Daily evening bulletin. (Philadelphia, Pa.) 1856-1870, November 05, 1869, Image 2

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    ■Witii t'BEATtt QF THE NEW. BOOKS.
' jfip j • Acnan's - St, I’anl.” ■. ■ ■
¥ His a misfortune tliat the American edition
f f\ty Mr. Carleton is so cheap and popular. By
' Jk'printing this important work of research on the
r ■■■■/si : (heap paper (a paper that seems to be nearly
1 half clay) habitually used in his common prib-
L \lieations, and by the omission of the invaluable
i ‘'Map prepared for the original issue, Mr,
Oarieton has done all that a publisher can do
to degrade the importance of a work, and to
A *«iabe readers enter upon the perusal in a frame
* mind little prone to edification.
Saint Paul,” the third volume of Renan’s
. • -jfcgte&t work on Christianity, partakes of the
’ merit of setting forth the por
a,?ns of the Bible in new and picturesque vivid
ness. His Jesus, his Magdalen, his Paid, are
| t ! " v Bke'careful figures in a historical novel, the
V legendary facts being: carefully collated, while
M. the effort is strongly made to bring them
i/'ißvingty and in modem freshness before the
~f «ye. It is this rare narrative art which has
f popularized M. Renan and given liis philosophy
• , a. vogue among the masses which. it would
■„ \ otherwise have missed. The “ Saint Paul” is
v filled with those graphic touches of portraiture,
>/ these landscapes of hectic orjental beauty, and
lh delineation of Christian life as a
Jr > generous but effeminate dream, which have
bcconife recognized as‘giving the Kenan accent.
book begins with one of his exquisitely
R C sentimental female dedications, this time to his
B ■' wife,-Cornelia, daughter of Henri and niece of
v Ary Sciieffer, as that of “ Jesus” was to his
sister,“ These constant obeisances to women'
seem to emphasize what Lecky has recently
recognized and pronounced with eloquence, the
feet ,that Christianity imported the feminine
element into morals.
~<| T;he volume opens with a long Introduction,
which is a critical essay on the so-called Epis
ties Sof Paul, the original documents on which
7 ; . thisjportion of. his work is founded. In this
_ ■ preliminary essay the critic occupies himself
the question of authenticity, then
the question of the integrity of the
thirteen canonical Epistles. His decision on
the first point is that Galatians, both Coring
tbians, and Romans, are past doubt; that Tlies
saloliians and Bhilippians, though obnoxious to
objections, are certain; that Colossians and
V Philemon, are, on the whole, probably authen
tic ; 'Tthat Ephesians is doubtfid;' that the
two ‘Epistles to Timothy and the one to
Titus are false. For the integrity of
the text, the theory maintained, and espe-
cially illustrated by a critical analysis of
, . the Epistle to the Romans, so-called, is
:' f that the editors of the final and accepted text
js jof Paul’s letters had, for a general principle, to
\ reject nothing and add nothing—but above all
‘Jo reject' nothing. The common body, then,
ofthe so-called Epistle to the Romans was a
J circular letter, an encyclical letter addressed to
the churches of Ephesus and Thessalonica
principally, but also to the brethren at Rome;
and one or more other places. Local and in
dividual items were adjoined, according as the
'special destination of the general circular.
These specialities were selected and sewed on,
so to speak, to the final edition, by honest edi
tors, more desirous bf saving all Et. Paul’s au
thentic words than of nice literary form. Here
is the explanation of repetitions,and of a saluta
tory phrase, in the midst of the Epistle tothe
Romans, otherwise inexplicable. It is a great
deal to say of Renan that of the Epistles re
cognized by poor unlettered Christianity as the
work of Paul,- he dutifully accepts seven as
genuine; and his novel and ingenious theory
respecting the Epistle to the Romans will com
mand the attention it deserves.
, Renan’s restoration of the figure of Saint
Paul will be less acceptable. He unhesi
tatingly asserts that: “In everything a true
ancestor of Protestantism, Paul has all the
defects of a Protestant.” He does not concede
to St. Panl a superlatively high morale. “He
was not a Saint,” says Renan; “the dominant
trait in his (the Apostle’s) character was not
goodness. He was haughty, stiff, aggressive;
he defended himself, asserted himself; he used
some hard language; he held himself to be
absolutely in the right; lie\ stuck to liis own
opinion; he quarrelled witn various persons.”
And more than this, M. Renan speaks of
■“jealousy” as the basis of his character, and
even attributes to him at times something like
deliberate, misrepresentation. “We may fairly
believe that more than once lie (Paul) at
tributes'to a private revelation that which, he
had learned from his seniors,” quoting, as “ a
remarkable instance,” St. Paul’s statement in
1 Corinthians, xi, 23, as to the words in which
•ur Lord instituted the Communion Service,
where St. Paul says that he has “ received of
the Lord that which I also delivered unto you.”
This is his final judgment on the great Apostle
of the Gentiles:
PAUL’S PLACE IN liELIOIOUS HISTORY..-.-
The first places in tbe kingdom of heaven
are reserved for those whom a ray of grace
has touched, for those who have adored only
the ideal. The man of action is always a weak
artist, for he does not make it his only aim to
reflect the splendor of the universe; he.cannot
he a awcant, for he moulds his opinions' by po
litical utility; he is not even a man of the
highest virtue, for he is never irreproachable,
the folly and wickedness,, of men
forcing him to come to terms with
them. Above all, he is never ■ lovable;
the most charming of the virtues—reserve—is
forbidden him." The world favors the auda
cious, those who help themselves. Paul, so
great, so honorable, is obliged to decree him
self the title of Apostle. One is strong in ac
tion by one’s defects; one is weak by one’s
best qualities. In a word, the historic person
age who has most analogy with St. Paul Is
liUther. In both there is the same violence of
language, the same noble independence, the
same .frenzied attachment to a thesis em
braced as absolute truth.
One of Renan’s harmoniously-tinted land-
Bcape-stixdies embeds Paul in the bosom of
Thessalonica:
PAUL IN TIIESSAI.ONICA.
- From Amphipqlis the apostles, alter leaving
the estuary of the Strymon, took their way be
... .: , tween the sca arid the.moiinteiiL through thick :
woods and fields which advance to the sand on
tbe beach. The fust halting-place, under palm
■y trees near a cold spring which rises from the
sand a few steps from the sea, is a delicious
place. The apostles then entered into the
Auion of Aretliusa, a deep ravine, a. sort of
Sndicular, Bosphorus, which, serves as
; to the waters of tire interior lakes
toward the sea. They passed, probably un
jb i' consciously, by the side of the tomb Euripides.
iM ( The beauty of the trees, the freshness of the
* ' air. the rapidity of the, waters, the Juxuriancy
~ «f the. ferns and arbatiis of all kinds, remind
c '*■ one of the site in the Grande Chartreuse, or of
/ \ tho Gresivaudan, thrown at the door of a
■ furnace. The basin of the ' Myg
; donian lakes is in truth torrid,
. veritable., surfaces of melted lead. Addei-s,
..swimjnirig with their; heads out of water, and
for shade, alone cause a few ripples.
;I '-The Hocks, towardsnoon,gathered close at’the
. ' loot of tlie trees, appear worn out, Were it
■ a"i ■■" ■/
V/3 *
c'' ,< -i '-I'jssjttjf'i’fj.- j. rvfttgn,''
THE DAILY EVENING BULLETIN—PHIL AD I
not for the hum of the insects, and the singing
of the birds, which, of created being 3, alone re
sist this lassitude, one wopld believe himself in
.the dominion of delath. •; Passing through the
little city of Appollonia, without making, a
halt, Paul skirted the southern shore of the
lakes,and proceeding almost to the depth of the
plain of which they occupied the central depres-,
sion,’ lie arrived at the little chain of heights'
which shut in the Gulf bf Thessalonica on 1 the
east side. Upon reaching the summit of these
hills, Olympus is visible iu the horizon in all
its splendor. The base and the lower portion
of the mountain mingle with the blue sky.
The snows of the summit appear like an
ethereal dwelling-place, suspended in space.
Rut, alas! already was the sacred mountain
devastated. Men had scaled its heights, and
discovered that the gods no longer inhabited it.
When Cicero, froni liis place of exile in Thes
salonica, saw ' these • white summits, lie knew
that there was only snow 1 and rock there.
Paid, without a doubt, had not a thought for
these enchanting places of another race. A
large city whs before ,liim, and his’ experiehce
told him that lie would find there an excellent
basis whereon to found something great.
In the land of Plato, M. Renan believes that
;he new religion had but a mediocre success.
, PACT, AT ATHENS. ; ’
There was a synagogue at Athens, and Paul
spoke there to the Jewsand “ devout” people;
lmt in such a city, synagogue successes
amounted to very little. That brilliant Agora
where so much mind was displayed, • that
Poecile portico where all the questions of the
world were agitated, tempted him. He spoke
there, riot as a preacher addressing the assem-,
bled crowd, but as a stranger, who steals in,
spreads liis ideas timidly, and seeks to create
for himself some basis of action. The success
1 was moderate. “Jesus and the resurrection”
(anastmis) appeared to be strange words, de
void of sense. Several, it appears, took
anastasis for the name of a goddess, and.
thought that Jesus and Anastasia were some
new divine couple, whom these oriental
dreamers had come to preach. Epicurean and
Stoic philosophers, it is said, approached and
listened. ' ,
This fu st contact of Christianity and Greek
philosophy was‘not very friendly. It was
never better seen how men of intelligence
should be careful not to depend upon them
selves, nor scoff at an idea, however ridiculous
it may appeal’ to, them. The had Greek spoken
by Paiil, his incorrect and hesitating enuncia
tion, were not calculated, to gain him credit
in Athens. The philosophers turned- their
backs disdainfully, upon these barbar
ous expressions. “He is a babbler”
(spemotogos), Aaid some.' “He is a setter
forth of strange gods,” said others. Not one
of them imagined that this babbler would one
day supplant them, and that, four hundred and
seventy years after, their professorships would
be suppressed, considered useless and hurtful,
in consequencerof Paul’s preaching. A great
lesson! Proud of their superiority, the
philosophers of Athens disdained the
questions of popular religion. In this
respect Athens almost equaled the
most religious cities of Asia Minor, The aris
tocracy of thinkers cared very little for the.
social wants which made their way through
the covering of so many gross religions. Such
a divorce is always punished. When philoso
phy declares that she will not occupy herself
with religion, religion replies to her by
strangling her. And this is just; for philoso
phy is nothing, unless it points out a path for
humanity,—unless it takes & serious view of
the infinite problem which is the same for all.
• * » ' «■ » *
If the discourse was really pronounced, it
must have in reality caused a vCry singular im
pression upon the cultivated minds wliicli list
ened to it. This language, at times barbar
ous, incorrect, and without .instruction, at
other times full of justness; this unstudied
eloquence, filled with happy hits and disagreea
ble faults; this profound philosophy, border
ing upon strange beliefs, must have seemed to
come from another world. Immensely, supe
rior to the popular religion of Greece, such a
doctrine fell, in manyjrespects, below the, cur
rent philosophy of the century. If, on one
side, it held out a. hand to this philosophy by its
high conception of the Divinity and its moral
unity of the human species, on the other hand
it contained a- portion of supernatural beliefs
which no'positive mind could admit. Atany
rate, it is not surprising it did not succeed in
Athens. The motives which were to make
Christianity successful existed elsewhere tlian
in circles of lettered men. They were in the
hearts of pious women, hi the secret aspirations
of the poor, the slaves and the meek of all
classes. Before philosophy draws near to the
new doctrine, it will be necessary that both
philosophy should become much weakened
and that the new doctrine should .have re
nounced the great chimera of an impending
judgment; that is to say, to the concrete ideas
which were the envelope of its first formation.
"Whether from Paul or from one of his disciples,
this discourse, at any rate, shows us an at
tempt, almost the sole one of the first century,
to conciliate Christianity with philosophy, and
even in one sense with paganism. Affording
proof of a broadness of views very remarkable
in a Jew, the author acknowledges in all races
a sort of interior sense of the divine, a secret
instinct of monotheism, which should have
home them towards the true God. * * * *
But the soil was toe ungrateful. The lively
spirit of tbe Athenians was the contrary of that
religious disposition, tender and deep, which
made conversions and predestined to Chris
tianity. . The really Hellenic lands took hut
slight interest in the doctrine of Jesus. Plu
tarch, living in an atmosphere purely Greek,
has not as yet the slightest breath of it in the
first half of the second century. Patriotism,
attachment to the recollections of tho country,
turned the Greeks away from exotic religions.
“Hellenism” became an organized religion, al
most reasonable, admitting a large part of phi
losophy. The “gods of Greece” seemed to
wish to be humanity’s universal gods. * * * *
Tired with his want of success in Athens,
Paul, without awaiting the return of Timothy,
set out "for Corinth. He had not established
an extensive church at Athens. Only a few
isolated persons, among others a certain Dio
nysius, a member it is said of Areopagus, and
a woman named Damans, had adhered to the
doctrines. This was the first and almost the
only check he met with in his apostolic career.
Even in the’second century, the church of
Athens lacks stability. Athens was one
of the last cities to be converted. Next
to Constantine, it was the second in
opposition to Christianity, a bulwark
of philosophy. By a rare privilege, it kept its
temples undisturbed. These prodigious monu
ments, preserved for ages, thanks to a sort of
instinctive respect, were destined to come down
to us as an eternal lesson of good sense and
honesty given by artists of genius. Still, in
our day, we feel that of Christianity
which covers the old Pagan basis is here very
superficial. There is scarcely need of modify
ing the • actual names of the churches of
Athens in order to discover those of the antique
temples. [Ala VcMili is the Stoa Vasillos, the
church of the twelve apostles, the temple of
tlie twelve gods; Aia Pamsk'eci, the Pom
peion.]
