Daily evening bulletin. (Philadelphia, Pa.) 1856-1870, October 08, 1866, Image 1

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    GIBSON PEACOCK- Editor.
VOLUME XX.—NO. 157.
MARRIED.
- New York, on the 4th
isst, at St*Mark’s Church, by theßev. Alexander H.
y»t pr D. 8.. Edward Bleeker, M.D., and Ellen .H.,
djftur -ox the* late liient. C. C. Barton, .
. DIED.
■DOUGLAS.—Oct. Gtb; after a short illness, Bobert
/Brown Douglas, in the 31st year of his age.
His funeral will take place on Tuesday, 9th insfc, at
10 o clock,Trom his late residence, No. 253 Senth Tenth
street. /The relatives and friends of the family; the
members ofEastern Star Lodge, No. 186, A. Y. M.,
ColumtjJa Mark Lodge, No. 91 are Invited to attend.
Funeral to Mount Moriah Cemetery. *
i HBLMBOLD.—Suddenly. on the Bth lust., George K.
son of Edwardß. and Louisa J. Helmbold, in the 21st
year of his age.
The relatives and friends of the family are respect
fully invltdtt to attend his funeral, from h's fathers
residence, Np. 1917 Lombard street, on Wednesday
alternoon. at 2 o’clock, without fUr.her notice. ** ;
JEFFBEB—AtAIbanyTN.T.. i at the residence ef
her son-in-law, Rev. J.Spencer Eennard, on Sunday
morning. 7th Inst,, in the 70th year of her age, Mrs.
Ruth Jeffers, widpw of) John B. Jeffers, Esg., formerly
of Bridgeton. New Jersey. Interment at Bridgeton,
On Tuesday, 9thinsLt at> noon. ' ■ *
LEVJSBItiG.-At Lafayette, Indiana, on the 7th
Inst., Abraham Levering; - Br., .formerly of Lower
llerion, Montgomery county, Fa: Due notice of his
■funejal.will be given, which wilTbe at Leverlngton
-Cemetery, Bt zboro. •
MILLER.—On the of the 6th inst., Mr.
John 6. Miller, In the 83d year of his age. orgacist of
-Zion German Lutheran Church', lor the past 53 years.
The funeral aery Ices will take place at the Church,
corner of Fourth and Cherry streets, oh'Wednesday
morning, 10th lhst.; at 11 o c)ock L precisely *
ROWLAND.—On the meming ot the 7th instant,
Charles T. Lowland. •
•His male ftfendß and. those of the family, also the
membeis ofßobert Morris Lodge. No. 29.L0.0f O. F,
of Pa., Hope Lodge.No 21,1.0.0f0.F.,and Washington
Engine Co~ of Wumlngton, Delaware, are respectfully
invited to attend his funeral, from his mother , a resi
dence, No. 624 South Eleventh et., eh Wednesday
afternoon, at 2 o’clock . ‘ 2t
SALFORD -On the Bth inst, Mary A., widow of.
Alex. Sanford* anddaughtex of the late WUliam Lane.
Her fTiChda are invited to attend her funeral, from
the- residence ot her Bister, S.W. corner of Girard
and Corinthian avenue, on 'fe ednesday morning, at 10
o'rlocfe, withoutfurther notice*. * *•
. STOCKTON.—At Morven, Princeton, N J., pa the
7th iMi'fßobert j?ield Stockton, late a Commodore la
the lx S. Navy.
Funeral from Morven, on Wednesday, the 10th inst..
at 2 o’clock, -P. M. **£
WHORRALL —On the 7th inst, Captain George W.
Wborrall. aged 24 years.
* His relatives and friends are invited to attend the
from bis late residence. No. 804 North Twelfth
street* on Wednesday, at 2 o’clock.; : ** •
EYBE & LANDELL IMPORTED FOB FALL
SALES,
at. Bernard Woolen Cloakings. •- —
Dagmar Woolen Shawls, Mosaic Woolen Shawls.
Splendid Plain Silks.
Magnificent Plaid Poplins. > §
HFUVIAk NOTICES.
SCSM OJFIC COURSE,
lAFATEITE COLLEGE.
In addition to the general Course of Instruction in
\ this Department, designed to lay aßptjstantial basis of
knowledge and scholarly culture, students can pursue
those branches which are essentially practical and
-technical, viz-: ENGINEERING, Civil, Topograptcal
■And Mechanical: MINING - and METALLURGY;
ARCHITECTURE, and the application of Chemistry
to AGRICULTURE and the ARTS. There is also ai
forded an opportunity for special study of TR ADE and
COMMERCE, of MODERN LANGUAGES and PHIL
OLOGY; and of the HISTORY and INSTITUTIONS
of our own country. For Circulars appiy to President
CATTELL, or to Prof. 8.8. h OUNGHANT
Easton, Pa. April 4, 1866. Clerk of the Faculty. .
my3-6m03 ' • • v
PHIL A DEL PHIA
SREWEBS’ ASSOCIATION,
■ Oflicf, No. SOSonth SIXTH Street.
Your attention is called to tie Philadelphia Brewers’
Association, which is now in operation, and brewing,
since ETBR AND BROWN STOUT,
' The quality of which is -not excelled by that of
other brewery in the Uruted States; the best material*,
only are used , and best attention yivsn to meet the wants
or the consumer. _ .
1 he Association islncorporated by Act of the Legis
lature. and being upon the mutual benefit piao, each
Stockholder part owner of the Brewery Fix
tures, etc. aiKWJaacnred from any‘risk of loss, while
the price of shKfis being almost nominal, and not sub
ject to as; additional assessment, the benefit derived is
immense. •
The stockholders receive their Ale, etc., at cost, bo
that they save nearly one-third of the price now being
paid, and besides this savin*, the profit upon sales
others, who are not stockholders, and to
whom fall price is charged, will be divided among the
Stockholders semi-annually; tins dividend alone, oe
yend donbt, will make it a desirable .and prof table In
vestment. . .
To secure these advantages the trade should sub
scribe ai once, as the amount of Stock is limited, and
will be sold tejione but dealers. >■ '
jjg* Full particulars ffivermtd samples shown at the
Office of the Brewery, 30 South BIXTfI. Street.
