Daily evening bulletin. (Philadelphia, Pa.) 1856-1870, June 27, 1870, Image 1

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VOLUME XXIV.-NO. 65.
EDDING , CARDS, INVITATIONS,
v,‘ for Parties, &o. New etgloe . MASON & 00.401
Obootnut street. de3Ofmwtit
FIXED EARTH CLOSETS —og. Agt
floor, in or out of doorsland PORTABLE EARTH
COMMODES; for use •In bed-chatnbers and elsewhere.
Are absolutely free from offence. Bluth Monet Oom
pany's office and salesroom at WM. G. &IBM DS', No.
1221 Market street.- •- •• • • '' • - • ' ap29•tf§
MARRIED.
RODMITS--BDGAR . .--Or} ThursdaY., 3nne 2 3 40
At Grace Chilielf,' , Wiltnington, &Ms,
Cookman, Augustin H. Roberta. of Philadelphia, and
'Margaret McComb Edgar, of the former place. ,
MUD.
BINGII.3III.—On the 24th Inst., John Bingham, In the
6fi Th e r
t b"a e
i ve
fhi s a
s tt nl friends of the family ' ri '
snec tfullY
Invited to attend his funeral, from Ida late residence.
No. 36 Nortb Eleventh street, on Tuesday, 28th inst.. at
GILLESPIEt—On the mornitift of the Nth instant, at
lier residence, itillucke county ' Rebecca Gillespie.
Her friends are invited ton eet the funeral at Laurel
B iii. mn Thursday. the Mtn inst., at 2 o'clock. •
' ULE tbe 27th tett., stag &cloak KS
becca 1"., wife of . John M..Ornler.. • :
Due notice of the , f uneral will be given. *
KIRK .-4)m the 24th James N:-N-lrk, in the 37tfi
flis relatives and friend's ' and Lafayette Lodge, No. 71,
Id. ;Girar4.lKarrlioe O.;114; KeystoneUhap-,
- ter,-No. 76. and SOO t John's ( i 4minandery. No. 4 ; also,
Covenant Lodge, No. 114, 1.-0. 0. F.. are respectfully
invited to attend his funeral, from- his late residences
b,o. 712 Green street. on, Triesday,the 25th instant, at 3
oak. To proceed to Laurel Alit Cemetery.
SNYBEIL—On the 27th inst.. Peter L. Snyder, in the
07.4 year of his age. - ,
flue notice or the funeral will be Oren.
WEI L.--On the morning - of the 27th inst., Mathilda,
reliri of the late H. I. Weil, in tbo 70th year of her age.
The male friends of the family are invited to attend
the funeral. from her late residence. No. 415 Buttonwood
street. on Wednesday afternoon, the 26th inst,, at SKI
400 ARCH -- STREET. - .400
EYRE & LANDELL.
__DEPAILTId.ZAIT L. ME.N'ES_WEAR, - ; ISIO.
CANVAS DRILLS. PADDED DRILLS. SCOTCH.
.011EVIOT6.. CASSIMEILE - yROR 00.11 DU
ROYS-AND
f --- !,ENII INE MEDIGINAL COD LIVER
"k) BAKER. & 719 Market et. • •
SPECIAL NOTICES.
ID'ILTII. 'LIST
111A4 AIER SPECIALTIES.
THIN SUITS.
llvtly.3tade or to Order
Duel:, :Alpaca
1 ,aitx, Serges. Tmeesi,
:trap
&e., 4c
:SEASIDE WEAR.
Bathing Bolwa
I mike, Gents Ind Children
f , ee-Side Overconte,
•Fiehing Judith',
I:c..
The Finest Clothing Establishment,
81S and 820 CHESTNUT STREET.
J 4 I-1 INT
NV A.. 'INT A NI. A .IK. F. JR..
FOURTH OF JULY
AT THE
V.A.-siFi.c , n,E,
VIA
tABIDEN'AND ATLANTIC RAILROAD
TO
ATLANTIC CITY.
Trains leave VINE STREET FERRY on SATURDAY
at 8.00 A. 111., 2.00, 3.30 and 4.15 P. M. • ' •
On SUNDAY at 8:00A. M.
!SUNDAY, 8.00 .14 !and 3.30 and aid
Tlas 2.00 and 3.30 P. M. trains run through in 133 hours.
I:XCURSION,TICKETS, good from SATURDAY' 's •
MORNING, July 2d, until TUESDAY MORN-`
ING, July oth, inclusive e 3 03
D. H. MUNDY, Anent.
je24 tjy4
THE IMPROVEMENT OF
BROAD STREET.
A GRAND MASS ?FLEETING
OF THE CITIZENS OF PHILADELPHIA
Favoring the
IMPROVEMENT OF BROAD STREET,
Wilt beld.urider tho attabicee of the
BROAD STREET IMPROVEMENT LEAGUE,
.And by authority of the Meeting of Citizens held on tho
17th June, 1370,
AT THE
ACADEMY OF MUSIC
ON THURSDAY EVENING,
Juno 30th, at 8 o'clock.
. . . - .
All who appreciate the advantages that the thorough
fare of Broad street enjoys, to make it, with proper
prevenient,
THE FINEST AND MUST IMPOSING AVENUE
IN TER WORLD';
and all who take en honest pride hi •, r '
BEAUTIFYING AND ADORNING OUR CITY,
are cordially invited to attend the meeting.
By order of the BROAD STREET IMPROVEMENT
IEAGUE.
T. T. WOODRUFF, President.
DR. F. C. MELVILLE, Vico President.
GEO. S. GRAHAM, Secretary.
JAMES W. HAVENS Treasurer. - jo2l9trp
ni:INIVERSITY OFTENNSYL
FACULTY OF. ARTS.