Nothing in the volume is more characteristic
of Renan’s originality and independence, his
irreverence, his ingenuity, his unembarrassed
and disrespectful analysis of sacerdotal acts,-
than the version he gives of Paul’s condescen
sion toward the Christian hierarchy of Jerusa
lem during his last visit to that capital:
PALI. AND THE FOUR MEN WHICH HAD A
VOW AT JERUSALEM. * /
If the elders of Jerusalem were not tilled
with the most contracted opinions, how can
we explain the strange discourse attributed to
them by tlie author of tlie Acts, ami one which
betrays, all tlieir > peri '.axity ? Scarcely had the
return of thanks been concluded, when they
say to Paul: “Do, therefore, this that we say
to tbee: We have four men which have a vow
ion them; Them take, and purify thyself .with
tliem/aifd be at charges with themi, that they,,
may'shave their heads: and all may know that
those (bh)gs,wly.i,e. they lire informed
ing .tliec, Are nothing; but that thou thyself
also ’ waikest orderly and kcepest the law;”
Tlius these shallow minds can Only reply with
language of. to him who brings, them
the homage of a world. Paul will be obliged
to expiate his ■ prodigious conquests by hy
pocrisy. He must give pledges to littleness of
mind! It is when they shall have seen lilm
with four beggars, too poor’fo have their heads
shaved at their own expense, fulfil a popular
superstition, that they will recognize him as
colleague. Such is, the strange condition of
humanity, that we ’ must not he surprised at
such a spectacle.
Men are too numerous for it to be possible
to establish anything here below,,„ without
making concessions to mediocrity, in order
to disregard the scruples of the weak, one
must be either completely disinterested in the
action,tor else very powerful. Those whom
their position obliges them to reckon with the
crowd, are led to demand. singular inconsist
encies from great and dependent men. Every.
vigorously asserted thought is an Incumbrance
in the government of the world. Vindication
and proseiytism, when they imply a little
genius, are suspected things to the conservative
parties. Look at these eloquent laymen who,
in our clay, have attempted to enlarge’ Catho
licism, and to conciliate for -it’the sympathies
of a portion of society, until , then closed
against religious sentiment, what have they
obtained from tlie church to which they brought
crowds of new adherents? A disavowal. The
successors of James Obliam have found it
prudent to condemn them, even while they are
profiting by then’ success. They accepted
then - offerings without thanks. They said to
them, as to Paul, “ Brethren, ye see these
thousands of old believers, who hold to things
which ye pass over in silence; when ye speak
to people of the world take care; put aside
novelties which scandalize, and sanctify your
selves with us.” What will Paul do, placed
between his great principle of the uselessness
of works and the immense interest whicli he
had in not breaking with the church of Jeru
salem ? His position must have been painfid.
Submit '.o a practice which he considered use
less, and almost injurious to Jesus, since it
allowed one to believe that salvation is ob
tained through other things than the merits of
Christ, was to place himself in flagrant contra
diction with the doctrine that he had every
where preached, and which, in his great circu
lar epistle, in particular, he had developed with
such unparalleled force. Why, moreover, do
they ask him to re-establish an antiquated rite,
destitute of all efficacy, and almost a denial of
the new dogma? To show that he is a Jew,
to refute in a peremptory manner the report in
circulation that he has ceased to be a Jew,
that he no longer acknowledged the law or
traditions. Now, most assuredly he did no
longer acknowledge them. Was riot a con
nivance at tills deception an infidelity towards
Christ? All this must have caused Paul to
pause, and agitated him most 'deeply. But a
superior principle which guided his life, led
him to overcome his repugnances. Paul
placed charity above opinions andindividual
sentiments. Christ delivered us from, all law;
but if, by profiting by liberty which Christ lias
given us, We scandalize his brother, it is better
to renounce this liberty pnd give one’s self up
to slavery. It is in virtue of this principle tliat
Paul, as he says himself, became everything to
all men,—a Jew with a Jew, a Gentile with
Gentiles. In accepting the proposition of
James and the elders, he made application of
liis favorite principle. Therefore he submitted.
Never, perhaps, in liis apostolic life, did he
make a greater sacrifice to his work. These
heroes of practical life have other duties.than
the heroes of contemplative life. The first
duty of the latter is to sacrifice their activity to
their idea,—to say all they think, nothing ex
cept what they think, in the exact measure in
which they think it. The first duty of the.
others is,, often, to sacrifice their ideas, at
times even their most fixed principles,!?) to the
interests of the cause which they are seeking to
render triumphant. What they asked Paul,
moreover, was less 'to make himself a
Nazarite, than ,to take upon himself
the ordinary expenses of four Nazantes, who
had nothing wherewith to pay the sacrifices
made upon this kind of occasion. This was a
highly esteemed work.- There were around
the temple multitudes of poor people who had
made vows; and who were waiting till some
rich person should pay for them. “To
have. a Nazarite shorn ” was ail act of piety;
and occasions are quoted in which powerful
personages, by way of thanks for a signal favor
from heaven, had hundreds of them shaven; —
just about as it was meritorious in the Middle
Ages to pay people for making pilgrimages and
entering into monastic institutions. Paul, in
the midst of the misery which existed in the,
church of Jerusalem, was considered wealthy.
They requested Mm to perform the act
of ; a rich devotee, and to prove to all, by
a notorious proceeding, that he had remained
faithful to the practices of his country. James,
much given ' to outward* observances, was
probably the inspirer of this -fantastic idea.
They made haste to add, moreover, that such
obligations in no wise concerned the converted
heathen. It was simply a question of not
allowing credence to be attached to the fright
ful scandal that it was possible for a Jew not"
to practise the law of Closes. So great was the
fanaticism inspired by the law,that such a phe
nomenon would have appeared more extra
ordinary than the ruin of the world and total
overthrow of creation. Paul, therefore, joined
himself to the four beggars. Those who fid
filled such vows began- to purify themselves;
then they entered the temple, then remained
shut up there a certain number of days, ac
cording to tlfo vow which they had made (seven
and thirty days),‘abstained from wine and had
their hair shorn. When the number of days
was passed they offered sacrifices, which they
paid for at rather .a high price. Paul submitted ,
to everything. The day after his visit to James
he went to the temple and inscribed himself
for seven days, then he performed all the cus
tomary rites—a greater man during these days
of humility, in wMch through voluntary weak
ness he fulfilled an act of antiquated devotion
among people in rags, than when ire displayed
the for ce and independence of his genius at
Corinth and Thessalonica.
This edition of Renan is well translated by
Ingersoll Lockwood, and is put by Carleton at
a price which will accommodate the poorest
student. Sold by J. B. Lippincott & Co.
Pressense’s “Early Years of Christi
anity.”
From E. D. Pressense’s “The Early Years
of Christianity,” translated by Annie Har
wood, and published by Hodder & Stoughton,
London, we borrow a paragraph in which the
critical author takes a direct , issue with those
who magnify the priestly office on the strength
of a comnussibh"derived by" 'direct*' succession
from the Apostles:
We must set aside, first of all, aqy ideas of
sacerdotalism. At the period when the apos
tolic authority wasused with most power in
the Church, the Church still acknowledged the
Jewish priesthood. Besides, Christianity re
cognizes no priesthood but that of Christ,'
communicated, by faith, to the Christain.
The apostles were not the sole organs,of in
! spiration, for the Holy Spirit was promised and
granted to all the disciples assembled in the
upper chamber on the very day of the Lord’s
resurrection. On the day of Pentecost all the
Christians were filled with the Holy
Ghost. In the primitive Church
home private Christians, not in
vested with tlie apostolic office, had more influ
ence than the majority of the apostles. It is
enough to cite tlie names of Stephen, Philip
and .James. In what then consisted the apos
tolic office? Their name of messenger has
UlßPtwuiM jjii'W-ojl
ILPHIA,FRIDAy,
nothing exclusive in it, since all Christians aro
witnesses of Jesus. Christ. Their numbers,
point to the twelves tribes of tho cbosert people.
They clearly do not represent the.prieatly tribe,
but the,twelve tribbs; that is to say, the:people.
of Coil as a whole. In other words, ;thoy are
the nucleus of the Church, so made by, Jesus
.Christ himself. Apostolical succession is not:
then the privilege of a certain poition of the body,
but of the whole; the Christian Church itself
carries on the apostolic office..' * * The apology
of Stephen reveals an important development of
Christian thought. And we owe this develop
ment to a man who is not an apostle, anil who
appears in this crisis superior to the twelve.
We have in this fact an irrefragable proof that
nothing like a monopoly of revelation was'
enjoyed by the apostles. - * It is surely
more honorable to : tlic apostle to suppose the
results to have been wrought by the living power
of their words, than by any outward and ma
terial act—the transmission of some myste
rious, magnetic fluid from their persons. Such
theories are truly derogatory, anil lower the
apostles to the rank ot the magicians, whose
power they were come to destroy.
‘ SPECIAL NOTICES.
H-=Si FOURTH NATIONAL BANK, NO.
723 ARCH STREET. • „ ' „
! IMnLADEI.PIUA i OctoborM, IM.
At ft meeting oftho Board of "Directors held this day it
tvos unanimously resolvod that tho Not liftruinga of the
Bank for tho preceding Six Months, amounting to
,•811,124 84,hoingfiH percent, on tho Capital Stock, bo
passed, and that tho siiid amouht bo placed to tho surplus
account of the Bank. • „ • r^/ . TvV
no 4 2t§ •- S. MOODY, Cashier.,..
iy-==i. MERCANTILE BENEFICIAL AS
SOOIATIONOF PHILADELPHIA.
Tho Twenty‘eighth Annual Mooting will °®
TUESDAY NEXT, Gth inutunt, at 3 o’clock, P. M.. at
their rooms, N. W. corner Seventh and Sam>om streota
(entrance on Seventh street). 111111 . W , M1
•>Tho Annual Report will be submitted, and an election
hold for a Board of.Sfanagwa townw‘ho |°QLii?, y
Secretary.
rpis. NOTICE.—NOTICE 18 HEREBY
ILiy irivcn that a special meeting of tho
crThe AMYGDALOID MINING COMPANY OF LAKE
SUPERIOR will bo hold jit the Office •}‘»^25 1 JW n J»
No. 321 Walnut street, Philadelphia,on WEDNESDAY,
the 24th day of Novembor, 18U9, at 12 o’clock, M., to take
action on increasing the capital of the Company, Ana to
consider such other business as may legally |come
before them. „ _ ‘ .
< By order of the Directors. M _
* 11. H. HOFFMAN, Secretary.
Philadelphia , Oct. 7 , 1869. 0c23t0n024§
IV—=» OFFICE--OX*’ GIRARD MINING
ly? COMPANY OF MICHIGAN, NO. 224 WALNUT
STREET. Philadelphia, October 15,1869.
Notice is hereby given that all Stock of the GIRARD
MINING COMPANY, on which instalments aro due
and unpaid, has been forfeited,and sold at publlo
auction on iIONDAY, November 14th, 1869,at 12 o’clock,
noon, at the Ofllco of tlio Secretary of tbo Corporation
( according to the Charter and By-lawB), uuless previ
ously redeemed. •
By order of tho Directors, HOOPE9
ocl6tbol6§] , Secretary aiid Treasurc’r..
The Company claim thorlght to bid unsaid Stock.
OF THE -ETNA MINING
Uj? COMPANY, NO. 324 WALNUT STREET.
PjIILADKLPHIA , Oct. 13,18®.
Notice ia hereby given that alt Btpck of tho .Etna
Minin'fi'Company. on which instalments aro due cud un
paid, bas been forfeited, and will be Hold at publlo auc
tion on SATURDAY, November 13tb, 1569, at 12 o’clock,
noon, at tho office of tbo Secretary of tho Corporation
(according to tho Charter and By-Laws), unlees pre
viously redeemed. ’ 1
By order of tho Directors. . . _
B. A. HOOPES, Secretary and Treasurer.
Tbo Company claima tho right to hid on said
Stock. ' ocl3tnoHS
OFFICE OF THE PENNSYLVANIA
ly? IRON COMPANY. No. 407 Library Btreot,
Philadelphia, Oct. 27... IS®.
Tho Annual Mooting of tlio Stockholders will be held
at the Offico of the Company, on WEDNESDAY, tbo
10th day of November, at 3 P. 31.. when au election will
bo hold for Directors to servo for the ensuing year.
oc27w fmttS WILLIAM J. BARR, Secretary.
jy--=D OFFICE HUNTINGDON AND
iLgr BROAD TOP MOUNTAIN RAILROAD COM
PANY, No. 417 WALNUT Street.
PIIIt.ADKE.PHIA, Nov. 2, 1860.
Coupons No. 26, on the Second Mortgage Bonds of this
company, will bo paid on presentation at tliiii office.
J. J*. AEKTsEN,
no2tu til «3t§ ■ ; Agent fog Trueteea.
iv-3» PHILADELPHIA EYE AND EAR
[I y infirmary
8/W. corner ELEVENTH and BUTTONWOOD Btroeta.
Open daily at 12 o’clock.
ATTENDING SURGEONS.
P.D.Kcyser,M.D., 1111 Arch street. ,
James Collinß, M. D., 8. W. corner Marshall and
Green streets.
VISITING TRUSTEES.
Geo. M. Snowdon. S. W. corner Fourth ana Noble.