THOMAS J. MAKTUT, President
Dexxis P. Dealy, Secretary. QCsrptf
TWENTY-bEVEJJTH WARD
I_ UNION BEPUBLIUAN TICKET;'
GOVERNOR.
'Major General JOHN W. GEARY.
' CONGRESS.
•WILLIAM I>. KELLEY.
ASSEMBLY,
JAMES N. MARKS.
SELECT COUNCIL,
( R, P. GILLINGHAM.
COMMON COUNCIL,
WILLIAM OGDEN.
ALDERMAN,
THOMAS RANDALL.
GUSTAVOS BERGHER, Brewer of the City
ILgr of Philadelphia, Penna., has in compliance
with the Act of Assembly, April 4th, 1865, providing
against a wrongful detention and appropriation of
barrels and other vessels-belonging to him, tiled in the
Office of the Court of Common Pleas, a description of
marks by which his barrels and other vessels are
known. .: . - '.. - - , ' „ ,
He claims as his property all vessels marked 1,
branded “G. Bergner,'’ on the head and cottdm, or on.
both of each vessels.
■2 branded“G. Bergner, Piula,” , - - ■ /-
s, with the.private mark in -the shape of a stave
about of ah inch in diameter. •
!, with a private mark of a concave branded within
one and a half Inch from the tape.hole, about \ of an
inch in diameter, ' _
ocB m',w,l2tj . GU3TAVU J B.ERGb. ER.
AMERICAN" ACiiiIEMY OF MUSIC,
. JOHN B. GOUGH, \
ill deliver TWO ’LECTURES under the auspices of
THE YOUNG MEN’S CHRIS 1 lAN ASSOCIATION.
, WEDNESDAY EVENING. Oct. 10th,
Subject—“CURIOSITY.”
This is an entirely New Lecture and will be delivered
for the FIRST TIME in Philadelphia,
. THURSDAY EVENING, Oct. 11th,
Subject—ELOQUENCE ANB.ORATOR3,
Tickets at ABHMEAB & EVANS’ Book Store, 724
•Chestnut Btreet, •. *
Reserved Seats—6o cents and 75 cents. /
Orchestra and Stßge, 50 cents.
Unreserved Family Circle, 25 cents.
s Boors open at 7 o’clock.. Lecture to commence at
<3 o’clock. / ■ ocs 4trpg
..HEALTH OFFICE,. PHILABELPHtA; S.
W. CORNER SIXTH andS aNSOM STREETS.
OciOBEBS. 1866.
NOTICE.—At a special meeting of the Board of
Health, held this day for that purpose, the following
named persons were duiy elected special sanitary In
spectors, to act until otherwise directed, viz:;-.
I • I MERBIT GIBSON,
T:. . F. D» BINGHAM, .
, J. B. GREECE, N
W. B. LANE, *
BAVIS EMERY,
H. E. B, TAYLOR.
will proceed upon duty at once.
WASHINGTON L. BLABEN,
its Chief Clerk.
Jr'S* . NATION 4.L OIL BEFININa COMPANY
Il£? OF PHILADELPHIA, No. 132 booth SECOND
Street, Octobeb, 4th, 1866.
Notice la hereby given that all stock of this Company,
npon which assessments have been called, and the
same yet unpaid, will, be sold at Pnbllc Angtlon,at
the Office of the Company (as above), on TCEsDAT,
.. October 30th, 1866, at lo o’clock A.M., or so much there
of as may be necessary to pay said assessments with
the Incidental expenses thereon, unless the amounts
doe npon said stock are paid to the Treasurer on or
beiore that time.
JAMES H. STEVENSON,
Treasurer.
POMEROY VERSOS KERNS.—This contest
lies between Hr. Kerns, wbo is an avowed
■‘ Cameron” man, and Ur. Pomeroy, wbo stands for
“Curtin,” wittkthi&priveiege, that if occasion warrants
lie shall vote for a City man for United States Senator
who' Bball truly represent the business and commercial
interests of this city! Citizens!! Yon here have the
facts In brief relative to this point in the contest/.
By order of Committee,
lt» J •••-. C. H.NEET>T,KS t Secretory.
MEETING IK EIGHTH WARD.—A. meeting
of the Union Republican citizens of the Eighth
"Ward will be held on MONDAY EVENING. October
4th,‘at 7% o'clock, at the HOSE
ROUSE, LOCUST street* above TWELFTH.
By order of Committee of Superintendence.
• JOHN C. MARTIN, President
CLAYTON MACMICHAEL, Secretary. 3 $ ■>
SPECIAL NOTICES.
PHTLADELPii lA, JUNE 19, 1866.
pb the Son, Leonard Myers, Member of Congress from
the Third District of Pennsylvania :
Sib : At a meeting of the Manufacturers ana Jour
j3£ymen Cigar Makers of Philadelphia, held Jane 18th,
1866, the following resolution, together with other pro
ceedings, was adopted :
Resolved, That a vote of thanfta be tend ered to the
Eon, LEONARD MYERS, for the very able and con
sistent manner in which he defended the interest Of
our :bußinesB, having stood almost alone in his advo.
cacy of placing the tax on the raw material, Extract
Of minutes of meeting held June 18,1866.
AUGUSTUS PFAFF, President;:
Attest; Chab, Baxeb,Secretary. ' ocs-2t
SEPTEMBER 20th,
HON. LEONARD MYEBS;
' Sib: At a meeting of the Philadelphia Druggist Ware
Glass-blowers’ League, held at the Kensington Engine
Bouse, Thuiiday evening, September 20, it was unani
mously
1 Resolved, That a vote of thanks be tendered to the
Hon, LEONARD hCTERStor his promptness and en
ergy in presenting our petitionsJOr an increase on the
tariff on glassware, ahd'for~'bia able'advocacy of our
claims for protection. Also,
Retolved, That in hlarrw&) recognize A TRUE
FRIEND OF THE WORKINGMEN and of HOME
INDUSTRY; and be it further “
Resolved , That % committee of two be, appointed to
present a copy of the foregoing resolutions to'the Hon
Leonard ifyersr " ?
WM, HARMER, President.
A. FLACK, Bee. Secretary.
PETER DAILY,
GEORGE E. DUNLAP.
