Daily evening bulletin. (Philadelphia, Pa.) 1856-1870, December 08, 1869, Image 4

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The IlLtildletown New
0641116 Coierte—Delaware ,Insitoea-Bust
' mess Ihill--dough—mileneralArevs-s, &C.
itiorrespondelleb of the Philadelphia Eeenfita Bulletin.)
WlLhilßo TON, Dec. 4th.—:The chief excite
ment, since .1 last wrOte you - bas been the Mid
dletowii Bank Rebhery, - COn&rning Which you
bad the essential facts' by telegraph. Had not
the movements of a lady living next door
seared the rascals into a hurried flight, they
would donb,tless haVe: opened the Smaller safe
and largely increased their booty, as it con
tained The Bank's securities' and deposits. As
it ,was, the, Bank, loses - nothing—all of the
$20,000 worth of bonds taken having been
special deposits. Now, that ~the robbery has
been corinnitted everybody begins to . see how
misafe it is to conduct a bank in a room' in• a
hail, without a vault and without a watchman.
‘, o Twas ever thus," &c. .
The Weccacoe Hose Company, of this city,.
received last' Saturday the .hose-carriage and
hose of the Weccacoe Hose Company of Cam
den, N. J. They originally called . themielves
the Western Rose Company, but took their
new name as one of the conditions of the pur
chase. They are not, yet admitted to our lire
department, and it is possible they may not be,
as we already have too many fire companies..
There are seven companies without the new
one, and six of these have steam fire engines.
Rather a heavy department for a city of 35,000
inhabitants.
Joshua Jones and Lewis Carpenter, the two
colored men recently convicted of attempt to
commit rape, Were on Tuesday last sentenced
to be hung on Tuesday, the 4th of February
next. Carpenter received his sentence with
composure, but Jones was visibly agitated and
tears coursed down his cheeks. They were
doubtless guilty, and had a perfectly fair trial.
The case was an aggravated one, and the la*
will without doubt take its course. With all
of 'Delaware's many faults, the attentive ob
server will do her the justice of allowing no
prejudice against color to affect the judgment
of the courts in cases like this. A few months
ago a similar charge preferred by a disreputable
white woman against a respectable colored
man in the Sussex court was actually laughed
out of, court, the jury returning a verdict of
4 'not guilty" without leafing : the court. In
Maryland he would have been hung by a mob
before he could get to jail, much less to court.
The carriage-business is very dull now, and
work is much curtailed in the smaller factories.
Some of the larger establishments are still run
ning full time, making up a stock to meet 'ex
pected spring orders; but they have but few
orders now in,
and no sales. A little custom
work is being done for the South.
Gough lectures here on Thursday.. Of
course, he will have a full house ; he and negro
minstrels will draw houses in Wilmington
when no others can. Whether flails due to
any similarity in the character of the enter
tainments they present, I am not prepared to
say. Anna Dickinson will lecture here on the'
and will be received by many of us with
'pen arms—not literally, but metaphorically..
Middletown has caught the lecture fever, and
has engaged Olive Logan, Henry ll'ard
Beecher, Horace Greeley and "Brick" Pomeroy.
The last named is the tub thrown to the rebel
whale that swims thereabouts.
News is as scarce here as it appears from the
papers to be everywhere, and, so lacking it, let
me give you a little piece of gossip. We have
all beard of that modesty that leads ancient
maiden ladies to speak of the limbs of chairs
and to drape piano legs in pautalettes. I have
just beard of a piece of delicacy of a similar
nature. A house and sign painter, who has a
room in the basement of the Institute Building,
had painted for himself a sign which was
decorated by a picture of one of the little
cherubs, now so popular, standing with his
back towards the pavement painting , a sign.
Some of the directors of the Institute remon
strated with the painter, and insisted that he
should put some clothing on the cherub, which
be has accordingly done, and the little fellow
now appears with a sort of apron painted on.
his back and falling to the knees. is not this
refreshing' in the days of the nude drama? If
Formosa appears in your city again, let your
shocked citizens rush to Wilmington for pro
tection and relief. DALE.
iiiist CONGRESS—.SECOND SESSION.
[CONCLUSION OF YESTERDAY'S PROCEEDINGS.]
SENATE.—Mr. Trumbull introduced a bill
to relieve members of Congress frpm impor
tunity, and to preserve the independence of
the different departments of the Government.
It provides that any member of Congress or
delegate from a Territory, who shall directly
or indirectly solicit or recommend the ap
pointment to office by the President, or the
bexis of the departments,, of any person, or
who shall solicit Or recommend the employ
ment of any person in any of the executive
departments, except . such recommendation
be in wilting in response to a written request
of the head of the department 'asking infor
mation, or by a Senator in giving his advice
and consent in the manner provided by the
Constitution, shall be gitilty of a misdemeanor,
and on conviction thereof shall be fined- not
exceeding $l,OOO for each offence; and it shall
not be lawful the President or the head of
any department to-appoint to office or employ
in his department any person who shall be in
directly recommended therefor by any mem
ber of. Congress or, delegate from a Territory,
except in the manner now provided.
The bill was laid on the table for the present,
and ordered to be printed.
On motion of Mr, McCreery, the bill to re
lieve certain persons from legal and political
disabilities imposed by the Fourteenth' amend
ment to the Constitution was read and laid over;
• IlousE.—Mr. Williams introduced a bill to
repeal the duty on coffee, tea, salt, and writing
and printing paper. Referred to the Commit
tee on Ways and Means.
Mr. Walker introduced a bill to pro Mote the
International Industrial Exhibition to be held
in Washington City in IS7O. Referred to the
Committee on the District of Columbia.
Mr. Wood introduced a bill to prevent mem
bers of Congress from accepting or holding
any place of trust under the President. Re
ferred to the Judiciary Committee.
Mr. Ingersoll introduced a bill to prohibit the
sale of coin on the part of the United States,
and to provide for the redemPtion of the United
States legal tender notes in coin, at par. Re
ferred to the Committee of Ways and Means.
Mr. Paine, Chairman of the Committee on
Elections, reported hack the credentials of four
Alabama members, with a recommendation
that they be sworn in, and the oath of office
vias thereupon administered by the Speaker to
Messrs. Hays, Simmer, Helfin and Dix.
Mr. Butler (Term.) presented the creden
tials of the Virginia members. Referred to the
Committee on Elections.
Mr. Jenckes, from• the Committee on Pat
ents, reported a bill for the extensiom of
Richard M. Hoe's patent for printing press for
seven years. After considerable discussion,
Messrs. Jenekes and Peters advocating the
passage of the bill, and Messrs. Washburn, of
Wisconsin, and Niblack opposing it, the bill
was, on motion of Mr. Finkelnburg, laid on
the table.
Mr. Butler (Mass.) offered a resolution
directing the 'Postmaster-General to 'Fe port
what; if any, plan is practicable, by which
the pensions due to widows, orphans and
Soldiers may be paid through the money order
system of the Post Office Department.
Adopted.
Mr.Jfetcham presented a petition of citizens
of Pouglikeep§ie, New York, asking Congress
to accord belligerent rights to Cuba.
IT is thought that the arrest of Blatchford,
guilty of fraud in the New York Custom
House, will end in implicating a number of
"mpoTtervalatgonicirigh
~;aiiei.'.'r~iL'.it::+uri w~~+~%~~t:'~'~ii7la';l ~.s,.
CITY'
--The Chamber of, Cempiere,44 ;on . ,
street, abbe © Naf. , the, finest
most substantial,,binklings'inthe.trnited i ,Statei,
was, destroyed. by fire fast eVening. The flames
were first seen about five ; bey
named Michael riunigan, Who T notiged:the:Mil
gineer, Mr:T. Fine.' • Re was in the:basement
attending 0 the: fires, and ran up ,'Stairs
stantly, and by the time lie reached tlie• ' to 4
tunda,.the flames bad sPrea,d.with istindshing
rapidity,tind in afew minutes the glass sky-light
covering' , the dome • came, down • with a.
tremendous crash. The 'first thought,
of , the ' engineer, when Wormed *- of the
fire was to put ' the 'hose in . the
building in service, but he soon found : it 'would
be impossible to check the progress `of the
flames, which were then spreading through
portions of the edifice. Re then hurried to the
point where the means are provided to step the
flow of gas into the building, and shut it off,
thus preventing the escape of the gas and a
probable explosion. With terrible rapidity the
flames spread through the various apart
ments arid the < hall-waysi and descended
into the lower stories`, •so onickly ' en
veloping the building that a number
of persons busily employed in the rooms of the
second-story had to find egress through the
windoWs and reach the sidewalk by the agency
of ladders; 'The firemen, trying to , . gain - en
trance through the main door, were forced
back.by thick volumes of smoke, which for an'
hour laid a thorough embargo upon any at
tempt to penetrate the building. Luckily the
stricture was isolated by alleys and narrow
streets from surrounding buildings. The
firemen walked bravely, but against
adverse circumstances. While the de
partment did all in its power, it
was like working against fate, for the
flames would burn, and did burn until every
thing consumable by them was destroyed.
The Insurance Patrol reached the scene soon
after the alarm was given, and their coverings
were at once carried into the building to pro
tect the furniture and property on the first
&Or. The fire spread with such rapidity
that in a short time the interior of the structure
was one vast sheet of flame, and the falling of
the timber and portions of the roof soon hid
from view the blankets of the Patrol.
The Commercial 'Exchange building occu
pied a front of 92 feet on Second .street. and a
depth of 150 feet. The height from the pave
ment to the .top of the cornice was 60 feet,
while the eaves of the tower were 20 feet above
this. It was apparently, when looking. from
the front, i:tivo,story building, but in the rear
portion one:0 theSe stories, the lower one,was
dotible, thus making another half-story, with a
number of offices. The walls stand upon a
base of granite, with a facing of brown stone,
while the front, though now sadly disfigured,
was conspicuous for its fine proportions, the
dressing over the windows and doors being in
the. Roman-Doric order of architecture., The
main entrance, from Second street, eighteen
feet wide, was floored with marble and flanked
on both sides with offices of spacious dimen
sions.
The.building was occupied by the following
named parties:
First Floor.—The first'. story front, on the
side towards Chestnut street, was occupied by
Lewis Audeuried & Co., coal shippers.
The' first story front, lower side, was occu
pied by the Tradesmen's Bank. his portion
of the bulling was fire-proof, and no loss was
suffered, except by water.
Office No. 1. The Captains' and Ship-owners'
Assotiation.
Office No. 2. Water closets, &c.
Office No. 3. Vacant.
Office No. 4, by the Cotton and Woolen
Manufactory Association.
Office No. 5, Messrs. Pierce & Neyhart, pe
troleum brokers.
Office No. 6, E.'N. • Howard & Co., petro
leum brokers.
Office No. 7, Malcom ok, Lloyd, petroleum
brokers, and by C. H. Grant, tallow and candle
manufacturer.
Office No. 8, H. L. Foster, petroleum
broker.
Second Floor.-office No. 9, reception-room
of the Commercial Exchange.
Office No. 10, the . Secretary of the Com
mercial Exchange and Treasurer of the Cham
ber of Commerce.
Offices Nos. 11 and 13, the i WeStern Union,
Pacific and Atlantic, and Bankers' and Brokers'
Telegraph offices.
Office No. 12, the Pacific and Atlantic Petro
leum and Storage Company.
Office No. 14, Wardenfrew & Co., petroleum
brokers.
Office No. 15, Tack Brothers and A. B. Grey,
petrolemn brokers..
Office No. 16, F. A. Dilworth, petroleum
broker.
Office No. 17, Waring, King & Co., petro
leum brokers:
()like No. 18, Wm. P. Logan & Co., petro
leum bfokers.
The third floor formed a large hall, known
as the "Chamber of Commerce," and was
occupied by the Commercial Exchange Asso
ciation.
Its length was 130 feet, its width 88
feet, and its wails 35 feet high. The top of the
grand staircase, which opened into the centre
of this room, was surrounded by' eight Corin
thian columns reaching to the base of the
dome, the intervals being filled with a balus
trade. The walls and ceiling were handsomely
frescoed, being relieved by pilasters supporting
the once beautiful stucco cornice. The tables
in the room, thirty in number,
were of black - walnut, with polished
marble tops. It was through this
apartment that the flames unobstructed
made such great headway. They curled about
the pillars, shot up to the dome. and soon crept
into the soft., where the rafters fell quick prey
`to them. The roof and third floor went down
almost simultaneously, throwing up a vast cloud •
of sparks, which threatened the adjacent build
ings. The weight of the tables precipitated
the falling of, the joists. The fire burned
fiercely until everything was consumed. The
tables in this hall were occupied by the following
firms:—A. 0. Cattell & Co., Jas. Gibbs & Bro.,
C. 11. Cummings, R. M. Lea & Co.. F. M. & 11.
Brooks, George Ogden & Co., J. W. Suplee.
I3rooke, Colket & Co, H. Hindman & Co.,
Hoffman & Kennedy, A. Cowton & Co., Et,
tey & Co., L. G. Graelf, S. Busby & Co.,
Malone & Co. D. Dunwood & Co., All
man & Tisdale, S. &E. L. Perot, R. J.
Riddell, Sharpless, Slier &. Co., Lambert,
Thomas & Co., J. T. Bailey & Co., Cookman
& Baugh, Carhart,: Smith & Howell, Simon
Matlack, L. F. Perron, Wm. Brice & Co., Steel
& Cookman, J. W. _McKenna & Co., Beatty &
Hay, W. I'. Stroud, M. Devine & Co., J. Bober,
J. P. Bankson, C. S. Habits, 11. Craig & Co., A.
J. Catherwood, H. B. Hunsicker & Co., Britner
& Co., S. D. Prentzell & Co., C. B. • Rogers,
Frank Worley, S. C. White, N. Sellers & Co.,
E. V. Machette & Co., J. C. Aman & Co., P.
B. Mingle & Co., J. E. Palmer & Co., Josiah
Bryan & Co., Lafayette Baker,- S. Macky &
Co., Robert McKnight, F. C. Hill, Mathew,
Kolb & Co., Wm. B. Thoinas & Co., Clinton
& Co., Elkins & Suddards,
Hopkins & Griffith,
J. A. Blake & Co., Troth & Engle, S.J. Comly .
& Co., J. L. Bewley & Co., James Steel & Co.,
D. W. Hartine & Co., Cooper & Rogers, M.
L. Fell & Co., and H. H. Mears & Co.
The building viits owned by the Chamber of
Commence. Inchading the furniture, the build
ing cost $175,000, the furniture being valued at
$15,000. The lildingitts it stood, with all the
furniture of the various occupants, was valued
at $250,000. :• .