CANDIDATES FOR ADMISSION to either of the.
College courses will. preeent themselveS forexamination'
.3n WEDNESDAY, June 29th, at half-past ten o'clock:
' TUE REGULAR COURSE included the Aficientp.
guageet with French and German ; the. Mathematic .
the Physical Sciences, with an ELECTION of cor e in .
studies in the two last years:, , !,;;-•- •
In the SCIENTIFIC COURSE; more eiteniled studios
in Mathematics, Physics, and the Modern Languages
are substituted forth°. Ancient Languaes.
Students may also.euter for 'a PARTIAL COURSE,
including such studies as theylmay eoleot and which die"
_Faculty may approve.,
----- FRANOIS - kitACE.SOI4 - ; •
SecretarY of the Faculty.,
Mai
giut , NIY F R OF PEIsINSYL,
VAPT I 4.- • • •
The Annual Commencement; for conferring Degrees,
will be held on THURSDAY, June 30th, in the ACA
DEMY OF MUSIC, Atli) o'clnck M, 'The Reverend .
Clergy, Judges of the United States and State Courts,
the Mayor of the City,Select and Common Councils,
'the Board of Directors and President of the Girard Col
lege, the Principal of the Central High School, the can
-didates for the Degree of Neater of Arts,• and other
-Graduates of the University , are invited to Join the
Faculty, in the Foyer of the .Academy, at a quarter he
lm 10. FRANCIS A. JACKSON, •
Je23-6trp§' . • Secretary.
- THE -LEHIGH VALLEY
ROAD COMPANY .yvill, Auglist' Ist. next;
pay off at par and accrued interest any of their first
mnortgago bonds, due , -in - 1813, on - presentation at their<Mice, No. 303 WALNUT street.
- - - .
L. CHA2I.I3EItI AIN, Troasurer.
JUNE 23, 1870. , . J on lutrp§
TOURISTS' GOODS.
Travelindßults,
Dusters of all kinds !
TiLliees; Vslises t
Varnishing Goods,
Stcw+3:c.
SUMMER CLOTHES
For Youths and'BOs.._
Lin n Jackets and Pants,
Boys' Busters,
Marseilles and Duck Vests.
Thin. Goods generally.
SPECIAL NOTICES
r*, , UNITED STATES TREASURY.
PIMA 1870.--
ti pursuance of an order of the Secretary of the Trea
sury. this °Rico wl.l be in the payment of the July in
terest TO-ROB:ROW (Tuesday), the 28th inst. • .
GEOBAJIC EYSTES,
jer/ 2t Assistant Treasurer U. S.
---
EXCURSION TO [U FORT_,DEI.-
. awere.:— An ,excurstoh , to I Tort' Delaviare
will take place July 7,1870. under Alto auspices of the
Mariner's Bethel Baptist Church. .(BCCIaI.-perinlielow
to land at the Port has been' Bemired. Tickets 60 cents:
to bo obtained at the store of E. M. MICE, Is North
. . ..
Seventh street.
~.7a22tHi, rp
C''NORTH PENNSYLVANIA RAIL
ROAD AND ORREN LANE STATIOIISI.
Pure Lehigh Coal delivered to the reeiden ' - ger
IMoWII at reduced rates.
' . _HINES kiMEArr;
mown
' ' Office . . No. la 8. BeventLatreet,
• - •
63fl'ItQWARD .11.08P1TAL„.:N913...1518
and 1 Lombard streat, Dfspenaary DeiartmoOt.
odical treatment lad - medicine furnished gratuitously
POLITICAL NOT ICES
1870. . 1870:
.
SBERIFF,
WILLIAM D. LEEDS.
Joe tl ocl2ro
. HEADQUARTERS UNION RE
v!'7IiBLICAN CITY EXECUTIVE COMMIT,
TEE, ]WS CHESTNUT Street—To the Union Republi
mu Executive Committee Elect or the Twenty-eighth
In aceordance with the rules governing the Union
Republican party.
_ you will assemble at the„ LAMA
TA N'ERN. on INEDNEGDAT EVENING next, June.
29, at it O'clock. and 'organize in compliance with the
rules. - and - elect a - representative to the . Gity . Executive
- •
By order ,tr tbe_l3 - ntom.,ltepublican City Exe&dire
Committee: JOlllt L. HILL, Preeldent.
.101115 MCCULLOUGH t / S Ot
e.c -e2 -
1111SCELLAIVE - OUS.
rill-LEG o'B TELBERRY TOOTHWASH.—
.
i It Is the most pleasant. cheapest and best dentifrice
satant. Warranted free from injurious ingredients.
- It Preserves and_Whitetts the Teeth!
_ .
- - Invtitorates and Soothes the Gums !
Purifies and Perfumes the Breath I
Prevents Aectimtilatiou of Tartar! _ _
V a
EdreTh n ei - lif Purina artiticTa - Weth
rior t rtiele for Children !
Bold by all Di;ggs
A. WILSON, Proprietor
t y rp _
Ninth and Filbert etreete, Pizugdelf
UMADQUARTERS FOE. EXTRACTING
1111 TEETH WITH FRESH NITROUS OXIDE
"At3SOLUT.MI•Y NO PAIN."
Dr. F. R. THOMAS, formerly operator at the Colton
Dental Rooms, devot , 2e hie eating practice to the painless
extriictionnt teeth. 011ice,911 Walnut st. mi.S.lyrp;
TNAA(.i.NATITAILS; AtreTlO NEER - AND
it Money Broker . northeast corner Third and Spruce
nt reets.-6 2f0,15.10 to Lean. in large or small amounts, on
Diamonds, filver-Plate, Watches, Jewelry .and alt goods
of calve. Office Hosing trom 8 A.-M. to 7P. M. I/W*.Es
tablishc-d for the last 'Forty Years. Add - fatless made in
large amounts at the lowest market rates. 03g - No Con
nection with any other Meant this City.'