PHILADELPHIA, OCT. S, 1866.—1 b the Kan*
vfscturert and Journeymen Cigar Makers of
l j rnladelphia—G&x r iS’. I notice in to day’s Ledger a
card signed by. Augustas Pfaff and Charles Baxer,
siating that since the resolution passed at a meeting or
your members, thanking me for my defence of your
business inter eats. in advocating a tax upon the
Raw Material, I veted in oppoaltwh to what I
then advocated, and that thtir names .were used
without authority. Neither of. these statements
are true. The resolutions of were sent me
exactly as published. It was giveh unasked aad
tagout restriction, and these gentlemen, who were
merely the officers of the meeting, will not attempt to
deny the statement over their signatures as such offi
cers 1 voted for the.amendment; the passage of which
I urged , to tax tobacco in the leaf as the workingmen
in ihe trade desired, belle*, icg it just aDd equitable. As
four letter admits, “I stood almost alone” In such
advocacy, and the amendment failed. Yet I take great
pleasure in saying tiat, notwithstanding the failure to
incorporate my amendment, I voted for the present
tax ia\V which not only to some degree relieves your
trade from the burdens of the. former law, but is an
ACT i O REDUCE TAXATION, and release the great
• mats of the mechanics and business men of thecoun
try iromlmptata amounting to many millions of doi-
Isjs. Yery respectfully, yours,
oeS-2t . LEONARD MYERS.
ft-rs** PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 6, 1866.— Hamilton
Dlsiton , Esq.:
Deab Sib: jb reply to several kird inquiries ftem
you, made with the intention of silencing ihe slanders;
of our opponents, I desire to say:
First. That the assertlQ|jpr that Congress gave higher
bounty to the negro than to the white man is as ab ♦
tinda» it is false The acts became law by tbe signa
tures of Andrew Johnson; and had ary sucb distinc
tion been made, he would very properly have used the
veto he Is so fond of. _
7 voted for , and thfi Mouse passed, a law giving
1 igher bountyto soldiers and to sailors,too; bat under
tne pressure ofa protest from Andy Johnson’s Secre
tary of tneTreasury, the Senatereinsed to concur in it:
ana<en the last morning of the session, having voted
downa bill to equalize our salaries, which was offered
and urged by the Democratic leaders or each House,
we took the best bounty bill we cmid get. the Senate
Saving incorporated the equalization of salaries and
bounties In one bill and refusing to pass one without
the other. • .
&cor,d. That the questionof negro suffrage, about
which demagogues are prating so much, is fa no wise
involved in the issues before the people. The great
Constitutional Amendment expressly leaves it to the
several &ate*.
: That amendment repudiates the rebel deht, guaran
tee* the payment of the National obligations, making
our b jndfl, pensions and bounties secure; prevents for
sworn traitors from raoccupytne tile high places of
the nation, and asseits'ihat no Southern man, disloyal
or loyoly shall, on the basis of rep esentation, be al
lowed more votesthan a Northera one.
On the adoption of this amendment every Southern
State may, like Tennessee, obtain admission for its
loyal members. The fruits of our victories will then
be secured, and the country, released from the excite
ment produced by designing leaders, whose only object
1b to reach power, regardless of the popular voice,
will, under a judicious system of protection to the
bights of labor, march forward to a prosperity
hitherto unknown, I am, air, yours, Yery tenly,
pcB»2t LEONARD MYERS.
THE HON, LEONARD MYERS’SERVICES
TO THa STATE.— Tne following Interesting
correspondence Is well worthy of perusal and explains
Itself: *-
Harrisburg. Augast 6.1666.
DeabBib: It is always agrteabie to a public man
c foteel that he enjoys the confidence of his constituent
ry, and that he has so fulfilled the trusts committed to
his care as to deserve their approbation. I awaited
the adjournment of Congress to thank you for the zeal
efficiency and fidelity you lent to the advocacy of the
bill you introduced, and which passed Into a law at
the last session ot Congress, to relmbuxse money ad
vanced by the State in 1*63, at the request of the Presi
dent and Secretary of War. '• ;
. Saving failed to procure the appropriation at pre
ceding sessions ol Congress, although earnestly pressed
by the this Btateand our members of
Congress, and as my term of office expired before an
other effort could be made, I watched the progress.oi
your bill with much solicitude; and whilst the interests
of the people were faithfully served by our entire dele
gation in aiding the passage of the appropriation, I
have never failed to Bpeak of your able, persistent and
succfßftful efforts as deservincthe thanks of the State.
When reflecting upon tbe great questions upon
which yon were called to act during tbe late session of
OoDgreas. it must be a gratification to you to feel that
you gavethls measure, so just and equitable in all re*
specie, your earnest and efficientaupport.
, Very iespectfully, your obedient
Hon. Lxokabd Myers.
Philadelphia. August a* 1566.
Hon. Andrew G. Curtin, Gova'nor of Pennsylvania:
Dear Sib : I cannot leel otherwise than gratified at
your v«ry complimentary l«t er upon the passage by
Coegress of my bill reimbursing |7u0, 000 to onrstate..
The measure, however, was. aa yon wellremark, “just,
and equitable in all respects/'l and I only did my duty
inpresenting and urging it. '
The money was advanced by some of the banks of
Philadelphia, neither Congress nor the State Legisla
ture beingthen in session, to pay those troops from our
State, who,in thegreatemergencyof iB63,volunteered
10 repel the invaders, and pressed them back toward
the decisive battle-grom-d of the war, at Gettysburg.
When the legislature met, the State, at your in*
stance, promptly assumed and afterward paid this
sum. Mr. Lincoln and the Secretory of War fulfilled
their promise to recommend the reimbursement; and
in BDite of delays and strong opposition, it is a pleasure
to feel that Congress at last recognized the validity of
the claim. •
The part which Pennsylvania bore,in the war to put
•f own the rebellion—and Philadelphia did her fall share
—ls, indeed a proud one The records of the War De
partment show that we furnished over 366,000 soldiers
to defend the Union.
3 hese were exclusive of the militia who, in 1862, 1863
and 1864, sprang to arms at a moment's notice to re
sist the reoel hordes In addition to oar gallant
sailors who, equally with their comrades on the land,
aided to render the American name more illustrious
tnan ever. Yet it adds to the fhmeof our goodly Com
monwealth that throughout the war she had in your
self a Governor whose, every pulsation was for his
country, and who iaknown as the friend of its de
fenders.
Pleased to have received commendations from such
a source , l am, with sincere regard,
Yeurs, very respectfully, • .■ -.