F. K, Womrath, 1212 Chestnut street.
B. B. Burrows.3l6 Arch street. oc2 slm
DIVIDEND NOTICEB.
the sixth national bank,
Philadelphia, Soy. 3. IS6O.
r Xh© Board of Directors have this day declared u divi
dend of Five Per Cent.,, payable on demand, clear of
tax. • JkOBEBT 11. SALTJBB, -
no43ts Cashier.
THE COMMERCIAL NATIONAL
BANK OF PENNSYLVANIA. v
*v vr- Philadelphia, Nov. 2,1369.
The Board of Directore havo this day declarM a semi
annual dividend of Five Per Cent., payable, clear of all
taxed, on demand. -
no2Gt§ 8. C. PALMER. Cashier.
NATIONAL BANK OF THE
NORTHERN LIBERTIES.
• . Philadelphia, Nov. 2,1869.
The Directors have this day declared a dividend of
Ten’ Per Cent., payablo on demand, clear of tax;
no2.6t§ W. GUMMERE, Cashier.
MECHANICS’ NATIONAL BANK.
Philadelphia, November2,lB69.
The Board of Directors have this day declared a divi
dend of Six Per-Cent., payable on demand,free of taxes.
no2-6t§ * J. WIEGAND, Jr., Cashier.
jy-s* CITY NATIONAL BANK. #
lKiy Philadelphia, November 2,1869.
Tne Board of Directors have this day declared a divi
dend of Six Per Cent., payable on demandjclear of taxes.
no26t| G. ALBERT LEWlS,Cashier.
COIIN EXCHANGE NATIONAL
BANK,
Philadelphia, November 2d, 18G9.
The Board of Directors Uavo this day declared a Divi
dend of Six Per Cent, for the last Bix months, payablo on
demand, clear of taxes.
uo2-6t| H. P. BCIIETKY, Cashier. ,
PENN NATIONAL BANK.
Philadelphia, Nor. 2,1869.
The Directors have this, day declared a divideud of
Five Per Cent., clear of taxes, payable on demand. '
no33t’§ GEORGE P.LOUGHEAD, Cashier.
"FARMEKS’ AND MEO HAXICS’
NATIONAL BANK -
Philadelphia, Nov. 2,18(39.
The Board of Directors have this day declared a
.Dividend of Five Per Cent., payable on demand, clear of
l! iio3 ICt V. JtUSHTON.JK., Collier.
NATIONAL BANK OF COM
ly? MEBCE. t ■ • .
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 2, 1869.
The Board of Directors have this declared a dividend
of Five l’er Cent., payable on demand, clear of taxes.
no2*tuths3t§ JOHN A. LEWIS, Cashior.
OFFICE CATAW IB S A It AIL HOAD
COMPANY, No. 424 WALNUT STREET. ‘
Philadelphia, Nov. 2,136&.
Tho Board of Directors of this Company ha\othts
day declared a dividend ofThrco and One-Jlalf per
Cent, on account of the dividends to be paid tho preferred
Stockholders, payablo on and after tho 20th
instate those persons in whoso name the stock stands at
the close of the transfer hooks.
. Tho transfer books of tho preferred stock will be
closed on the 13th and reopened on the 20th inst.
no 2 tn th B_tno2ojj \Y\ L. (rILKOY, Treasuror,
OFFICE PENNSYLVAN IA KAIL
BOAD COMPANY*, TREASURERS DEPART
MENT
Philadelphia, Penn’a., Nov. 2,18G9,
NOTICE TO STOCKIIOLDEUS. ,
The Board of Directors have .thin day declared a semi
annual dividend of Five Percent. on tho Capital Stock
of tho Company, clear of National and State taxes, pay
able in casn on and after November 30th, 1860. t
Blank Powers of Attorney for collecting dividends can
be had at tlie office of the Company, No. 238 8911th Third
The office will bo opened at BA. M. and closed at 3 P.
M., from November 80th to for the pay
ment of Dividends, and after that date from 9 A. M. to d
1 jiu2tjai” BUl>1 ‘ THOS. T. FIIITII, Treasurer.
COPARTNERSHIPS.
COPARTNERSHIP NOTICE. —JAMES
0. FINN & SON have associated AMBROSE
SMITH with them in tlio Wall l’apor business, which
will bo carried on as heretofore at tho N.E. corner of
Tenth ana Walnut street*. 0 pIJJN
VALENTINE 11. FINN,
AMBROSE SMITH.
Nqvembkk 1,18C9. • not at*
CO-PARTNERSHIP NOTICE.
Tho limited partnership at present existing under
the style of SHARP, GALLON BY & .MOWN, w m bo
dissolved by niutual-conHcnt on- tlie 31st ol December,
ISO 9. . SHARP, GALLONEY & BROWN.
CAItD.—Wo willtfoll our present largo assortment of
imported dry good# ut extremely low rates, in order to
rln«e out our stock boforo the llrst of the year.
Cl ° SHARP, GALLONKY A BROWN,
>.tJO7 Chestinitstreet.
nol-Ut§_
Novcmbor_li_lS69.
INSTRUCTIONS.
THE PHILADELPHIA BIDING-
School, Nob. 3334,333*1, 3338,3340 and 334fc Market
now open. Thu School in the largeHt,beafc ar
ranged < and the Stables attaohed are tho most commo
dious and thoroughly ventilated of any in tho city.
HorHpnnmßhip BdentuicaUy taught, and Horeea thor
oughly trained lor the baddle. The moat timid way ride
with perfect safety. . , f _
* To hire, handsome Carriages, with careful drivers, lor
weddings, parties, opera, Bhopping, Ac. t
liorHos taken at livery..
ffatf SETH ORAIQK, Proprietor. _
DENTISTRY.
ACTIVE PRACTICE.
flSgSg._l)r. FINK, No. 219 Vino utreet, holow Third,
inßortd tho handaomeßt Tooth in tho city,at prices
to suit all. Teeth Plugged, Teeth Repaired, Exchanged,
.rlleniodelledtoHult. OftB end Ether. No pain in ex
tracting. Office hours,B to 0 8025-»au,t!!in
ppw«»p^ — r T — '
, PROPOSALS. \
pitOPOSAES EOK MAIL LOCKS.
-i Post o?»i cm Department,,
i l:r. Washington, OctobeflO, 18t!9.
SEALED PROPOSALS for; furnishing
Mail-Lochs and Koys of new kinds, to be sub
stituted* for the Locks and Keys now usedon
ihe United States mails, will bo received at this
Department until 9 o’clock A, M. tlio 3d day of
FEBRUARY, 1870. It is desirable to obtain
.Locks and Keys of a new construction for the
exclusive use of the United States mails, and,
if practicable, invented expressly for that pur
pose. As the oxposure of a model Lock and
Koy to public examination would impair, if
not destroy, Its utility for the mails, tue Do-,
partment prescribes no model for bidders* but
relies-for its selection oh the specimens of
mechanical skill and ingenuity which a fair
competition among - inventors, hereby
invited, may develop. It is suf
ficient to describe tho principal
.requisites of a Mail-Lock, as follows: Self-
Locking uniformity, security, liyhtnem, strength,
durability, novelty of construction and facility of
use. Two kinds of Locks and. Keys; ono of
brass and tho other of iron, different in exte
rior form and interior construction or arrange
ment,, are required; tho Proposals should;
specify .separately the prico of each brass
Lock; each Key for same ; each iron Lock,
, and each Key for same. Duplicate samples or
each kind of Locks and Keys proposed are
required to be submitted with tho Proposals;
ono of each Sample Lock to bo rivetedup and
finished, and another to be open or unriveted,
so that its internal structure and arrangement
may easily be examined. Evory sample should
be plainly marked with the bidder’s name,
and, if the samo or any part of it be covered
by a patent, tho date of such patent and the
name of the patentee must also be attached
thereto. ■> r.
Tho Internal plan or arrangement of tho
Locks offered, and the particular shape of tho
Key requisite to open them, must not bo like
any now or heretofore in use.
They must bo warranted not to infringe
upon or conflict with any patented invention
of which the bidder is not tho patentee. Pre
ference will be given to a Lock, the Key of
which has not been exposed to general obser
vation, or been publicly described, disclosed,
■or suggested.
A decision on the various specimens and
Proposals will he made on or before tho 3d
day of MARCH, 1870 ; and, unless tho Post
master-General shall deem it. to be best for the
interests of the Department to reject all'the
Proposals and specimens submitted under this
advertisement,(a right hereby expressedlv re
served to himl, contracts will.be entered into,
ns soon thereafter as practicable, with the
successful bidder whose Locks shall be
adopted, for furnishing similar Locks and
Keys for four years, as they may be required
and ordered. If mutually agreed to in writing
by the contractor and the Postmaster-
General for the time being, not less
than six months before its expiration,
the contract may bo , extended and
comtinued for an additional term of four
years. But on and alter tho expiration of
either term of the contract, or on and after
its rightful annlment at any time, the Post
master-General, shall bave the right to con
tract with or employ any other party to
furnish the same, or any other kind of
Locks and Keys; and if he shall deem proper,
to demand and receive from the late or de
faulting contractor all finished or unfinished
Keys and the internal parts of the Locks con
tracted for, and all dies, gauges, and designs,
(which would enable others to make or forge
such Locks or Keys), in the possession of such
contractor, who*, their surrender to the
Department, shall be paid for the same,at such
price as may he ascertained by fair appraise
ment. ■
The contractor must agree and be able to
furnish, if required and ordered, 20,000 Brass
Locks and 3,000 Brass Keys within three
months from the time of entering into con
tract, and 80,000 Iron Locks and 00,000 Iron
Keys within ten months from such time. But
the Postmaster-General will reserve the .right
to increase or diminish, as the wants or inter
ests of the service may demand, the quantities
of the Locks and Keys above specified, with
a proportionate allowance of time to furnish
them. ,
Ail the Locks furnished by the contractor
must be warranted to keep fn good working
order for two years in the ordinary use of the
service, when not subjected to obvious vio
lence ; such as become defective witliin that
i time to he replaced with perfect Locks with
out charge. All tho Locks furnished under
contract are to be, each, distinctly marked
“ U. 8. Mail,” in either sunk or raised letters,
and all the Keys are to be numbered iu the
natural order; each Key having its appropri
ate number distinctly stamped upon one side
I of the bow, and “ U.’S. Mail” on the opposite
j side.
I The contractor will he required to deliver
i the Locks at his own expense at the Post-
Oflice Department, Washington, D.C., put up
I on sticks, forming separate bundles of five
j Locks each, and securely packed in wooden
I boxes containing not more 1 than two hundred
; Locks each. The Keys are to tie delivered to
< an agent of the Department,duly and soeciaily
1 authorized in each.ca.se to take charge of and
! convey the same from the contractor’s mauu
factory to the Department, where both Locks
! and Keys are to he inspected andapproved be
! fore they shall be paid for.
| The contractor will bo required*to give bond,
I with ample security, in the sum of fifty thou
! saiid dollars, to be forfeited to the United
j States as liquidated'damages, in case of /his
i failuro to 'faithfully perform the contract,
| either as to furnishing the supplies ordered
’ within a reasonable time, or as to guarding
j> the manufacture of the Mail Locks and Keys
with due privacy, integrity and care.
| No Proposal will, therefore, ho accepted if
, not accompanied with a bond Of the penal
sum of Twenty Thousand Dollars, duly exe
; ented by the proposed sureties (whose respon
i sibillty must he certified by a Judge of a Court
orßeCoM'ffeat'eSt tO their place of residence,
! attested by the Clerk of suen Court under the
j seal thereof), and conditioned for their becom
ing responsible as sureties on the required
bond for tho fulfillment of the contract, in case
such Proposals shall be accented.. The manu
facture of Mail Locks and Keys is, of neces
sity, a highly important anu delicate trust
which the Department will confide to no bidder
! whose Proposals are not also accompanied
j with testimonials, of good character. .
In deciding on the Proposals and Specimens
the PostmasterUcperal may deem it expedi
ent to select the Bra&s Lock of ono bidder and
the Iron Lock of another. He, therefore, re
serves tho right ot contracting with dillerent
individuals ior such different kinds of Locks
as he may select. „ „ , , , .
Proposals should be carefully sealed and ad
dressed to the “Second Assistant Postmaster-
General,” and endorsed on the envelop e“Pro
posals for Mail Locks.” „„^ D „ rT ,r T
JOHN A, J. ORESWELL,
Postmaster-General.
0c22 lGt
_ GROCEUIES.OQUORS,
SHOTWELL
SWEET CIDER.
Our ÜBual supply of this celebrated Cidor just received
ALBERT C. ROBERTS.
DEALER IN FINE GBOCEBIEB,
Corner Eleventh and Vine Streets.
Tew MESS SIIAD AND SPICED
Salmon. Tonguca and Sounds, in priine orders just
race®re”Dfor sale at K»»
No. 118 South Second street* below Chestnutatreot.
TdURE SPICES, GROUND AND WHOLE
A-Pure English Mustard by the Pound-Choice
liR &A". Second Blreet, helow Chostnut struct,
ATEW GREEN GINGER.—4OO POUNDS
l\ of choice Green Ginger in store andforealoat
OOtISTY’B Eaat End Grocery, No. 118 South Second
etreet, below Chestnut street. _
TJ/HITE BRANDY FOB i*KBSERvino.
W —A choice article just rccoirod and for sale at
COUSTY’S Kant Knd Grocery, No. 118 South Second
street, below Chestnut street
b 6 U P S.—T OM AT O, PEA, MOCK
O Turtle and JulUen Sonps of Boston Club Manufac
ture, ono of the finest articles for pie-nics and sailing
rajtka. For saloat OOUSTY’9 East End Grocery, No
lla South Second street. boiowOhostnut street.
