The daily Pittsburgh gazette. (Pittsburgh [Pa.]) 1863-1866, October 15, 1863, Image 2

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'I3IIIRSDAY 310 BNING -- --OCT. 15, 1863.
, c - New
Welnkretteat pteUsttre, to-day', to piesemt
ing-tlus Ge.zszra-ta-car aznereus readers in a
new and elegant suit. Wo should hare made
the change some jimb libido hi( for the abso
late impossibility of finding. time do do so,
ambit the pressing engagements of the cent ,
pip. We l e fty also take this sppottanity of
statin g dint the circulation, influence and bu
siness prospects of the aizerra were never
merit *prosporons otrcortragitirthsn . nt the
present. For this we have to thank oar
friends an'd patrons. We shall continue, as
heretofore, to render our paper worthy of that
liberal and increasing support which has ena
bled us to add so lar g ely to oar facilities for
prointing early and'reliablemews,LAus mak
ing every reader and patron of the Glizrrrs an
interested shareholder ill' sdoOoks Wild prim:
To our advertising friends, we hero to say,
that we shell be able to make up for possible
delintiummies whlCh rosy here-occurred ; 4dur
lug the prose upon. our columns, incident to
the e x citing canvass just closed.
The bieaftiliolViciarf.
. . _
are Nll ll . l . iti'sfit4fie_di hiY Itot surprised,
at the result Oftheelections in Pennsylvania
and'Ohio on Tuesday. 'We wore prepared
SOr gi glorious result, although the majori
ties are larger than were expected. We
knew. that the hearts of a largo majority of
our people - beat trae toile Union and the
Government, and that itwasirepossible that
they could supperk - etitelt Men afs reire.r-
DIGILLK and Weonwsnp. We knew that the
leaders of what is called the • Democratic
party had prepared tl platferm upon which
the people would not stand.
'Niter *is there an eredtion *lth turned
more upon principle and less npon men.
The quesiion was Loyalty against Ansloyal
; Liberty against Slavery ; AnIIASAa
LINCOLN against late DAVIS; ; and the result
was just what might have been erpected
—"Loyalty, Liberty and LINCOLN are tri
umphantly sustained.
It is true that the old party name, D=o
cram, which has been so long used and
abused by as arrant political knaves as ever
oxistetl, had a great effect; for such abom
inable principles as were taught by the
Copperhead leaders, under any other name,
I rota not have received one half the votes
that were given on Tuesday to the candi
dates of that faction.
This vote in Pennsylvania and Ohio pus
an end to Copr erheadism in the entire
North. The same spirit which redeemed
these two States will sweep over New York
and Illinois like a hurricane, and leave
SLyxorn, FERNANDO Woon, and their fol
lowers stranded high and dry; or rather,
we might say, sink them, politically, so deep
that they will never come to the surface
again. It will, morever extinguish the last
hope of the rebels, and fill •them with con
sternation and despair. When they see
the people:of the loyal States rallying with
ash unanimity and enthusiasm around the
:thivernment, and to the support of the Pres
ident, they will learn that their long cher
' ished hope, of a divided North were all moon
. Aka% and-thattheir Copperhcadiriends had
..undertaken more than they could :worn-
Nish.
'This Tote is an emphatic endorsement of
thaTtettioir. of. Emancipation, and in
: deed of all s Oo great measures of the Ad
ministration in the prosecution of the war.
It is a declaration that slavery is the-great
enemy _of peace and union,, and that it 0311
perish as the guilty cause of all our Present
calamities. It is an order to the Adminis
-tration to deal with slavery and treason on
radical principles—the only principles that
are truly conservative of every thing that
ought to be conserved.
By this vote the people of these States
have given the best possible assurance to
oar gallant soldiers that they will stand by
them, and -that they have effeetually spiked
the guns of their enemies in the rear. Now
they can go at their enemies in front with
buoyant spirits, and make short work of the
Rebellion.
Now is the time to press on—to strengthen
the army with fresh recruits, and to encour
age them by every token of good will, and
by bountiful contribiationa to their comfort
and well-being, both moral and physical.
and now is the time to lay strong hold of
that Almighty Arm \which has uphold us so
-gloriously through this fearful Conflict, and
for rendering the homage of grateful hearts
to aim,whe has given us the victory over
.our moat subtle and dangerous enemies.
- Tat P/6111DICNT ON THE ZELBS01:121Q1:1311 . 103.