" • ...PiIdfAbti,PELLI.SIIIIGEONS'
-61 -,! l i A ro l .!P A s G b! . :Fit r r i k T eE r s i !b i . 4 E l4 4 t itE N Alt
Tit PS positively cures Ruptures. Hard Rubber
Trusses, Elastic Belts, litockiny . Su p porters, Shoulder
- B races . Ladien attended to by Mrs. .jyllyry -
.
..:AR 31 811101"Nt
Undertaken', MT Gertdantown 're net and' Fifth lit.
DH. Scnnyr.era., ,Latd4-I,rai n 8.13, Artierrraoree
CONDENSED MILK, EAGLE BRAND—
The very.rbest article for travelera, infanta, &c.
Nettle's Milk Substitute, Patent Barley, Fresh Oat
Meal, Bermuda Arrowroot, Arc. Liquid Rennet and
Flavoring Extracts. Fortelle. by JAMES T. SHINN
.s corner Broad and Spruce 'drake
Vl' ARK Eti . I WITH-11TDELIBLE INK-
17.1 Embroidering, Bg, Stampin*, acc.
A. TORREY. MO filbert
MONEY TO Al Y AMOUNT
LOANED UPON DIABIONDR,WATOFIEB,
JEWELRY, PLATE, CL CO OTRING, &c., at
JONES dr. S
OLD-ESTABLISHED LOAN OFFICE, _
Corner of Mfr.:l'6nd Ga.skilt streets,
• - • Below Lombard.
N. B. DIAMONDS, WATCHES, JEWELRY,
GUNS, ac.,
7/011 MALE AT r ' - -
REMARRABLYLOW PRICES.
terltrhVil
fl WARBURTON'B . I3IPROVED, VE/T
-AMA tilated and'easy-fitting Drees Hate (patented) in all
the approved fashions of the season. a•theetntit street.
next door to th
.Post-0 co.. • oc&-tfrp
FOlt TRAVELERS.— NEAT, SMALL
ALARMS ; will awaken at
Li .....
" any T hour .
"' i r&pt'-& - BROIIER,I
mporter s, jeV-tfrp
WATCHES
THAT HAVE HITE.-
erto failed to give satisfaction, put in good
order. Particular attention paid to Fine Watch
es, Chronometers, etc., by skilful workmen.
Musical Poxes repaired.
BARB & BRCTRER,
, fmporters of Watches, Musical Boxes.'&c.;
mylo' ,
FLUTING MACHINES. . .
All sizes at reduced prices.
GRIFFITH & PAGE,
' ' 1004 Arch street
•71 - 17 EDDING AND • ENGAGEMENT
TY ,Binge of solid 18karat fine Gold—a specialty; a
fall assortment of sizes, and no charge. for engraving
names, &c.. FARR & BROTHER, Makers,.
my 24, rn tf 8?,4 Chestnut stioet. below Fourth:
E DWIN H..FiILER . & CO., •
Cordage Manufacturers and Dealers In
.11emp,
•
23. N. Water. Streetanit 22 R.-Delatocrre Avenue
PILEGADELPHL!. . • • •
EDWIN N. FITLITE. CONRAD P. CLOTHIER ,-";
~- &SIOUAN'. WEA WEAVER.
VER & GEO.
00 H. 8.
,
'Dope and Twine Manufacturers and
Dealers in Hemp and Ship Cbandlery,
29 North.WATRR.— ' 28 North WHARVES.
PHILADELPHIA.
KO tit,
o THE COURTS.
The Nagle Homicide.
OYER AND T.ERMINE.II.Idge.4 Ludlow and
Paxson.—This morning, Thomas Hill,colored,,
was put on trial, charged with, causing the
death of John G. Nagle, on t 9th of March
Jest, on Letitia street. It • be recollected
that the pilsoner was . ged, in connection
with George Black, also colored, with causing
the death. Black was tried at the last term,
and acquitted. The circumstances were briefly
these
Mr. Nagle, a baker residing and doing busi
ness in Letitia street, came out of his house on
'the afternoon of the day in question, and was
on the- opposite side of. the street from his
house when Black came down the street and
ran against him. Mr. Nagle • remonstrated
with Black, and, told himoto be careful where
upon Black proposed to fight and did take
hold of the deceased, and both went to the
ground. An apprentice of Mr. Nagle
now 'int6rfered, and the parties
Were ''separated. About this time
Hill, who was lila tavern in the neighborhood,
dame out and at once assaulted Mr. Nagle,
,knocking him down, his head striking an iron
gtatiiig in the fall. Mr. Nagle was picked up
insensibleand died shortly afterwards, never
having recovered his consciousness after- the
ta.
,A jury was empannelled this :morning and
'the trial was Viogressing when our report
closed. S. Davie Page and J'
~ T:Pratt appeared
for the prisoner. ,
—The Clildago POst, in the course of a modest'
article on that city, says: "Ey no possibility
can New York esterd,,beyond Two •Hundred
and Twenty-fifth' street. T,here the Spuyten
puyvil comes in, and bars'all Jorogress. Chi
cago can go to SeVenteen Thousand' Nine
gund,red and Eighty-seventh street without
an objection. As 17,987.i5, g,reater than. 225,_
So will Chicago be greater than New' York in
the good , time cornibg."- Such is the unauswer-,
able argument, of geography and the earth'ii
surface, as established from the foundations of
the world."
IHE ENGLISH CLERGY . ON DICKENS.
The BealthfuligfptilltelligeTesebtlkuirs—
Tgie Creed efliannaulty.