T>OSIN~ANI> ~ SPTS. - XtJBPENTINE.-
11 6 V! Bhjs. Boein; 137 I!bl». Prime .Southern
Distilled Spirits Turpontino. Now landing / r 9JJ
steamer “Pioneer,” from Wilmington, N. 0., and for
KlShy COCIIbXn. BUBMELL % ob., 11l Chestnut
vtreot.
CORSETS.
BARATET.
G O RSETS,
TOURNURES,
PANIERS.
112 St eleventh St.
BROWN’S
Wholesale and Retail
Corset Warehouse
REMOVED
819 ABCH STREET.
’'GENTS’ FURNISHING GOODS.
PATENT SHOULDER SEAM SHIRT
. MANUFACTORY.
Orders for those celebrated Shirts snpplUd promptly
•■■■'■■•, brief notice.
Gentlemen’s Furnishing Goods,
Of late styles in fall Variety.
WINCHESTER & CO.
,706 CHESTNUT.
|e3-ro w f tf ■_
FINE DRESS SHIRTS
AND
GENTS’ NOVELTIES.
J. W. SCOTT & CO.,
No. 814 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia,
Four doom below Continental Hotel.
i . mhl-fmwtt
LUMBER.
MAULE, BROTHER & CO.,
2500' South Street.'
IQCQ PATTERN MAKERS. IQOQ
IOOt/. ■ PATTERN MAKERS. lwOtf.
CHOICE SELECTION
Michigan” cork pink
„ _ _ for patterns. _ _____
I QPQ SPRUCE AND HEMLOCK.! QOQ
looy. BPBDCE AND IIEMLOCK. IOOiJ.
liAHGE HTOIK.
IQCQ FLORIDA FLOORING. IQfiQ
iOD«7. FLORIDA FLOORINO. 100«7.
CAROLINA FLOORINO.
VIRGINIA FLOORING.
DELAWARE FLOORING’
ASH FLOORINO.
WALNUT FLOORINO.
IOCQ FLORIDA STEP BOARDB.II
IOOi/. FLORIDA STEP BOARDS.
KAili i'uAnK.,
BAIL PLANE
M™ ¥l rS? D 8
WALNUT BOARDS AND PLANK,
WALNUT BOARDS,
■WALNUT PLANK.
ASSORTED
TOR
CABINET MAKERS,
BUILDERS, AO.
1869. ™ D <E^ EES ’ 1869.
UNDERTAKERS’ LUMBER.
RED CEDAR.
WALNUT AND PINK.
1 Q£Q SEASONED POPLAR. IQPQ
lOt)*/. SEASONED CHERRY. lOo*7.
WHITE OAK PLANK AND BOARDS.
HICKORY.
1 QfiQ CAROLINA SOANTLING.I Q£?Q
Io0«7. CAROLINA 11. T. SILLS. IOOiJ.
NORWAY SCANTLING.
1 QOCk CEDAR SHINGLES. IQCQ
lot)*/. CEDAR SHINGLES. lOot7.
CTPHESS SHINGLES.
LARGE ASSORTMENT.
FOR SALE LOW.
PLASTERING LATH. IQ£Q
PLASTERING LATH. 100*7.
LATH.
UACIiE Bit OTHER A CO.,
*5OO SOUTH BTREET.
18.69.
Xjnm.'ber Undercover,
ALWAYS DRY.
W»lnnt, White Pine, Yellow Pine, Bproce, Hemlock
Shingles, Ac., always on hand at low rates.
WATSON & GILLINGHAM,
924 Richmond Street, Eighteenth Ward.
mhaiyj ;
Yellow pine lumbee^-okdees
for cargoes of eyerr description Sawed Lpmbirexo
cntsd at abort notice—goality subject to Inspection.
Apply to BDW.H.BOWLEY. id Booth Wharves. «
MISCELLANEOI) S.
PLUMBING.
WM. G. RHOADS,
1221 MARKET STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.
Steam and Q Befitting, Hand Power and Steam Pumpi,
Plumbers 1 Marble and Boapstono Work. •
Terra Cotta Pipe, Chimney Tops, Ac., wholesale and
of finished work may be seen at my store.
mySSmi ~
£=>. f s CAPE MAY SAIjT OYSTERS
IfTtftt i»J nt CIIOIIWEU.S.- Oyfti-r* fried. *f«wd,
(f broiltMl, panned and roasted. W Dock
HtrtHJt, opposite the Excbaugo.
BUSINESS CARDS.
Established 1831.
WM. G. FLANAGAN & SON,
house And snip plumbers,
No. 129 Walnut Street..
. in m. :
.. v pa , wbisßT. thorntos pike, clkmejlt. a. gkwk
JAMEB A. WBIBBT, L
'“’’pEm WBIOHi 4 SONS,
Importers ofeartbonware
Shippin.ymaCo^U.^^a^,^
E b: WlG S’okney-at.law, , , ,
Commissioner of Doeds for the State of Pennsylvania In.
96 Madison street, No. lllcJiicugo, _
7S ott on sail duck of evert
gftMsslSK'fgSiSfS®
T H3S ’ 4 No. 103 Church street, City Stores.
—tTtvy WELLS.— OWSeSS OF FROP
erty—The only place to get privy
HARDWARE, &C.
WHITE IVORYIDE,
An Indestructible WHITE
an American improvement of groat merit t boat quality
iSandleknives and forks,
® ABIfTOFOOOD KNIVES AND FORKS fi»r 81.
BEST CITY MAKE TBEBLE-PLATED SILVER
'SSSkIV’MES®'ON PLATED FOItKS, 82 25 per
‘"p'LATED TEA AND TABLE SPOONS, in great t»*
ri^k*iEitLA W Nt P NArLS, 0» 10 PEB KEG, of ICO-
OF NAILS, 88 M PER KEG. ‘
At tho Gbeap—for Cash-Hardware SU.ro of
J. B. SHANNON,
1009 Marfcet Street.
my22-B tuth 1y
CUTLEIIA.
ODOEJtB 1 ' ANI> WOSTENHOLM’S
POCKET KNIVES, PEABL and STAG HAN-.
trHnf beautiful Jlnlell; BODGEBS’ and WADE*
TcSEß®S?“nd fflo CELEBRATED LEOOULTBS
n»'/t)Tt ScisBORS IN OASES of tho finest uualltx.
Bclssbrs nmd Tnblo Cutlery, ground ana
nnllshoh EAB INSTRUMENTS Sf tho moat approved,
construction to assist the hearing, at P. MADETBA S,
CutSor and Surgical Instrument Maker, 116 Tonth stroet,
bolow Chestnut. myi-ti
rtANTON PRESERVED GINGER.—
IJ, Preserved Ginger, ii. syrup]of the celebrated Ohy?
rand' aIBO, Dry Preserved Ginger, in boxes, im
normd anil'for sale 7 by JOS. U BUSSi’kB A 00., 108-
south Delaware avenue
TEUEOBAPHIC BUSIMART.
The Prussian ministerial budget has been
• Submitted to tlie Diet.
The Dalmatian rebels Lave suffered another
Severe defeat.
'6 .Athens .is at present being visited by the
Emperor of Austria.
THE-St. Domingo revolutionists continue in
active.
llu&ions ih 'St. Domingo of its sale to the
. >U nited States are gaining strength.
The Internal ltevenue receipts yesterday
amounted to $750,000.
, ; At last the New City Hall imbroglio in
Baltimore is settled.
The New York Grand Jury are still en
gaged in investigating the late gold muddle.
GnoiiOE Peabody, ■ the distinguished''i>hi
lanthropist, died in London, at half-past eleven
©’clock, last night. : •
Two young men were killed by falling from
a pole on the Fair grounds, at Rome, Ga., yes
terday.
The dwelling'of Nathan Davy, in Harwich,
•Mass., was’burned pn Wednesday night, and
two children perished in the flames.
The warehouse of the Citizens’ Oil Refinery,
near Pittsbiugh, was burned yesterday.. Loss,
slo,ooo. ' ;
While the gunboat Thistle was- on trial
trip off Sheemess, England, her boiler exploded,
killing ten men outright, and severely wound
ing eight others.
Two priests, returning from a land meeting
at Cavan, Ireland, were set, upon by supposed
Orangemen, and so brutally beaten that one
■ lias died from his injuries.
Many electoral meetings have been held in
varioijs parts of Paris. The proceedings have
been orderly, and in no instance has the inter
ference of the police been needed.
Gen. Chkvalikii, President Salnave's Sec
retary of War, was compelled to raise the siege
of Jacmel in order to check the revolutionary
advance on Port an Prince.
A gauge delegation from England will be
present at the Evangelical Alliance Convention,
to be held in New York next fall. All the
leading prelates of England express hearty
sympathy with the movement.; ■
Me. Lowe, our Minister to China, had an
interview with the President and Secretary of
State yesterday, and received his instructions.
It’is understood that these contemplate a “con
ciliatory policy,” leaving the Minister large
liberty in canying out details.
The National Baptist. Sunday-school Con
vention adjourned yesterday, after adopting
. resolutions recommending the earnest coope
ration of all Baptists in Sunday-school work,
the employment of Sunday-school missiona
ries, and the establishment of a weekly paper
to promote the Sunday-school interests.
A Madri d despatch of yesterday says the
Regent refuses to accept the resignation of To
pete, but the Admiral remains firm In his de
termination to withdraw from the Ministry.
It is probable that the whole Cabinet will re
sign, and that Prim will form a new one. The
Cortes has again adjourned. It is thought the
government will endeavor to fill the vacant
seats in the Cortes with Deputies favorable to
the Duke of Genoa.
The Committee of the Old School Presby
terian Assembly to investigate the affairs of
the Northwestern Theological Seminary, has
made a report, re commending that Dr. Lord
retain his Divinity professorship, that C. H.
McCormick be released from the payment of
the $25,000 claimed to be due the School, and
that three of the Directors should resign and.
others acceptable' Ur each , party take their
places. This compromise has been agreed to,
;xnd the difficulty is euded.
A RKronr having been circulated that Gov
ernor Wannoulb, of Louisiana, had Issued
$2,500,000 in bonds, of which there is no
official record, the Governor publishes a state
ment, that all the bonds issued have been duly
recorded by the Treasurer, and concludes :
“ One tiling is certain, and that is, that not a
single bond of the State lias been issued with
out authority of law, during my administration,
and the interest has been and will be promptly
paid.”
Arml or an Organised Clangor Connie r
frltero -or Tobacco Ntamp*.
N kw York, Nov. 4.—Colonel >Vliitely, of
the United States Secret Service ..Division, and
his detectives, have succeeded ■in cap
turing a gang of counterfeiters, regu
larly ~ organised for-" ’the purpose of
manufacturing/ and selling counterfeit
tobacCo stamps,,securities and money. It is
said that many persons—in good standing in
this city,.,Virginia, and North Carolina—are
compromised. The detectives captured a
large "quantity of bogus stamps, &c.
/On October 15 a somewhat notorious
/ character, named Yolney Wright, was arrested,
charged with having attempted to sell a large _
quantity of sixty-pound tobacco stamps. lie'
was quietly taken before Commissioner Os
borne and held in $B,OOO to await the action
of the grand jury, the facts of his arrest being
carefully concealed, lest publication • should
warn his Confederates. These stamps. are of
the finest execution, and even good officials,
who have examined them, are unable to de
lect their worthlessness. The bed piece,
roll,* and plate, witii six transfers, were se
cured. The investigations were continued,and
resulted in the discovery, as is alleged, that
llart Pierce, of No. 39 Nassau street, was a
member of the gang. Pierce is an acconi
plished engraver, a native of this city, and
thirty-eight years of age. It being evident that
more important individuals were behind Pierce,
a watch was set at his door, which led to the ,
discovery that Colonel Robert Clark, who dur
ing the war commanded the Fourteenth New
York Volunteers, and whose military reputa
tion was good, was a constant visitor of Pierce.«
. Clark occupied a suite of rooms at No. 130
East Seventeenth street. On October 30
. Whitley made a descent on Pierce’s quarters,
and seized all the dies and machinery used in
■ counterfeiting, among which was a costly press
for transferring. After the seizure of the
premises, Clark came -in and was arrested, and
in examining his apartments abundant evi
dences of his guilt were found. One valise
contained a plate for sixty dies for
making one-ceut stamps, a large quan
tity of 210-pound stamps, together with about
$15,000 of dean genuine stamps.
Further inquiries discovered that these
stamps were printed at Prince’s Bay, and a
sufficient force was sent there, who surrounded
a little hut'on the beach, in which they arrested
John liipon, an Englishman, a steel and cop
per-plate printer, William S. Kempton, of
Maine, and Itipon's wife. .A search of the
premises discovered a large amount of paper
such as is used by the Government in the
manufacture of revenue stamps, a large quan
tity of inks, oils, and other materials used in
counterfeiting, dies for making tliree-cent silver
pieces, steel dies for stamping coin, etc., but no
plates, or finished work. ■
Finally, Ripon divulged the fact that plates,
etc., were buried in his garden, and a box was
dug up which contained a plate on which had
been transferred the ©ne-cent revenue stamps,
the bed piece, and' transferring die, a laige
number of stamps), thousands of printed
sheets, and other articles. The prisoners and
material were brought to this city, and the*'
forgers taken to the United States Marshal’s
office, where they were held in custody.
It was now ascertained that an engraver,
named Carpentejj, haying an office at No. 11
Bloomfield street, Boston, had been employed
to engrave United States five-twenty bonds for
this gang. Wliitely despatched two men to •
Boston on Monday evening. On their ar
rival they called to their assistance Wood and
Heath, detectives of that city. On Tues
day morning the four entered Carpenter’s
establishment and arrested him while em
ployed in engraving a pass on the Wilmington
and Baltimore Railroad. Immediately after
bis arrest be surrendered to the officers a $1,095
five-twenty bond, which Ire had been employed
to engrave by a man in New York city, who
was in the last stage of consumption.