14110 . 1,113111130:41 correspondent of the Now
Ereninsgbst writes on Monday :
~, The President has - been briny WI day, so
`.that he oonid,receiro butfew callers. 110 hoe
.:nearly AnisheChis written ,risply.,:xl the Kis
..4ottri Deleption. Well-informed persons as
:Alert to:darthnt the President will eatiety the
"4elegation, except on - ono .point—the removal
- . :Wfitieh. Schofield. Be will not be removed,
bathe wn! be imorned directly from Washin
g. :tot.' •The'comms4d of the State troops is to
glean to Gen. Sishofield, and Goy: Gamble
. ariU bo'sliorn of moil of his power. ,
•
BrtcriSA T 9 TI/5:549.#4CT. - IV 9
following paragraphs in close proximity in the
:mai/ ..anteneary...:freln 'She: JimattenZ.iplWlLerft
amide up for the last American mail :
" Mashic - thd Endey` tbr the : Sentherti
'States, left London yesterday evening. by the
mail t rain for Paris.
Mr. Jamey 'Buchanan, formeily Minister
-Plenfpptenttary and Envoy Extraordinary' to
ths Court of pt. James from the Unita! States,
iand afterwards President of 'the Rpptisll,,nr
'Arad in London a fow days ago.
Iris tuArtersto l od !hit Itosocrans telegraphs
tollin ,- Wit - Deportment that. be expects agen t
- iliairattratiarcr the enemy soon on his right
link: !Vie" wirpthlng (Aiello. of the enemy
* be., appealed for . In but ono way--,they
;cannot stand wither srintor, and aro making
twist desperito attempt to -win two or throe
- kettles, and thus to secure recognition abroad.
It L the very desperation of their position
whieh.,dtires atom tq great risks.
A LETraz — frocti Mr. Beecher, dalql.
Lon
.don,Bept:33th Ile need not bow:pent
ad bsortm,riit.aottte time yet. Be:had; made
ingagoments to speak in London on the ROth
it4, l aast ntoequenti7 at Llverpool, Manches
ter aid Birmingham . In all probability:he
trill be ready to hove _England - in the, latter
inert of: this month.
TEL "Atm= Trix! r -ple , Englith: Colonel
!Ito writes to Etktektritai'e*asrazinr-annecount
Ittlift:rieeodlitien vita tha: rebel lfmy,. when
it•iuwe its: raid into • Pentreylvanini:sayet
. . .
1 4 112. - Soutbem troops,7bon
• =.tothealsolvegri... *p ; kiic!`;p es , r,lo
lore like pursir_plit.thotkmfoderat.e.ntll
'fors'deiitarti-thst tike robot yell bse s pirtlett
;- jot missit,andahriLyx;priiiitcooCifatttArtitid
'• ; laiiefil - 444. 1 1P44thilirAf , 014 1 eiC'*00115
' pod yelli;ivivig
, . u r. •
•'- - I
'~ a~r,'~.a 4. r x
~ 'j'F F c ~. -2 ' ° c~~t,t 4'lsT'.
Speech of Secretary Chase.
When Mr. Secretary Chase, on Monday
' '. *lied ia - _h,st'uati fiar the trystOr `'sin;- • t"l'itve:at
.),Yashin . to taltesht_g
kihet , ' Ar : en on Aitc a
k,, ,,t4.
mon o . Lusco n ttiate - riesrdZi - tcy, in
3latch,lB6l he was welcomed by the citi
tens of the ;Queen City of .the West with
traly,Wcatetti intitusiaam and cordiality.
At a meeting held during the evening. he
ho made the following speech, - which we
copy from the report-1n the Cincinnati
Gazette:
SPEECH OF Mt. SECILETIRT SALSION P. CITAAE.
After . °&ring a few - renmrksof . an intro
ductory character, apologizing for his unpre
paredness to speak, he went on to say :
4r 4 aro 'engaged .in 4 great. straggle.. Jt
is a struggle brought upon us by no fault of
the peopltof the Utrited States; and when I
say
,by no fault of the people of the United
States, I mean precisely what I say. The
laboring masses, the merchants, the manu
facturers, the mechanicsof the North, hare
had no part in britiging, on this strife. It
is a strife brought on by a conspiracy of the
few to rule the many, and it is simply be
cause they were not willing, .to _trip'. the,
people with their cause that they went to
arms for the purpose-of establishing a do
minion where they could rule blacks .and
whites' serntrelyirotn-the Fideral GOlTrti=
ment. That is all there is of the rebellion.
Now this conspiracy 'la not a recent affair.
Wherever :you: find. an aristocracy ..in the
country, and that aristocracy finds itself
ciiiPreised,by the people, it goes to war with
the people. The difference between our ar
istocracy and the aristocracies that have
warred UpOn the people in other countries
ls, that our aristocracy happened do be es
tablished in certain portions of the country.