LEONARD MYERS..
Philadelphia, Sept. 20, 1866,
Hon. Leonard Myers: *■ ■■ . ■
fciß— At a meeting of the Philadelphia Druggist
Ware Glass Blowers’ League, held at the Kensington
Engine-House,' Thursday evening, September 20.1866,
It was unanimously 4
Resolved. That* a vote of thanks be tendered to the
Hon. Leonard Myers for his promptness and energy In
presenting our petitions for anincreaseof the tariff on
glassware* and for his able advocacy of our claims for
protection. Also, . .
Resolved, That in him we recognize A TRUE
FRIEND OF THE WORKINGMAN.and of HOME
INDUSTRY; and bedt further. _
JUsolved, That a committee of two be appointed to
present a copy of the foregoing resolutions to the Hon.
Leonard Myers. -:■? ; ’ 4 »
wm. HA'RW'RTt., President. -
A.FLACK,' Rec. Secretary. '
PETERDAILY, .
V - GEORGE E DUNLAP,
Committee.'
! Philadelphia, Jane io, 1866;
2b the Hon.jLeonard Myers, of Congress from
Vie Third Dtstrictof Pennsylvania;
gut: At a meeting of the Manufacturers and Jour-'
neyznjn Cigar Makera 4 of Philadelphia, held Jsneis,
1866 tne followlng resolution, togetner.with uther pro*
ceedmgs, was adopted: .
Besoived, That a vole of thanks be tendered to the
Hon. Leonard Myers fot the very able and consistent
manserin which he defended the Interests of our
business, having stood almost alone in his advocacy
of placing the taxon the rawmaterial.— Extract of l
minutes-of. meetingheld JhndlS, 1866.
AUGUSTUS PFAPF, President. 1
Atteet-CHA3. BAKER, decretory.
PHILADELPHIA, MONDAY, OCTOBER 8,1888.
SPECIAL notices.
MONDAY, oct. 8, 1866,—a. meeting of detect
Council was held in their Chamber this morning
to take suitable action upon tbe death of Thomas Mas
sey, late messenger of that Chamber. • . _ .
The Chamber having been called to order. Mr. Lynd
stated the object of ;the meeting in the following ad
dress:
• Gentlemen of .Select Council— For ".the first
many years the Select Council of the city of Philadel
phia Is assembled to recognize the death .of one of Its
own officers, and to render fitting tribute to his me
mory.
*; Thomas Massey, our late respectable and efficient
messenger is no more—a summons moreperemptory
than anyjhat could emanate from this Chamber, has
called him to that bourne which earthly messages are
impotent to penetrate. . - • - _
. Death’s call is ever unwelcome—ever unexpected:
but this time, it has been particularly and impressively,
unforseen And sudden. On Thursday afternoon last,
he was in our midst in theusual-penormance of duty.'
and apparently in his übujvl health. The next morn
ing we were startled with the intelligence of his dan
gerous Illness; and ere the day was scarcely past, his
spirit bad flecLfrom us forever. „
The eVenLkas its lessons, whichwe cannotfali to un-.
dersundaud appreciate, and it imposes duties, the
chief of which Is to hear Impartial testimony to . the
virtues of the deceased. ’ ■
For nearly three years he has moved dally among
Us, and: has tarnished na with ample opportunities of
noting bis conduct and of estimating his character. ~
It is highly gratifying to me, as the presiding officer
of Select Council, to be able, on this sorrowful occa
sion, to express truthtal and unqualified approval of
him both as a manand as, an officer. As a man he
was quiet and unobtrusive; In manner asd temper
faultlessly even and mild, and of genuine sincerity of
heart. As an officer he was Always at his post, ever
ready and prompt in the discharge of his duty, and
untiring >h his efforts to oblige bis fellow officers and
to accommodate the members of this Chamber. In
all my intercourse with him. 1 never witnessed an lm
>atienige&ture or an inconsiderate act; I never heard
iim utter an unkind word or give expression to an
uncharitable thought, m • ' •’ A 1 •
In his humble poaitiOD. he achieved all that is most
worthy of achievement by the highest official m the
land—tbe merit of a will-fulfilled alscharge of duty r ,of
a character without exception or reprosch. Death is
a sterh leveler of all worldly distinctions; an ever re
curring and emphatic admoniaher that “An honest
man’s tbe noblest work of God.”
With this sentiment and in this spirit, my fellow
members, let us meet this sad occ&lon, and : alike
with inner sense and outward observance, unite in
paying the last tribute of respect to. our late worthy
and esteemed officer. , ■•• •
. Hr. Spe ring presented an invitation from the family
of the decease, to attend his taneral, ahd on his motion
a committee of three was appointed resolu
tions commemorative of the deceased.
Messrs. Spering, Wagner and Hopkins were appoint
ed the Committee; who alter retiring for a short ;tlme
submitted the following:
MINUTE or, SELECT COUNCIL UPON THE DE4.TH OP
THE MESSENOKB.
Whereat, The Select Connell of tne City of Phlladel ■
phla by the death of Mr. Thomas Massey has lost a
taithful and efficient officer therefore
EcMlveti, That the Select Council o» the City of Phil
adelphia hereby declare the esteem in which they held
their late Messenger and erpreta •their great regret at
hlsdecease. They also offer to ht3""&mily this testi
mony of the affection In which he was held by those
' with whom his public duties called him to act.
Eeeolvcd, That Select Council accept the Invitation
to the funeral, and will attend In ’ a body; that the
usual badge or .menrnlng be worn by the members,
and that the chair of the President and the Clerk’s
desktedrapedwithblackforamonth. "
Besoimi, That the officers and members of Common
Council and of the City Government be Invited to par
ticipate with Select Council in paying the last tribute
of respect to the memory of the deceased.
Bttolved, That the Clerk be directed to engross a
copy 01 these proceedings and send them to the widow
as an expression of the esteem of this Council fox her
deceased husband. ",.. ,
Which wereunanlmonsly adopted,
appropriate remarks were made by Messrs. Page,
Barlow, Freeman. 6mltb, Omerly and Bpcring.