17,05 i the London Daily. Nfrvre.). - ,
On Sunday evening the Bishop of Man
chester preached at Westminster Abbey,from
the words " Onfatis the mystery of Godliness!'
The sermon,waa. a plea forth° toleratiore of
differences Of opinion where the foundations
of religious trutifwere accd.- Towards its .
conclueion, the Bishop sai d' It will not be
out of harmonyWith. \ -the, line of thought we
have been pursuing—Certainly, it will be
keeping with the associations of this place
dear to Englisbrnen,.. not only as one of the,
proudest Christian temples, but as containing
th e memorials , of scrmany who:try their genius"
in -arts, or arms, or statesnmne hip, or literature,
have. made, England . what,, , she.' is—
is—
if in the *simplest and briefest - words I allude
to that sad and unexpected - eath - which has
robbed English literature of one of its highest
living ornament's; and the news of which, two
mornings ago, must have made_ every, house
llold‘ilEngland feel as though they had loit
a personal friend: He has,been called itebne ,
notice an aposile'of the people. I'SuPpose
it is meant that be had a, mission,
but in a style and fashion of his own, a gos
pel, a cheery, joyous, gladsome rneMage which.
people'ttridendood, and by which - they could
hardly help being bettered; it was the gospel,
of kindliness, of brotherly" love, of sympathyin the, widest sense of the Word. lam sure I
have felt in myself the healthful spirit of his
teaching. Possibly we might not have. been
able to subscribe to the same creed in rela;
thin to Ged; but I think we should have
subscribed to 'the same creed' in relation to
man. He whir has taught us our duty to our
fellow-men -- better than we knew -it laefore;
who knew 'sso well to weep, with them that
wept, and to rejoice with' them that' rejoiced;
who has shown forth, all his knowledge of:the
dark corners of the earth, how much sunshine'
may rest, upon the lowliest lot, who had such
evident sympathy with suffering, such natural
instinct of purity, that there is scarcely a page
of the thousands he has written which might
not be put into the bands of a little child, must
be regarded by those who recognize the
diversity of the gifts of the spint as a teacher
sent from God. He would have been welcomed
as a fellow-laborer in the common interest of
humanity . by; Him who asked the question.:"
If a man loye not his brother whom
he hath'seen, how can he love God
whom he bath not seen ?' " The Rev. Mr.
Vl~ite,_( plainto_the_llonSe_of_Commons,-
in his sermon at the, Savoy Chapel; spoke of
the death of C'harles Dickens, and said that,
strange as it might, sound, Mr; Dickens had
by his writings, thine essential service' to the
ChristiawChurch. There was a purity and a
healthfttlnesiin his - writings which were a,
natural consequence_of his character, and this
might be understood by the fact that oneof,
the last, letters he wrote,if indeed not the very'
last, was written with a view to'remove a cal
umny that lie had been unfaithful to Christian
truth. Mr. Dickens, the Reverend Chaplain
said; had taught. ' Christianity with much
greate.r effect than many priests; had done.
CAIVADIAN ".TUSTICE.
The 'Rebel Raid at Sti Albans.
Since the_ late Fetdan attempt to Invade
Canada - florae of the Canadian journals have
labored to show that our Government ought
to reimburse the Canadians fiir the expenses
made necessary in their defence, asserting that
the Canadian government, in the case of the
_St.. Albans raiders d uri tigthe,_late war -in-the
;South, "admitted their responsibility for their
depredations. and appropriated a SUM of
money to cover the losses of the batiks at St.
Albans which they bad robbed." The St. Al- -
bans Messenger says in reply to this: - - -
" The facts are these : There were three
banks robbed at this place. The First National
Bank lost $60,000, the Franklin County. Bank
lost $72,000, and the St. Albans Bank lost $75,-
000; amounting in all to the sum
.of $207,000.
Our own citizens pursued the raiders into
Canada, and succeeded in capturing fourteen
of them, with about $86,000, swatch warrants
having been refused'• 1113 in many 'instances.
This 586,000 was held by the Canadian Govern
ment against, our wishes, as evidence, ..1.13 they
claimed, against the raiders, in the application
of our Government for their extradition, and
with the raiders was kept by a magistrate un
til the notorious Judge Coursol assumed juris
diction, claiming that the magistrate had no
jurisdiction in, the matter. In less than two
months this same Coursol decided that he, him
self, had no jurisdiction in the case;whereupon
he set the men at liberty; and the $86,000 cap
turedat our expense,*by our efforts, was given
up by the agent of the Canadian Government
to the agent of the raiders, and not to the law
ful owners. ' . This outrage was BO < flagrant that
the Canadian Government appropriated.fifty
thousand dollars to defray the expenses of in
vestigating into the conduct of Judge Coursol,
and the balance was paid to the . St. Albans
banks, as follows: The First National Bank
received eighteen thousand dollars in. gold
the St. Albans Bank, twenty-two thousand
dollars, and , the • Franklin County Bank re
ceived thirty-four, thousand dollars in their own
bills,purchased of the raiders,we are informed.
at fifteen cents on the dollar, by au aggjQf
the Canadian Government.
"The result is, the Canadian Governmen
paid.about forty-live thousand dollars in-gold
towards the eighty-six thousand dollars cap
tured by our citizens, and that is all that has
ever been paid towards the two hundred and
seven thousand dollars that our banks lost,and
Judge Coursol is fully restored to his position
on the bench.'
WARR WEATHER IN THE PAST.
A Beeortt of Hot SOO U
. . _ . . . .
The records kept at Nuremberg, in Ba,variti,
supply the following Interesting facts :
In 1132 the earth cracked by reason of the
;Ilieat r the wells and streams in Alsace all dried
and the bed of the Itiver Rhine was dry.