—The annual meeting of the Sixth Army
Corps Legion was held last evening, at the Hall
of the Fire Association, Fifth and North streets.
The- President, Gen. Latta, read the annual
report. The following were elected officers for
the ensuing year: President, J. W. Latta;
Vice President, Chas. Noble, jr. ; Secretaries,
Chas. 1). Green and D. W. C. 1P4.1 4 11ne ; Trea
surer, Dr. C. C. McGlaughliu; . Corresp
cries, J — nes - Dykes aiiiljjl7o7p,
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I „ r . 41 1
THE DAILY EVENINGELPRIA,'W”
• --Tbe-! Philadelphia Ministerial Conference
Of the Baptist Church held its annual session
yesterday in the Tenth Baptist Church, Eighth
street, near Green. . The following officers for
the ensuing year were elected. F'resident,
Rev: J. M. Pendleton; Vice-Presidents, Rev.
.1. F. Steadham, Rev. .1. B. Hutchinson, Sec
retary,Rev, J. G. Walker. 4During the mein
ing outlines..of sermons on Hebrews, Ist chap
ter, 14th verse, Were gi ven by Rev. J. E. E..
Jones, ,Rev. G. •E. oterelt: acid Rev. J. B.
Hutchinson. In the afternoon an 'exegesis
was given by Rev. P. L. Davies; .;of Camden,
on the' Ist chapter, 24th verse, of the Epistle of
Paul to the Colossians. Rev. G. D. Board
man, D. D., followed in -a discourse, the sub
ject being i‘The Second Adyent 'of the Shiner a
Surprise. in the evening a sermon was
preached on "The Insignificance of the Inear
nation," by Rev. W: P. Hellings, from the 3d
chapter of John, 14th. rem'. Addresses were
made by the retiring president, Rev. J. Spencer
Kennard, and the late secretary, Rev. Dr.
Spencer.
—Messrs. Thomas & Sons sold at the Ex
change,
,yesterday noon, the following stocks
and real estate :
Lot No. 461 Woodland Cemetery, $5O.
$l.OOO Harrisburg, rortsmouth, Mount Joy
and Lancaster Railroad, $9l 75.
$2,000 Connecting Railroad, $B5.
,$7,000 Central Passenger Railway, 11 per
cent. • • . . ,
35 shares Enterprise Insurance Company,
$47 50.
20 shares Enterprise ineuranee Company,
$47 50.
100 Schuylkill Navigation Company, $O.
S Bank of North America, $231 B'7.
3 Southwark Bank, $llB.
13 Southwark Bank, $ll7.
3 Southwark Bank, $ll7.
20 Amygdaloid Mining Company, 50 cents.
10 Pennsylvania Fire Insurance Company,
$174.
10 American Locomotive Read-light Com
pany, 10 cents.
8 Mercantile Library Company, $6 75.
—An inquest was held last night upon the
body of the little girl, Carrie L. Oldfleld, who
died from the effects of burns received on
Saturday morning last. The verdict of the
jury was : "That the said Carrie L. Oldfield
came to her death on the 4th inst. from the
effects of burns caused 14 the explosion of a
Can 'of burning fluid, called the Excelsior Re
fined Fluid, in the hands of Samuel B. Golf,
while he (the said Goff) was experlinenting to
test the non-explosive character of the article
at the grocery store of Charles P. Stackhouse,
N 0.124 Orthodox street, Twenty-third Ward."
Goff was committed to prison.
—Detective Miller went to Germantown
road and Ridge avenue yesterday, to arrest a
man named Louis Grim, on the charge of res
cuinf, a prisoner. He entered the house quietly
by the back door, and found Grim seated at a
table with all the paraphernalia of a policy
shot) before him. Forty-three cents were found
in the drawer, and among the other papers a
ticket bearing the mysterious numbers, 21, 31,
47. lie was held in $1,200 bail to answer the
charge of keeping a policy she!). •
. 7 -The trial of Gauge Mountjoy upon the
charge of aiding and abetting the removal of
whisky from his distillery after. it had been
seized by the Internal Revenue officers, was
concluded yesterday in the United, States Dis
trict Court, before Judge Cadwalader, and re
sulted in a verdict of guilty. Notice of an
intention to file reasons for a new trial was
given, and the defendant was released upon
$lO.OOO bail.
—An interesting game of billiards was played
last night at Mr. James Palmer's saloon, 609
Chestnut street, by Victor Estephe and Jatnes
Palmer against E. H. Nelms and Wm. Rock
lin'. It was 200 points French caroms, and was
witnessed by a large audience. The largest
run, 18, was made by Nelms, and the best
score and' average by Estephe, the game finally
standing—Estephe and Palmer, 200; Nelms
and Rocklin', 144.
—The Aldermanic fines and penalties re
turned to the City Treasury for the month of
November were: Lewis Godbou, $3B; W. S.
Toland, $44 '75; William Neill, $B4; C. C.
Pancoast, $4B; Thomas Dallas, $29; A. T.
Eggleton, $6O; J. P. Thompson, $26; Charles
Carpenter, $5O; Andrew Morrow, X3O; J.
R. Massey, $37 ; Francis Hood, $35, and W.
R. Heins, $3O.
—Michael White, who keeps a harness store
on Girard avenue, above Tenth street, was ar
rested yesterday, by Detectives Cobb ano
Fletcher, on the charge of receiving stolen
goods. A lot of whips, valued at thirty dollars,
stolen from the store of G. W. Otto, No. 1802
North Eighth street, were found in his posses
sion.. He was held in $BOO bail to answer.
—Wm. Y. Leader, James M. Divine, and
M. H. Rondenbush were before Alderman
Jones, yesterday, on a further hearing, charged
with an alleged conspiracy to defraud C. Leslie
Reilly of $l,BOO. The Alderman held the
parties to bail in the sum bf $1,500.
—Yesterday a man named Philip Clarke,
late Ocean county, N. J., was before Mayor
Cox on a charge of having more wives than
the law allows, one:more, at least, than he felt
disposed to support. It appears that about two
years ago; while residing in Ocean county, he
professed to have fallen deeply in love with a
Miss Thompson, at all events, he went so far
as to marry her. Soon afterwards he for
sook her and went to parts unknown. At
last the wife discovered that he was residing in
Camden with another Mrs. Clark, " bone of his
bone, and flesh of his flesh," and she hastened
to that city. She soon found that her informa
tion was correct, and applied to his Honor the
Mayor for the necessary process to bring him
to justice. The document was issued, and
the man was arraigned. Here he was con
fronted by his two " better halves," and no
doubt he felt himself a third " half " in rather
a strange and Unenviable predicament. lie made
no excuse; what excuse could he make? But,
as his marriage with wife No. 1 occurred in
Ocean county, the bigamy charge is cogniza,-
, ble before the courts there. He was held,
Thowiiyer, to answer , another very serious
charge in the Camden courts, whither lie re
paired yesterday, and Pleaded guilty. After he
gets through there he will go to Ocean and be
put through a course of moral training in the
courts of that county.
—Much dissatisfaction is exhibited against
the proposition to remove the post-office from
its preSent eligible position to Third and Plum
streets,
in the miserable building designed.
Mr. Lee, the Postmaster, has been given the
credit (and he was worthy of it) for establish
mg the post-office in its present location, the
only decent place and building it has been
in for the last twenty years at least; and now
to remove it to an old rickety, tumble-down
shanty, out of the way of the general travel
and business streets will be regarded as highly
improper and ridiculous. The Government
should allow enough to rent a respectable
building, instead, of $2OO per annum, as at
present.
—Some time during Monday night the dwell
ing house of Mr. Gillingham, on Vine street,
Cooper's Point, was entered by some burglar,
who took advantage of the storm and robbed
it of an overcoat and some other articles. He
forced an entrance by prying open a window
shutter, but he must have been frightened
away before obtaining the amount of booty he
was after. '
—The different phases of human physiog
notny and character are pretty well developed
in those persons who make application at the
Camden Station House for lodgings at night.
That institution is crowded nightly by such as
have no place to sleep, and are willing to accept
any accommodations that are available:
—The members of the Third Street M. E.
Church, of Camden, are making extensive
is for giving their usual Holiday -
i:alieneht o-tlieFSabbath-school.
CAMDEN GOSSIP.
—Burghtm begin to, operate in: in Cam
den. For 801116 time pad the Citizens have OR. ,
joyed a blissful immunity front their depreda
tions, and began to think' that they , had ample
pkoteCtlon against their nocturnal deeds oflaw
lessness, but they have `recently been Warned
of the necessity of being their own protectors.
- -I.tost'of the churches are preparing for. the
holiday festivities in Camden, some otthem on
an 'extensive scale. These reunions ate, al
ways attended with , many pleasing iceldents
and ceremonies.
-- , -The proprietors ,
of the Camden Skating
Park are' fixing it up in good condition, and it.
Is determined ,to 11MT;
,some gItY thrifts on It
this winter, if the, weather is at, all favontl i llt
and it bids fair to be. ,
—The sleighing in Camden, yesterday a nd
this forenoon, was enjoyed by large numbers of
people, but the wagons soon mixed the snow
with'sand, and made it unfit for sleighing pur
poses.
—The painful accident which occurred in
Ifiuldonfield a. few days since,in which' a young
lad, aged fourteenlyearS,_ named Fowler, was
wounded in the forehead by a pistol shot; haS
since resulted in his death.
recent cold snap has caused the sus
pension of work on all the streets and other
improvements of Camden, as far. as outside
labor is concerned.,
—The special Court of Quarter Sessions of
Camden• n
, commeneed yesterday. The usual
number of cases were on the list for a hearing,
some of which are rather spicy.
The Father of Frederick the Great.
The king was scrupulously clean, washing
five times a day. He would allow no drapery,
no stuffed furniture, no carpets in his apart
ments. They caught dust. He sat upon a
plain wooden chair. He ate roughly, like a
lamer, of roast beef, despising all delicacies.
His almost invariable dress was a close raill
ery blue coat with red cuffs and collar, buff
waistcoat and breeches, and white linen gaiters
o the knee. A sword was belted around his
loins, and as we have, said, a stout ratan or
bamboo cane ever in his hand. He walked
rapidly through the streets which surrounded
his palace at Potsdam and Berlin. If ho met
any one who attracted his attention, male or
female, he would abrnptly, menacingly inquire,
"Who are you V. A street lounger he has
been known to bit over the head with his
cane, exclaiming "Home, you rascal, and go to
work." if any one prevaricated or hesitated,
he would sternly demand, "Look me In the
face." If there was still hesitancy or the king
were, dissatisfied,with the answer, the o'ne in
terrogatell was lucky if he escaped without a
caning.
The boorish king bated the refinement and
polish of the 'French. If he met a lady in rich
attire, she was pretty sure to be rudely assailed,
and a young man fashionably dressed could
hardly escape the cudgel if he came. within
reach of the king's arm. The king, stalking
through the streets, was as marked , object
as an elephalit would have been. Everybody
instantly recognized him, and many fled at his
approach. One day he met a pale, threadbare
young man, who was quietly passing him,
when the king stopped in his jerking gate. and
demanded, in his coarse, rapid utterance,
"Who are you ?" "I am a theological student,"
the young man quietly replied. "Where fmm?"
added the king. "From Berlin." was the re
sponse. "From Berlin," the king rejoined.
" the Berliners are all a good-for-nothing set."
"Yes, your Majesty, that is true of many of
them," the young man added, "but I know of
two exceptions." "Of two ?" responded . the
king ; " which are they ?" " Your Majesty
and myself," the young man replied. The
king burst into a good-humored laugh, and,
after having the young man carefully examined,
assigned him to a chaplaincy.—Harper's Mag
azine. -
STATIONERY.
IMPORTANT TO BOOK-KEEPERS:
JUST PUBLISHED.
THE
" CATCH-WORD
LEDGER , 'INDEX.
(COPYRIGHT SECURED.)
Book-keepers and all others having' to use an Index
will find this a very valuable book.
By using the "Catch-word" Index, it will not only
save time and eyesight.but the finding of a name quickly
Is a mathematical certainty.
You are invited to call and examine it.
PUBLISHED BY
JAS, B. SMITH & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Blank Book Manufacturers and
Stationers,
No. 27 South SEVENTH Street,
PHILADELPHIA.
n 024 w f m 3nirpF,
EADQUARTERS FOR EXTRACTING
11 TEETH 'WITHFRESH NITROUS OXIDE GAS.
ABSOLUTELY NO PAIN.
DR. F. IL THOMAS, " formerly Operator at Colton
Dental Rooms," positively the only O ffi ce in the city
entirely devoted to extracting teeth without pain.
Office, MI Walnut street. mlts lyrp§
OLTON DENTAL ASSOCIATION 0111
C
gloated the antenthetic nee of
NITROUS OXIDE, OR LAUGHING GAS,
And devote their whole time and practice to extracting
toot .without pain.
Office, 'Eighth and Walnut etreet4 . • ap2Oly
_
TWIN GRUMP, BUILDER
1731 CHESTNUT STRL I ET,
and 213 LODGE STREET.
Mechanics of every branch required for house-building
and fitting prorontly furnished. ' fe27-tf
HENRY
CARPENTER AND BUILDER,
NO. 1024 BANSOM STREET,
Jelo-Iyro PHILADELPHIA.
rritiATS A SMART LAD OP YOURS!
A. Don't you think the gift of a Chest of Toole would
greatly delight him, by givingkirrithe moans of morels
ingfiis mechanical talent and inventive faculties? A
variety of them from 6ilto e5O. For sale by TRUMAN
& SHAW, No. 835(Eight Thirty-five) Market street,
below Ninth. • •
SKATES FOR MISSES, BOYS, LADIES
and gentlemen. Skates sharpened up and repaired
Skate Straps, Heel Plates, Skaters' Companions, Pocket
Gimlets. Also Creepers, to prevent your slipping upon
ice or sleety pavements. For sale by TRUMAN &
SHAW, No. SZIA (Eight Thirty-live) Market street, be.