They occupied certain States, and, therefore
it was iliac Whe - n - froilltde Otufui 'Air the ar
istocracy to rebel against the democracy,
they succeeded first in carrying out of the
Union the most aristocratic of tilltheStates,
namely,. South .Carolina and then_ South
Carolina was followed by the other aristo
cratic States in succession, until we became
involved in this terrible war.
Now when an aristocracy thui wars on
the democracy, especially if that aristoc
racy be a local aristocracy like ours,
there is nothing for it but to meet•the
challenge which they threw down, or sub
.dtspsemberinen!„. This is the chal
lengepresini to us and you."" The . ques
tion in the West was, shall the aristocracy
rule the 'Nfissisippi; the question in the
East was, shall the aristocracy have the
whole sea coast down to the Gulf; and the
whole country pronounced tmanimously—
This shall not be, And when they went to
war to establish a separate aristocratic go,
ernment. like the monarchical institutiona
of the Old World. thou. we went to war too.
BIECK!
Now, then, the simple question before us,
iscis this country worth n-war? Are the
hopes depending upon the prosperity of
American institutions worth enough to jus
tify us in going to scar .for the nation's
life? Is the life of this nation worth
enough to justify us in going to war? Look
-through the history of man and tell the
where you can find a people involved in a
struggle for a more noble object than that
of preserving a nation's life. We mean to
preserve the life of this nation and the in
tegrity of this nation, too; we mean to make
it-thoroughly impossible in time to come,
that a disaffected faction in any part of the
country can strike a deadly blow at the vi
tality of the country. [Cheers] . That is
all there is of it. and I have, therefore, no
doubt about the issue of this war. I have
thought the issue was certain from the be
ginning that it was simply a question of
endurance. It was a simple question,
whether the great liiilSSefi of the people
could continue to struggle to enable the
Government to subdue the aristocratic por
tion and to prevent them from controlling
the whole laboring portion of the Southern
States, white and black. I have no doubt
about the result. We shall_go on as.ive haVe
Igone oft. It may be we cannot go on as
fast as we desire. .1 . sliould liare been very
' glad myself if we could have stricken this
rebellion down in tho first six months.
Sometimes I thought it might have been
done, but it has turned out that we could
not yet, and the war has gond on with vary
ing'snecesses until - riche.. At last we hare
the positions that are certainiobring suc
cess. I suppose all military men will agree
that the military occupation of East Ten
nessee must necessarily control the issue of
the war. If the rebels could take possession
of that great valley and bold it permanently
and send out theirartaies from that locality.
; then we could not hope for success in the
long run. It is just as certain, now that
we have that, volley,of - .F4totTertuessee, that
great mountain region, and hold it, just as
certain is it a• question of time whether
this rebellion shall be put down or not. We
shall just as certainly succeed as time rolls
on, because we have that great internal
fortress, and all we have to do is to send
our armies from it. Besides we have the
complete control of the Mississippi river,
the commercial possession of the river, soon
to become complete by the advance of our
army. Everybody can see that the party
I that bolds the Mississippi holds the control
of the Mississippi Valley, and, we hold to
day-virtually the-control of Iliat.valley.
Now, what remains? Gen. Gillmore, one
of Ohio's sons, is now constructing his bat
teries in front of Charleston; and that
Charleston must fall is as certain as that
Fort Wagner was to fall before Gilmore. I
consider, therefore, my -fellow-citizens, that
the rebellion is virtually subdued—l
know it is not actually subdued. The) ,
have largo armies'in the field, but ours hre
vastly stronger. Everywhere our armies
are stronger than they are. Therefore I re
gard the rebellion as virtually snbdued.
But I think-tbouglt it is not my business
to speak confidently of these things—l
think, with the very slender lights I possess
on thus subject, that with energetic, resolute
conduct, with the whole head and the whole
heart of the nation thrown into it, that this
rebellion will he brought to a close tolerably
quickly..
ALAVERT AND Mg EMANC4PATIMN PROGLA.
Now, my, fellow,eitizenA I pin not going
to make a speeigrbui T will go over some of
the- heads -that•appear most prominent to
my cAt:iityitfiv, I'haveabown.yolt what land
ista.warsei hatro 1i414612.0wn you where
wo:stand in the work-allow-me to say an
othek thing to 'you. `lt _wile one of the most
imiititillithigitin the 'World, tliiit wljeu the
wiz' began WO multi:tam to Aft through
with it without ins - turtling the institutiop
of Slavery e Ll ltte,ofter; ii,poketi to you in
Cincinnati and you all know what my feel
,'
tp:ate,-fonintalnit.thiii tame maximal)
when I spoke to you ten years ago.