In 1152 the beat was so great that sand ex
posed to the sun's rays was hot enough to
cook eggs. In 1160 great number of soldiers
in the campaign against Bela died from the
heat. In 1276 and 1277 crops of hay and oats'
,failed completely. In 1303 and 1304 a man
could have crossed, dry shod, over the rivers
Seine, Loir, Rhine and Danube. In 1393 and
'94 a multitude of animals perished by the heat,
which was so great that the harvests dried up.
In 1440 the heat was extraordinary. In 1538,
1539, 1540 and 1541 all the rivers were nearly
dried up. In 1556 there was agreat drought,
which extended over nearly the whole of
Europe.- In 1615 and 1616 there was, in Italy,
France and the Netherlands, an overpowering
heat. In 1648 there were fifty-eight con
'secutive ' days of extreme heat. 1678
was very hot, and as were the first three
years. of the eighteenth century. In 1718
it did not rain a single time from April until
October I The growing grain was burned, the
rivers dried up, the theatres (but wherefore is
-not --stated) were --closed by command
of the , police.. The thermometer showed
thirty-six degrees Reaumer; equivalent to 113
degrees Fahrenheit. In irrigated gardens the
'.fruit trees bloomed twice. In. 1723 and 1724
there was great heat. The summer of 1746
was,hot and dry, the growing grain being cal
cined. It did not rain for months. - .1748; 1754,
1700,1707, 1778 and 1788 were years in which
the summers were extremely hot. In the
famous comet year-1811—the suirimer was
warm, and the wine produced that season was
very precious. In 1818, the theatres had to be
closed on account of the heat, the highest
-temperature being 35 Reaumer, or 112 Fahren
heit. During the three days of the revolution.
of_July, in 1830, the thermometer stood-at 36
degrees Centigrade, abbut 97 Fahrenheit. In
1832, during the uprising of the sth and 6th of
July, the temperature was about the Same.
MONDAY JUNE 27 1870.
General Prospect- in the Northwest.
(From the 31111orankeo Wisconsin, Altura]
From all we can learn concerning the crops
in, the Northwest, the favorable weather of
the last fortnight has improved them wonder
fully, and though there may not be a heavy
growth, the filling will undoubtedly be good if
favorable weather continues. There are some
localitlei, where - the, soil is light, where the
crops are injured beyond recovery by the long
drouth, but these,• we think, will prove the ex
ception and not the rule.
The Dronth In the Northwest.
U/roin the Chicago Republican, Jane 22.1
The dronth in the Northwestern States is
confinedto very .. moderate limits. If a .line
_ ._
were drawn through Wisconsin, running
north'from near Monroe to' the Muer Mounds, .
and thence nearly east to about the vicinity of .
Sheboygan, it would enclose the district in
that State that is particularly. suffering. The
south and - . northwest parts of the
State, and almost the entire interior,
have enjoyed plentiful rains, and will have
good crops- The States of-Minnesota, lowa,
Nebraska, Kansas and Missouri, as well as the
Territories West and North, have all received
their usual aihount of - moisture, and the Press
have made no complaint in any section of a
failure in the supply. The rainless belt, this
season, seems to have a direction nearly north
east by south West, and includes wportion of
this State, Indiana andOhlo, - and — perhaps a
small portion of Michigan : and, doubtless, if
the subject.were investigated, would be found
to cover a part' of Kentucky; Arkansas and
Eastern Texas. .
The Coming Harvest, in IPennsylvania.
[From the. Pittsburgh rdepetch, Juno 234 --
, Any one desirous of obtainiug an idea Of
the near approach of the haying season., should.
take a trip out- about twenty or thirty. miles
on. one of .our railroa.ds. The_ hay - crop
will ,be unusually heavy, but, experi
enced agriculturists tell us, of not quite
so good a quality as last season.
Wheat has been, in a . great many places,
materially injured by the very heavy and con
stant rains of the season, consequently less
than an average yield is anticipated in some
wheat-growing sections. Corn looks flourish
ing, and gives promise of an abundant crop.
The yield of fruit will , be below the average.
If men who loiter on street corners grumbling ,
because they have no work, will but betake ,
themselves to the country, our rural friends
will give them a hearty welcome, and work
in-abundance-at-fair-wages.
The Wheat Crop in Virginia.
[From the Peten3buro indezJune e.. 1
From all the information we ' have been able
to gather, the crop_ of wheat _which, in -some
localities hereabouts has been harvested, is ex
cellent, both as'to yield and to quality.. Some
of om-farmers say that there has riot been
such a' wheat crop for many years. Great
fears were entertained that the bloom had
been washed off -by the. heavy rains that fell
Just at the time When injury. was .most likely
to result from such a cause. It was appre
-herided aLs45 - , - that the all tort - "continuo - Us rain,
even . with the - little alternate
warm sunshine, would produce_ rust
in the wheat- and greatly lessem the
crop. •-Buttill -these-fears; it would - noWnii.;"
pear, have provento be - groundless, and,. with
;this exception, that the-wheat was thrown
down in some - localities„„ and • partially. sub
merged in. certain lowlands, the yield and
quahty will turn out tO be much better than
the average. ' ~ ' -
The corn crop;ocie fear,will he_ damaged,_
- miless --- the - Miffen; can have more favorable
weather for plowing. In many portions of
our. State the weeds have almost taken pos
session of the lauds, and are likely to* " choke
the good seed," uuless they can be extirpated
by the plow very soon. But, having been
most agreeably disappointed in the wheat
crop, we will not despair of the corn and to
bacco.
Our advices, with few exceptions,
report the
wheat and oat crop as unusually fine in all
parts" of the State. The apprehensions of
damage from excessive, rains Would seem in
the main unfounded, and the line weather of
thepresent week has been all that could be
desired for the completion of the harvest.