'
low Ninth.
PRETTY TINY POCKET-KNIVES SCIS
SORS, Pincers, Hatchets, Saws, Razors, km. for
Watch Charms, at TRUMAN SHAW'ti.No.l33s(Eight
Thirty-tivo)Market street, bolow Ninth.
FO3l INVALIDS . —A FINE MUSICAL
Box as a companion for the sick chamber; the finest
assortment in the city, and a great variety of airs to se. ,
lect from. Imported direst by eARR & BROTHER,
mhletf re ,524 Chestnut street. below Fourth.
K ANCREATICEMULSION, FOR CON
SBMPTIYES.
' •
EIBIG'S EXTRACT OF MEAT.
lIA'WLEY'S PEPSIN.
TOURTELOT'S EXTRACT OF BEEF.
For sale by JAMES T. SHINN,
oca-tf rp Broad and Spruce streets, Philadelphia
UT ED DING AND ENGAGEMENT
Binge of solid 18 karat fine Gold—a specialty; a full
assortment of sizes, and no charge for engravin .g names,
etc. FARE & BROTHER, Makers,
nv2ii-ro tf Ohastnut street below Fourth.
---
MAGAZIN DES MODES.
1014 WALNUT STBERT.
MRS. PROCTOR
Cloaks, Walking Suiteßilks
Dress eloods, Lace Shawls
Ladies' Underclothing
and Ladies' Funs
Dresses made to measure in Twenty-four Hours
cl„„„ 41 HORSE COVERS, 'UR ROBES,
Lap Rugs and Morse Get( All kinds. NOIIO
utter or cheaper. KNEA SS'S Harness Store, 1128 Mar
ket s t r eot. Big Horse in the door. iYI7-IY4P_
ftW.A.RBURTON'S IMPROVED, v.ixtr-
Carded anVttey-11tting Drees Hate (patented) In all.
ho approved btone of the season. Cheetnut street,
nest door to th ,Post-Onlce. oc,(1-tfrp
.__. —
A REPAIRS TO WATCHES . AND
Mnsicati Boxes in the beet manner, by. skillful
workmen. --- FARR - dt—BROTHErt,
Chestnut greet below Fourth.
'.....' A . ..80 *14,40.ir0Ti0..88:);.....
kiZTHE ANNUAL SALE FUR MIS
i kelo o v e rfori:.
o va hug In the Sunday
nbovo Byruco,. an qt.INSPitY, WElSNAlblP r i e in t d
'i THURSDAN of this4446olw date
...1
I&OFFICE OF 0, , TILE ..ttELIANC , 'E
INSURANCE COMPANY EMILADEIe„
1" Eti4 /306,
' PHlL2.llltEPtirk, Nov. W. IBM
The ,Annual bloating Of the Stockholders of "Tho
Ito-
Ilance Insurance Doinoao2 of Philadelphia," and tho
' Annual Election of thirteen ill) Dirootori, to serve for,
the mooing year, held at' this °Mee OttMON
DAY, December 20th, IMO, at 12 o'clock M.
n 029 to de2o§ ' WM. CHUBB, Socrotorf.
ADELPHIA, V. ID, 1849;
An election for Managers of the Plymouth Rail
road Company will ho held at the, office of the Company,
northeast aornor anal Oreem Watts, In the oitY 4
of Philadelphia; on MONDAY, thellth day of Deeerm
bar, 1809, between the hours of 10 A. M. and 3 P. M.
A. E. DOURIIERTY,
lenct22-18t§. , , Secretary_ !
APPLICATION" OILL - BE' . 3 , EAD
w e v to Franklin Insurance Company to reissue Polley
26,833 in nainoof WILLIAM W. JUSTICE, on premises
WallacelNUß street. Original del et*
AANeING, ACASiEMIES.
ASHER'S DANCING ACADEMIC,
NO. 808 FILBERT STOIIET.
All the New and Fashionable Dances Taught.
Ladies and Gentlemen—Monday, Tuesday, Thursday
and Friday le yen in . •
1111ssee and Masters—Tuesday and Battirdar After
noons.
Gentlemen Onlr—Saturdar Evening.
Private Ineaons.siugly or in maws, at any hour to.snis?
oonvonience. oc2B-2ral
A.BI USE M Elm Ter:
AMERICAN ACADEMY OF MUSIC.
HANDEL AND HAYDN SOCIETY.
FIRST CONCERT. FOURTEENTH_ SEASON.
A NIGHT WITH MENDELSSOHN.
The Society
EVENING,
the production on
TUESDAY EVENIN, DECEMBER ItTH, MO,
the performance of
" THE HYMN OP PRAISE,"
a selection from
E
FORTY-SECOND PSALM,"
and a chorus and chorale front
" SAINT PAUL."
by Felix Mendelisoltn-Bartholdy.
The solo parte will be sustained by -
MISS MARIA BRAINERD, of New York:
MISS NELLIE LIICKENBACH, of Philadelphia;
MIL JACOB GRAF, of Philadelphia; twisted by the
large CHORUS OF THE SOCIETY, and a POWERFUL
ORCHESTRA OF V) PERFORMERS.
The whole under the leadership of Mr. L. Engelke,
Subscriptions for the three Concerti of the Society,
with secured seats for the season, received at Trampler e,
926 Chestnut street.
Reserved seats for this Concert (el 60) can be obtained
after Monday, December 6th, at either Trampler's, No.
926, Gould's, No. 923, or lioner'e, No. 111)3 Chestnut
street. dell•St§
rl/IRS. JOHN DREW'S ARCH STREET
/71. TREATRHE E. OVERLAND ROUTE Begins to 8.
T.
BY MRS. JNO. DREW AND COMPANY.
MONDAY AND EVERY EVENING,
Toni Taylor'S Great Scenic Comedy
THE OVERLAND ROUTE.
WITH EVERY:SCENE NEW:
MRS. JOHN DREW
APPEARING AS MRS. SEABRIGUT.
Aided by tho Full Company.
Seats &cum." Six days in advance.
WALNUT STREET THEATRE,
N. E. cor. Ninth and Walnut streets.
THIS, WEDNESDAY, EVENING, Dec. tith,
Mint NighMt
ISS of theßA Renowned artiste,
TEMAN,
When will be presented the New firma, by Tom Tay
lor, written expressly for Miss Bateman, entitled
MARY WARNER.
MARY....... .... MISS BATEMAN
Bliss Bateman will he pportei by Mr. GEORGE
JORDAN, MISS VIRGINIA FRANCIS and the full
strength of the Company.
Chairs Secured Six Days in mit ;ince.
L AURA KEENE'S • •
CHESTNUT STREET THEATRE.
TO-,NIOUT, after weeks of preparation, an original ro
' mantic Irish Drams. in tire acts, entitle.,l
,PA.TRICE •
OR, THE WHITE. LADY OF WICKLOW.
With now scenery. notel effects and flue cast.
PATRIC' , Miss LAURA KErsE
THIRD CHILDREN'S MATIN Eli. SATURDAY AT 2.
. , The Play—POOß BABES IN THE WOOD '
Or, THE KIND FAIRY BIRDS.
Et smug. doors open at 7. Commence at to I.
DITPREZ & BEN EDI() Ts OPERA
HOUSE, SEVENTH. Street, below Arch.
(Late Theatre COM Poe."
Confirms,' Success and furrow... 4 Attraction.
THIS EVENING ANL CONTINUE EVERY NIGHT.
DUPKEZ 4 BENEDICT'S
Gigantic Itlinstrela and Burlesque Opera Troupe.
Introducing Another Immense New I.rogranune.
First Tits:a—N ew If I—T—Thiarog.
First Week—Fascinating Font G7ces.
Time—!Jett It
First Tinu—eear Back Bob.
First IVeek—ltobluson, Belle of !Multi/.
AMERICAN ACADEMY OF MUSIC.—
THE TWELFTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION
W ill take place on
ViEDNESDAY EVENING. Pel).9th, tno.
PROFESSOR L. LEWIS:
IS. D.—GYMNASIUM, Corner NINTH nnd ARCH,
IS OPEN ALL DAY AND EVENING.
Private Lesonr in Fencing nut Sparringalso.
IPCX:43 AMERICAN THEATRE,
1' Er err Ereming, the Greatest Gymnasts of the arm
RIZA BLLL I BROTH BRSi Printers Dauseuse, MIle:
LUPO. 3.111 e. DE ROSA , BB A LL , Sc.
MISS kVA. BRENT, Queen of Song. .
New Ballets, New Sown,. Datum, an., &c.
Matinee on Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock.
T EMPLE OF WONDERS,
ASSEMBLY BUILDINGS.
SIGNOR BLITZ In hit new mysteries, assisted by his
son, THEODORE BLITZ. Evenings at TU. Matinees
'Wednesday and Saturday, at 3.
Magic, Ventriloquism, Canaries and Burlesque. Min
strels.
Admisaion, 25c.; Reserved Beats, 50c.
AMERICAN CONSERVATORY -7- 61 4 ' -
I'l MUBIO.—WINTER TERM will begin MON
DAY, Jan, 3, WO. Names of New Pupils should be en
tered BEFORE THE 18th of DECEMBER.
There are a few vacancies which may be filled by
early application'at the office.
No. 14 , 24 WALNUT STREET. • del-l4§
NEW ELEVENTH STREET OPERA
HOUSE
FAMILY RESORT.
CARNCIWES t DIXICY'S MINSTRELS.
EVERY EVENING.
. • , J. L. OMINCROSS, Manager,
QENTZ AND HASSLER'S MATINEES.-
lifnalpal Fund 'Hall, 1869-70. Every SATURDAY
AFTERNOON, at o'clock. ocl9-tf
A SCHERZER'S CONCOItDIA HALL,
A
formerly City Museum, in Callowhill street,below
Fifth, is the most convenient and finest structure In the
city. Can be rented for Concerts, Dolls. Theatrical .
Performances, etc. nol2-f m w 12t
A CADEMY OF FINE ARTf3,
CHESTNUT street, above Tenth.
Open from 9 A. M. to 6 P. M.
Benjamin West's Great Picture of
011BIBT REJECTED
Is still on exhibifton. jet2.tf
BUSINESS CARDS.
Established 11521..
WM. G. FLANAGAN ds SON,
HOUSE AND SHIP PLUMBERS,
wny§
No, 129 Walnut Street.
•
JAMES A. WRIGHT, THORNTON PILE, CLEMENT A. GUI
COM, THEODORE WRIGHT, PRANK L. NEALL.
PETER 'WRIGHT & BONS,
Importers of earthenware
an
Shipping and Commission Merchants,
No. lla Walnut street, Philadelphia.
lfil B. WIGHT_,
L:I. ATTOBNEY-AT-LAW,
...)ouunissioner of Deeds for the State of Pennsylvania in
•Illinoie.
i+G Madison street, No. 11, Chicago,llllnols. anl9tll_
COTTON SAIL - 0
1. DII OF EVERY
width, from 22 inches to 7d inches wide, all numbers
Tent and Awning Duck, Taper-maker's Felting, Bail
Twine, tie. JOHN W. EVERMAN,
j a 2.6 ' No. 303 Church street, City Stores.
_
PRIVY WELLS.—OWNERS6O PROP
erty—The only place to get privy wells cleansed and
dislnfected, at very low prices. A. PEYSSONJdann
factnrer of Poudrette. Goldsmith's Hall. Library street
COAL AND WOOD.
COAL! THE CHEAPEST AND HEST
Vin the city .—Keep constantly on hnnd the celetrated
HONEY BROOK and HARLEM LEHIGH ; also,
J
EAGLE VEIN LOCUST MOUNTAIN and BOSTON
RUN COAL. J. IdACBONALD. JR. Yards, 019 South
Broad at. and 1140 Washington avenue. 00l 9m
S. MASON limas. JOHN F. 911Biiii.
filllE UNDERSIGNED INVITE ATTEN.
lion to their etock of
Spring Mountain, Lehig. h and Locust Mountain Coal,
which, with the preparation lidven byitts, we think can•
not he excelled by any other Coal.
Office, Franklin institute Building, No. is S. Seventh
street. BIN ES & MEANT,
ialodfArch street wharf. Schuylkill.
CAUTION
Q TIC E. , -ALL PERSONS ARE
hereby.cautioned against trusting any of the crew,
of the British Burk Kensington, Raymond, Maator,from
New York, as no debts of their contracting will be maid
by either the Captain or Consignees. PETER WRIGHT
Jr. SO B,IIA Walnut street. del-t.9
401 MONEY' TO ANY AMOUNT
LEANED JIJPON DIAMONDS, WATCHES,
JEWELRY, PLATE, OLOTHING, so., at
JONES & CO.'S
OLD-ESTABLISHED LOAN OFFIDE•
Corner ofßelow Third
L and Gaskill streets,
ombard.
. _ .. . . . _ .
R.B.—DIAMONDS,WATORES;JEWELRY,GUNB
0.,
HOE SALE AT
, REMARKABLY LOW PILIOEB.
mr24tfrui
SPIRITS TURPENTINE AND ROSIN.
66 barrels Spirits Turpentine; 292 barrels Palo Soap
Rosin ;199 barrels No. 2 Rosin, lauding per steamship
"Pioneer." For sale by EDW.' IL ROWLEY, 16, South
Trout street.
NAVAL STORES.-298 BBLS. ROSIN,
GO bbls. Tar, 30 Eiteb, 203 blits. Mime
White Spirits Turtiontine. Now landing from steamer ;
Pioneer, - from Wiliontaton,—N, • 0. -and-for—aate
COCIIRAN, IttitiSELL CO., 111 dirstuut street. l•
,11 OR 04144.4..i.]....1.,:.
.11ARGAINI
NEW 4ND HANDEIDME DWELLINO.
' 110'7 Eirfre4DE "WIRIEST,
4-Story (Trench roof.)
Finished*** Fine Nixie. pails, ,
tril/ be sold reasonable, and not much money
,needal.
.6.PPLT TO
SOFIN I arANAMAICER,
Sixth and Markoit Street&
if ARCH STREET RESIDENCE
FOR SALE
No. 1922 ARCH STREET
•
Elegtint Drown-Stone Ileaidence, three storMi mid
Mansard'roof ; very commodious, furnished 'with ento,
modern convenience, and built in a very superior and
substantial manner. Lot 26 feet' front by MO feet deep to
Cuthbert Meet, on which is erected a handaome brie"
Stable and Coach House.