On moron, the Chamber adjourned ocs ltj
if'=> TO THE UNION REPUBLICAN 7 VOTERS
IL^OP THE EIGHTH LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT,
JAMES N. KERNS, ESQ.:—DEiK Sra -.—The un
dersigned, voters of the Eighth Legislative District,
anxious for yonr reflection, with great pleasure tes
tify to your unswerving fidelity to toe party, more es
pecially when good men and true were wanting In the
1 i egislatl ve Bails ol our- good old Loyal Keystone
state, and we are happy to be able to call the attention
of every loyal voter in the District that eTery voce you
have ever given since you have so -well represented us
has been on the sioe of Union- and Liberty. -Your
course in opposing the insidious and villainous policy
of treasonable machinations, will evermeet our hearty
approval. As a self-made man from among the ranks
ol the people, we are proud of the action of the Con
vention which has Disced you again for Representa
tive upon the Union Republican Ticket for the Eighth
Legislative District, and call upon the voters to at
once discard all Independent movements as dangerous
to the beat interests of our Government
And now we appeal to every man who Is in favor of
Liberty to again endorse the nominee for the District
you have so faithfully represented. Very respectlhliy,
1 JOHN W. CLaGHORS.
JOHN PRICE WETHERILL.
GEORGE TRUMAN. Ja.,
ALBERT a ROBERTS, -
TMI P. HAMM,
R. W CUSHMAN,
DAVID R. POSEY. M. D.,
F. W. BRAID W OOD.
f». WILLIAMSON,
L. R. BROOM HALL.
. E.K. TAYLOR,
(iHuRT.m F. NORTON,
EDGAR E. PETIT.
WM. F. HIBBERD.
MORTIMER L. JOHNSON,
RAYMOND T. MAULL,
L. E. LIPPINCOTT.
SAMUEL J. WILLIAMSON,
HENRY'A. FIBBER,
WM GORGES. D. D. S.,
GFORGE G. LOUDER,
J. PRESTON WILLIAMS,
W. FISHER MITCHELL,
H. B. LIPPINCOTT,
1 P. F. BOTHEKMKL,
JOSHUA SPARING,
T. B. PUGH,' -- _
JOHN OKIE.
JACOB BRETZ. r
WM. C. HKNSZEY,
WM. B. WEBB.
J. NEWTON CLARKE,
ELLWOOB TRYON, -v
SAMUEL B. BRICK,
ISAAC SULGEB,
And many others. . It*
EIGHTH LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT,—The
' attention of the voters of urfaNQLtrict Is called
to ibefollowiagfocts: • - -
a n effort was made on Thursday, the -Ith Instant, to
bribe the primer having charge of the Independent
Ticket for Representative to suppress them, or; to dls-‘
appoint the Committee in obtaining them. This effort
was entirely unsuccessful.
' Mark whut followed: -
On Friday night the premises of the prloter were
broken into, ana ransacked; to discover tbese tickets,
but without success.
Do notthese facts show how utterly unscrupulous
the frieuds ofMr. Kerns are, in their efforts to defeat
thewillofthe people. . , *•-*.
The same spirit which nominated Mr. Kerns fraud*
ulently\will nesitate at nothing to accomplish his
election. .
Voters, attend to it!
By order of the Committee.
ELC* THOMP3ON,
It* ; President.
FIFTH WARD.—A meeting of the Union Be
ltsy publican Ward Association will be held THIS
(MONDAY) EVENING, October Bth; at 7% o'clock, at
the Hall of the Good Intent Hose, Spruce street, above
Sixth. “ . > ,
A full attendance is requested. --
B. HUCKEL, President.
HENRYS.GILBERT,! 6*™**-.- .. *■
XJ. c, fiTvfTTH, j-fcecretaries.
CARD published in yesterday’s Dispatch was
IfcJy printed without, my knowledge or consent. I
leafflrm all that I testified to lo regard to the delegate
election In the Eighth Precinct of the Ninth Ward,
ana Mr. Pomeroy s friends quoted me accurately in
their circular.
It* JOHN LYNCH. /
PEENSYLVANIA RAILROAD
AND GREEN LANE 6TAIION,
The residents of Germantown can have superior
. • . LEHIGH COAL- •
delivered to them from the above place at|B 00 per ton.
Prompt attention given to orders addressed to Box 62,
Germantown Post-office. Office,ls South Seventh street,
Philadelphia, or to yaxd at Green JLaneStation.
peg lmxp . ' BINES & BHEAFF, .
iv-==b OFFICE OF THE AMERICAN FIRE LNSU
BANCE. COMPANY, Philadelphia, October
;>th 1866, '*•'••• ! * •
TheDlrectors have this day declared a dividend of
SEVEN DOLLARS AND FI6TY CENTS per Share,
forthe last six months, which will be, aid to the stock
holders or their legal representatives, on and alter the
isthlnst. clear eftultaxes. A, C.L. CRAWFORD,
-• OCB-918 • -. '•*. ■ ' Secretary.
ITS* GERMANIOWN ‘WATER COMPANY.—
lIS* Holders of Preferred Stock will be paid the.
valtie thereof estimated ini City Doan, upon surrender
of their certificates at the office of the Company; Ne,64
North SEVENTH street ... ...
■ at*.. ISAAC C.~ PRICE, President.
THE LEHIGH VALLaY RAILROAD COM
IKS* PANT has declared a Quarterly Dividend of
TWO AND A HALF PER CENT., payable at their
Offlcei No. 412 WALNUT street, on and ■ after October
10th.1656. L. CHAMBERLAIN,
Ocl-m,wJ&t* Treasurer. -
n-S» ,THE GIPSIES.—These singular beings are
now encamped at Fair Hill Garden, Seventh
and York. Fourth and Eighth street cars run within
one square. . , t ocs-3t,rp»
It'S* YOUNG AMERICA CRICKET CLUB.-Spe
iKgr clal Meeting THIS EVENING. October Bth, in
Town Ball, at 8 P.M, Important business. . Fall at
tendance requested. CHAS, E, MORRIS,
it* * Secretary.
OUB WHOIiE COUNTRY.
fTrry* EIGHTH LEGISLATIVE OLvißtCr,
INDJPENDENT CANDIDATE.
JOHN M. POMEROY.