The threshing, however, can alone determine
the yield. ,The wet weather has, delayed the
corn crop, and made it more backward than
usual, but, we trust, there is plenty of time yet
for-it and tobacco.
"(From the . N. Y. Standard.)
DURDER OF OEN. GRANT'S. O.IPDSCOIFF
AND SPY.
It will be remembered by many of the Stan
dard readers that Bonner, in his New York
Ledger abouta year ago, published for several
months the personal history and. deeds of
Capt. C. S. Bell, a scout, detective and spy for
Gene. Grant, Sherman,Thomas - , Sheridan and
others of our army. After the conclusion of
the war,. Grant retained him in service, and
wiihin a year he was sent to Texas, where 'he
has been under the command of en. Rey
nolds of the Fifth Military Distriet.l
The following letter was received from Clin
ton, Dewitt county, Texas, 'yesterday :
CLINTON, Dewitt' co., June 7, 1870.—Dcar
. • • An occurrence of the most mysterious
character has plunged our usually quiet vil
lage into the greatest excitement. Capt. C. S.
Bell, the renowned " Union scout and spy,"
whose war history has been given in the New
York Ledger, was attacked by five men in the
Guadaloupe bottom, about two miles below
this place, at a late hour yesterday, and is sup
posed to have been brutally murdered by
them. A negro living on White's plantation
first brought the news, and a party, headed by.
Jack Haien, our Sheriff, at once proceeded to
the spot, guided by the negro witness of the
'deed. ,
A bloody trail, where a heavy body had
been - dragged, was found, and upon tracing it
up the party reached the banks of the Ganda
loupe river, overwhich the body had evidently
been thrown.
Returning to the spot where the trail was
first started, three other.trails were found and
traced by horse tracks and blood drops for
some distance and lost. A very fine silver
handled navy revolver was found near the
• scene of the murder,.with S. Bell, Scout,"
engraved on its handle. Five barrels of the
pistol had been freshly discharged.
. The negro said he saw the firing from a dis
tance, that one man was shot off his horse and
.then tire men rode off; leading the fallen
man's horse; they passed near him, and he
saw that three of. their party were wounded
and bleeding. He then went to the wounded
Man, Who was dying, but happening to loek
up saw two men coming, when 'he ran into
the bottom, and then came into town' and
gave the alarm. It is generally belieVed that
Captain Bell . was the Man that was 'killed,
and - Sheri Holm and a largeposse have gone
in,pursuit of the murderers. lours,
„ CLINTON. ,
THE ENCILLSU' MARRIAGE SERVICE
A Queer Alteratteit.'
A story has been told of a graceless scamp
who gained access to the Clarendon printing
office, , in. Oxford, when the forms of a new
edition of the Episcopal Prayer Book had just
been made up and
.were ready for the press.
In that part of; the ," form" contataing the
marriage service he substituted the letter lo for
the letter y in the word live; and thus the vow
&
"to love, honor, comfort, a, so long as ye
both shall live," was made to read " so king as
ye both shall like!" The change was not disco
_vered' until 'Abe whole of the -edition was'
printed off. -If the sheets thus rendered useless
in England be still preserved, it would be a
good speculation to have them ndatlybonnd
and forwarded to Indiana and Connecticut.
THE CROPS.
[From the Richmond Whig, Juno 25.1
C. S. Bell Killed in Texas.
SWIRMAX ON LEATMESIL
Gen. Sherman Amour the Bostonlffen of
Leather.
(From the Boston Transcript, J une.25.1
Efen. W. T. Sherman visited the Shoe and
Leather Exchange this afternoon. A large
number of the trade tilled the spacious room
of the Exchange, and gave the hero of the
"march to the pea"_ .a. warm .reception, the
thermometer standing about 120 diig in the
ball. The Stars and Stripes, were tastefully
displayed in the ball, and the motto " Welcome
to the General" had been placed in a promi
nent position over the platform. The Presi
dent of the Association, lion. W. B. Spooner,
flanked by Goys. Claflin and Jewell, of Con
necticut, introduced General Sherman' to the
assembly. Mr. Spooner referred to the extent
of the trade represented by the Association;
and said many members of it bad served under
Geris. Sherman, Grant and Thomas. He could
not find appropriate words to express. the
gratitude of the members of the .Association
toward General Sherman and his compatriots.
He concluded by presenting the General to,
the Assembly, who 'was received with three
hearty cheers. i,.
General Sherman replied that on .moving
through the building he had not expected to
be called upon to address so line a, body of
men as this association, representing one of
the largest manufacturing interests hi .the
country. He was a friend of .the_ ;trade, and
had given it a good deal of patronage in 'his
day.. His marching army had worn out a
large.amount of leather, and an immense
number of shoes, some of them bad,_
which' he 'did! not believe ever came from
Boston. No manufacturing interest- , does'
more for comfort than the one whioh fur r
Dishes the community with good ; shoes..:_ Hi
llis marches, when making a post,Plthe first
thing was to purchase good shoes for the bare
footed. The General said he preferred sewed
shoes to pegged shoes. He should remain a
friend of the trade if the members furnished
the army with a,serviceable article, until the
time when, so far as he'was individually con
cerned, shoes would be no longer needed.
Gen:Sherman then shook hands with each
person of the audience who desired, and left
the hall loudly cheered.
LIVINGSTONE.
ins 'Probable Fate.
At the final' fortnightly meeting of the ses
sion of 1869-70 of thelloyal Geographical So
ciety-of EnglaudiTlif - rendon, Anne'l 4", - Sfrß.
-
Murchison referred to the present position of
Dr. Livingstone and.the succor which is to be
sent to him. -
said: There have been great misap.pre
hensions abont this affair, andl have received
numerous applications from active young men
anxious to: go in search of Dr. Livingstone,
supposing that there' was a real expedition
about to start from this country or elsewhere.