It is believed that several hundred thousand
dollars of these stamps have been put in circu
lation, and it is alleged that numerous other
prominent persons in this city are under sur
veillance, whose arrest sufficient evidence liar
not yet been obtained to warrant.
SEW JERSEY MATTERS.
Tin; Lessons or, Tuesday.— -The lessons
which the election oii Tuesday in Camden
county is calculated to teach are important.
Thfey indicate a wide-spread Feeling-among
trug, Republicans,—those who are unwilling: to
permit themselves to be led astray from their
party fealty by the influences of discontented
politicians,— to double their efforts for success
at the next general State election. There are
always some weak-kneed persons in all parties,
who, on the eve of an election," are tampered
witli by the friends of opposing candidates. With
the Democracy this is expected; but with honest
Republicans it should be looked upon with
scorn and contempt. If there be any now in
.our ranks who have heretofore- been silly
pnougli to be seduced by Democratic premises
and patronage in consideration for their votes,
they should be .made to realize the folly of
such conduct, by such efforts and purposes as
will educate them to true and uncompromising
devotion to. Republican prinfeiples before the
.next election comes arouiid. The conse
quences which depend upon the next election
are sufiiciently important to justify an early
commencement of this educating policy, and
it is best to. look the -questions of the
hour squarely in t lie face. Those men who
may have, heretofore, become prejudiced
against certain measures advocated by the Re
publican party, through wrong information,
misrepresentation, or inability to comprehend
their true meaning, should be placed in pos
session of such lacts as will completely dis
abuse their minds from the erroneous impres
sions upon which they have acted. Had this
been done in the Third Assembly District of
Camden county previous to the last election,
it would have saved Mr.. Kirkbride, the
Republican candidate, from being de
feated. But, basing a calculation upon
the majority received in Monroe township in
1808 of one hundred and two for Grant, the
people Were pretty much left to the manipula
ting powers of the Democracy,and tlieirpeCii
liar style of putting the. “nigger questioTv“ as
they termed it, reduced the majority to fifteen
on Tuesday last. Mr.' Kirkbride was only
forty-nine votes behind Ms opponent, and that
too in' the townships which usually give Demo
cratic majorities. Had Monroe township
come fully up to her duty in proportion to the
others, the Republicans would have gained a
victory by at least thirty or tMrty-five majority,
instead of being defeated by that much.
This, however, is but another instance in wMch
a too implicit confidence in past success has
proved fatal. "Work, persistent and unceasing
work, alone can meet with effective results.
Nojv.ihat the next Legislature of New Jersey
Stands just as it did the year before Hon. A.
G. Cattell was chosen to’ the United States
Senate, it behooves every Republican to work,
with earnestness to bring it back to the condi
tion it was when that gentleman was elected—’
with the* exception we do not want any James
M.Scovels there—so that liemay he returned to
that body in 1871. The choice of a United
States Senator will be the incentive to prompt
to vigorous, exertion in both parties, but an
early campaign and the right kind of logic can
scarcely fail to give a Republican victory.
Dkeis. —lt is reported that these animals,
are becoming quite plentifnl in some
thickly wooded sections of West and South
Jersey. The salutary effects of thejaw passed
by the Legislature for the past teii or twelve
years, have had the tendency.to cause them to
increase gradually. But.-their numbers had
run down to a pretty low' figure, and it will be
several years before'they will bea>me suffi
cienUy numerous to allow- them to "be killed.
In fact, none of them shouM be destroyed for
ten or twelve years longer. They are a per
fectly, harmless animal, and the woods they
frequent are large and .dense enough to hold
thousands and thousands of them. They
could thus be propagated and made to con
tribute to the actual necessities of man, in
stead of being an object to kill for his gratifi
cation.
MOW THEY LIQUIFY THE BLOOD OF
SAS UENNABO.
Mr. Henry Dircks, C. E., contributor to the
Atltencewu, suggests a solution of the Naples
Miracle, to the fallowing effect. Referring to
a correspondent’s description in the Times of
28th September, he observes:
We thus learn that this alleged miracle dates
back fifteen centuries, during which period it
has never failed of success in its operation, or
in its support of superstitious belief iu the
genuineness' of its- character. Also we obtain
the clearest possible conception of the external
appearance of the reliquary and its two in
closed, bottles, one containing some dark-co
lored “opaque" substance, which, in six
minutes or thereabouts, passes from a solid to
a liquid state, after “incessant reversing" of the
reliquary by the operating priest. Now it does
appear to me that a Very moderate share of
chemical and mechanical knowledge will serve
to dissipate this ancient mystery, and for ever
destroy its hold on any other than the most ig
norant and superstitious of mankind.
Chemically considered, the.so-called “blood"
is most likely nothing more Jlpn an alcoholic
solution of‘dry, haTa' sjapv colored by-mcans"
of burnt oils or dragon's blood, carmine or
Jfther pigment. The experiment of dissolving
%oap in. spirits of wine, heated in a Florence
flask, is easily made, and*, the solution may be
brought to any required state of fluidity, after
which it may be pom-ed into a small bottle
made of thin Bohemian glass, and.hennetieally
sealed.
The mechanical arrangements require the
bottle to be of a size to he inclosed within a
metal hoop, two inches broad, which is fitted
with circular plate-glass on each side. This
hoop should have soldered .to it a “shank
tube,” about two inches iu diameter, witii a
circular opening in the metal hoop communi
cating with the tube, and over, which the bot
tom MUie bottle is to be firmly attached with
any insoluble Cement. Supposing the “ shank
tube” to be six or nine inches long, provide a
second tube of somewhat less length, and about
one-half its diameter—say one inch, made of
copper. This short tube must be closed at
the bottom, and have a screw plug at the top,
and should ■ be neatly and firmly wrapped
round with woolen cloth, as a non-conducting
material, until its diameter is just sufficient to
allow of its being easily thrust up the “ shank
tube,” at the bottom end of which there should
be a spring plug, or other simple contrivance,
to retain the copper tube in its situation. This
small woolen-coated tube is to be filled with
boiling hot water, or, for a higher temperature,
with heated oil. -
The alcoholic, solution of soap, when cold, is
solid, but easily liquifies—first appearing a vis
cid substance, “seeming to move altogether,”
even “asif it were in a skin or bladder.”
And the heat, when only applied below, its
circulation may be promoted by continually
tf turning round and round” any vessel con
taining it. This composition has every requi
site in favor of its keeping sound and good.for
an indefinite period; and, iu use, the modus
operand/ could easily be kept secret by con
fiding it to never more than two priests. The
insertion and removal of the liquid heater is
one of such easy mechanical contrivance that
the slightest practice would render its correct
performance unfailing; and indeed, by having
two suclrheaters, one could be allowed to re
main in the “shank tube” until the next
“ feast-day’-’ required its removal and substitu
tion.
—The army-worm is marching through the
cotton fields on the Colorado, Texas.
,Y EVENING BULLETIN—PHI!
THE DAI
■ Booorte<f<^t^9S'3!,uS r^SS‘naU«tln.
MALAGA—Bark Bead, Crosby-12,162 boxes ratlins
lG9d half boxes do 0626 quarter boxes, do 2314 frail# do
G5O kegs grapea 60ft boxes lemons 100 boxes almond# N
Mary C Fox, Dolan-478 hhtU 71 tea 1
b GLOUCEBTEItYEN(i.—Burk Locheo, Wodo—SMJtmt
01 bXng%» foot apruco
lumber 217 AOO Iftths T I' Galvin & Co. j.-i
MO VEMENTS OF OCEAN STEAMERS.
TO ABBIVE. „ ••
SHIPS FROM , ■ FOB bXTB
Erin- ; Ljtorpool.,.New York. ..-Oct. 29
Leipzig...-.i.;..Soutbnmoton...Baltimore .....Oct. 23
Paraguay Y0rk,....,.. ...Oct.«
City of Bouton Liverpool...Neur York via H
Malta Llvernool...New York via 8~......0ct. 26
Donau Soutbampton...New York.. Oct. 26
Ncbraskn :.Lherpoo!...Ncw York . 0ct.27
The Queen Liverpool... New York.
O, of Brooklyn..:Llverpool...New York Oct. 28
Alaska ..A«pinwall...New York Oct. 26
10wa... ..Gluekow...New York ~...0ct. 29
Livorpobl...New York ;.....0ct.30
N TO DEPAKT. M •"
Tonawanda...Phnadolj>hla...Bavannah.... Nov. 2
City cf Pari* New York... Liverpoo- .Nor. fl
Virginia New York... Liverpool.... NoV. 2
Cel lit New York... London .Nov. 6
India New Yorki/.Gloagow.. Nov. 6
Oimbriu .New York... Hamburg .Nov. 9
Pioneer. Philadelphia. ..Wilmington—.
Cleopatra,- New torn... Vera Cruz....... Nov.
Colorado.; New York... Liverpool Nov. 10
Cuba New York..,Lirerpool,~. 10
Siberia _New York... Liverpool Nov,}}
America .....New York... Bremen.... ...Nov. 11
Columbia .....New York... Havana .. Nov. H
""BOARD OF TRADE.
WM. W. PAUL. }
ii. C. BUTCHER, > MONTHLY COMMITTEE.
S.E.STOKKK S
COMMITTEE OS ARBITRATION.
j.O. James, j B.A.Bouder*
Geo.L.Bnzby. _ L n ;Wm.W. Paul,-
Ttiomakiysnicßpie. 1 . - • •
~ MARINE BDtiETiM.
POBT OP 6. ..
Sus Rises, 6 351 Sun Sbts* 4 mTHioh Water,' 3 22
ABBfVED YESTERDAY.
Steamer 0 Utley, Davis, 24 hours from New York,With
mdse to W M Baird A Co. , _ •
Steamer Anthracite, Green, 24 bourn from New York,
withmdaoto WM Baird & Co.
Bark Locheo (Br), Wade, .36 days from Gloucester, E.
with railroad Iron to Penna Central lilt Co—veil'd to L
Westergaord A Co.
Bark Alary C Fox, Dolan, 19 days from Hagna,with
sugar to 8 A W Welsh.
Brig Nathaniel Stevens, Saunders, 12 days from Cog
gins, NS. to Merhon & Cloud. "
Bchr Flora Sawyer, Norwood, 44 days from Windsor,
NB. with planter to bmith A Harris.
Bchr John Farnuiu, Baker, 19 days from Boston, with
md«e to Mershori A Clond.
Bchr Georgie Peering, Willard, 5 day# from Portland,
with mdse to Crowell & Collins. ■
Bcbr Franconia, Jarvis, 2 days from Bangor, with
lumber to T P Galvin & Co. . _ .
Bchr Morning Light. Ireland, 14 days from Bichmond,
with mdso to 3lerhfion A Cloud. „
Bchr 8 A Hammond, Wiley, 12 dayr from Gardiner,
with ice to Knickerbocker Ico Co. •
Bchr Florence, Hudson. 6 days from Bappahannock
River, with railroad ties to Collins & Co. <
SchrWm 8 Mason. Lacey, 1 day from Milton, Del,
grain to Christian & Co. • „ , . f *.
Bchr Zouave', Short, 1 day from Frederica, Pel. with
grain to Ja., t
Steamer H Ij Gaw. Her. Baltimore, AGroves.Jr.
Bark F Beck (NO), Denker, Bremen, P Wright A Sons.
Brig Sportsman, Morton, Portland, L Audenried A Co.
Schr Hamburg. Sanborn, Barbados.
Bchr A Hugel, Buell, Mobile, 0 8 Stetson A Co.
HAVRE DE GBAOE.Nov. 4.
The following boats left here this morning, laden and
consigned as follows: . .„_**._*
St Lawrence, with lanjber to H Croskey: Albert Lift
and Geo W Striue, do to Taylor A Bette; A A Cobil and
O Hartman, do to Mcllvain A Bush: Grapcshot, do to
Patterson A Lippincott; Merchant, do to Connecticut;
Homewood, do to Craig A Blanchard; Francis A Alice,
do to Tilbert. Otto A Co; Gen Meade, do to Saylor, Day
A Morie: Podge Mills, do to Newark; Thomas Arnold,
slate to T Arnold & Co.
- MEMORANDA.
Sliip’Col Adams, Morse, which arrived at Queenstown
22d uft. from Callao, had fore and mainmast*
and cross jack yard gone, and received other damage.
A survey was hold on her 23d. „
.. Ship Gaspee, Emerson, from Guanape for Antwerp,
put into Falmouth 21« t ult. leaky. / >
1 Steamer James S Green, Pace, hence at . Bichmond 2d
instant *’*” *. •
Steamer Utility, for Norwich, sailedlCrom Alexandria
3d met. .
Steamer Palmyra (Br). Watson,cleared at New York
yenterday for Liverpool. . « ...
Steamer Berlin (NGKUndntscb, cleared at Baltimore
2d iuet. for Bremen via. Southampton,
fitenmer Bhein |NG), Meyer, lor Bremen, cleared at
I New York veateroify , .. ~ _
' Stcjtiner Clark, from Savannah 14th iilt. for
i Liverpool, went ashorv 2d inßt. at Cow Bay, CB. and
; will probably be a total loss. The cargo will be saved
in adnjuagea state. _ . ...»
r Bark Lapwing, Bentliall, cleared at Baltimore 3d inst.