, - • PHILADKLPHIt, OCt. 5,1866,
The nnderslgoed Independent Republican voters of
the Eighth Legislative District, having confidence in
theabilily ana Integrity of JOHN M. POME SO Y, the
independent candinate, cordially recommend him to
the support 6 fthe votors of this district. Tlilscontest
Is edtirely between Mr. Kerns who Uon the regular
ticket, and Mr. Pomeroy, the Democrats having de
clined to mike a nomination:
H. a THOMPSON,
n STARLING BONSALL,
a h. needles; , . •
DAVID McPARLAN,
WM. B. THOMAS,
D. W. CHANDLER, . \
: D. D. CLARK',
CHARLES N. KUGLEB, ■
THOMAS E. LEWIS,
JOHN YARD, Jr;,
■ JOHN E. POX,
’ JOHN ATKINSON.
J. H. BOUTHWORTH.
THOMAS B. WTI.I.fAMVI,
WM. COFFIN.
WM. A.RHODEB:
JOHN W. CLARKSON,
; H. W. SAPPHRD,
THOMAS BELLAS, .
! CHARLES W. PICKERING,
* FRANKLIN KNEASB,
J. L, HILL. ‘ S ' '
. SAMUEL BAUGH, •
JOHN BONER,
D. B. McGINUCY,
JOSEPH J. BABSHAW,
B. F. MUSTIN,
~ HENRY B. BENNERS, /
CALEB R. KEENY,
WASHINGTON BROWN,
WILLIAM HUBSKB,
WILLIAM H, BISK,
SAMUEL HAINES,
JOHN H. DAVTS,
LOUIS D. BAUGH.
: NATHAN ROWLAND, A
L. A. TRUEFITT, i <
WILLIAM MITCHELL,
DAVID GILBERT, ,
THEODORE M. KEENY,
A. ROTRTROCK.
DAVID MERCER,
JAMES ALCOH. '
GKOKuE MITCHELL,
CHARLES TARO,
JACOB EHRENSALLEN,
B. RAGNOR, '
GEORGE JACKSON,
BAMUEL KIKER. -
TOWNSEND MERCER,
ABRAHAM LYBTEB
MICHAEL LAFFARTY,
JOHN ELLIOTT,
-W. WESTCOTR ~ lt»
nr---* HOWARD HOSPITAL, NOS. ISIS and 1520
Lombard street, Dispensary Department. Hedi
caTtreatmeut and medicines furnished gratuitously
to the poor. -
SPECIAL notices.
D«atb of Commodore Stockton.
Tbe telegraph announces the death of oar
well-known fellow-citizen, Robert F. Stock
ton. Commodore Stockton was the grand
son of Richard Stockton, one of the signers
of the Declaration of Independence, and a
prominent statesman of New Jersey, daring
the revolution., Commodore Stockton was
bem in .Princeton, N. J. f in, 1796, and was
oonsequentlysejenty years'hf age at the
time of his death. Thirty-eight years of his
life were passed in the naval service of the
United States. He distinguished himself
on various occasions during the war ol 1812,
and was in almost constant active sea service
for many years. His name is also identi
fied with many important Improvements in
gunnery, steam engines and naval architec
ture, and the famous steamer Princeton was
constructed under his special supervision. <
He was in command of her, at the time of
the'fjttkl explosion of one of, her large guns,
February 28,1544, which caused the death
of the then Secretaries of War and the Navy
and other distinguished public men.
In 1845, Captain Stockton,'was ordered to
California, where he was plifted in circum
stances requiring the most prompt and
decisive action, without any means of com
municating with his government, and he
succeeded in folly establishing the United
States authority over that country, with the
merest handful of men under his command.
He resigned from the Navy in 1849, and
in 1851 was elected to the U. S. Senate, a
post which he resigned in 1853, since which
he has "continued in private life. He has
been, all his life, deeply interested in
the internal improvements of his native
State,and has exercised an influence upon it,
politically and socially, probably exceeding
that of any single individual either in pub
lic or private life. He was trained in the
Democratic school, and, daring a. leave of
absence from the navy, took an active part
in the election of General Jackson. Cap
tain Stockton, or “Commodore” Stockton
as he was universally denominated in this
community, was a man of great mental
activity and physical vigor, which he re
tained to the end of his long and eventfn 1
career. He leaves a large family connec
tion and a large circle of warmly attached
friends and neighbors to mourn his loss. He
died, last night, at his birth-place, -in
Princeton, after a short illness, and will be
buried on Wednesday next at that place.
Every Saturday, for the week termi
nating October 13th, presents us with more
than its usual variety. It contains twelve
articles, embracing; stories,-serial and com
plete, essays, poems,' and foreign notes.
Tbe poems in this issue, three in number;
are more excellent than the poetry generally
found in the English magazines. In addi
tion to fresh chapters of “The Village on the
Cliff” and “Black Sheep,” the editor gives
us a pretty little storyentitied Mr. Tiddi
jobn, a charming paper on “liiterary Part
nerships,” a whimsical essay on “Sneezing,”
and a sparkling protest, against “Pretty
Actresses.” . '
Mr. Gough at the Academy_of Music.
—Mr. John B. Gough, the world-renowned
orator, will deliver two of'his best lectures,
at the Academy of Music, on the evenings
of Wednesday and Thursday next. The
demand for tickets is great and those who
desiie to hear Mr. G. should seoure their
seats promptly. .... ?'. ■
The French Trade in Roses.— The
trade in roses is of importance in France.
Rose trees are cultivated in, different parts
of the country in open fields like turnips or
cabbages. u Thus there are five hundred
thousand rose trees near Orleans; two htm
dfed thousand near Metz; one million'near
Ahgers; phe million five hundred thousand
near Lyons; two million near Paris; and
two million in the thirteen comtpunes of
Brie-Comte-Robert; The varieties' called
Rose-Thfi, the Bourbon and Mousseuse*
flourish particularly in' the environs of
Paris and Orleans,
As an illustration of the palsy whiob
has fallen en enterprise of all sorts ih
Georgia, k letter writer states that nearly
three hundred aores of arable landinElvert
county were recently sold for. twenty-five
dollars—a little more than eight cents an
acre. ’■ ■
CONFLAGRATION IN NEW YORK.
DESTRUCTION OF ST. PATRICK’S
CATHEDRAL.
Other Large Buddings Damagad.
Lobs Over $600,000
Bremen and Policemen Injured, &c.
{From to-day 'a New York Tribune.]
