Line Pennsylvania Railroad Co.
Philadelphia, February, 1857. aul-ly
Philadelphia, Germantown
AND NORRISTOWN RAILROAD—SUMMER AR
RANGEMENTS. On and after May sth, 1857.
FOR GERMANTOWN.
Leave Philadelphia at 6, 7,8. 910-min., 10.11#, A.
M., and 1,2, 3-10 min., 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, ll*, P. M.
Leave; Germantown at 6,7, 7-35, 8, 9-10 min., 30V,
UN, A. M., 1,2,3-10 min., 4, 5,6, 7,8,10)8% P. M.
The 7-35 o’clock, A. M-. train from Germantown, will
not stop at intermediate Stations.
OS 80XDXTS.
Leave Philadelphia at 9-20 A. M., 2, 3,10,5-30 and
P.M.
Leave Germantown at 3-20, 9-20 A. 11., 1-10, 4V. 6
15, and 7 P. 11.
CHESTNUT HILL RAILROAD.
Leave Philadelphia at 6, 8,9-10 mis., l\)i A. M . 2,
4,6, 8,9, P.M.
Leave Chestnut Hill at 7-15, 7-35,10-10, 11-10, uiis ,
A. M., 3-40, 3-40, 5-40, T-40, 10-30 min., P. M.
OS SDXDATS.
Leave Philadelphia at 9-20 A. 31., 2,5)4 and BP. M.
Leave Chestnut Hill at 8 A. M., 12*50,4-10, and 6-40.
P.M.
On and after May 4th, 1857.
FOR MANAYUNK, CONSHOHOCKEN, AND NOR
RISTOWN.
Leave Philadelphia at 6,9, and 11, A. M., and 3,4 h%
6K, and 11#, P.M.
Leave Norristown at 7,9, and 11, A. M., 3. and 6£,
P. M.
05 305DAT8.
Leave Philadelphia at 9 A. U., and 3 P. M.
Leave Norristown at 7 A. M., and 6, P. 51.
CHESTER VALLEY RAILROAD.—FOR DOWNING
TOWN.
Leave Philadelphia at 6 A. M., and 3 P. if.
Leave Downir gtown at 7# A. M., ami 1 P. M.
aul-ly HENRY K. SMITH. Gen lSupt
Depot, NIK*K and GREEN streets, Philadelphia.
IVORTH PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD.
1A FOR BETHLEHEM, EASTON, ALLENTOWN.
MAUCH CHUNK, WILKESBARRB, DOYLESTOWN,
Ac., Ac..
THROUGH TO BETHLEHEM WITHOUT CHANGE
OF CARS.
On and after Wednesday, July Bth, 1857, the trains
on this Road will lea\e aa follows, daily, (Sundays ox
cepted:
For Bethlehem, Easton. Allentown, Mauch Chunk,
Wilkesbarre, Ac., via Lehigh Valley Railroad, Morning
Express, at 6 15 A. M.
For Bethlehem, Easton, Allentown, Mauch Cbank,
via Lehigh Valley Railroad, Evening Express, at 2 15
P. M.
Passengers for Easton by 2 15 P. M. train take stages
at Iron Hill station.
For Dojlestowu, (Accommodation) at 845 A. M and
4 P.M.
For Gwynedd, (Accommodation) at 6 35 P. M.
RETURNING.
Leave Bethlehem at 915 A.M. and 245 P M with
Passengers, via Lehigh Valley Railroad, from Easton,
Allentown, Mauch Chunk, Wilkesbarre, Ac , arriving
in Philadelphia at 12 10 if and 5 45 V. M.
Leave Doylestown, (Accommodation) at 645 A.M.
and 410 P.M.
Leave Gwynedd, (Accommodation) at 6 50 A M.
ON SUNDAYS.
Leave Philadelphia for Doylestown, (Accommodation
at 8 30 A. M. sad 5 45 P. M.
Leave i>ojie‘-town for Philadelphia. (Accommodation
at 6A. M and 315 P. M.
Faro to Bethlehem . . . $1 50
Fare to Mauch Chunk . 2 60
Fare to Wilkesbarre 4 50
Passenger Depot, FRONT and WILLOW Streets
aul-ly ELLIS CLARK. Agent.
COTTON —200 bales good Middling to Mid
dling Fair Cotton, in store and for sale hr
MARTIN A MACALISTER,
anl ji9 North Water Street.
TO - OSS —17 bales Carolina Moss, for sale by
JjJ. MARTIN A MACALISTER,
aul 119 North Water Street.
COTTON —100 bales Gulf Cotton, in store
and for sale by
MARTIN A MACALISTER,
aul 119 North Water Street.
TUVANS' GREAT GIFT BOOK SALE,
JCi No. 335 CHESTNUT Street. N. B.—No eonnec
tioa with any other home is the City. aol-Sm
A GIFT WITH EVERY BOOK, WORTH
from 50 Cents to 109 Dollar*, at MAGEE'S GIFT
BOOK STORE, No. 397 CHESTNUT Street, second door
below Fourth, Philadelphia. ' aal-lw
Spikes.— railroad spikes and
CHAIRS constantly cm hand. Orders received for
tight Railroad iron—2B ffis., 83 lbs 49 lb*, per yard.
waamvr ja unnota . .
\ S, £< tfirc frat u 4 W*£act.
75c. per 100 49