; for Bio Janeiro. •
1/ Brig Ida M Coxaery, Norden, hence at Matanza* 25th
! Bchr T D Wilder, Holmes, sailed from Havana 23th ult
i for New York via feagua. _ • _ . .
Bchr SC Evans, Tuthlll, for Pernambuco, cleared at
New York veifterdav. . , _ , .
BchrW L Springs, Hal*jey,.deared at Baltimore 3d
\ Inst,forNewYork. .
{ Bchr Z Steelman, Adams, at Wilmington, NC. 2d inst.
i from New York _ , ,
SchrHM Condop, Condon, cleared at Wilmington,
NC. 2d Inst, for this port.
Bchr BeaDoke. Barrett, hence at Bichmond 2d met.
Bchr J M Brocmall, hence at Charleston yesterday.
Bcbra B A 8 Corson, Corson: Bescne, Kelley; L A
1 Burlingame, Bnrlingftme; T O Donahue, Smith; Ethan
! Allen, Blake, and Alice B, Alley, hence at Boston 2d
i instant. . * « •
The brig Cyclone, from New York, or and for Boston,
with government stores, went ashore on Cuttyhnnk on
' Wednesday night. She leaks badly, but will probably
I be got off. _ _____
The county fire insurance COM
PANY.—Office, Ho. U 0 Sooth. Fourth street, below
Cheetoul. _ ... ..
“The Fire Inranace Comna.y of the Ooontr of Phila
delphia.”,lncorporated by the Legislature of Pennsylva
nia in 1839, for indemnity against loss or damage hy Are,
exclusively. CHABTHK pEBPETUAL.
This old and reliable Inatitntlon, with ample capital
and contingent fnad carefully invested, continues to in
sure hnildmge, furniture, merchandise, Ao., either per
manently or for a limited time, against loss or damage
by fire, at the lowest rates consistent with the absolute
* & Lossea a&usted P ° MibU d® 8 ®* I*ll
- J. Sutter, D Andrew H. Miller,
Henry Budd, James N. Btone,
John Horn, Edwin L, Beskirt,
Joseph Moore, ItobertY■ Massey, Jr.
fleoree Mecke, Mark Devine,
tteorgo rneca OHABLBSJ. SDTTEB, President.
HBNBY BUDD, Vice President.
BENJAMIN F. HOBCXLKY, Secretary and Treasurer.
The reliance insurance com
pany OF PHILADELPHIA B
Incorporated in 1841. Charter Perpetual.
Office, No. 308 Walnut street.
CAPITAL 8300,000.
Insures against lobs or damage byFIBE,on Houses,
Stores and other Buildings, limited or perpetual, and on
Furniture, Goods, Wares and Merchandise in town or
“Tosses pbomptly adjusted and paid.
ASSCtS...—.— .....0437,598.38
Invested in the following Securities, Via..
First Mortgages on City Property, well se
cured—.. ; : -~~0268 1 f100 00
United States Government Loans- 117,000 00
Philadelphia City 6 Per Cent. Loans 75,000 00
Pennsylvania£34oo,ooo 6 Per Cent Loan.——. 80,000 00
Penney lrania Railroad Bonds, First Mortgage 540 Q 00
Camden and Amboy Railroad Company’s 0 Per _
- -Gent. Loan—,.,.. ..... 4,000 00
Loans on Collaterals...— 600 00
Huntingdon and Broad Top 7 Per Cent. Mort- _ _
gage Bonds 4,560 00
Conntv Fire Insurance Company’s Stock. 2,050 00
Mechanics’ Bank Stock. - .. 4,000 00
Commercial Bank of Pennsylvania 5t0ck...... 20,000 00
Union Mutual Insurance Company’s Stock. 380 00
Reliance Insurance Company of Philadelphia . _ M
Stock 3,230 00
Cash in Bank and on hand. 13,238 33
Worth at Par. 0437,398 32
Worth this date at market prices... .....
DIBECTOBB.
Thomas 0. Hill,! Thomas H. Moore,
■ William Musser, Samuel Caatnßr,
Samuel Bispham, James T. Young,
H. L. Carson, Isaac F. Baker,
Wm SteTenson, Christian J. Hoffman,
Beuj. W. Tingley, Samuel B. Thomas,
Bawftra Siter.
THOMAS 0-HILL, President.
Wm. Chubb, Secretary.
Philadelphia, February 17,1869. jal-tu 8 tf_
T" HE PENNSYTiYANiA EIRE INSU
RANCE COMPANY. 4 ,
—lnconsorated Perpetual.
No. MO WALNUT street, opposite Independence Square.
This Company, favorably known to the community for
over forty years, continues to insure against loss or
damage by nre on Public or Private Buildings, either
permanently or for a limited time. Also on Furniture,
Stocks of Gooas, and Merchandise generally, on liberal
Capital, together with a large Burplus Fund, la
invested in the most careful manner, which enables them
to offer to the insured an undoubted security in the case
•n.89.\ dibictorb.
Daniel Smith, Jr., . John Devereox
Alexander Benson, Thomas Smith,
Isaac Hazlehurat, Houfl, Lewis
Thomas Robins, _ , J.OiUingham Fell,
Daniel Haddock, Jr. ~ *
DANIEL SMITH, JR., President.
WM. G. CROWELL, Secretary. aplB-tt
Fame insurance company, no.
809 CHESTNUT BTBBET. ■ . • „„„, T
INCORPORATED 1858. CHARTER PEBPETUAL.
CAPITAL, SaOOjOOO.
FIRE INSURANCE EXCLUSIVELY. „
Insures against Loss or Damage by Fire, either by Per*
petual or Temporary Policies.
DIRECTORS.
Charles Blchardson, Bobert Pearce,
Wm. H. Bbawn, John Kessler, Jr.,
WllllainM.Beyfert, Edward B. Orne,
Henry Lewis, Charles Stokes,
Nathan Hilles, John W.Brennan,
George A. West, Mordecal Bozby, . .
* OH ABXIEB BIOHARPBON, President,
WM. H. BHAWN, Vice-President.
WILLIAMBI, BLANOHABD.Secretary. apl tt
ANTIIBAOITE INBUBANOE OOM
PANY.-CHABTEB PEBPKTUAL. "
Office, No. 811 WALNUT streot, above Third, PWlada,
Will insure against Loss or Damage bjr Fire ©n Build
ings, olthor perpetually or for a limited time* Household
Furniture and Merchandise generally.
Also, Marino Insurance on Vessels* Cargoes and
Freights. Inland Insurance to all parts of theunlon.
DIBEOTORB.
William Esher* Lowis Audenried,
D. Luther. JolmKetcham,
John It.Blackiaton, J.E.Baum,
William F. Dean, Jolmß.Hoyl.
Petor Sieger, Samuel H. Bothermol*
“ 8 tfILLIAM President. ~
WILLIAM F. DEAii, Vice President.
' WM.M. Smith, Secretary. ja22 tuthetf
INSURANCE.
■5454J81 S 3
.ADELPHIA, FRIDAY, NOVE:
INSURANCE.
1829
FRANKLIN'
FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY
orraiuDEuvu.
Office—436 and 437 OhesthatStreet,
Assets on- j arniary 1, 1809, ■
#5,677j373 13.
Cap1t»1...,..„—....... muofxo M
Accrued A2B 7V
J9334S 43
INOOMKFOB IBM
Losses Paid SincelB29 Over
#5,500,500.
w£ r, !nS«i£? 4, 0 n liberal Tenn*.
op<n> tho Bent* ot
all kinds of buildings, Ground Bents and Mortgages.
BIBSCTOSB.
Alfred ritler.
Thomas Spark*.
Wm. S> Grant,
Thomas 8. KlU*.
GnstaTQS 8. Benson,
-BAKBB, President.
KB, Vice President.
Alfred G. Baker.
Baxnnel Grant,
Geo. W.Bicharda,
Isaac Loa,
Geo. Fales,
ALFBBD
mcallibtkr, 1
THEODORE M. EEGEB
fHa FI * E ASSOCIATION
SUM PHILADELPHIA.
pBP Incorporated March, 27, 1820.
Office —No. 34 North Fifth Street.
IM6ITBE BtJILDIKGS, HOUSEHOLD FOBNITUBE
AMD MERCHANDISE GENERALLY FROM
LOSS BY FIBE.
Assets January X, 1869,'
#1,406,095 08.
TRUSTEES:
Wflltam H. Hamilton, Charles P. Bower,
John C'arrow, Jesse Liehtfoot,
George I. Yotmg. Robert Shoemaker,
Joseph B, Lyndali. Peter Arm br us ter,
Jtßvi P. Coats, M. H. pickinsen,
Samuel Bparhawk. Peter Williamson,
Wm, Aug. Beeger.
WM. H. HAMILTOSNPreeident,
«. SAMUEL BPARHAWK, Vice President.
WM. T. BPTLEB. Secretary.
MUTUAL
FIBE nSORAB.CE COMPANY
PHILADELPHIA,
Office, No. 701 Arch Street,
From No. 3 South Fifth Street,
The Directors, in announcing thefr REMOVAL to
this location, with increased facilities for bnsinesft
would respectfully solicit the patronage of their friends
and the public, .believiug'tho advantages to the assured
are equal to those offered by any other Company.
The only strictly Sfntnai Fir© Insurance
Company In tlie consolidated City.
iLßebate of 33 per cent. la made, and a further deduc
tion may be expected if the Company continues as sue-.
Kcessful as it has been.
All to whom Economy la an object should Insure in
this Company. _ _
BATEB LOW.
Insurances made on Buildings .Perpetual ana Limited;
on Merchandise and Household Goods annually,
Assets, - - $183,682 32
DIRECTORS.
Caleb Clothier, . William P. Seeder,
Benjamin Malone, Joseph Chapman,
Thomas Slather, Francis T. Atkinson,
T. Kilwood Chapman, Edward M. Needles,
Simeon Matiack. Wilson M. Jenkins,
Aaron W. Gaskill, Lukens Webster.
CALEB CLOTHIER, President.
BENJAMIN MALONE. Tice President.
THOMAS MATHER, Treasurer.
T. ELLVTCOD CHAPMAN, Secretary.
se2Ssl2ts
The Liverpool d? Lon
don Globe Iris. Co.
Assets Gold\ 817,690,390
“ in the
United States ; 2,000,000
Daily Receipts over % 20,000.06
Premiums in 1868,
$5,665,075.00
Losses in 1868, $3,662,445.00
No. 6 Merchants' Exchange,
Philadelphia.
LIFE INSURANCE AND TRUST CO.
THE GIRARD LIFE INSUBANNCE, ANNUITY
AND TRUST COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA.—
OFFICE, 408 CHEBTNUT STREET.
ASSETS, 83,063,646 66, JANUARY 1,1869.
The oldest Company of the kind bnt one in the State;
continue to insure lives on the most reasonable terms
and declare profits to the insured for the whole of life.
Premiums paid yearly, half yearly, or quarterly. They
receive Trusts of all kinds, whether as Trustees, As
signees, Guardians, or Committee of Lunacy. Also, act
as Executors and Administrators, to the duties of which
particular attention is paid. Deposits and Trust Funds
are not in any event liable for the Debts or Obligations
of the Company.
Charter perpetual.
V THOMAS RIDGWAY, President. :
SETH I. COMLY, Vice President.
John F. James, Actuary.
’WiiLllii'Er. Stoever Ass’t Actuary.
N. B.—Dr. S. CHAMBERLAIN, No. 1411 LOCUST
street, attends every day at 1 o’clock precisely at the
office. ocZ7 8m
UNITED FIREMEN'B INBUBANOB
COMPANY OF PHILADELPHIA.
This Company takes risks at the lowest rates consistent
with safety, and continents business exclusively to
fibe insubanob in the city br philabel-
PHIA.
OFFICE—No. 7ZS Arch street, Fourth National Bank
Building. BISECT OBS
'Thomas J. Martin,' H<mry W. Brenner,
John Hiret, Albertua King,
Fm. A. Bolin, Honry Bumm,
James Mongan, Jameswopd,
William Glenn, . John Shallcroas, .
« James Jenner, J. Hen^Aekm,
Alexander 'LBlckson, gush Mulligan,
Albert O. Boherta. Philip Fitzpatrick,
James F. Dillon.
CONBAB B. ANDBBSS, President.
Wm. A. Bolin. Treaa. Wm. 11. Faghn. Sec’v.
JEFFERSON FIRE INSURANCE COM
PANY of Philadelphia.—Office, No. 2i North Fifth
street, near Market street. , ■ _
Incorporated by the Legislature of Pennsylvania.
Charter perpetual. Capital and Assets. $166,000. Make
insurance against Less or damage by Fire on Public or
Private Buildings, Fumitpre, Stocks, Goods and Mer
chandise, on favorable terms.
.BIBEOTOKS.
Wm. McDaniel, Edward P. Moyer
Israel Peterson, Frederick Ladner
John F. Belsterlin , AdumJ.Glasz,
Henry Troemner, Henry Delany,
Jncob Bchandem, . John Elliott,
Frederick Doll, Christian D. Frick,
Samuel Miller, George E. Fort,-
William D. Gardner.
WILLIAM McDANIEL, President.
ISBAEL PETKBSON.VicePresident.
Philip E.Colbmah, Secretary and Treasurer.
American fire insurance com
pany, incorporated 1810.—Charter perpetual.
N 0.310 WALNUT street, above Third, Philadelphia,
Having a large pail-up Capital Stook and Surplus In
vested in sound and available Securities, continue to
insure on dwellings, stores, furniture, merchandise,
vessels in port, ana their cargoes, and other personal
property. All losses promptly adjusted.