There is no such expedition, even in imagina
tion, and certainly pone in reality, cOntem
has been more than three years and
a half in the heart of Africa, without a single
European attendant. - 1 am not sure that 'the
,sight of 31.:Yellitg gentleman seneontfrom-Eng
land, wha Was not atelimatized, would oat .
produce a very bad effect instead of a good
one upon my friend the doctor, because - he
would have to. take care of the newarrival,
who would very soon die there, and the poor
doctor would have an additional load. I have,
therefore, to announce that there is no such
intention-whatever: — l - havereceiVe - . a ozen
letters from admiring young voltinteers, who
are anxious to distinguish themselves, but
who have not the least idea of what they_
are abbut. I have every reason to believe
that the '..CI-,000 that the government • has
given will go out by the Consul of Zanzi
bar, who happens, accidentally, to be in this
country and who is going out immediately.
He will instruct Dr: Kirk, the Vice Consul, to
refit the same expedition which was started
before, but which was impeded by an attack
of cholera. The cholera has passed away en
tirely, the country is free from Zanzibar, and
the only difficulty now is to get to trjiji, where
my dear and valued friend was and still is, for
he cannot move forward or backward without
carriers, supplies, and so forth. It will take
two months or more for those supplies to go
from the seaboard to Ujiji, therefore you must
put aside all anxiety for some months to come.
I hope in about seven or eight months hence
you will hear good news, and that very, soon
after that we shall see our friend again in his.
native country.
CONVERTING THE HEATHEN.
Church litissionary "Kidnappers" in
India.
[From the Punjab (Lahore) Times, May N.]
The Christian missionary is at his old game
again of what is known as "baby conversion."
This time . , however, he succeeds in reaching
his victim through one of the teachers of the
Zenana. mission, who.. had been hitherto
unsuspectingly • admitted into most of
our native households. It seems that,-
on Saturday last, a young B indoo wi
dow girl, aged abOut fourteen years, who used
to receive her first lessons from a Zenana
teacher, by the name of Miss Martha, belong
ing to the Church Missionary Society, was
removed from her house by the latter without
the knowledge or consent of- her widowed
mother, and, under the auspices of the Bev.
J. Vaughan, baptized in hot haste. She was
placed by the reverendgentleinan in the house
of one Hazra, a native convert, and there
detained from the lhwfill custody and_ guar
dianship of her mother. - The reverend gentle
_Man,and his accomplices were served with an.
attorney's letter calling uon them to deliver
the girl into her mother's custody ; but
this was refused, and we understand that im- .
Mediately on receipt of the letter the girl was
baptized, and the next day the mother was
Informed by'Rev. J. Vaughan of her baptism.
A few relatives and friends' who accompanied
the mother in bringing back the 'girl were
treated to a volley of abusive epithets by the
Christian confraternity of Amherst street.
Such are -.the facts of the conversion of the
victim of the missionary body; The story will
speak for itself.• • . , ,
,The text will no doubt form the subject of a
grandiloquent report of thep ' rogress of the
mission, by the Rev. J. Vaughan and so the'
supporters of the mission and the British pub-
lie will be considerably hood Winked; the ques
tionable means resorted to ~ f or. conversion be.
ing of course carefully kept out• of view. We.
are afraid that the present instance will give a
death-blow to the, cause, of native feinale,edu
cation,through the Zonana Missidn.. Already.
it has been :a warning to Many 'llindoci fami
lies in the city. The aged mother,. we 'are.ln
formed, is about to take proceeding at law for'
the restitution of the person of the girl;,:;'
—An English youth who married on fifteen
shillings a week, has naturally gone tojail for
stealing , -
—A Jersey, preacher is being tried in hiti
Synod for "preaching dry anti .uninterestiug
Sermons." ,
,
' —A traveling bear, carried about for exhibi
tion, lately I,iiet Avith a sudden death. The
owner took his•'_grizzly . charge - to Niagara
Falls; and stopped to rest on the banks of the
riveria short distance below the new suspen
sion bridge.' Bruin was chained to a stump,
while his master lay • dOw.n •to take a snooze:
'the stump,proved to,be rotten and was pulled
up by,thebear, and.-the latter, venturing .too
near the odge of the - cliff; tumbled- over-and-
Wps: killetk• - Tbo - body - wa.s• - found - some' dis-•
Mime below the spot - where the accident oc
curred, and tho skin removed by the .discon
solate French gentleman, who'has thus been
deprived of his pet and supporter. • '
PRICE THREE CENTS.
FIFTH EDITION;
BY TEL E GRAPH.
MON WASHINGTON
1NT.414, - VA.L4 con.p.mEimg.
Bill to PrOvide for the Issue _of Bet& T
Another Internal Revenue , Bill:
FROM WASHINOTOM,
[By the American Preen Aseociationii . .•f,
Naval Orders.
Wasnoto-Toa, aim, 27.--Midshipmatt•Wlnt:
Kemsen is ordered to the Plymouth... .
First Assistant Engineer James X. Kobby ; r
is detached from the .Ashuelot, and granted` ,
sick leave. , ' ' '
The orders of - Midshipman Geo. Aw Calhoutll.
to.the Plymouth have been revoked,. ,
Bill to Provide for an Issue of Bonds.
Mr. Davis, or New introduced in the House this morning a- bill to authorize the is--
sue of convertible bonds It authorizes Abel.
• SedreWy - of - the Treasury to iSsue registered,
bonds in denominations of not less than $5O„
payable in' thirty years in gold, and freelront.
all excise and taxation whatever, either on
such bonds or the incomes derived therefrom.