J. M. GUMMEY & SONS,
733 WALNUT Street.
- ee2o tfro
Et, No. 1805 Spring Garden St. a
FOR SALE.
•
A new Drown Stone Doulple Front, with plata
and glass so walnut finish ,
on the whole front, high
stoops end all modern conveniences throughout. Built in
the best manner, and with best material. Terms emir. ,
Apply of promises from /I to 12 A. IL, or 3 to 5 P. IC, or
at =Christian street.
de7 At" R. T. mzrzr.n..
FORSALE.—MODERN RESIDENCE
JUL in thorough repair, 734 Flue street,• 23 by 130 to a
hack street, On easy terms. FRED. SYL FESTER, XS
South Fourth street. deS Wite 21¢
FOR SALE OR TO LET—DWELL
MING 633 Coates street, V 3 to 21 feet front, 126 feat
deep, roar entrance on Marshall street. Large saloon.
parlor, good-size hall, 2 doors entrance to parlor, wide
staircase, dining-room and kitchen on first foor, with
new range ;side-alley from Coates street, with large nide
yard ; 2 large-size chambers, sltting•room, with hot and
cold water, on second fluor ; with 2 largo pleasant attics
in perfect order, being lately papered and painted ;• largo
(genets, At,. Apply 1404 Spruce street. de .2t•
eFOR SALE,-THREE-STORY BRICif
Dwelling. 1110 Rodman st. Lot 60 rod back, en
trance on Eleventh et. Possesslon In January. del-2t`
0 - 4 titit SilkNE6 NTrir .
Ka price street, nine rooms. Lot 111x101. Only
49.000. Only. §3,4X10 cash wanted. Apply anon to
C. KEYSER KING, next to depot, Germantown. dent'
te FOR SALE OR TO LET=-THE DE-
M a Irable property. No. VS North Moth street,
suitable 'either for a reshleuce or., place of
buelnesd.
xio2B fuj tvt; "
A• -----
FOR SALE—ELEGANT DEO NV N-
Stone 110xIdeace, with Coach Rouse, No. ROI
ce street. Furniture ty,w. and will'Lo included
wished. ApplytoJ. NORRIS ROISINSON. at DR,I4X Ins
&CO 8,34 'Third street. nuAl to w tti
fffe, HIGH. writEET, GERM. AN TO N
V. For ttale.—A double stone residence with all the
city convenience. The grounds are handsomely laid wit
and planted with choke fruit, shade twesand shuddery.
Loratett within five minutes walk of Itailtoari Depot.
J. M. tit 31.31EY it SONS, Trs Walnut street.
.1 , " 0 R.SAL E HANDSOME
thres•story brick dwelling with attics and three
story back buildings, situate No. ILI North Nineteenth
street; him every tuodern convenience and improvement,
end iutx rfectorder. Lot M feet front by lag feet deep.'
Immediate poseession Oven. J. M. GUMMI!, Y k BUNK
733 Walnut Ftreet.
M. FOR SA— WELL INGS
2524 Korth broad,. 1239 North Ninteenth,
27 booth Boroad. lUD 'North rrtreet s
2 3D Chtildiaa. 94 North Fifteenth street
Also many other* for sale and rent.
JAblEti W. fIAVeNB.
nonft S. W. for. Broad and Chestnut.
AR. FOR :SALE DWELLING 1421
Ald. North Thirteenth street ; every convenience, and In
good order.
Soperior dweltlng.l4= North Twolfth street, on easy
terms. th 5.501
Three-story brick. 235 North Twelfth street, having a
good two story dwelling in the rear. t=9llo
Three-stot7 brick, 5/8 Powell street, in good order.
e 2.750.
More and dwelling, N 0.340 South Sixth street. SS,IXe.
Frame house, trrJ Third street, South Camden, mar
spruce, Near. 800.
310 Queen street, two-story brick, good yard.
'Building Lotion Passyunk road, and a good Lot at
Rising no.
1108EHT ORA FFEN
all Pine street.
1011. SAL E 11ANDSODI El
'5 Brown Stone and Prom Brick liwellin,g. No. 2118
bpruco street, with allow] every improvement. Built la
tbo best manner. Immediate poaseoslon. Ono
half can remain, if 'derirett. Apply to COPPUCK It
JORDAN. 433 Walnut street.
FOR BALE. - THE VALUARLR
Property LW. corner of fifth and Adel phi streets,
elow Walnut. 02 ft.t front by IWS feet deep frontiod
on three streets. .1, G EY sO?b , 7 33 Walnut
street.
ORARCH STREET—FOR SAGE..:--THE
Elegant Tlrown•Stone Residence, So feet frest.
and finished throughout in a superior manner.
with lot 155 feet deep to Cuthbert street • with large sta.
ble and coach- housenn the rear. .1. hi. GUEURET
802it3,193 Walnut street.
mIFOR SALE-A HANDSOME EMI
EOIE:WE, 21113 Spruce street.
A Store and Dwelling, northwest corner Elgtitti ..4
Jefferson.
A tine Residence 1711 Vine street.
A handsome Residence, 4O South Ninth street.
A handsome Beaklence. West Philadelphia.
A Business Location ,
_Strawberry street.
= A Dwelling, No. 1110 North Trout attest. Apply to
CO PPUCK A JORDAN. 4.13 Walnut street.
TO RENT.
New Motel to Lease,
Fifteenth and Chestnut Streets,
PILILADELPIIIA.
Flrst-elass In all Its apartments. Marble stone front.
About ff) rooms. Aildreya JuuN'CUUMP. CIIIC'T•
NUT Street, l'hlludelplila, Pa.
de.3 6t¢
CREME Lic MoCOLLU.Si, REAL ESTATE
AGENTS.
Oftlee,isekson street, opposite Mansion street, Oape
island, N.J. Real Rstate bought stul sold. Persona
desirous of ren tins cottages during the season will apply
or addries as above.
Respectfully Wet. to Chu. A. Rubleam,fienry Hamm
Francis Mellvaln, Aagustaa Merino, John Davis I
W. W: Juvenal. le
rPO LET.—A. SPACIOUS SUITE OF
1 COUNTING 1100315,--vrith- ono or more "orison
Chestnut street,. Apply to
,COCII/14N, &
CO., Chestnut street. • oezt-tr;
• -
rpo — LET—THE SPLENDID SECOND
." Kory room ofstere southwest corner of Eleventh
Mid Chestnut streets, with all the modern conveniences.
Also. the front basement to let. Apply oh the preml , * ,
R
at the office of the American Dutton Role and Sevrmy
MachinoCompany. mo29m w f 6t§
PORREN -T-4500 PER.YEAR-
Three-otory Dwelling, modem conveniences.
oodlantt street, above Thirtrthird,
S West Philadel
phia. In thorough repair. HIED. YLVESTICR,2Oe
South Fourth street. dpi was-20
- FOR RENT, ON LIBERAL TERMS
NEL Restunrant, Boarding-home, largo building, at
east end °11:41444nm street bridge, 1p good order, oppo
site elating Mutt. FliEll. SYLVESTER. Me South
Fourth iiireet, de -w a 2t§
en, TO LET.-.-STORE NO. 318 MARKET
jigistreet. POSSCHRiOII given Jtimunty I next. Apply to
T 11. BACHE,
231 South Thirteenth aired.
02 TO LET.-LARGE SECOND-STORY
roonhon Thlrd street, below Arch. 40 feet front.
Apply to"F.W., BULLFTIIi OffiCe." de6rn w f 3t`
ea TO LET,--DESIRABLE NEW IRON
Nlna front Store, If o . 635 Market street, 22 by 130 feet to
Cen,naerce. Excellent light. ApPE
tly to
JOHN ARCE,
No. 327 Market street.
FOIL RENT-A LARGE AND SPLEN
ESL DID Mansion Mouse, northeast curler ThirtY
n inth and Locust streets, formerly belonging to Samuel
T. Alto:atm. ESQ., and adjoining A. J. Drexel, Esq.
A pply to Wharton E. Barris, 3907, Spruce street.
w s-2t*
02 TO RENT-THE INTERNATIONAL
Lail Aotel, on Second street, below Spruce. Address,
LANDLORD, this office, del
al TO LET—HOUSE 706 SOUTH SEVEN..
TEENTIf street. Portable heater, rouge, bath,
but water, gas—all the modern conveniences. Eight
rooms. Apply on the premises. Jo/At
FUENJ.SHED HOUSE FOE RENT—
Ma situate on Pine street, west of Twentieth. Immo
diate.possessien given. J. M. OUbIMEY Sc SONS, 733
Walnut street.
figg 'NORTH -NINETEENTH STREET.—
.mg To Rent—The three-story residence, with three
story double back buildings and side yard t has all tho
modern conveniences. Situate No. 102 North Nineteenth
street, second door above Arch. J. 111. tRI3IIIIEY &
SONS, 733 Walnut street. .
im FOR RENT.-THE DESIRABLE
`ilanroperty situate N. E. corner Gliestant end
Elbventh streets. Will be improved. GUMMET
& SONS, 76.3 Walnut street.
dB FOR RENT-THE DESIRABLE 4- •
.11111 story_brick store No. 612 Market street. J. M. '
GUMMEY & 50N5.7.33 Walnut street.
Iy&ORTG - AGES.
2 090
these amounts for sole. App , ly to
rao 4 i B drstriTio 2o 2 „A , ,N, "
tortgai,es for
A. N ITLER, Conveyancer,
No.Bl North Sixth street.
MEEM
§BIG. P. RONDINELLA, TEACHER OF'
Blnging. Private lessons and classes. Residekse
B. Thirteenth street. an2S-tri
DI OE-79 CASKS RICE NOW LANDING
IA from steamer Prometheus from Charleston. 8.0.,
and_forsale_by ilaULEßAtiatilnur. sz co., to Chest-.
I nut street.
M. M. WILLIAMS,
Ivo. :In Walnut litres -Pt
TIOLII1X11010.161:11.11 . E8
Eon. James . Pollock, the Direeter of :the
United States. Mint, has just submitted hid an
nual report to Secretary Boutwell. - The oPera
tions for the yar e ending dune 30 were as fol
lows :
The deposits of bullion at the Mint and
Branches during the 41¢cal i year Were as
• lows : Gold, $31,463,249 76'; . 411ver; $1,190,-
453 49 ; total deposits, $33,253,703 25.
From, this total a deduction,_must be made
for the bullion re-deposited, or bars • made at
one branch of the Mint and re-deposited jn , an-.
other for coinage. Deducting the , re-depesith, •
Abe mount will be $32,940,258.
• The coinage for the Satire "period was' as
follows : Gold coinage, pieces; 1,181,302; value, •
$21,828,637 50;, unparted and Ode gold bits,
$10,199,328 53 ; silver coin, pieces, 1,702,616 i
value, $840,740 50 ; silver bars, $734,190 117;
nickel-copper and ! bronze . coinage, ;pieces,' .
43,782,750 ; value, $1,279,055. Total number
of pieces struck,, 37,660,668; totarvalue ;of
coinage,` $34,681,058 20. ' r' •• '
The.distribution of '..the bullion received at
the Mint and branches was as follows :
At Philadelphia, gold deposited, $3,681,-
• 000 84; gold coined, $3,178,637 60 ;, line gold
bar5,,5130,141 91 ; silver depoSited and pur-
Chased, $503,540 89; coined, $434,s
\ .746 50; silver barsys92,ooo , 12; - nickel-copper
and bronze coinage, Value, $1,279,055. Total
deposits of gold and silver, $4,185,801 '23 ; total
coinage, $5,114,67103; total number of pieces,
84,660108. • . . • _
At the Branch Mint, San Francisco / the gold
deposits were $17,717,393 81; gold comed,slB,-
650,000 ; silver deposits and purchases, $352,-
344 74; silver coined, $406,000. Total de
posits and purchases, $18,009,738.5:, ; total
' Coinage, $19,056,000 ; total number of pieces,
2,006,500.
The Assay Office in New York received
during the year in gold bullion, $9,205,168'83;
silver bullion, including purchases, $879,439 23.
Total value received, $10,144,608 06 ; number
of line gold bars stamped, 0,721 ; value, $9,221,-
014 30 ; silver bars; 5,764 ;-value, $642,100 55 ;
total vrilue' of gold 'and silver bars stamped,
$9,864,014 85.
At, the Branch. Mint, Denver, Coloradd, the
deposits for imparted bars were, gold, $795,-
506 38; silver, $54,828 03; total deposits, $850,-
305 01. The deposits at this Branch for the
fiscal year ending Jule 30, 1808, were, $303,-
017 713 ; showing an increase of $487,377 23. '
Prior to and since the recent act of Congress
changing the Branch from a Mint to an Assay
. (Mike, It has been engaged in mehin i , assay
ing and stamping gold and silver builiMri, re
turning the same to the depositors in the form
of unparted bars, bearing 'the Government
stamp of weight and fineness. As an Assay
Office 'it will meet all , the demands of the
miner, and promote as effectually the mining
interests of the region as a Mint for coinage'
could possibly do.
At the Branch Mint, Charlotte, North Caro
lina, the deposits have been very limited, but
are increasing. It Is now in operation as an
.Assay Office; deposits being received, assayed,
and returned to depositors in the form of un
parted bars. The deposits for unparted bars
were.: Gold, $3,160 40.
The Branch dint's at Dahlonega, Georgia,
and at New Orleans, Louisana, have not been
in operation since the close 'of the rebellion.
No necessity now exists fortheir continuance,
either asAssay Offices or as Branch Mints.
The Branch Mint at. Carson City, .Nevada,
is rapidly approaching completion. Tire ma
chinery is nearly all in. place, and operations
will soon be commenced. Orders were issued
to complete and put in operation as promptly as
possible the Assay Department. This will be
done. The Superintendent of this branch IC
ports that they will be ready to open early in
September; and this will probably be the easy
so far as the general operations are concerned;
but the more complicated details in reference to
the furnaces, assay apparatus, etc., will require
sonic weeks longer.