It watt - very Simple and very plain, that
Shivery - depended for its existence outside
of those Statesupon the national will, which
is Simply; saying 'your will and my will; '
that Slavery outside,of those States should
not exist antagthilstic'to I}.le labor. 'But
with Shivery in South Carolina, we in Ohio
had nailing to dci, - Cidll - fis JIM as much
averse to any interference with anything
within the limits of other States. Although
I the institution and condemn It,
yet I was jllOl, as much averse to any inter
ference with it as I Should be with their
interference. with our institutions here in
Ohio. That was my. doctrine ; ' and se when
this rebellion commenced it would have been
extremely agreeable tome if we could have
put our foot upon the snake.l mean the re
bellion—and crushed' (Edit- without any
further trouble. - But,while I greatly desired
that, :and had Ibeen general-ia-chief I should
hive attempt e d , in an 'ikWkWard Xo so.
nomplish.§till weall know the mebellion
wont on, and assumed greater. and_greater
proportions. We put ,grittter4tid greater
armies into the field, but, the slavarpritti
tion of ilie - SiititrenfkilieliMaiirop of the
rebellion—mising.iprovisions for the army
while. it .wint.,.sotptig it},tho tieltly.so that
theykiMuld•fi3iv4tedy mtieli ail t6eirlblioid
ing P92 1 4 1 0 1 .9 - Vedkifr u iliktb,ay had spotler 'shor ing'.. lsv oa uo t and
• .
~_,..,-..,_ T i r ~ Sir ~~ x~-M r'r~ - ;.5,-~ ~.wc;`a3a~~x
I:.~S~~xLFKIr c~..~:v:L>ti~t,'~'w..el.9l~i~"F Af
them-to feed and support them; and there
fore it appeared evident, especially as we
had to depend srpcorthefilatink in tho Bluth
for incantation - -for orir armies,:::and'the
whole array was.tio deraorallied thit ihey
were the only friends our armies ehuld firid
when the) passed tiAitgii."
say, perfectly clear that we had to strike at •
this under propof the rebellion, and so,
when President Lincoln thought fit to issne
his prod oration. I said
. amen, with all nth
heart. [Tremendous applause.]
It was never Intended to interfere with
the States that were loyal. The proclama
tion
comes up as a great feature in this war.
In my judgment the proclamation was the
right thing in the right place, and without
it, I am just as sure as I am of my own ex
istence, that We could not have made the
progress we have madq and I hold the man
who denounces the proclamation, either
speaks ignorantly of that of which he
knows but little or nothing, or else he re
ally desires that the rebellion should succeed.
[Loud applause.] There is no alternative.
The rebellion would have succeeded but for
the proclamation; he opposes it because he
does not understand it, or because he wishes
the rebellion to succeed. But then, say
some, you are making war upon the people
of the South. and you will not let them
come back into the Union with their slaves.
Well, now gentlemen, there are two classes
of States in the South; there is the class of
States affected by the proclamation. We
have simply nothing to do except to bid God
speed to the unconditional Union men of
thhie 'States. They will do their own work
in their own way, and in their own time,
[applause] and all we have to do, is to stand
by them. But in the States which are af
fected by the proclamation, the case is dif
ferent. Either the proclamation . was .a
great, monstrous sham and an imposition in
the face of the whole world, or else that
proclamation was an effectual thing, and
there are no slaves to-day in the rebel
States. [Lend Cheers.] They are all en
franthised oy the proclamation, for what
says it, all the shires are declared now and
forever free, and the executive power is
pledged to the maintenance of this freedom,
If it were not so, it would be a national im
posture, and I would no more be guilty of
that piece of infamy than I would steal into
your house at night and rob sour pantry.
[Laughter and cheers.] But whet have we
to do with this proclamation in the
slave States? It is a very simple
thing. Just simply recognize the Union
men who remain in those States. Such
men as Durard, Mr. Flanders, and Mr. May,
and a whole host of others who were known
as slaveowners, are now satisfied that the
Union men of the South must see to it, that
Slavery must never bo permitted to be re
established in those States.
Take such a man as the lion. Mr. Ander
son: When he went home and stood up for
the Union, what. did the slave aristocracy
do for him? They drove him from the
State, and his wife and little ones were
obliged to take shelter in the bushes, and so
with multitudes of Union men in Texas at
the present day, but all of them wish to get
back and establish a free State in Texas, be
cause they say no other than a free State
can ever protect them from the enemies of
freedom, and, I was going to say, of human
nature. [Cheers.] Again, in Florida there
were many who were driven, away who are
now anxious to return. Is there a man here
who wants these noble, generous Union men
of t' e South to go bock to be trampled un
der foot by restored rebels? [Cries of No,
No.] Let them go back, but let them go
back under the tees of the American Union,
with the protection of the Government
pledged to them, [cheers] and then they will
take care to settle this question of Slavery.