Internal Revenue Bill. •"
A bill was introduced in the House. this- -
morning by Mr. Lawrence, of Ohio,-providing:
for the creation of -a new Executve Depart-
ment, to be-called the Department of Reve—
nue, with a Secretary at a salary of $B,OOO per -
annum, one Assistant Secretary at a salary of
86,000, land two Commissioners of Revenue at
a salary of $l,OOO each:- A=bill to= abolish the
offices of DepntvCommissioner of .Internal '
Revenue and Collector of Customs after
January Ist, 1871, at which timethe bill
goes into effect, was - referred - tcreonimittea-on
Retrenchment,. and ordered to_be printed.-
Arrival of a Practice Squadron.
• Commander E. O. Matthews, in charge of •
the Torpedo. Station off - Newport, R. 1., re:. "T •
ports to the Navy Department that the Frenolix
linoof-battle ship Jean Bart and the brig, -,
Obligado, comprising the French Practice
Squadron, arrived there on Friday front. , ::''
Bahia, Brazil, and would remain. at Newport,
ten days. • '
• - - • Ariny' Order.
Medical Purveyor, U. S. A., has been ordered
to proceed to New York city 6n the first Of
July arid asspniertenmorary"cinty - Or Chief , of
MedicalPorveyors, - 16. ' •
Segretary Itobepo,n
left here on Saturday evening for Prineeton,
New Jersey, where he will deliver the annual
address before the Alumni of Princeton. Col- -r
lege to-morrow. 33 - e will return ,here on.
Thursday.
rßy the American Press A.esociation. ~
FORTY-FIRST CONGRESS;
Second Hoodoo. , •
(SE%A.TE—Coutinvied from Third Edition.] - - -
Mr. Howe addressed the Senate in opposi
tion to striking'out the inceme t ix. section.
Mr. Cameron moved to'go int.) Executive.
session. Lost, yeas 26, nays 30. The question
being on striking out remaining sections re-,
lating to theancomeetax, it was agreed to. -
Mr. Sherman, offered two new se'etions„to , '
take the place ef the income sections stricken ;.: ,'
out. The sectionh were read and agreetito;
The following are the two sections' reported'
by Mr. Sherman mid adopted by the Senate';`
as substitutes for the income tax. sections
stricken out : • • •
First—That sections 120y.121,122. audl23 of '
the act ofJune 30th, 1864, as amended by. the, •
acts - of July 13th, 1866, and March 2d, 1867',,
shall be construed to impose the taxes therein • ' -
mentioned, being taxes on the dividends •of; -
corporation and' salaries of Government ;
officers, for and during the year 1870, and that •
all such taxes shall be collected in themanner ; .:
now or hereafter to be provided bylaw. -- • - 7 - 7
Second—That for the purpose of allowingde
ductless from the incomes of any religious' or ' '
social cOmmunity, holding all their liroperty
and the income thereftom jointly, and in com
mon, each five of the persons composing such.
society, and any remaining fractional nutiaber- -
of such persons loss than five, over such
groups of five, shall be held to constitute a
family, and a deduetion of $l,OOO shall be
allowed for each or. said families. Any taxes --.'-
on the incomes, gains and profits of such so
cieties
, •
now due and unpaid shall be assessed
and collected according to this urovisien. •
The next amendment of the committee, an-
thorizing the consolidation of two or more •
collection districts, was agreed to. •
The tariff sections of the bill were then pro
ceeded with, when the following amentimente
were agreed to : Striking out thellutyot live
cents per pound on chiccory, succory, dande
lion root, and on coffee and all substitutes for ,"
coffee.
Mr. Sherman desired to withdrair the
amenuments reducing the duty on sugar so as '
to allow the rate to remain as under the exist-„ ' ‘
' Ir.Handin and others objected to the with: . "
1 drawal of the amendments, and desired a vote
of the Senate upon them. Mr... Hamlin argued
that it would be perfectly competent to reduce ;
the duty' on sugar if_necessary. The large
surplus in the Treasury could be drawn upon.
Mr. Sherman thought it would not be wise,
now to make this reduction.
Boustr-Woutinued from the Fourth Edition.
On motion of Mr. Schenck, the rules were
suspended and the special order was agreed
to. On motion of Mr. Kelsey, from the Com
mittee on ApnrOpriations, the Senate amend
ments to the Consular and Diplomatic Appro
priation bill were non•concurred in, and a
conference committee was ordered..
Mr. Cox submitted a resolution reciting
that in April hist the House had instructed
the Secretary of the Treasury to report the
facts concerning the cartage system in conisee-,
Mon with the Custom service in 1.1 . ew York :
that the Secretary had subsequently abolisluid •
that system ; that it is alleged , his orderi have`
not
not been carried out and that therefore he be
requested to report what orders he has issued
in relation to the cartage system, what has
been done in the promises, &0. , Adopted.) :
Mr. Butler, front the Judiciary Cehninittee;
reported back the Senate bill to change jo
dicta] circuits, with the recommendation that
it do not pass. . ~ •
The Speaker laid beforelbe House several
communications from heads of departments
in answer to resolutions calling for inforina,
~
,
Pending the motion by Mr. Daw es, that the
House resume the Miscellaneous Appropria
tion bill in Committee of the Whole, the
Speaker laid before the House a telegram to
the Washington agent of the American Press
Association, dated_ L,ondon, announcing the.,
Ileatli'of the Zart of Clarendon, British Midis- •
ter of Foreign Affairs. '
Mr.Dawee'e motion was then agreed to.
- - Several - amendments were offered-to -are , :
graphs - milltirig - appro - pilations - fer — bri es,
s t
water-works, .!6c., in the District of Colt= ia.
--France has " maggot factories " which.
turn out-fgoti for 4:ski-ponds,
430 O'QYook.