Thomas R. Maris., J Ci Dutllh,
John Welsh, , Charles W. Poultuey,
Pstrickßrudy, ' Israel Morris,
John T. Lewis, John P. Wetherlll,
William W. Paul.
THOMAS B. MABIB, President.
AlbhrtO. Crawford, secretary.
StJTIONT
All persons are hereby cau
tioned against trusting-any of the crow of tho N.
G.Brig- u Evolina,” Von Schrader Primly,master—from
Liverpool—as no debts of tlieir contracting will be paid
by either captain or consignees. I’ETEIt WBIGIIT A
SONS, 115 Walnut street, 0c23-tf^
All persons are hereby catt
tlonod against trusting any of tho crew of tho N. G,
hark Astraea.Hellel master, from London,as no debts of
their contracting will be pan! by olther tho captain or
consignees. PETER WEIGHT A SONS, 115 Walnut
street. oc2B <f
Pl ceased.—Letters testamentary upon the estate of
WILDIAM NEAL, deceased, Into of the city of Phila
delphia, have been granted-to tbo uadersigned; all per
sons indebted to said estate are reauested to make pay
nient, and those having claims against the same' to
present them, without delay, to
ALFIIED WEEKSiM.D.,I
.Mo. 622 Franklinst„
■ CUABT.ES D. JAMES, hxecntois.
uot-thlk* No.ll N. Svooud st.,
BER 5,1869.
SHIPPERS’ GUIDE.
For boston.—steamship line
DIRECT. SAILING FROM EACH PORT EVER!
Wednesday and Saturday*
FROM PINE STREET WHARF. PHIL ADEtPHIAi ■
„ , AND LONG WHARF.BOSTON. ; '
FBOM PHILADELPHIA ’ FBOM BOSTON. .
ARlEB,Wedne«day,Nor.S SAXON, WedpesdaF,NOT.S
ROMAN, Saturday, “ « NORMAN, Baturctay,“i 6
SAXON, Wednesday,» 10 ARiXd, Wednesday, ««> ID
NORMAN, Saturday,“ M ROMAN, Saturday, I*
ARIES. Wednesday .**, 17 SAXON, Wednesday,«; 17
ROMAN,Saturday,' “ 20 NORMAN', Saturday,29
SAXON, Wedneaday “ 24 ARIES. Wednoadayt “? «
NORMAN, Saturday, “ 27 ROMAN, Saturday, “i 27
These Steamships Ball punctually. Freight received
every day. ■ *
- Freight forwarded to all points In New England.
ap F p£to F “ ,Bh ‘ " Pf ‘|Ssmwioßr«>V MO “’
’ 388-Spnth Delaware avenue.
■PHILADELPHIA, fiICIIMOHD , AHD
L NORFOLK STEAMSHIP LINE.
THROUGH FREIGHT AIR LINE TO THE SOUTH
ANU WEST. i ■
EVERT SATURDAT t at Noon, from FIRST WHARF
i ftt noon, iivu> _
__ aboveMAßKETStreet.-
THROUGH BATES to all points in-North and South
Carolina via Seaboard Air-Lino Railroad, connecting at
Portsmouth, and to Lynchburg, Ya., Tennessee and the
West via Virginia and Tennossoa Air-Lino and Rlch
mond and Danville Railroad.
Freight HANDLED BCT ONCE .and tahec at LO WEB
BATES THAN ANY OTHEB LINE.
The. regularity, safety and cheapness of this route
commend !t to tho public as the most desirable medium
for carrying every description of freight.
No charge for commission, dray ago, or any expanse for
transfer. . - ‘ ,
Steamships insure at lowest rates.
Freight received DAILTy. • _____ .„„ •
WILLIAM P. CLYDE ft CO.
No. 12 South Wharves and Pier No. I North Wharves.
- W.JP. PORTER, Agent atßichmond and City Point,
T.P. CROWELL A CO., Agents at N0rf01k..... i
■PHILADELPHIA AND SOUTHEBN
S' WAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY'S BEGULAB
LINES FROM QUEEN STBEET WHABF. , : .
The JUNIATA will ’sail for NEW OBLHANB, via
Havana.on Tuesday,Nov. 16,at BA. M._ _ .
The YAZOO will Bail from NEW OBLEANS.vIa
The TONAWANDA Will «»U for SAVANNAH on
The WYOMING -will Bail from SAVANNAH jon
s The d p?6NEEß'wlll Ball for WILMINGTON, N.C.,on
Wednesday, Nov. 10, at BA.M. ; '•
Through Dills of lading signed, and passage tickets
For General Agent, .
130 South Third street.
Notice.— fob new vobk, via ded-
AWABE AND BABITAN CANAL EXPRESS
STEAMBOAT COMPANY. -
The CHEAPEST and QUICKEST water communica
tion between Philadelphia and Now York.
Steamers leave daily from first wharf below Market
Btreet, Philadelphia, and foot of Wall street, New York.
Goods forwarded by all the lines running out of New
York—North, East and West—rree of Commission,
Freight received and forwarded on accommodating
terns. > WM. P. CLYDE & CO., Agents,
No. 12 South Delaware svenne, Philadelphia.
JAB. HAND, Agent, No. 113 Wall street, New York.
XT EW EXPRESS feINS'TO ALEXAN-
drift, Georgetown and Washington, D. 0., via Ches
apeake and Delaware Canal, with connections at Alex
andria from the moat direct route for Lynchburg, Bris
tol, Knoxville, Nashville, Dalton and the Southwest.
Steamers leave regularly from the first wharf above
Market street, every Saturday at noon.
Freight received dally. WM. /
No. 12 Sonth Wharves and Pier i North Wharves
HYDE&TYLEK, Agents at Georgetown. _
M. ELDItIDGE & CO., Agents at Alexandria. Vo*
Notice— for new york, via de£i
awsre and Raritan Canal—Swiftaure Transport**
tion Company—Despatch and Swiftauro Lines.—'The
business by those Lines will be resumed on and after
the Bthof March. For Freight, which will betaken
on accommodating terms, apply to WM. M. BAIRD St
CO., 132 South Wharves. _ *
TVELAWARE AND CHESAPEAKE
JL/Steam Tow-Boat Company.—Barges towed between
Philadelphia, Baltimore, Harre de -Grace, Delaware
City and intermediate points. .«**•*• v »
\(M. P. CLYDE * OO.vAßcnta; Capt. JOHN LAUGH
LIN. Bnp’t Office, 13 Bouth Wharves, Philadelphia.
Notice.— for new york, via Del
aware AND RARITAN CANAL .
SWIFTSUBE TRANSPORTATION COMPANY.
DESPATCH AND SWIFTSUBE LINES.
The basinets of these lines will bo resumed on andafter
the 19th of March. For freight, which will bo taken o
accommodating terms, apply toWM. B AIRDfe CO
No. 132 Sonth Wharves.
AUCTION SALES.
Bunting, durborow & 00.,
AUCTIONEERS,,
N 05.232 and 234 MARKET street.cornor of Bank street
Snccessore to JOHN B. MYEBSaTOO.
LARGE SALE OF FRENCH AND OTHER EURO-
PEAN DRY GOODS.
ON MONDAY MORNING,
Nor. 8, at lOo’clock, on four months 1 credit, including—
-100 PIECES SILK CHAINE POPELINE,
various qualities,in black and colors, of the celebrated
Gold Medal mako.
150 PIECES POPELINE AND EPINGLINE
FANTASIE,
of a superior Paris make.
Pieces Parlß black and colored Merinos, Delaines, Reps,
do Paris black and colored Empress Cloth, Poplin
- Alpacas, Serges, Ac.
do London black and colored Mohairs, Alpacas, On
bUrfoo PIECES DRESS SILKS.
Full lines Lyons black Drap do France and Drap do
Lyon.
Full lines Lyons black and colored Poult do Soie and
Faillies.
Fall lines Gros do Rkin, Cochemerode Soie, Taffetas.
200 PIECES VELVETS, SATINS, Ac.
50 pieces colored and black Satins, various grades.
£0 pieces Lyons black Bonnet Velvets, all silk and cotton
back.
25 pieces superb quality Scotch Plaid Velvets.
Full lines black and colored Velveteens and Veivettas.
SHAWLS, CLOAKS, Ac.
Paris Broche and Brocbe Border Shawls and Scarfs,
New style Wool Plaid Shawls, Cloaks, Basques, Ac.
300 CARTONS BONNET RIBBONS,
of a well known importation, embracing—
Plain and assorted colors Taffeta Ribbonß, all widths.
Colored und black silk Satin Ribbons.
All boiled heavy black Ribbons.
Splendid line of Sash Ribbon^ just landed.
Full line Ostrich Feathors, Aigrettes, Pinnies, Ac,
Fullllne French Artificial Flowers.
-ALSO
Ad invoke of extra rich embroidered Slippers, in
single and double stitch, raised work, fancy figures*
latest patterns, just landed.
—‘ALSO—
Balmoral and Hoop Skirts, lldkfs., While Goods,
Ties, Embroideries,Dress and Cloak Trimmings. Braids,
Buttons, Gloves, Umbrellas, Fancy Goods, Ac
SALE OF 2000 OASES BOOTS, SHOES, BRO
GANS, Ac.,
ON TUESDAY MORNING,
Not. 9, at 10 o’clock, on four months’ credit.
LARGE SALE OF BRITISH, FRENCH, GERMAN
AND DOMESTIC DRY GOODS,
ON THURSDAY MORNING,
Not. H, at 10 o’clock, on four months’credit. f
Concert hall auction rooms,
1219 CHESTNUT street. •
T. A. MCCLELLAND, Auctioneer
ON MONDAY,
'Not. S, at 10 o’clock, at Concert Hall Salesrooms, 1219
Chestnut street,
LARGE AND ATTRACTIVE SALE OF NEW AND
FIRST-CLASS FURNITURE AND UPHOLSTERY,
FOB ACCOUNT OF MANUFACTURERS.
The catalogue (a choice one) will contain an unusual
Belection of fine Parlor Suits, covered with plush, hair
cloth and terry, and upholstered in tirst-class style;
latest designs of Chamber Sots, finished in oil and var
nish: Handsome Wardrobes and Bookcases, elegant
Sideboards and Etageres, marble top Tables,
Mirrors, Bedsteads, Oak and Walnut Extension-Tables,
Bureaus, Lounges, Teapoys, Towel Rucks, Washstands,
Cane-sent Chairs and Rockers, Ac.
CARD—The attention of the public is called to the
above sale as'offering special inducements.
ON TUESDAY,
Not. 9, at IUK A.
THE ENTIRE FURNI3HMENT OF RESIDENCE
NORTHWEST CORNER OF NINETEENTH AND
ARCH, • . ,
- will be disposed of, nt publis salo, on the promises, as
the family is leaving the city. Among the articles most
worthy of notice witr~be found a T octavo rosewood
Piano, one tine plash Parlor Suit.' first-class French
Plato Mantel Mirror, Handsomo Brussels and Ingrain
Carpets, Dining Room Furniture, Waluut and Cottage
Chamber Suits, Bookcases, Wardrobes. Sideboards,
Extension Table, large Refrigerator, Straw Matting,
Kitchen Utensils,Stoves, Ac. • ...
N. B.—The house can bo rented of Clark & Etting,7ll
Walnut street, orof the Auctioneer.
Sale at 2U29 Brandy wiuo street.
ON WEDNESDAY MORNING,
Nov. 10, will be sold, by catalogue, commencing at 10>£
o’clock, on the premises, 2029 Brandywine street, tho
entire Household Famishment of a family leaving tho
city, embracing Oil Paintings, Ac., Parlor Suit* hand
some Walnut Chamber Suits, Sideboard. Extension Ta
ble, Bookcase, three Clocks, Huir and Husk Mutresses,
Brussels and Ingrain Carpets, Kitchen Utensils, Ac.
Davis & harvey, auctioneers,
fLate with M. Thomas A Sons.)
Store Nos. 48 and 50 North BIXT2I street
Sale No. 1438 Hamilton strtfot.
SUPERIOR FURNITURE, PIER MIRROR. FINE
TAPESTRY CARPETS, PAINTINGS, BEDS, Ac.
ON MONDAY MORNING,
At 20 o’clock, at 1838 Hamilton streot, tho entire Furni
ture. superior Waluut Parlor .Furniture, flue French
Plate Pier Mirror, fine Oil Paintings, superb make
Chamber Furniture, Walnut Exteuslon Table, Hand
some Tapestry Carpets, Feather Beds, Kitchen Uten
sils. Cook and Cylinder Stoves, Ac.
Thomas birch & son,- auction
eers AND COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 1110 CHESTNUT street.
Rear entrance No. 1107 Sausom street.
Household Furniture of every description received on
Consignment. . • ‘
Sales of Fnrniture at dwellings attended to on the most
reasonable terms.
The principal honey establish
ment—S. E. corner of SIXTH and RACE streets.
Money advanced on Merchandise generally—Watches,
Jewelry, Diamonds, Gold and. Silver Plate, and on all
articles of value, for any length oi time agreed on.
WATCHES AND JEWELRY AT PRIVATE-SALE.
Fine Gold Hunting Cass, Double Bottom and Open Face
English, American and'Swiss Patent Lever Watches;
Fine Gold Hunting Caseand Open FaceLoplne Watches;
Fine Gold Duplex and other Watches; Fine 811ver Hunt
ing Case and Open Face-Knglish, Americanjmd Swiss
Patent Lever and Lepihe Watches; Double Case English
Suartlor and other Watches; Ladies’ Fanoy*Watohes;
iamond Breastpins; Finger Rings; Ear Rings; Studs:
Are.; Fine Gold Chains; Medallions; Bracelets; Scan
Pins; Breastpins; Finger Rings; Pencil Cases and Jew*
®%??SALI£-A large and valuable Fireproof Chest,
suitable for a Jeweller; cost G 650.