They trill amnia the Constitution so as to
put the Slavery question where it ought to
be. When that is done, who is going to
talk about the proclamation ? You have
here, my fellow citizens, an intelligent state
ment, as it seems to me, of the manner in
which this thing can be settled, simply by
standing by the unconditional Union men,
who almost all of them have embraced the
doctrine of emancipation in the border
States. and standing by the Union men In
the pro-Shivery• States, and letting them
protect themselves against the institution of
Slavery. We hare heard a good deal about
popular sovereignty. Is not that the beat
popular sovereignty to let the people pro
tect themselves against, what they conceive
to be evil? How simple all things are when
we come to test them by the plain light of
reason ?
FORMS STYPATIIT WIER SEE REBELS
As might have been expected, this war
has attracted the attention of the whole
world. Evirywhere, throughout the whole
world, despotism and aristocracy are in
sympathy with the rebellion. Despotism
and aristocracy do not like a great and
flourishing republic. The 'English aristoc
racy and the French despotism would natu
rally like to see the country broken up.
Then there is another ground for sympathy.
Despotism naturally sympathizes with des
potism, aristocracy naturally sympathizes
with aristocracy, and the despotism of
whole world sympathize with the aris
tocratic, and the despotism that they
expected to build up in the Southern
States. Therefore it is that they have nat
undly been against us. You know what
has been done in England; you know that
a great deal of sympathy has been mani
fested for the South; but just in proportion
as we advanced, partly through the Procla
mation and partly through the success of
our armies, the sympathy has become less
available, and just to proportion as we
carry this war on will, they think less and
less of interference with us. lam asked
now and then what I think of intervention,
and while I am here among my old friends
in Ohio, I can tell you what I think myself.
It is this: If we are weak they will inter
fere, but when despotism sees we are strong,
it will slink away. [Applause.] I think
we have demonstrated some strength in the
field. What nation before ever maintained
such armies in the field, and was so lavish
of its strength?
We are showing our strength to the na
tions of the earth, there will be no danger
whatever of intervention. There will ho
no danger because it will notpay. [Cheers.]
It is true that Great Britain has behaved
very unneighborly. We used to think this
great Anglo-Saxon family was to stand to
gether the world over to establish freedom
of the press, freedom of the ballot-hex, free
dom of thought, freedom of speech, and
freedom for all ; but, of late years, we have
seen manifestations of a very.nnkind and
unfriendly spirit; and sometimes, I have
felt. as if I wanted to take pld mother Eng
land by the hair and give her a good shak
ing. [Loud laughter and-applansel Pam
not sure that this ix the wisest plan; but of
this I feel tolerably sure; that England Will
not send any more pirate ships out against
us; and I think when England thinks the
matter over calmly—when she reflects of
the Alabama, fitted - out in a British port,
manned by British seamen, armed by Biit
ish guns, and over since roving over the
seas, plundering merehant vessels, without
brihging a single one into any, port—when
they come to look over these things, they
will conclude it is best to pay Ito American
Merchants for all the pillage the Alabama
has don't). [Loud-cheers.] • •
TUE TRENCH IN MBXICp-7 . 1107 Tlll4 ITTriE
We have got a sort of new empire upon
our borders in Mexico. Well, gentlemen, I
am not mneh disturbed about that. Empires
will not last long in Central America.
[Cheers.] I don't know how long this em
pire,—if It gets born—will last. There was
an attempt to make an empire in Mexico
some time ago, and if I am not mistaken
was no great success.' I do not know that
this - Austrian Emperor will find his bed of
roses there, bet I am strongly inclined to
think that tile' roses wllibe very fee and
the' bed very hard. [Cheers , and , —Lend
Laughter.] lam willing tointetto
tore,. itUd. 1.4 m _perfectly.. jure, tatting: all
things Into consideration,,thattheEnropean
monarchs. will, in the end; think it best to
keep Allakisiiiitutions stlvinie lam .conti
denvot [Cheers.] Ido not plveelev any
peallehlermeseure just noir. ,11 Je • nein
wise to announce what you are going to do
a great while in advance of doing it, but I
tbittic thetiemerai !come:, theu,thOztfZ
trio iicatkildetAltese thin'
! Itepuhlic ottrati wilt b - blishettfrenv
thetUf;fo tranfthePoie r bnd frail the ..91;1;
loath' ( to the—Peeift . e•,-hasid %till, - freed.
and free labor; gathering strength from our
tursent contest, nod rising from it gander
than ever. [Cheers.] I think the time will
cetne when this nafion, so regenerated and_
so renovated,' trill command the aspect of
the world, and people will begin to regret
that they thought it was best to be un
friendly to us When we were weak. [Cheers.]