From the peculiar character of the bullion
that will be deposited for fine bars or eoinag,e,
the operative officers of this branch should be
'practical, experienced and scientific men. Tim
deposits will be generally of mixed bullion,with
a gold fmeness of two and one-half to forty
thousandths ;•silver, 940 to 960, and a small
per centag,e of base metals, etc. This bullion,
whether deposited for fine bars or coinage,
must be refined or refined and parted, accord
ing to the condition of the , deposit. ' It' does
not seem likely that mdch, if any parting, will
be done at Carson. The bars of mixed bul
lion being officially stamped with both gold
and silver proportions, will be as salable in, that
form as if tkey were parted.
I regret that I am not able to report prOgreSS in .
the erection of the new Branch Mint building
at San Francisco. .It should be commenced al
once, and prosecuted, Without further delay, to
final ceinpletion.
The redemption of nickel-copper cents was
continued during the fiscal year, payment be
ing made therefor in the three and five cen
_ .
nickel coins. The amount thus redeemed was,
in pounds, 103,536; value, $101,465 25. The
redemption for the year ending June 36, 1868,
was, in value, $260,482.04—a decrease bf
about one hundred and fifty per centum. This
marked decrease indicates that the redundancy
of these small coins has been greatly dimin
ished, and that the amount now outst'►nding
of the one and two cent pieces was but - little,
if any, in excess of the actual demand for
them. Existing laws provide for the redemp
tion of the three and five\' cent nickel-copper
coins. No consideration of public interest or
private convenience demands the redemption
of the bronze one and two cent pieces, or the
substitution of a nickel one cent piece for the
bronze coin of that denomination.
I cannot concur in the recommendation of
my predecessor for the reduction and redemp
tion of the inferior coins by creating a fund for
redemption out of the profits of such coinage
heretofore paid into the Treasury of the United
States.
The net profits of the nickel-copper.and
bronze coinage, and paid into the Treasury of
the United States during the fiscal year, were
seven hundred and fifty thousand dollars.
The restoration of — a" silver currency 'for
change," in lieu of the postal or small note cur
rency, would be an important adjuvant to a
general resumption. But while the law stands
as it is,
fixing the weight of silver colas at so
high a figure, no man can foresee When we
shall have the pleasure of paying and receiving
silver. There is no legitimate reason why the
premium on gold should exceed ten per
centum, nor why specie payments could not
be safely resumed in three mouths from this
date.
It is not very easy to find a precedent, if we
needed one for such a policy, as is indicated,
for few nations have been brought to such a
pass. We may mention one, however, which
is Austria. That country, like the United
States, has for the past eight years been using
paper money, almost down to the last kreutzer.
The Government Is now replacing it with a
silver currency at a reduction of real value.
No doubt the people are greatly pleased with
the change.
France, Italy, Belgium and Switzerland have
also lately reduced their lesser silver coins.
This they did, not to get rid of paper, to which
they bad not been driven, but because the rela
tive value of silver had increased, so that they
must either take that course or do without sil;.
And while they were doing that
ced the intrinsic value con-
ver change.
they wisely, `,
_ _
he market .rate for silver bul-
siderably
lion, so as -easonably out of the reach of
fluctuations, ... not have to do the thing over•
again upon a lower basis.
in 'mute of Wins. in Love.
Every o knows how being in love changes
for the tim a man's spiritual atmosphere, And
makes snirn ion and buoyancy where before•
there was fla less and dulness. One may even
say,that this i the reason why being in love is
so popular wit the whole human race—be,
souse it relieves 'n so irresistible and delightful
. a manner,the tedium or depression olenmuum,
place human life„ And not only does it change
the atmosphere of our spiritsrosnaking air,
and moirAipent wbete: : bet* veasl sagnatifi
'arid gloom, but it also Sensibly'and powerfully
increases'our faellities'ior action. It is matter
of the commonest remark - howa timid man
whd ib in We will'all6W iourdici,or anindolent
ilhoWkdiligenee. Nay, a timid Mai',
who would be only the more paralyzed in
a moment of danger by being told that it is his;
bound9n duty as a man to show,finr i mees, and
that he !bust be ruined and' disgraced forever'
if he doe, ni7t, show , firranass,Aulte easily
frOin 'being in' lobe.' An indolent man Who
Arias bait from vigormis effort only the
more, because he is told an knows lint it ok
inn* business i°l3ll°W.enfirgY,e.apdfithift:itiill;
shameful ,in him ithe does not, rill shoiv •
„enstgp wilts easily from being in hive:
say,welearn from the analogy of the most
every-day experience--;thitt a_,p6werfulAttaeli- ,
went will give a Matt spirits •, , and confidsned. 2
which he could by no means call, up or conk
,nuaid of 'dwell, and that in this mood he Can.
do wonders which would not be • possible' to
him without it.—Cornhill Magazine.
ART 'Mut'
—William T. ,Richards is represented at.
Avery's Gallery, New York, Ivy a strong
tura entitled 4 'Valley of the Lauterbrimnen."
Stupendous granite, walls rise perpendicular
upon either side of the valley, which near by is
rich, in trees and shrubbery, and as it recedes
into the perspective the verdure appears less
and less luxuriant, until it finally disappears
entirely under the intluence of, the evetlasting
snows.which-cover the mountain.
—.The New York Star thus gives Knight his
rank, in a short review of the Aeademyhi=
bition in that city,: Where , "The Duet=
Asleep" has been Lung, The Star speaks of
"several newmen, *hose naums are unknown
to the public, but who r give bright promise of
future excellence- „Notable among these are
B. R. Knight and'eltarles Valkmar, of whom
we may prophecy , reputation and remarkable
pre-eminence in, the fidure:"
—A
,Eoston paper notices Rothermel's
" Landing of the Pilgrims," now, bthing en
graved by Andrews ; "Having recently visited
Mr. Joseph Andrews' room, 21 Bromfield
street,- we cannot forbear the pen -utterance of
a few words on the :Subjeet of his steel
,en
'graving of the ,Pilgrims; just finished, from
Itothermers easel, Philadelphia. We had pre
, viouslylmen informed that Mr. Andrews was
about this work, and that he had been patiently
,and faithfully elaborating it during a per;ull of
fifteen years, but we were not prepared for
such results; conscious, though we were,
• that Mr. Andrews had, always filled a very
high place as an engraver in this department.
Even at the very first glance the heart is
thrilled and warmed into expansion of the
full, and earnest life which pulsates in, every
line of the scene in review. This is of rare
occurrence, we think, in a word of. such deli
cate details. 'I he whole principle of that
bold movement which laid ' the foundation
stone of our republic, giving the hard muscle
of serious endeavor to all the New World's
activities, both masculine and fel:Alpine, is
opened before the spectator, and he seems to
read our history from the beginning. It is
that the outlines of the 'great principle -. which
moved them am' so clearly defined, that we
see much at first glance; clear, and as sig
nificant:as the title-page of a book, opening
the way, at first, to an appreciation of these
details so gracefully filled in, that they not
obscure the , grand idea by, any confusion.
The Mayflower.sits serenely as a sea-bird on
the distant waters, as if the insensate thing had
been imbued with a consciousness of the high
duty faithfully done. Even her boat, in the
midst of the , "breaking waves," which has
borne from her the precious freight to shore,
has the same sturdy and sea-worthy bearing,the
dutiful servant of her heroic destiny.. Tearful,
sweet and bright, sorrowful and prayerful,every
face and form tells its individual story. - And
yet each and all are emphatic in one high de
termination to achieve a freedom worthy of the
service of God.' Even, the nice matter of tem
wrament i 8 preserved by the engraver, and no
two complexions express precisely the same re
lations to it."
ACCIDENT ON A COAL ROAD.
A Train of Cars Breaks Loose and De
scends an Inclined Hallway.
The Pittsburgh Chronicle says:
A very serious accident occurred yesterday
afternoon at the coal works of MessrsDuncam
Cornell & Co., on the Youghiogheny river,
three miles above McKeesport. The workmen
were engaged in tilling a barge, • which
was moored in the river immediately be--
low the " tipple," and had a considerable
quantity of coal already in the boat. By
some means, not explained, a train. consist
ing of sixteen loaded cars, which were at
the check-hone at the top of the inclined
railway, started on the down grade and in a
moment had attained a frightful rate of speed;
when the ears 'reached the incline they
dashed down•with frightful rapidity, tearing
and breaking everything before them. The
" tipple" was completely demolished, and the
cars were thrown over into' the . par
tially filled barge, which was sunk
almost immediately. The tipple men
had a narrow escape from a korrible death,
but; fortunately, they escaped uninjured.
They noticed the train descending, and had
the presence of mind to throw open a switch,
by which means the cars were thrown over
against the office on the tipple: The tipple
was new, and was one of the most extensive
on the river, It is a miracle that none of the
employes were injured. The loss of the firm
will probably reach 51,000.
Ledrn Rollin and Rochefort.
The following extract from a private letter
written by M. Ledru Rollin to a friend in
Paris is worth notice: "tiorrie think that I
have shown good sense by withdrawing from
the election ; others consider me to have
shown weakness. I ,will not discuss either
opinion. I did what' thought my duty, but
to you I will tell the reason of my conduct,
which has appeared strange to my ; friends,
and has re joiced my enemies. Before young
Rochefort s visit I hesitated; after that visit
my hesitation entirely ceased. I wish for.
liberty, but not at any price ; I wish for her
clothed in white, not in purple. I leave pur
ple to Emperors, and I foresee that, with men
like Rochefort, we should inevitably come to
a civil war. Admitting that blood was neces
sary in '93, to shed it now would be odious
and useless."
FURNITURE, &C.
GEO. J.MENKELS,
CABINET MAKER,
1301 and 1303 CHESTNUT STREET,
ESTABLISHED 1844.
Good Furniture at the lowest possible
Price.
nol63mrP§
FURNITURE.
T. & j. A. HENKELS,
AT TNEIN
NEW, STORE, 1002 ARCH STREET,
Are now selling their ELEGANT FIIIINITUNE at Ter",
reduced once'. •
.a 25 Sutra
0 - E.Z4,800 .1 1 0UNIYS — VINTERN
CoMa l ta ViigitalarleWn.,Voniancignritrell
)* I N
• A" I AY
• gEil, 8 86'3
'I 1 •
NINANCIAi
RELIABLE HOME INVESTMENT
4 , 4
TIE FIRST MORTGAGE BONDS
'Wilmington and lading:Railroad,
inwirmszent ,
AT SEVE:I PER CENT. IN =WM 01',t
sod oetobto, woo or stotis
and ITEdted Stela, Taws:
^ ,
This roadr nn through ithiciily populated and rich
riciiihmal and tasoMfacturinil district. '
For the Presseit Wed* Offering* 4113it 4 140001221t °fibs
above bonds iit
86 Cents and Interest.
The connection of this road with the Penns/Wm' and
Reading Railroads Insures it a large and remunerative
trade. We recommend the bonds as the, chestiest Amt
.:lass investment in the market.
WM. PAINTER & CO.,
Hankered and Dinderiln Gosrersinafflitn,
No. 36 S. THIRD STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.
BANKING HOUSE
or ,
JAYCOOti
4!
112 and 114 So. TRIED ST. PHILAD'A
DEALERS
IN ALL GOVERNMENT SECURITIES.
We will receive applications for Policies of
Life Insurance in the new National Life In
surance Company or thd United States. /Pull
information given at our office.
REMOVAL,
lANDoinist
kERs „,
HAVE REMOVED TO
No. 121 S. THIRD STREET,
Ojpposite Girard Bank.
UNITED. STATES BONDS
Bought, Sole and Exchanged on most
liberal terms.
GOLD
Bought and Sold at Market Rates.
COUPONS CASHED.
PACIFIC RAILROAD BONDS
Bought and §old.
STOCKS
Bought and Sold on Commission Only.
COLLECTIONS
Made on all Acceesible Points.
.4) it
D- I t
40 South 'Third St.,
PHILADELPHIA.
&Ott
LUMBER.
MAULE, BROTHER & 90.,
• 2500 South Street.
TER MAKERS. 8. 1869.
1869. P A PA
CHOICE SELECTION
OD
MICHIGAN CORK PINE
_-_..FOR PATTEENI3.
1869.9tpuRIVE'ANDYLI,(WKa.9869•
LARGE STOCK.
1869. FLORIDAL ic?o ( i ) 1869
F .
CAROLINA FLOORING.
VIRGINIA FLOORING.
DELAWARE FLOORING'
• ASH FLOORING.
WALNUT FLOORING.
1869. iiI,IOEIDI. 8°~,D5•1869
'1869.
RAIL PLANK.
BAIL PLANK.
1869,7AL"TiPA?441'. 4 D1869.
“ALN UTWALN BOARDSUT BOARDS. AND PLANK,
WALNUT PLANE.
ASSORTED
FOR
__
CABINET MAKERS,
BUILDERS, &O.
869 UND ai l atit C . E"' 1869.
UNDERTAKERS' LUMBER.
RED CEDAR.
WALNUT AND PINE.
1.869; BE APSIf POPLAR. 1.869
SH. • •
WHITE OAK
H PLANK AND BOARDS.
ICKORY.
1869. CAR CAROLINA S C ANTL ING.?
. 1869
NORWAY S C A N T LING.
CEDAR SHINGLES. 18
CEDAR SIIINGLES.
CYPRESS S NOLES.
LARGE ASSORTMENT.
NOR SALE LOW.
1869.
1869. riATTARRCVAJATH . 1869.
LATH.
XMAS BROM= & CO.,
.2.600 SOUTH STREET.
umber Under Cover,
ALWAYS DIM
Walnut, White Pine, Yellow Pine, Spruce, Hemlock
Shingles, 10., always on hand at low rates.
WATSON & GILLINGHAM,
924 Richmond Street, Elichteenth Word.
mh29-IYli
YELLOW PINE LUMBER.—ORDERS
for cargoes of every description Sawed Lumber exe
cuted at short notice—wmlity subject to inspection
A ply to EDW. H. ROWLEY.IB South Wharves.
EDUCA 'a lON.
RT 3ERT H. LABBERTON'S SEMINARY
YOUNG LADIES
will be opened at 93S Soutb 41110011th street, on NON
DAY, January 2d,1870.. oc27w f mdmgt
re , V.giAERS#OO/044
, ORM P2I4I4IBYLVILNLei. RAILROAD - .
A. W yoming Oit_pitTldfl)D,Llllloll.lll,to , the ' .Zeh
and valley, Northern Pennsylvania.liimutheria
and , Interior .New York,:Rocbester,
Falb, the Great Lakes and the Dominion .of Cana..