Shortly before 10 o’clock 'on Saturday
night a fire was discovered on the third floor
of No. 44 Crosby street, in the packing-room
of Messrs; Joha Vogt & Co., importers' and,
dealers in porcelain, foreign glaasf ware add
articles of vertu. The building in -which tire
fire erigmated iB five stories in height, and
with the adjoining building, No. 46, whic§
extends through to Broadway, and is num
bered 502 and 604 on that thoroughfare. The
alarm was sounded immediately on the dia r
covery>of-the fire, and the Fire Department
quioluy responded, but before their arrival
the flames, Ted by the straw, boxes andother
inflammable material with which the place
was filled, ' ran rapidly through the upper
stories, and soon the entire upper part of the
building was a masaof flames.
The front door, on Broadway, was . burst
in by the firemen, on their arrival, and by
leading lengths of bogfe through the build-'
iqg, they were enabled to m eet and prevent
the flames from advancing far in that direc
tion.^.The stairs on the Crosby street side
only reached to the third Story, and this was
a serious drawback, as the bulk of the fire
was on that side, on the fourth and fifth
stories. The difficulty was remedied, how
ever, as soon as the hose was led through
the front of the building, but while this was
being done the flame® had attained a Head*
way that they might not have reached but
for this circumstance. ; •/ , .
> In the meantime ladders had been placed
sgainst the burning building on the Crosby
street'side, and, despite, the intense heat,
were mounted by the firemen, and a half
dozen Btreams brought to bear upon the
flames. Inside the building ,the firemen
were also working with vigor. ahd daring.
Two of their number, the assistant foreman
and pipeman of Engine Company No. 20,
having ventured too far into the building,
were overcome by the smoke, and sank' to
the floor. They were rescued by their com?
rades ahd borne from the building into the
street,where the fresh air soon revived them.
A newBonree of danger was soon discov
ered. A quantity .of the burning material
bad fallen through the “man-hole”—reach
ing from the basement, to the top of the
building, used for carrying up gaa and wa
ter-pipes—and in a few moments a, body of
flame was seen to illuminate the skylight oh
the first floor. A door leading into this.flue?
or, “man-hole” was broken open, and a
blinding volume of smoke and flame at
once rushed out, for the. moment driving
back all who attempted to approach. Two
streams were brought, to bear upon the’
flames, and they were speedily extinguished.
All worked nobly, and at the expiration
of an hour there was every indication that
the flames would be confined to the three
upper floors, andfprffirehted from advancing
to the front portionjofthe building.
Burning of St. Patrick's Cathedral.
At this lime the rumor was circulated that
St. Patrick’s Cathedral, situated on the lot
bounded by Mott Prince and ; Mulberry
streets, was on fire. Our reporter prooeeded
thither, and found that the rumor was, un
io; tunately, true. The roof, which was of
the old-fashioned sloping kind, and shin
gled, bad caught fire in two places, near the
apex, from sparks from the Crosby street
fire, the wind setting in the direction of the
Cathedral, Considerable delay was occa
sioned by those inside refusing' to open the
door, and thus precious moments were
wasted. Finally the door was opened, and.
some firemen hurriedly gained the roof and
attempted to put out the flames by cutting
away the fiery portion.
Two engines were detached from the
Crosby street fire and • ordered at once to
proceed to the "Cathedral and endeavor to
extinguish the fire, it being evident that if
the flames should gain "the interior of the
vast edifice, there would ;be no hope of
saving it. By this time an immense crowd
had assembled'around the.building, drawn
,from the other fire, and from the houses in
the the rumpr that- the venerable
edifice was on fire having spread with start
ling rapidity.
In spite of the exertions of those on the
roof, and before a stream could be brought
to bear from the street, the fire had,worked
through the thin, wooden roof, and spread
rapidly through the light wood-work Jon thei
inside. It was now evident that* the build
ing was doomed, and attention was'at once
turned to getting out the portable articles.
Members of the congregation and dtherST,'!
under the direction of Fathers McSweeney,
McGeehan, and others of the priesthood,
; succeeded in removing all the fixtures with
the exception of two which hung above Jpe
altar, the silver service,.many of the vest
ments, and other articles, and -conveyed
them" to the residence of the pastor, the Rev.
Mr. Starrs, located directly opposite.
- superintending the work of re
moval, Fathers Mullon and McGeehan nar
rowly escaped death by the fall of the large
lamp suspended in front of the altar, the
supports having burned a way.
Before the work of removal was com
pleted, the roof wag. one mass of flame,
while liuge fragments 6f burning wood and
other materials were falling v -into the; 'ln
terior. Rapidly, the flames L ran. down the
columns and communicated with the altar
and pews in the body of the church, illumi
nating the church in far grander Btylethan
had ever been attempted on occasions of
ceremony. 'By this time the danger had
become so great from falling -timbers and
fragments of the ceiling that the Police
drove out all who had courage to remain
and watch the spectacle.
The grand old edifice continued to bum
'until a late hour in the morning, and when
the flames were at length subdued, but little
else beside the blackened walls were left
standing. ; .
Showers of burning brands and sparks,
wafted by the west wind, fell upon the roofs
of the houses in the vioihity, and several
were set on fire in consequence. These,
however, were soon extinguished, in most
cases after causing slight damage. The fol
lowing are those thus damaged: AtlOi
o’clock the roof of No. 68 Spring street
caught fire: it was extinguished with a few
pails of wathr. At 1 o’clock A. M., the roof
of No. 314 Bowery was found to be on fire;
it ,was soon extinguished, oausing slight,
damage.
E. L. EETHEBSTON.
DOUBLE SHEET, THREE CENTS,
At about the same hour, a. fire: was dis
covered on the roof of the dwelling No. 9-
Second'street- This, too, was soon extin
guished. At 3i’o’clock A. M.; the reef of •
Nd. 52 Prince street took fire, and that and '
their pper ’floor were burned out It was
occupied on the third floor by Mr. Brush as
a dwelling. -■ Loss on 1 furniture by fire 1 and;
water, slso;rio insurance. ’ The second floor ■
was occupied 'by Michael Reynolds. Loss
on furniture, f ICO: no insurance; The first,
floor was occunied as : a toy store: by Patrick 1 -
Flood. Loss on 1 stock ; by water, $lOO. ■: The
building is owned by Henry Kettletaa, and -
damaged to the amount of $1,000; insured in >
the Stuyvesant Company.