Now, my fellow-citizens, one word fur
ther'. I have spoken a word or to upon the
regeneration of this nation. Just think of
it; free labor is better than slave labor.
Now suppose there was fret labor all
through the South, do you not think the
manufacturers of Cincinnati would have a
great deal more employment than they have
now? Don't you think that all this trou
ble about tho negro would come to an end,
when the negro could go down;toward the -
Gulf, and find himself free there, and be
employed there a hired laborer?
Now many do you think Would be loft in
Ohio to interfere with you or with me?
Would not that question be settled 7 Would
not all the heart-burnings that grow out of
it come to an end, and with free labor de
veloping the resources of that soil would we
not be stronger than ever? And when we
add to that the removal of this great element
of strife and contention front our country,
and freedom everywhere prevailing—no
man obliged to work unless his employer
will give him honest wages, and every man
willing to work to build up the glorious fab
ric of our prosperity, do you not think we
should be economically and politically vast
ly stronger than we ever have been hereto
fbre ? I think, therefore, this rebellion will
come to an end, and that we are to have a
great nation based upon the universal prin
ciple of free labor made homogenous in all
its parts, and capable of playing a mighty
part in the drama of human affairs.
[Cheers.]
When I look at this, and I remember
"there's a Providence that shapes our ends,
rough-hew them as we may," when I re
member there is a Providence that presides
over the destinies of nations—and all na
tions are but dust in the hollow of his hand,
to be shaped as he pleases—l feel, even
should I be deemed by some superstitious,
that God has a hand in all this business; and
out of this great, trial of ours is to come
forth a free, intelligent, prosperous, and
glorious nation, based upon one principle,
and challengingihe admiration of the world.
[Cheers.]
Thinking thus, I have been laboring in
my humble way, to du something toward
securing the permanence of a reconstructed
republic, and I thought that if labor was
to have its just reward, it was necessary to
have something in which that reward could
be paid, which -was substantial and perma
nent and uniform throughout the whole
country. [Loud cheering.] And so I set
my poor wits to work, to try to devise a
uniform currency for this country. [Great
applause.] I 'Would not think much of a
uniform currency if we were not going to
have a unitbrm people. I would not think
much of one currency, if we were not going
to have One republic; but if we are going
to have one republic, based upon free labor,
then I want sodiethin by which that free
labor can be rewarded, and by which that
reward shall be as safe as the nation is safe.
[Cheers.] I think, gentlemen, that I have
one: something toward that, and it will be
reward enough for nut if, at the close of this
great struggle, I can think by constant ef
fort I contributed at all to the progress of
our armieti, or to the safety and honor and
welfare of the country, during that strug
gle, or after it shall have closed. [Cheers.]
=BEM
Now, my fellow-citizens, I have given
you not a speech, but a rough outline of
ideas as they present themselves to my own
mind. If I had time, I could, perhaps, put
them into better shape; but I hove given
them to you as they weal-zed to me. But
the simple question is, whether you believe
: that this is a country worth saving: whether
: if youbelieve that this Republic is worth
restoring-, whether if you believe that it is
well for the world that• America shall live;
whether you will, yourself, do . your part?
How gloriously you have done it thus far.
flow readily you have came forward with
your resources! Row promptly you have
sent your sons and brothers to battle! How
nobly they have gone! How gloriously
they bare fought! What undying names
they have inscribed upon the roll of their
country's history ?You have done your part
well, thus far. God bless the army! [En
thusiastic shouts and cheers.] God bless
the glorious people who have thus far nobly
sustained it I And shame and dishonor to
the men, whoever he may be, who will re
fuse, by his vote or his voice, to sustain it
to-morrow (Loud cheers.]
My fellow-citizens, the whole world will
look upon yon. Why, hardly a number of
the London Times comp out in which there
is not an article upon the success of Mr.
Vallandigham, and their assurance of the
termination of this struggle in the separa
tion of these States. Hardly a paper comes
out in Paris that has not something about
this same thing; and the Russians, too, who
are gathering upon our coast, to keep their
vessels in a convenient place, if they are
needed—everywhere they are looking to
you. They want to know whether you will
stand firm; whether Ohio is to give her
voice for the Union; whether Ohio will
stand by her troops in the field; whether
Ohio will remember the glorious and honor
able men who have fallen. I feel sure that
everything you can do will be done to-mor
row, and I should feel as if I should be in
suiting you by an exhortation. You know,
just as well as I do, the mighty Issues that
hang upon your vote. Yon will do your
duty; I am sure ofit; and when to-morrow's
sun goes down, it will go down upon a peo
ple resolved to free themselves, and to
maintain - the freedom and unity of this
Government.