W_INTOR. ARRANORMENEE.
• . TARES EFFRCT,November2244lBWe
I 4 DAILY TRAINS leave', Passenger. Depot, corner of
Barb and , Americas street* excepted),'
. ^ 4: • • 1.
7" Accommodation for rcitWohingtoo
Ag.l) A. M. -- MorninicrProlo • or Bethierldi and
Principal Statiolut on nut lino of N orth Pa ]llia
Railroad, connecting at othlehem with Lehigh Valley
Rallrit for Allentowni_Adanch Chunk. Mahanoy City,
Wilkestarre; Pittston, Towandsk and Waverly; conne d
ga i Teri7 rat- ERIE IRA ILWAY for Niagara '
u alo, • °cheater, Cleveland. Chicago Eton
Fla andall Points. in the Great
.at 8.40 Mr-A ccommodation for Dolielibirwm,VP'
pipirio on-iffierwedjate Passengere for . II -
low Groveitatborp! and ,mrtivillo4 by this , train, take
Stage at 0 York Road. - •
, trapreseL for thlehenk, ,Allentown,
Rauch chunk, Whits Haven, ilkesharre, Pittston,
Scranton and Carbondale via Lehigh SoolgodulddS
Railroad., and Allentown..-Ssaton.. &SIC Ott" wog and
points on New Jersey Central Railroad and ilisrriennd
liner Railroad to Newyork vial eh VallerSallrokit.
At 10.484.. M. — Aocommodation.forion Washington,
Itopphur at intermodiate Stations.
.—A ,
1.15, 6.20 and 8 P.M ccommodatiorito Abiniron,
_At 1.40 M.—Lehigh Valley Express for Re hlehein,
"AMA Allentown, Mauch Chunk„ Whits
ilaven,Wilkesbarre, Pittston, Scra nton, and Wyoming
foal one.
At 2.4 b P, M.—Accommodation for EciplestoWn, stop
ping at all intermediate stations.
At AM P. JR.—Accommodation for Doylestown, Iltolo
ping at all intermediate stations.
At 5.00 P. X.—Through for Bethlehem, connecting at
Bethlehem with Lehigh' Valley Evening Train, for
Easton, Allentown; Mauch Chunk. _
Al 6. F. 31 .—Accommodation for Lansdale, stopping
It all intermediate stations. -
At ALSO P. Al.—Accommodation for Fort Washington.
TRAINS ARRIVE IN PHILADELPHIA_._
Weal Iletillehien at 21". ii.:_f_lls74.lo — tindtrii - P. M.
2.16 P. IC, 4.40 P. 151. andB2.6 P.ld. Trains make direct
connection with Lehigh Valley or Lehigh and &mane
banns trains from Easton, Scranton.l9llkesbarre. Ma
keno, City and Hazleton.
From Doylestown at 8.35 A.M.4.30 P.M.and 7.05 P.M
From Lansdale at 7.30 A. IC
From Fort 'Washington at 0.25 and 10.36 A.M. and 3.10
P. M.
ON SUNDAYS.
Philadelphia for Bethlehem at 0.30 A. N.
Philadelphia for Doylestown at 2.00 P. N.
Doylestown for Philadelphia at 7.00 A. M.
Bethlehem for Philadelphia at 4.00 P. M.
Fifth and Sixth Streets and Second and Third Streets
Lints of City Passenger cars ran directly to and from
the Depot. Union Line run within a shortdistance of
the Depot,
Tickets must he procured at the Ticket Office, in order
to secure the lowest rates of fare.
ELLIS CLARK, Agent.
Tickets sold and Baggage checked through to ririnci•
pal points,
at ]Mann's North Penn. Baggage Express
office. N 0.105 South Fifth street
PENNSYLVANIA CENTRAL RAIL.
ROAD.—After 8 P. M., SUNDAY, November 14th..
iscs. The trains of the Pennsylvania Central Railroad
leave the Detiot,rd Thirty-first and Marketstreets,which
is reached directly by , the cars of the Market Street Pas
senger Railway, the last car connecting with each train
leaving Front and Market street , thirty minutes before
its departure. Those of the Chestnut and Walnut
Streets Railway run within'one square of the Depot.
Sleeping Car Tickets can be had on application at the
Ticket Office, Northwest corner of Ninth and Chestnut
etreets. and at the Depot. .
Agents of the Union Transfer 'Company will call for
and deliver Baggage at the Depot. Orders left at N 0.901
Chestnut street, No. 116 Market street. will receive at.
tention
TRAINS LEAVE DEPOT, VIZ.:
Mail Train at 8.00 A. M.
Paoli Accom. at 10.30 A.31.,1.10, and 6.60 P. M.
Fast at 11.50 A. X.
Erie Expre55.......... at 11.110 A. M.
Harrisburg at 230 P. 31.
Lancaster Accent at 4.10 P. M.
Parksbnrg Train at 6-30 P. DI.
Cincinnati Express. at 8.00 P. M.
Erie Mail and Pittsburgh Express • -.at 9.46 P. M.
Accommodation ... at 12.11 AM.
Pacific Express at 12.00 night.
Erie Mail leaves daily, except Sunday t running on
Saturday night to Williamsport only. On Sunday argils
passengers will leave Philadelphia at 8 o'clock,
Pacific Exprese leaves daily. • Cincinnati Ex
press daily, except Saturday. All other trains daily,
except Sunday, •
The Western Accommodation Train runs daily, except
Sunday. For this train tickets must be procured and
baggage delivered by 6.00 P. AL. at 116 Market street.
TRAINS ARRIVE AT DEPOT, VLZ
Cincinnati Ex ipiress... -at 3.10 A. M.
Philadelphia Kx press ....... ----at 6-VA. M.
Erie Mail at 6.30 A. It
Paoli Accommodation at 8.20 X. M. and 3.40 & 6.25 P. X.
Parksbnrg Train....-- ........ ... ....at 9.10 A.M.
Feet Line at 9.40 A. 31
Lancaster Train .....at 12.55 P.
Erie Express at 12.55 P. M.
Southern Exprese...-- -
.—. .... LBO P. X.
Lock Haven and kliniraExpress at 7.80 P.M.
Pacific Express ... -- at 4.25 P. M.
Harrisburg Accommodation..: .at 9,60 P.M.
• For further information, drly to •
JOHN F. VA NLEER, Ja., Ticket Agent, 901 Chestnut
street.
• FRANCIS FUNK, Ticket Agent, 116 Market street.
SAMUEL H. WALLACE, Ticket Agent at the Depot.
The Pennsylvania Railroad Company will not assume
any risk for Baggage, except for wearang apparel, and
limit their responsibility to One Hundred Dollars in
value All Baggage exceeding that amount in value will
be at the risk of the owner unless taken by special con.
tract. EDWARD
General Superintendent. Altoona, Pa.
PHILADELPHIA, WILMINGTON AND
BALTIMORE BAILROAD--TIME TABLE. Com•
meneing MONDAY, May 10th, 1869. Trains will leave
Depot, corner Broad and Washington avenue, as fol
lows!
WAY Itan, TRAIN at 8.30 A. M. (Sundays excepted),
for Baltimore, stopping at all Regular Stations. (idb
netting with Delaware Railroad at Wilmington for
Crisfield and Intermediate Stations.
EXPRESS TRAIN at 12.00 11. ( Sundays excepted ',ter
Baltimore and Wushington, stopping at Wilmington,
Perryville and Havre de Grace. Connects at WiLming•
ton with train for New Castle,
EXPRESS TRAIN at 4.00 P. M. (Sundays excepted),
for Baltimore and Washington, stopping at Chester '
Thnrlow, Linwood, Claymont, Wilmington, Newport,
Stanton, Newark, Elkton, North East, Charlestown',
Perryville, Havre de Grace, Aberdeen, Perryman's,
Edgewood, Magnolia, Chase's and Stemmer's' Run.
NIGHT EXPRESS at 11.30 P. ill. ( daily) for Baltimore
and Washington,. atopping AtChester, Thurlow,
wood, Claymont, Wilmington, Newark, Elktou, North
East, Perryville, 'Havre de Grace,Perriomatt'sand'lllag.
noliu.
Paesengers for Fortress Monroe and Norfolk will take
the 12.00 31. Train.
WILMINGTON TRAlNS.—Stopping at all Stations
between Philadelplila and Wilmington, •
Leave PHILADELPHIA at 11.00 A. AL 2.30_, 5.00 and
7.0 u P. M. The 0.00 P. M. train connote with Delaware
Railroad for Harrington and intermediate stations.
Leave W ILISINGTON 6.30 and 810 A. Di., L3O, 4.8 and
7 13) P. M. The 8.10 A. M. train will not stop between
Chester and Philadelphia. The 7.00 P. M. train from
Wilmington runs daily;allotherAccommodation Truing
Sundays excepted.
Trains leaving WILMINGTON at 8.30 A. M. and CR
P. M. will connect at Lamokin Junction with the 7. , X)
A.M, and 4.30 P. M. trains for Baltimore Central It. R.
From BALTI3IOItE to PHILADELPHIA.—Leaves
Baltimore 7.28 -A. M. Way Mail. 9.33 A. M., Express.
2,35 P. M.,Exipress. 7.23 P.M., Express.
SUNDAY TRAIN - FROM BALTIMORE.—Leaves
BAIiTIMORE at 1.25 P. M. Stopping at Alagnolia,Per
ryman's, Aberdeen ,Havre-de-Grace PerryvilleCharles.
town, North-East, Elkton Newark , ' Stanton, Newport,
Wilmington, Claymont, Linwood and Chester.
Through tickets to all point West, South, and South
west may be procured at the ticket office, 3.28 Chestnut
street, under Continental Hotel, whero also State Rooms
and Berths in Sleeping Cars can be secured during the
day. Persons purchasing tickets at this office can have
baggage checked at their residence by the Union Trait-.
fer Company. H. F. EIENNEY, Snp't.
WEST CHESTER ANDPHI:LAMM.
PHIA RAILROAD.—Winter Arrangement—On
and after MONDAY, Oct. 4, 1869,Trains will leavens
follows:
Leave Philadelphia, from New Depot Thirty-o"st and
Chestnut streets, 7.45 A. M., 11.00 A. M. 2.30 P.M., 4.15
P. M., 4.40 P. 11,6.15 P. AL, 11..30 P. M. '
Leave West Chester, from Depot, on East Market
street, 625 A. m.,s.eo A. M., 7.45 A. M., 10.45 A. M., 145
P. M. 24.50 P. 111.,6.55 P.M.
Train leaving West Chester at 8.00 A. M. will stop at
11. C:Junetion,Lenni,' Glen Riddle and Media : leaving -
Philadelphia at 4.40 P. M. will stop at - Media, .Glen
Riddle, Lanni and B. O. Junction. Passengers to or
from stations between West Chester and B. C. Junction
going East, will take train leaving West Chester at 7.45
A. If., and car will be attached to Express Train at B.
C. Junction; and going West, Passengers for Stations
above B. C. Junction will take train leaving Philadel
phia at 4.40 P. M., and will change cars at B. C. Junc
tion.
The Depot in Philadelphia is reached. directly by the
Chestnut and Walnut street cars. Those of the Market
street line run within one square. The cars of both lines
connect with each train upon its arrival.
ON SIINDAYS.—Leave Philadelphia for West Chester
at 8.30 A, M. and 2.00 P. l ".
Leave West Chester felt — Philadelphia at 7.55 A. M. and
4.00 P. M.
Mar Passengers are allowed to take Wearing Apparel
only, as Baggage, and the Company will not in any case
be responsible for an amount exceeding one hundreddol
lass, unless a special contract be made far the same.
WILLIAM C. WHEELER.
General Superintendent.
pHILADRLPHI.A. AND ERIE RAIL
ROAD—WINTER TIME TABLE.
On and slit s . MONDAY Nov- 15, 1&39, the Trains on
the Philadel and Erießailroad will run as follows
from Penney vania -Railroad Depet, West Philadelphia
, WESTWARD-
Mail Traha leaves Philadelphia
II 4 " Williamsport
" " arrives at Erie
Erie Express leaves Philadelphia .......
it 44 Williamsport
" . " arrives at Erie.
Elmira mail leaves Philadelphia.
" " Williamsport
" arrives at Lock Haven
EASTWARD.
Mail Train leaves Erie
'Williamsport...
" arrives at Philadelphia
Erie Express leaVes Erie
`` ' "-"' — Williamsport_
3.30 A. M
" ~ arrives at Philadelphia 12.45 P. M.
Elmira Mall leaveS Lock Haven 8.00 A. M.
Williamsport- 9.45 A. 51.
(4 " arrives' at Philadelphia 6.50 P. M.
Buffalo Express leaves Williamsport 12.25 A.M.
Harrisburg 5.20 A. M.
~* arrives at Philadelphia 9.25 A. 51.
Express east connects at Corm Mail east at Corry and
Irvineton. Express west at Irvineton with trains on
Oil Croak and Allegheny River Railroad.
ALFRED. L. TYLER, General Superintendent.
,WEST JERSEY RAIL R 0 A. D
FALL AND WINTER ARRANGEMENT. '
COMMENCING TUESDAY, SEPT. 21st, 1819.
Leave Philadelphia; Foot of Market street (Upper
Ferry) at
8.16 A. M., Mail, for Bridgeton, Salem, Millvillo,Vine
land, Swedealboro and all intermediate stations.
8.15 p. M., Mail, for Caipe.May, Malvin°, Vineland
and - way stations below Glassboro.
3.30 P. M., Passenger, for Bridgeton, Salem, Swedes
bore, and all intermediate stations.
6.30 P. M., Woodbury and" Glamboro accommodation.
Freight train for all Miaow leaves Camden daily, at
12.00 o'clock, noon.
.Freight received in Philadelphia at second covered
wharf - below •Waltiutstreet.
Freight delivered at No. 2/.8 S. Delaware avenue. •
Commutation tickets, at reduced rates, between Phila
delphia and all stations.
EXTRA TRAIN FOR' CAPE MAY.
(Saturdays only.)
Leave Philadelphia, 8.15 A. M.
Leave Cape May P. M.
WILLIAM J. SEWELL, Superintendent.