: The basement and first floor of the build- -
ing Nos; 502 and 504 Broadway, extending
through into Crosby street. is occupied by
C. Godfrey Gunther & Sons, the'well-known
dealers in fur goods. They had a very large
stock of goods, amounting to about $600,000;
in addition they have on storage s large •
quantity of furs, the property of various
private parties throughout the city who are, ’ >
in the habit of leaving them with the firm
(except -during the winter' aeason)for Safe
keeping and preservation; The building, a
large; white marble front, five stories in .
height, whs erected by the firm a few months '
since, at a cost of over $300,000. ■ * 1
: The three upper Stories in the rear are
badly damaged by fire,While the remainder '
Of the building was flooded with water,’'
necessitating the tearing down •of all the L ’
ceilings and replacing them with new. The' '■
loss on stock is about $250,000, principally •
by water. The loss on building about
$50,000. Insured on stock and building, -
$728,000, principally m city companies.
Theseoond, third,, fourth and fifth floors
are occupied by John Vogt <fe Co., importers :
of porcelain, china and fine glassware. Mr.
Vogt states that bis stock was an unusually 1
heavy one, be having recently received large
additions. On Saturday he had three carts
busily engaged, and took in 120 cases; His
eutirestock he intimates to have been worth
$350,000, and his loss by fire, water and
breakage at $200,000. The firm have an
insurance of $lBO,OOO mostly in city compa- •
nies. 3 ■ ■
: Of course the thieves and pickpockets riid ’
riot allow the opportunity presented tor two 1 :
large fires; with - the attendant crowds and : -
confusion*tdpasswithout improving it to the - 1
utmost. Notwithstanding the presence ofa
large police and detective force, the lights
fingered gentry swarmed around, watching
their opportunity, and many persona are •
probably now regretting the loss of their
watbhes and wallets. A few of these ope- ‘
raters were picked up by the police, how- ;
ever, and locked up# for the night. ’ Mr.
Thomas Collins, of No. 1 Centre Market, '
while standing in Broadway watching the -
fire, felt some one fingering his vest pocket, - •'
in which was a silver watch valued at $35. -
Instantly turning around, he seized the .
Bght-fingered operator, who proved to
be one John Dempsey. An examina
tion - disclosed to Mr. Collins the fact
thathis »watch was missing. As he was
about to hand hisprisoner over to the police,
a confederate of Dempsey, named Martin
Mullaly, proposed to Mr. Collins that if he
would release Dempsey his watch should be
returned to him. Much to his credit Mr. C.
refused the offer, and the altercation having
attracted the attention of the police, he
banded-over to the custody of Officer Carr
both Dempsey and Mullaly, 1 and they wore, ,
locked up for the night. Yesterday they
were arraigned before Justice Hogan; at the
Tombs, and on the complaint of Mr. Collins
committed for trial. Both are young men,
and claim to be mechanics. Dempsey is; 1
well known to the police, and has on save
ral occasions appeared at the Tombs in the
'character of defendant.
William Moriarty, of No. 227 Mulberry '
street, felt some one taking bis watch from...
his pocket, and caught a young man- named
.William, Connor In the act of : withdrawing
his hand from his (Moriarty’s) pocket.;
'binding that his watchnadbeen stolen', and.
probably passed to a confederate, Moriarty
handed hisprisoner over to the custody of '
officer McGrade of the Fourteenth Precinct,
and he was locked up for the night.' Yes
terday he was committed, for trial by, Jus
tice Hogan. Connor is a native of Ireland,
aged thirty years, a bartender, and says he
lives in Pittsburgh, Pa.
No one can give any satisfactory reason,
for the outbreak of the fire in Crosby street;'
Some thing it the work of an incendiary; but
■this is scarcely probable,as the building was
securely closed when the occupants left it,a
short time previous; It is more thanlikeiy
that some of thrise erriployed by yogt <fc Co,,
while;unpacking their goods, dropped* a
spark among the loose strew lying arotind,
arid this may. have smouldered for hours be-,
fore bursting info a flame, ; 1 .' ;, ' * ; •
Important * to < Gas" Consumers, —The
gas saving Regulator invented by Dr.
Charles Mi Cresson (late Managing Engi
neer,Philadelphia Gas Works,) is becom
ing quite popular with gas consumers, in
all parts of the United States, and especially
among manufacturers. In one establish- -
“raent in this city a saving of §617; was ef
fected by using the Cresson Gas Regulator,
in three months'. V ,
They are also in great demand for private
dwellings, as they not only effect a saving
in gas bills, but produce a steady, light. "
These Regulators are manufactured; m all
'sizesby Jftwfr&erafcs <6 lEictny, ’ 715 Chesbiut \
street, Philadelphia. ‘,
• 'Again SrcoESSFUE.— The York County
Fair just closed, awarded the first premium
to Will cox & Gibbs for “Best" Sewing
.Machines.” ■■ . ; v; ■’ 1T 5 :
Easy Treatment.—A writer in the Lon- ,
don Field says, that a successful dOg'doctor
in his neighborhood,, who had an extensive
custom amongst ladies of fashion, on retiring
from practicemade the following confession: t,
“When very fat and apoplectic pets were
confided to my care, I always tied ’em,:
said he, Vlo.a crab-tree at the end ot my
garden, and gave ’em nothing hut water for
a week,, "When I fetched ’em from home
they used to refuse to eat what I should
have been glad to get ; and when > I toot em
back they was glad to get what I would not ;.,
hdve touched. • I’ve had some dogs twice;
and even three times a year, but I always
cured ,’em at last. One of ’em was sb good >
as three pound a year to me. I. was. terrible
fond of him, hut he couldn’t abide me; and
when he saw me a coming to fetch down his.
fat, he used to waddle away and howl fit to ;
raise the dead.” ; .c~ i'o
Decapitation by* Steam.—Among the, :
sensational paragraphs about the ParisEx-'
hihition is one concerning a nejvShodel
guillotine invented by a compatriot of Count
Bismarck. The guillotine is capSble’bf cut
ting off six heads per mhinte, and eigbit if
properly handled. The machine is worked
by steam, and the knife,’ instead of falling
straight, cuts with a rotary movement. The
guillotinecanbe ,taken to pieces and put
together again in ten minutes; the engine
wprks the wheels, and the maohine can
steam to the place of execration, and take
the body up to the cemetery afterwards l