PUBLIC
Enettartno 800 orYtrrainnou,
October 15t ,18G3.
THE ELECTION FOR DIREC'T
- ORS of thhi Bank bo held at the Dank
fog on MONDAY, Nirromber 19th, DM, be
tween the boon of eleven it. to. nod 2p. to. The an.
noel meeting of Stockhohloth will tako -place on
TUESDAY, November 3d, at 1.1 a.
octtelta ' ' • - MURRAY, Cashier.
AMIfI:IDIERtIB.IWEVEA'Tig.
PINE "APPLE CHEESE, vary. choice
JL also imliation.Rdslieli Meese Pitt method and
for rale at t h e Family Grocery Store of
ear.. JOHN A. RENSHAW.
WANTED -3. Dan ,CLasa Boor-
Y IMP' ; ono who bin ipracticel.knowtodge,
sad onn come WeU recommended.
Address, BOX G 24. Poet se22;tf
WAREHOUSE FOR SALE.—A three-
TTeery. Briek Warebuqie and lot of ground on
dralthileld street bet* er n 'That and Water streets.
oel4 S. ut culla:l,lo7ol,ra Market at.
Bt'' ER I FRESH BUTTER-3 bbLs.
prime fresh Roll Beater jtut revolved and !be
sale at No. 120 Second street.
0014 • VtA,/qc.. 1. 4 1 5 G9IIIIBB.
L EA THER BELTING.—.IO,IXX, feet of
the Patent Blest 0 Jr 'rained Lamas! Belting.
Also, Lace Leather, 1 Leta, ac., always on hand and
Of .10 allios. 20 and A 3 Et • Mile street, bv •
' J. & Pill'LLlPit;
WOOD 'STREET :PRDP.ERTY FOR
BALE, 73 1.4 v tacb. !font Uy GO foot lo
depth, al corner of 81415 sue/es. 'Also, MN foetal-
Joining the ohne.-8. CUTHBERT b SON&
.14 3birkee stosel,
TURK,EY . PRII,Y44,, very abe;:just m,.colvoa; ISvniesh,r, gum Ina.
for tr. the vihnd or at wholeettle, Mid* /*Vail,'
Oruro thorn of JOITN RENSERI%
bah - !-• • - Corner Ltherty,and Rand streets.
AABP LOST.—Broke away from
J1'6041404 tbe4ubserlber, in Allegbaar CDT,
on Monday evening, • valuable COTSWOLD DAD
: LAUD. A liberal reward wit be given fel-Inform ,
Oen that will lend to ita • -
neTDSee. j. EfultAlailLiva
HERAIRTICALY
.::.r 2 sa cae d. N i b ,potbbi; .7* Aliple t
Ettnirbenlitt p ,Tiftaar*, ,tirocn Com," Llnis
Beate, Okos,l3aeroteatran Attrelit* . jusi, A*6l';
ed imdt:ir Vale by itirdoteetwat huar:_bt; '
.u, .1 a,,,;4• 44) alric
~_..,•••.v::', : ••?:•'.:4- ..- • • -i•• •.:'_•:-:.--...,W,1iif:::•....;::.'.,.art.'-•i•-.-4,',-.7.•-4,19,Ag.,..3,,r4;:i.4.-iiti..'4.:•••:,'....,:-"•?..:F.-.•
, .
,i;:-..;-.,:.t),!"',-,:4:1...,Y,T-:-,--;::::-.,Cii;i1,,.,0,'•-.•',67, * 4.!- . ,4,-.- ' 4,-;,--4,,,, ; - '> : ;• 44, ..: -,14 . 4 --_,4!,,,„."•:,•:::•,! ,, t - ,.„:•i'',1q± .. ,,...71,,,,,,,, : ,
,',-:f,Atagi.t--e14,•;1.,•,10.4..40.12.ZZ...Z•ii04,47,..^,..,i-.4'-'7-,•-v.:4:4.4•&dg-,...'-ay05i*,•Wer,174:7:4,3-41-Q•14.'1,•,--
AMP' AO VCR TISEME.I7.B.
NTI, - N115,..4T
itECUON.44iht Tr: Y EVEN IS Oct.
the Cumni,rtial Sale* Wont.,
No. :,,frXittli ktreel,":11111 sold i
Atteo,ny Coitstv IL.nd,, fro 'from T.
DATIS,A Mr ILWA IN E. Awe re.