It EA.DJN gf • RAiLItOAD. • - GREAT
Trunk Line Rem' Philadelphia to the interior of
, Sofrillyhaitilal tbeßchn,lllll, , Singdrebanne Ottinbirr•
larldaVojltia•Val/0121, the NOrthr Nort hw ard, and
yin Oli WhitrArtangernerit?ftaapp,Trains,
pv`...3_21,' , teat! /et 01.7ordpanY Jr an t, 1 rteeittib
ind•Calkewhill litreefiliThiladelhhili, hi Cr 1 0 1 /01q131
hoursM ANING ACCOXMODATIO.E.-Ati3o4. M for
Rea gEd all fa •_.trwitrildlitto Station*, liad Allentervir.
i f
MORNrn ttiOveitraillB 1 4645 R. Al. whin* la
f el 'atii;” 111 V. ' ,' .• • ' MORN 07EXPREffili-At 8415 Ad 31., far Beading
tabanop.ll.lrrjaburs,,Patkaville, pUto saroy,,,,uanavis,
Sunbury, wililamspotti Zlialra, Rochester,. Niagarrt
Falls, Buffalo, Wilkesbann Pittiton, York.' Urit'llsini
Chrareberanu, Roger/town: .. 1., _
Thel,Bq A.
ht. train cointiecta lit Reding With Maass:
Perinsyrialliallailroadtraina ford' estowir,ao " and the
11 . 16. A..111i4tairicoPneota with tha Lobanon rat plain
tor Rarriaburg, Ito.; at Port Clinton with Cattily XL
B. train* far Wiillicatiftmirt, Leek Hairen..ElMltit, &13_,.'at
Harrishurtfh Northern Central, Ouniberlatid rTal
lay.and fie &ill and Suaaviehaana trains for. Nort
h : , illialnanort. ,Tork, Chalaberspurir Pine
.7t/iltzithim zz.PRZEC-4htsv l s Philedelpida ,at
BM . • fir Reading, Pottetilla, Harrisburg, dre„ don
ne in with Reading and'Cohimitilit Railroad trains for
Co inn la. he.
POTTSTOWN ACCOMMODATION.--teaves potts
town at 6.45 A.M. t stopping at the interinediate stations;
arrives in Philadelphia $9.10 A. 31. Returning leaves
Pbrelphis at SAO P. 31.; arrives in PottstOwn at 6.15
READ/NO AND POTTSVILLE ACCOMMODA.
T10N.,-Leaves Pottsville at 6.40 A. M., and Reading at
7.30 A. fd., stopping ut all way statlems; arrives in Phila.
delphia at toa A. 31
, RattiOdng, leave" Philadelphia at 4.45 P. 1114 arri_ yes
fn Reaffing at 1.40 P . 31., and at Pottavilla at 9.30 P. M.
Traini for Philadelphia leave Harrisburg at 8.10 A.
M., an Pottsville at 9.00 A . Id, arriving in Philadelphia
at 1.00 .M, Afternoon trains leave Harrisburg at 2.55
P. M., rind Pottsville at 3.06 P. M.; arriving at Fight
delphlWat 7.06 P. 31 ,
Harrisburg Accommodation leaves Reading at 7.15 A,
M., and Harrisburg at 4.10 P. M. Connecting at Read
ing with Afternoon Accommodation south at 6.36 P. M.,
arriving in Philadelphia at 9.25 P. M.
Market train, with a Passenger car attached, Immo
Philadelphia at 12.30 noon for Pottsville and all Way
Stations; leaves Pottsville at 6.40 A. ht. connecting at
Reading with accommodation train for ihiladelphla and
all Way Statham
All the above trains run daily, Sundays excepted.
Sunday trains leave Pottsville at 8 A. M., and Phila
delphia at 3.15 P. M.; leave _Philadelphia for Reading at
8.00 A. M. returning from Reading at 4.26 P. M.
CHESTER VALLEY RAILROAD.-Passengers for
Downingtown and intermediate points take tho 7.30 A.
M„ 12.60 and 4.00 P. M. trains from Philadelphia,return
tag from Downinatown at 6.30 A. 31.,12.43 and 6.15 P.M.'
PERK. lON EN RAILROAD.-Passengers for Schwenk s
villa take 7.30 A.M., 12.30 and 4.00 P. 31. trains for Phila
delphia, returning from fichwenkeville at 6.10 and 8.12
A. , 12.45 noon. Stage lines for various points in
Perkiomen Valley connect with trains at Collegeville
and Schwenkayille.
COLEBROOIiDALE RAILROAD. --Passengers for
)11 t. Pleasant and intermediate points take th 04.00 P. M.
train Irma Philadhia, returning from -Mt. Pleasant
at NEW nd 11.00 •
YORKEXPRESS FOR PITTSBURGH AND
THE WEST.-Leaves New York at 9.00 A. AL, 6.00 and
8.00 P. M. passing Reading at 12.43 A. 31.,_1.45 and 10.06
P.M., and connects- at Harrisburg with Pennsylvania
and Northern Central Railroad Express Trains for Pitts
burgh, Chicago, VVilliamsport, Elmira, Baltimore, he.
Returning, Express Train leaves Harrisburg on arrival
of Pennsylvania Express from Pittsburgh, at 2.40 and 5.35
A. M., 12.20 noon, 2.66 and 11.00 P. M. passing Reading
at 1256, 4.30 and 7.20 A. M. and 2.00 and 4.40 P. M.,
arriving at New York 6.00 and 10.15 A.M., 12.05 noon,
and 6.36 and 10.00 P. M. Sleeping Cars ac-company these
trains through between Jersey City and Pittsburgh,
without change.
Mail train for New York leaves Harrisburg at 8.10 A.
M. and 245 P. M. Mail train for Harrisburg leavos New
York at 12 Noon.
SCHUYLKILL VALLEY RAILROAD-Trains leave
eottsville at 6.30 and 11.30 A.M. and 640 P. 31.. returning
from Tamaqua at 9.35 A . M.. and 2.15 and 4.60 P. M.
SCHUYLKILL AND SUSQUEHANNA RAILROAD
-Trains leave Auburn at 8.65 A. M. and 3.3 e P. 31. for
Pinegrove and Harrisburg, and at 12.10 noon for Pine
grove, Tremont and Brookside; returning from Har
risburg at 7.30 and 11.50 A. M., and 3.40 P al; from
Brookside at 4.00 P. M. and from Tremont at 7.15 A.M.
and 5.06 P. M.
TICKETS.-Throngh first-class tickets and emigrant
tickets to all the principal points in the North and West
and Canada.
Excursion Tickets from Philadelphia to Reading and
Intermediate Stations good for day only, are sold by
Morning Accommodation, Market Train, Reading and
Pottstown Accommodation Trains at reduced rates.
Excursion Tieketa to Philadelphia, good for day only,
aro sold at Reading and Intermediate Stations by Read
ing and Pottstown Accommodation Trains at reduced
rates.
The following tickets are obtainable only at the Office
of S. Bradford, Treasurer, No. 227 South Fourth street,
Philadelphia, or of G. A. Nicolla, General Superinten
dent, Reading.
Commutation Tickets,at taper cent. discount, between
any points desired, for families and firms.
Mileage Tickete, good for 2,000 miles, between all points
at 862 60 each for families and firms.
Season Tickets, for three, six, nine or twelve months,
for holders only to all points, at reduced rates.
Clergymen residing on the line of the road will be fur
nished with curds, entitling themselves and wives to
tickets at half fare
Excursion Tickets from Philadelphia to principal sta
tions, good for Saturday, Sunday and Monday, at re
duced tare, to be had only at the Ticket Office, at Thir
teenth and Callowhill streets.
FREIGHT.-Goode of all descriptions forwarded to
nll the above points from the Company's Now Freight
Depot, Broad and Willow streets.
I reight Trains leave Ph Ilailelithia daily at 4-35 A. M.,
12.30 noon, 5.00 ands 7.16 P. M., for Reading, Lebanon,
Harrisburg, Pottsville, Port Clinton, and all points be
yond.
al ails close at the Philadelphia Post-office for all places
on the road and its branches at 5 A. M., and for the prin
cipal Stations only at 2.16 P. M.
BAGGAGE.
Dungan's Express will collect Baggagecor all trains
leaving Philadelphia Depot. Orders can bed eft at No.
225 South Fourth street, or at the Depot, Thirteenth and
Callou hill streets
_.,.
FOR NEW SCORE.--THE CAMDEN
AND
.RAILROADd PHILADELPIJIA AND
TRENTON COMPANY'S LINES, from
Philadelphia to New York, and way places, from Wal
nut street wharf. , Fare.
At 6.30 A. M., via Camden and Amboy, Accom.. $225
At BA. M. via Camden and Jersey City Ex. Mail, 300
At 2.00 P. M., via Camden and Amboy Express, a 09
At 6 P. M. for Amboy and intermediate stations.
At 6.30 and 8 A. M., and 2 P. M., for Freehold.
At 2.00 P. M. for Long Branch and Points on
R.& D. B. R. R. •
At 8 and 10 A.M., 12 51,2,830 and 4.30 P. M.,for Trenton.
At 6.30,5 and 10 A.M.,12 M... 2,3.30,4303, 7 and 11.30 P. M.,
for liordentown,Florence,lhnlington,Boverly and De
lance.
At 630 and 10 A.M.,12 M. 330,4 . 30,6,7 and 11.30 P.M..ffir
Edgewater, Riverside, Riverton, Palmyra and Fish
House, d A.M. and 2 P, 81., for Riverton.
ag" The 1130 P. lft,. Lino leaves from foot of
Market street by upper ferry.
From Kensington - Deli:a:
At 7.30 A.N., 2.30, 3.30 laud 5 P. M. for Trenton and
Bristol, And at 10.45 A. M. and 6 P. M. for Bristol.
At 7.30 A. M., 2.30 and 5 P. M. for Morrhsville and Tully
town.
At 730 and 10.45 A. M., 2.30,0 and 6 P. M. for Schenck's
and Eddington.
At 7.30 and 10.45 A. M., 230, 4, 8 and 6 P. M. for Corn
wells, TorresdalesHolmeeburg,Tacony,Wisidnoming,
Bridesburg and Frankford and 8.30 P.M. for Holmes
burg and Intermediate Stations. •
From West Philadelphia Depot via COnnecting Railway
At 7,9.30 and 11 A. M., 1.20, 4, 6.45, and 12 P. lc New
York Express Llne,via Jersey City s32b
At 11.30 P. M. Emigrant Line 2 0 0
At 7,9.30 and 11 Affil .1.20,4,6.45,and 12 P.M.fer Trenton,
At 7, 9.30 and Il A. 10 .01,6.15 and 12 P.M., for Bristol.
At 12 P.M.(Night)for Morrisville,Tullytown, Schenck's,
Eddington„Cornwells, Torresdale, Rolmesburg, Ta
cony, Wissinoming, Bridesburg and Frankford.
The9.3oA. M. and and 12 P. M. Lines run daily. All
others, Sundays excepted.
For Lines leaving Kensington-Depot, take the cars on
Third or Fifth streets, at Chestnut, at half an hour be
fore departure. The Cars of Market Street Railway run
direct to West Philadelphia Depot Chestnut and Walnut
within one square. On Sundays, the Market Street Cars
will run to connect with the 9.30 A. M.. 6.45 and - 12 P.
M. lines
13ELVIDERE DELAWARE RAILROAD LINES
front Kensington Depot.
At,,730 A. M., for Niagara Falls, Buffalo, Dunkirk,
Elmira, Mama, Owego, Rochester, Binghampton,
Oswego, Syracuse, Great Bend, Montrose, Wilkesharre,
Scranton, Stroudsburg, Water Gap, Schooley's Moun
tain. lec.• •
At 7.30 A: M.and 330 P.M.for Belvidere,Easton, Lam
bertville Flemington, &c. The 3.30 P. M. Line con
nects direct with the train leaving Easton for Mauch
Chunk A Ilentown, Bethlehem, &c.
At 14 A. M. front II est Philadelphia Depot, and 5 P. N.
from Kensington Depot,for Lambertville and interme
diate Stations.
CAMDEN AND BURLINGTON CO., AND PEMBER
TON AND HI GHTSTOWN RAILROADS, from Mar
ket street Ferry (Upper Side.)
At 7 and 10 A. M.,1, 2.15,3.30,6& 6.30 P.M.for Merchants.
ville,Moorestawn, Hartford. Masonville,llainsport,
Mount Holly, Smithville, Ewansville, Vincentown,
Rinnlughani and Pemberton.
At 10 A. Al. for Lewistown, Wrightstown, Cookstown,
New Egypt. and Hornerstown.
At 7 A. 1t1... 1 and LW P. M. for Lewistown, Wright*
town. Cookstown, New Egypt, Hornerstown, Cream
Ridge, Imlay stown, Sharon and Ilightstown.
'Fifty pounds of Baggage only allowed each Passenger.
Passengers are prohibited from taking anything as bag
gage but their wearing apparel. All baggage over fifty
pounds to be paid for extra. The Company limit their
responsibility for baggage to Ono Dollar per pound,
and will not be liable for any amount beyond $lOO, ex
cept by special contract.
Tickets sold and Baggage checked direct through to
Boston, Worcester, Springfield „Hartford, New Haven
Providence, Newport, Albany,Troy,Suratega, Utica,
Rome, SYracuse, Rochester, Buffalo, Niagara Falls and
Suspension Bridge.
Au additional Ticket Office is located at No. P2B Chest
nut street, where tickets to New York, and all impor
tant points North and East, may be procured. Persons
purchasing Tickets at this Office, can have their bag
gage checked from residences or hotel to deetination, by
Linton Transfer Baggage Express.
Lines from New 1 ork for Philadelphia will leave from
foot of Cortland street et 1.00 and 4.00 .P. M., via Jersey
City and Camden. At 8.50 and 10 A.M., 12.30, 5,6 and 9
P.N. and at 12 Night, via Jersey City and West Phila.
delpoa.
From Pier No. 1, N. River, at 6.30 A. M. Accommoda
tion and 2P. M. Express, via Amboy and Camden. •
N0v.20, 1869, Whf. H. GATZMER, Agent.
_..
12HILADELPHIA AND BALTIMORE
Ji. CENTWAN T R E AI L AI O t A A D NG O E M R P E A NT .