Also, several Lots in South Camden, Fifth and Chest*
nut streets. :
~abtin brothers, auctioneers,
/Lately Salesmen for,M. Thomas & Sons,)
i 29 OHESTN UT atreet. rear_eu trance from Minor
lT^ashbrid co V AUCTION
• EEBS. No. 605 MARKET street, above Fifth.
&'
' • •/-«*
AUCTION SALES.
M THOMAS & SONS. ATTOmOHEpaCfM
*BAtIBB J Qg' ,) STOOKf AMPBBAXBff ‘\t
at the Philadelphia Bsctaflift*
tbo Anctton Btoro HVW
*r •
\ ' ON TtfESI>AT<nOVI 9, I •i'-JWi
At 12 o’clock noon, at the Philadelphia Exchangft—, ' rval-/
910,009 Lehigh Coal and Narlgatlon Co. CpatartiMA
■ IjO&Q; 18)7> ' . , • .•:r> r
$7OOO do do' do do" Sperceaf.tUit#;^
: SfitOO Peim'a B. R. General Mortgage Honda; WlO. !i l'* JKJP
; 727 i shares Cimdeni ami Atlsuiticß.R. preferred*
60 shares Girardßaak. "• /
5 shares Merchants’ Hotel.
l 7 &Ti&res Western National Bank. &mm
300 Shares TarrßamrOUCo. : . . •• :*»$&?
Xffe Membership MercantueXlbrary Co. v* ?
■ ]6 shares Union B/B; and Transportation Co.
BEAL ESTATE SALE. NOV. 9* J\
Orphans’ Court Sale—Estate,of WlUon JeweU
-THREE-STORY BRICK DWELLINO.
ifelon streot,w«stofßanksonatreet,FourtcentltVrar4.
Orphans’ Court Sale—Estate of Thomas Corner■ dec'll. »SS9
-THREE-STORY BRICK DWELLING, M*. MB jEtS
Coatee st. ' ? ti' " 1
Execn tors’ Peremptory Sale—Estate of
Sergeant, dec’d.-3 WELL SECURED IBREBEEM.-’,
ABLE GROUND BENTS, each slsoi Sl6* pad 9m/.,
year. ■■ • • ■>■>, -v _
MODERN THREE-STORY BRICK RESlDEtHmittk'-.
N.W. corner of Eleventband Wallace-et*. • yx
WELL-SECURED REDEEMABLE, GROUKI* V
E Su\7s’^ANTIAT“ r THREE-STORY BRICK BTOBB-, . J
and DWELLING, No. 139 North Serenth strea?, uA p
Three-story BricK Dwelling No. 7 Nicholson street* m *i
'very’ VALUABLE BUSINESS. STAND-DIS-iCil
TILLERY and RECTIFYING ESTABLISHMSMTMaSjI
FOUR-STORY BRICK BUILDING; No. 269 1?optlW #?
Front street, between Race and Vine. fej
THREE-STORY BRICK DWELLING, No. &,WhVp’£
high avcnue.Ninetcentli Ward.
BUSINESS STAND—TUBE E-STOB1? BRIGt R
STORE and DWELLING, No. 1233 Vin Sat. Jmmodt*t*,% /
possession •" y -I®*
XHBEE-BTORY BRICK DWELLING, UH -
Lombard street, witli 2Tbrcc-«tory Brick Dwellings In - i
tbe roar 1 . x."' * . _ . ,
VERY DESIRABLE EOT, Broad street. north of
Master. .
EOT, Broad atreot, north of Thompson. ,
BUILDING LOT, No. 2209 Lombard at. '
THBEE STORY BBIOK DWELLING, No. 3W
Franklin street, above Vino.
MODERN THBBE-STOBY BBIOK REBIPENOH,
?'HiSIWOME*MODEBN THREE-STORY; BRICK
BEBIDENOE, No. 1727 North Eighth street, above O*-.
lnmbla avenue. ■■ -
HANDSOME MODEBN THREE STORY BBIOK
RESIDENCE, No 1803 North Seventh street,ubora >
M HA& O DHoStE MODEBN FOUR-STORY ' BBIOK . :
RESIDENCE. Thirty-fourth street, Booth of Chestnut.. ' i
NEAT’THREE-STORY BRICK DWELLING, No.
1138 Camilla street, between Eleventh and Twelfth sts.,
On DEsiBAB?fe e T t w6 : BTORY BRICK STABLE and" •
COACH HOUSE, between Walnut and Locust streets,
E S?ODEBN d THREE-STORY BRICK RESIDENCE, :
No. 1098outhEighth street. Immediate possession.
VALUABLE MEDICAL BOOKS FROM LIBRARIES.
ON FRIDAY AFTERNOON,
Nov. 5. at 1 o’clpck.
Adminißtratrix’a Sals Nos. 625 and-627 North Bacond
aireet—Estato of John H. Hnbba. dec’d.
STOCK OF ELEGANT CABINET FUBNITHBB,
Elegant Walnnt Parlorand Chamber Suits, Wardrobe*,
Bookcasei.'SideboardSi Hall Tables, Centre and Bow*
Qn °tTa b IoN & WEDNESDAYMOBNING. '
Not. 10, at 10 o’clock, at Nos. 625 and 627 North Second
street, by catalogue, the Stock of elegant Cabinet Fur- t
niture, comprising—Elegant Walnut JParlor Suite,greet* *
E Irish und other coverings; 20 elegant Walnut Chamber *
uitsj Walnut Parlor Cabinet, 4 elegant. Walnut Side
boards. Lisbon and Italian marble tops; Walnut Ward
robes, Bookcases. Centre and Bouauet Tables, Broca- ,
dilia, Lisbon, Tennessee and Italian marble tops; JMb-' c
brary Tubles, Jtfusic Stands,HaU.Tables,Hat Standa* *
Extension and Work Tables, Becefption, Dining Booms#'
Chamber and Camp Chairs, Comfortable and SpajHpb'
Chairs, Jenny Lind and Cottage Bedsteads* CottWb'
Chamber Suits, Cribs, &c., comprising a general aMfQjre
meat. „ • •. ■. . r ;"
t&r The sale of the entiro stock peremptory, by order
of the Administratrix.
Peremptory Sale—On the Premises. •
COTTON MILL AND MACHINERY,
NORRISTOWN, MONTGOMERY COUNTY* PENN-;,
BYLVANIA. «£v
About half a mil© from Railroad Depot- * f.
On FRIDAY, November 12,1869,at 125* o'clock, on th© 'V
premise#:
All that lot of ground and tho improvements thereom
erected, known Creek Mill,” aituate.in'Nor
ristown, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania; beginning
at the southeast aide of Markley streetjund in the middler
of Airy street; thence along the south side of Markley .
stieet southwesterly 154 feet 4-10 of an inch to Ann
street; thonco along tho northeast aide of Ann street,
southeasterly 45 feet to the mill race ; thence along th©
same northeasterly 161 feet 1-10 of an inch to tho middle
of Airy thence along tho middle of Airyatreet
northwesterly 87 feet to tho place of beginning. The im
provements are a 2-story frame mill, large stone Roust. ,
with engine room. Ac. 3
Tenna—Bl,6oo may remain on mortgage; balance *
cash. _
VALUABLE MACHINERY, STEAM ENGINE, Ac.
Immediately after the sale of the cotton miU.will be sold
a2U-hon>e engine; 2 boilers, 36 feet long, 30 inches di
ameter ; steam pump and piping, English Willow*
spreader (30 inch), 8 30-inch cards, newly clothed; 2
drawing frumeadi grinders,speeder ,40 bobbins; 2 railway
heads,trough and belt,4 mules,3oo spindles (each In good
condition): 3 cotton lap cards and preparation* 2 reeling
frames and spooler, large quautity of shafting; also,
pulleys and steam piping, vise lathe bench, quantity of
doffing cans, 3,000 speeder bobbins, 3 gross of spools,
quantity of sorap iron and brass, tools, stoves, lamps*
oilcans, brooms, desks, pair spring scales and beam
scales, wrap retd, banding, belting, filleting, picker,
cylinder and drum, Ac. ■
JAMES A. EBEEMAN, AUOTIOHEEB,
_ No. 422 WALNUTatreet.
Bale 423 Walnut street.
ELEGANT FBENOH BLACK MARBLE, BRONZE
AND GILT CLOCKS, GILT CANDKLABRAS ANI»
FIGURES, MOSAIC TABLES, HALL VABEB,
BRONZE GROUPES AND STATUES, FRENCH
BISQUE FIGUBEB, AGATE AND SIENNA TASKS
ANU ORNAMENTS, ALABASTER STATUETTES
AND GROUPES, Ac. THE IMPORTATION OF
MESSRS. YITI BRO.,(LATE VITO VITI &SONBE
ON WEDNESDAY MORNING,
Not. 10. at 10}. o’clock, at tbo auction store. May bo
examined with catalogue on next Monday, Nor, g.
CD. McOLEES & CO.,
• „ AUCTIONEERS,
No. 606 MARKET street. V •
BOOT AND SHOE SALES EVERY MONDAY AND
THURSDAY.
By barritt & co., auctioneers.
CASH AUCTION HOUSE,
No. 230 MARKET street, corner of Bank street.
Cash advanced on consignments without extra charge.
*VT OTICE—INTERNAL REVENUE.
J3L The undersigned will sell at public sale, an
THURSDAY, Novembor 11, 1869. at 11 o’clock A. ML,
No. 337 GERMAN street, the following distillery ap
paratus and appurtenances,‘viz::
One Steam Engine and Bailors. Mash Tubs, Copper
Pumps, Platform Beales, Ac.
The said articles are seized and distrained upon far
non-payment of taxes, Ac., duo U. S. Internal Revenue.
JAMES N. KERNS,
nol-tnoll§ Deputy Collector First District.
ED lie A now.
Robert h.labberton’s seminary
for •
YOUNG LADIES
will bo opened afr 338 South Fifteenth streot, on MON*
DAY, January 3d, 1870. ue.27w f m3m§
MISS ARROTT AND* MRS. WELLS,
(Formerly of No. 1007 Poplar street),
Will open their Boarding and Day School for Girls, oft
tho firat Monday in October, 18G9, at No. 5254 GERMAN
TOWN avenue, Germantown, Philadelphia.
Until October Ist; direct to No, 744 North NINK-*
TEENTH Street. • ' aulo-3m§
French language.—prof. j*
MAROTEAU has removed to 223 South Ninth
treot. . _____ •oc9s Ui th Im*
Dr. J. M. FOX, TEACHER OF FRENCH
and German. Private lessons and classes. Real
deuce. No. 511 South Fifteenth street. oc3 tf S
MUSICAL.
Ballad singing.
T. BIBIIQP, 33 South Nineteenth street. 0c27 lm*
American CONSERVATORY Off
MUSIC,OFFICE, IOSKWALNUT STIIEBT.
(Removed from S. K. corner Tenth and Walnut.)
SECOND HALF FALL QUARTER BBGLNBNOV. Iff.
Pupils may begin at any time,
Cbiefti of Departments: ■
ETTOUE^BARILI, t JOHN , F.^HIMMELSBAOH*
\VE N Z KL_ K'A'P TA"11 ml tj ,* E N O K L K E
JEFFEBbON E, WILLIAMS, President.
Circulars at tlio Music Stores. oc2U-yr 8 Bt§
JAMES PEARCE, M. 8., OBGAKIST
St. Mark's (1430 Spruce struothcun be soon front
till 1U A. M., and from 7 till 8. Teaches the OmU|
Pian.o and Harmony. _■ ; oc9-a tu tatttl
SIG. P. RONDINELLA, TEAGHB® OB'
Singing; Private lessons and classes. Besldencu
308 S, Thirteenth street. - anJß’tfl .
HOTELS.
/BAER'S COTTAGE,
\J CAPE ISLAND, N; J.i
OPEN ALL THE YEAH BOUND. * i
Sportsmen and others desiring to spend apy time at the
SoaKhore, during the falland winter season, will find at
this houseovory convenience and comfort. •■.
Guns, fishing tackle, .etc., can be obtained at-thft
COTTAGE
«e 22 w a agio? FRANK PARK. Proprietor
EROEOSALS.
ATOTICE.-SEALED PROPOSALS, EN
JM (lowed “Proposals forfurnishingSupplies
to the Board of Controllers.<jf Public Schools,’*
■will he received at the office, southeast corner ■
Sixth and Adelplii streets, addressed to-the '
undersigned, until December 13th, 1869. at 12. a
o’clock M., for the supply of all the hooks and :«#>'«
stationery to be uscdln the Public Schools of > « I
Philadelphia for the yearlB7o. JChe proposals ;
must state the price and quality of the books ■
and articles of stationery proposed to be fur- , (■
nished, aud accompanied by a sample of esohJf j
item. A list of books as authorized br“(
tho Board, can he seen at the Secretary's
otli cc, southeast corner of. Sixth aud Adelphi '■ ■.
streets. ' . J 1
By order of the Committee on Supplies.- * ,
• H, "W. HALIjIwELIj, .
nol 8 IS 21) def> 13U 1 Secretaftr,
r BAILS' * COTTOS 1 '7 „
\J etoro and for sale by(JOCIUtAN, RIXtiSCLIi IOO.i - :
111 Chostnut Btrout. ,* * r
RICE.-100 CASKS CABOIiINA BICE IN V
Rtorc anti for mtlo by.COCUMAN i UDSSKLti * 0«i. '
jU Clieatnut utnot.