On and after MONDAY, Nov. let., 1869, Trains will
leave as follows, stopping at all Stations on Philadel
phia, Baltimore Central anti Chester Creek Railroads:
LeaVo PHILADELPHIA for PORT DEPOSIT from
Depot of Philadelphia, Wilmington and Baltimore
Railroad Company, corner Broad and Washington
avenue, at 7.W A. M. and 4.30 P. M.
A Freight Train, with Passenger car attached,will
leave Philadelphia for Oxford at 2.30 P. M.
Leave 'PORT DEPOSIT for PHILADELPHIA at
5.40 A. 61., 9.25 A. !Could 2.25 P. M. •
On Saturday the 2.25 train will leave at 4.30 P. M.
• Passengers are allbwed to take wearing apparel only
as baggage, and the Company will not be responsible
for an amount exceeding one hundred dollars, unletis•
special contract is made for the same.
HENRY WOOD,
President and General Superintendent.
. .
AST FREIGHT 1-1 LINE, PIA' NORTH
PENNSYLVANIA RAILROAD, to Wilkusbarre,
ahanoy City, Mount Carmel, Centralia , and all poiuts
On Lehigh Valley Railroad and its branches.
By new arrangements, perfected this day, this road is
enabled to give inereased despatch to merchaadise con
signed to the above-named points. •-
Goods delivered at the Through Freight Depot,
S. E. cor. Front anti Noble streets,
Before 5 P • M., will reach Wilkesbarre, Mount Carmel.
Mahanoy City, and the other stations in Mahanoy and.
Wyoming valley /before .A. M., the succeeding day.
4 /GUIS OWIK Asonts
9.35 P. M
. 7.40 A. M
,8.20 P. M
.11.40 A. M.
9.00 I'. M.
10.00 A. M.
7.30 A. M.
6.00 P. M.
7.20 P. M.
8.44/ A. M.
9.25 P.M.
6.20 A. N.
4.00 P. M.
..TRAVELERS' GUIDE
VILA VELEM? GIIUM
t ag li ILADZIAPHIA T , 041111MANTOWN
• • ARD 2401111ISTOWN RAILROAD TIMM TA-
O .-On and atter !feudal', Nov-22d, 1880, and "VII
' " het 44 q"_ !iiill , 4lllBMI.ll4OlON,
Lesva Dbilsdeiphie-6,7, 8, 0.06, 10 11,1! A..
5.73, 8118, 4.05, 4463 6, 168 618
6 t 68 , 2 7, Se e 11, ig
*l_ l'l l73 U S e -S t ri f in:6 l 6 7 7N. 8 8, 1f1 9 1:1 10 .
The 8.10 down-train, ana the u 818 up trains; Will
not atop on the Germantown Branch.
„ ON SUNDAYS, '
epye guilatteMd-915 8. M.,2i 445, minutes,' and
RIM P.M. , „
Leave Geranantcrittp-4,16 A. itt.. 14, 6 and MCP.
- ORMS'I'NUT HILL RAILROAD.
Leave Philadelphia-4,8,10, 12 A.M.: 2, SM. OM, S, 9.20
and 11 P. N.
LcainGhestnut.lllll-7.Rltninutes, 8,9.44, and jug A.
X.' 1.40 8.40 and 10.40 P 311..
1 •'••• ?, 34 5.49 0 .40
084 61718DABIl t • .
Leave f_hiltulelphlal4.ls minutes , 4. AI Sand
Chestnut irial4,• ls 9l l llil,ldosA. tit; 1,3.40 p I.4o,aasi
minutes . .
FOB OONSHOROORMIT- AND NOIMMEITOWNi
' Leave„Philad4llahla-9. PALOS; A- Sl.i 11(, 3,4,
6.15,104107 / 11 % r• M. •
Letwe o stn —6 • 40 ,645,7771 ft A.
3, 4N,'6. 8 and 4: 1 1 0 !d•
The'Thia. , from IforridoWn willitot atop
at Magee'', oils' Landing, Donaino or Schnee Lane,
119" The 4 P. M. Train from Philadelphia Will ittop OW/
at gchoolLane,Manay_unk and Conshohocken.
0.51 , SUNDAYS. _
Leave Philadelphia-4 A, At. • 23t i : nd 1.16 P. M.. ,
Leave Norrlatown-7 A.M.- i l s and 0 Di.
roxmAA, u x.
Leave Philadelphia-4,7N, 9,11.06 A. N.; 2%, 3, 4 0 4 3iii
518,8.15, 8,05,10.03 and 113.1. P.M.
Ide av e llanayunk -6 . 10 • 620 , 7 %, 010 , 9 • 20 ,11%A. 31'.i, St
318,6,6 M, 620 and 10 P. M.
__
• ON SUNDAYS •
Leave Thiladelphls--9 A. N.; 2%, 4 and 7,16 - M.
Leave' Manaynnk.,-718 A. M.; lg.. 0 and 9% P. „
PLYMOUTH R B.
Leave Philadelphia, MIA rt '
4rn
Leave Poutli, 6 3 % A. Id 434 r. Al.
W. B. Wason, General Superintendent.
. Depot. Ninth and Green streets.,
IDPHILADELPHIA, GERM ANTO WN
11 AND NORRISTOWN RAILROAD COMPANY.--
Pnrtiem going from Philadelphia to New York.can Nave
time by taking the care at Ninth and Green and Ninth
and Columbia avenne, at 7, 9.05,11 A, IC and 4A P. M„
'
to the lidernectlon Station, and there take the halm,
for New York leaving Weat, Philadelphia on the' mune
hours as above mentioned.
Novimnin 2 2
,1869. ;
CAMDEN AND ATLANTIC EAU".
ROAD.--4111ANGE OF 11011118—WINTER AR
RANGEMENT. On and after MONDAY, Nov.l,'lBB9i
trains will leaTo Vine atreet ferry as follows viz
Mail and Freight • 'BOOA. M.
Atlantic Accommodation..-
• 3.45 P.M.
Junction Accommodation to Atco and inter
mediate etationa ISM P. M.
RETURNINO. LEAVE ATLANTIC. ,
Mall and Freight 1.413P.M.
Atlantic Accommodation
6.05 A. M,
Jut:tea - onccOtaar -- odaiinn from Atco • if. 22 A. M.
Haddonfield Accotamodatinn trains leave
Vine Street ... . ...... A. M. and 2.00 P.M.
. 1.00 P. M. and 3.16 M.
_ll/1:THII H. MUNDY. Agent.
MEDICAL
Ayer's Cherry Pecthlrals
•. . .
For Diseases of the Throat and 'Lungs, .
• such as Coughs, Colds, Whooping .
Cough, Bronchitis, Asthma,
and. Consumption.
Probably never before in the whole history of.
medicine, has anything won so widely and so deepl3r
upon the confidence of mankind, as this excellent
remedy for pulmonary complaints. Through a longg!.
series of years, and among most of the racesef
men It has risen higher and higher in their estinut-'
tion, as it has become better known. ',lts uniform
character and power, to cure the various affections
of the lungs and throat, have made it known its a re
liable protector against them. While adapted ;to
milder forms of disease and to young children, it is
at the same time the most effectual remedy that can
be given for incipient consumption, and the dan
gerous affections of the throat and lungs. As a pro
vision against, sudden attacks ofCroup, it should
be kept on hand in every family, and indeed naafi
are sometimes, subject to Colds and coughs, all,
should be provided with this antidote for then:
Although settled Consumptionis thought in
curable, still great numbers of cases where the dis
ease seemed settled, have been .completely- cured, •
and the patient restored to sound health by. the
!Cherry. Pectoral. So complete Is its mastery
over the disorders of the Lungs and Throat, that
the most obstinate of them yield to IL When noth
ing else could reach them under the Cherry Pec
toral they subside and disappear.
Singers and .Publio Speahers find great pro
tection from it.
Asthma is always relieved and often wholly
cured by it. •
Bronchitis is generally cured by taldng the
Cherry Pectoral in small and frequent doses
So generally are its virtues lulown that we need
not publish the certificates of them here, or do more
than assure the public that its qualities are fully
maintained,
Ayer's Ague Cure,
For Fever and Amte, Intermittent Fever,
Chill Fever, Remittent Fever, Dumb
Ague, Periodical or 'Bilious Fever,&c.,
and indeed all the affections which arise-
Prom malarious, marsh, or miasmatic
poisons.
As its name implies, it does Owe. and does not
fail.
: Containing neither Arsenic, Win ine, Bisinuth,
Zinc, nor'any other mineral or poisonous fnibettince
whatever, it in nowise injures any . patient. The
number and Importance of its cures the ague dis
tricts, are literally beyond account, and we believe
without a parallel in the historyof Ague medicine.
Our
. pride is gratified by the acknowledgments We
receive of the radical cures effected in obstinate
cases, and where otherremedies had wholly failed.
Unacelimated • persons, either resident in ; or
travelling thrinigh miasmatic localities, will be 'pro
tected by taking the AGUE CURE daily. -
For Liner COmptaints, arising from torpidity
of the Liver, it is an excellent remedy, stimulating
the Liver into healthy.
For Bilious Disorders and Liver Complahlts, it is
an excellent remedy, producing many truly re- .
markable cures, where other medicines had
Prepared by DR. J. C. ATER Sr, Co., Practical
and Analytical Chemists, Lowell, Mass., and-Sold
ail round the world.
PRICE, $l.OO . P.ED BOTTLE..
At wholesale bp.1.11. MAWS ,t CO.,Philadelphia.
n9-tri"th s 4m
wQP.AL DENTALLINA.- A SUPERIOR
article for cleaning the Teeth,destraying animelcUla
eh infest them, giving tone to the grans, and leaving
a feeling_ of fragrance and perfect cleat:lllmm in . The
mouth. .11 may be need daily, and will be found to
strengthen weak and bleeding gums, while the aroma
and detersiveness will recommend it to every one.. Be
ing composed with the assistance of the Dentist, Physi
cians and Microscopist, it is confidently' offered as a.
reliable substitute for the uncertain washes fonnerly in
vt ue in
rient Dentists, acquainted with the constituents
of the Dentallina. advocate its use; - it contains nothing
to prevent its unrestrained employment. Made only by
JAMES T. SHINN, Apothecary,
Broad and Spruce streets.
ally, and
D. L. Stackhonae,
Robert C. Davis,
Geo. 0. Bower,
Chas. Shivers,
8. M, McCann, ' -
8.0. Bunting,
Chas. B. Eberle,
James N. Marks
E. Bringhurst
Dyott & Co.,
0. Blair's Sons,
!Wroth .4 Bro.
For sale by Druggists gene
Fred. Browne,
Bossard .Sc
U. B. Keeny,
Isaac, B. Kay,
O. H. Needles,
T. J. Husband,
Ambrosethnith,
Edward Parrish,
Wm. B. Webb
James L. Bispham,
Hughes & Combo.
Henry A. Bower.
LEGAL -- NOTIEEN
rTHE ORPHANS' COURT FOR THE
City
_and County of Philadelphia.—Estate of JAMES
. CUNNINGHAM, dee'd.—The Auditor appointed by
the Court to. audit, settle, and adjust the account of
WAYNI. MAcVEIGII, Administrator of JAMES H.
CUNNINGHAM, deceased, and to report distribution
of the balance in the bands of the accountant, rail
meet the parties interested, for the purpose of his aim
polutment, on WEDNESDA Y, December 13, 180, at 4
o'clock. P. M., at his Wilco, No. 217 South Third stmet,
in the City of Philadelphia. de3 f m w 6t§
IN THE ORPHANS' COURT FOR THE
City and Comity of Philiololphia.— Estate of
ROBERT EWING, deceased.—The
hp the Court to wilt, settle and adjust the account of
CHARLES A. REPPLI ER, Administrator of the Es
tate of ROBERT EWING, deceased. and to report dis
tribution of the balance in the hubris of the acieuntant,
will meet the parties Interested. fur the purpose of hid
appointment, on WEDNESDAY; the tritli day of De
cember, 1869, at 3 o'clock, P. M. at his oflice, No. tit?
Walnut street, in the City of Plithetof port.
do3-Im w tit* lI.SHAItKE Y. Auditor.
TN TEE COURT OF COMMON' PLEASA. for the City and County of Phibetelphia.—JANE C.
MIX vs. lIORACR B MIX, March term, Pida. : Ili Di
vorce. Sir: Please notice that a rule has been granted
on you in above case, to show cause why adivor , e,lj
.vincalo mutrimonie., should not be decreed. Return bin
Satu , day, December 11, IStD, at DI Web wh. A, M. Per
sonal service having failed on accunnrof year, absence
To HORACE B. MIX, Respondent.
WM. B. HANNA,
Attortioy fur Libell
no29m n•4t*
r'nr
101111LADELPHIA., 12TH: 310. NTH, 6TH,
i&39.
The firm of MORRIS, TA SKEIt. k CO. is Gaa dordts.
solved by mutes! consent, HENRY G. MORRIS rettelng
from the busineen '
STEPHEN MORRIS,
THOMAS T. TARKER. JR.
STEPI!NN I',.M. TASkIEH:
lIENRr'G. MORRIS.. ,
We; the midersigned, have this day, formed 'it .Cophrt
nerehip early on the business. of the. Paveat tro
'Werke, under the 11111.1.143 and tityle of 1101111 IS, TAS
KER g CO. , - , •
Tray TIEN MORRIS
. -
STEPHEN. TASKI.M. Jte.
T. M. TASK Kni.
DOD GER Er AND WOSTENHOLM'S
...LL POCKET ENIVES, PEARL and. STAG , HAN. ' - 1 4° -
DLES of beautiful finish; RODGERS' and WADE
BUTCHER'S and the CELEBRATED DECOUIMBIL ' •
RAZOR. SCISSORS IN CASES' of the finest quality. "
Razors, Knives, Scissors lead Table Outten', ground ited
polished. EAR INSTRUMENTS of the most approved ,
oopetruction to assiet.the heating, at ,P. MADEIRA'S",
Cutler and Surgical laetrumant M aker , Tenth street
below Chestnut. covbte-
R.lc.E.---Z CASKS STRICTLY PRIiIE'
Charleskos Mee landing and for sate by EDW H.
21 , 0W/gar)l6 south N'yen,t street.
.
,;
~XC.
W. S. WlL,l3pli,