NI 1 N IST HA T 1 /I{)4 SALE OF
I - 1 STOCK.—On TV MIA 17 EVEN I NG, On. =nil,
it 7+4 eclat, will be told, at the Commterrial Sales
Ite.Oao, No. 54 Fifth sliver:
10 ekerea Gkrman Trait k Savings flank.
._0r1.3• . DA di VLS• McIL W AIN E . . tart's.
PST TE OF 1)H. FR(NCLI 31c
.1:4 GRATH, DF.C'D.—Letters of Administration
on the Potato of Jr. If..llcOmith, late of sPittalrargh,
&mensal, hrivhnit 'been granted to the andenrigned,
ill persons kering claims aro requested to present
them, and all who are indebted are Ired to make
payment to TERESA McGRATII, Adm'x,
ad7:latvtlilt• Second street, Pittebergh.
I)APER AND ENVELOPE WARE
/. HOCSE.—Juat opened, • bugs stock of
NOTE, LETTER AND CAP PAPERS.
Alm, ENVELOPES. in great varieties, color. and
qUaliti., for every taste. For 410 by
W. G. JOHNSTON A CO., Paper Deniers.
orl49nw-vrisM 57 Wood street.
ICE FOR SALE.
100 to 200 Tons Good Pure Ice,
For sale by
LEESE & PRENTISS,.
Cleveland, Ohio
IF YOU WISH. u; preserve your CIDER
procure the PG&E BIILPHITH of LIMA used
to arrest fermentation in Cider, and than to pntserre
its sparkling properties. For sale in bades oontaln
ing l 0 oz. each, with full directions for using, at
GEC/. KELLY'S, Central Dreg Store,
oc7 In Market Howe, AllelalmiY•
2 500 WILL
4?' •rRCHASE A Viuni
DESIRABLY. TWO STORY BRICE
WALLING of olgbt ISOM.. Iltlelysl attic, hall,
largo basernont, &r. Lot 24 by 91 foot ; n r0pf...1
by Anthony Wetzel as a tin shop, WIN, No. 195
Pontoryllanla Arena., Applr to
G. S. BATES, Commotoi.l Broker,
on'
Butler street, Laarrenenrilln.
A NOTHEIt RICHMOND LN
LI. MELD.—We aro now prepared to furnish Cap
tains and owners of Steamboats with STEAM
GINES, of any size and stroke. We will furnish all
the machinery of • boat, and second In point of ex
cellence tp none. • We hope, by our promptness in
touting up to time, and the quality of our work, to
share the patronage of our own river men.
11. M. BOLE.
roll Bank of Allegheny River.
r "HE PARTNtYR.SHIP heretofore ex
feting under the name utdstyle of JONES, OUR-
Tie it CO., le title duy dboulred bTmnrnnl consent.
All of the huelnoes of the late firm will lte settled by
W. B. JONES, late of add Drub who alone Is author
trod and reeponsible for mole.
[Signed] C.IICRTIS
•
J. W. GUERNSEY,
W. B. JONES.
Pittsburgh, Oct. Pth, IE4I oc10:30
ICOLLISTER & BAER, Wholesale
Tobacco Deakin, 108 WOOD STREET, hare
now in afore the largeat and moat comploto aaort
moot of
TOBACCO, CIGARS AND PIPES
In the city, *lath they are selling •t the very lo
M cuh Ilipana. All orders promptly attended to.
0014
GW. DASH, MERCHANT TAILOR, No.
. 04 SMITHFIELD STREET, will .011 cheap
for cash a good 'UNION SUIT FOR 03);
MERE, LLK. wooc, $25: BLACK CLOTH SLIT, $35.
A suit of cloth made in Metro hours, at
G. W. DASH'S,
9 ' 16 91 Smlthficht,trt.4
FOR BALK
TWO SECOND-HAND ENGINE&
One Minch cylinder, 4% Poet etroke.
One 7 Inch • alc; ••
Four net of Boring Took, now and very uno‘i,
Cheap for cub. H. X. BOLE,
eelft:tf near the Point
. _
AMIPTANT tivatcruestaarraCa °nuns, )
4. , orner G and‘2":.(l , streets,
Washington D. C., Sept. 26th, 11163 c)
WILL BE - SOLI) AT PUBLIC A
TION on the FIRST, SECOND AND THIRD
WEDNESDAYS, 7th, 14th and 21st of October, at
the Corral,. near The Washington Obsenatory, a
large lot of HORSES and MUL&, condem.d se ea
fit for public service. Sale to conunence at to o'cick
Terretseb, in:thrrernment fonds.
seSilitti CHAS. GARRETSON, A. Q. M.
ALIA.IIIiENY AVENUE.—AII per
sons Interested are hereby notified that the un
dersigned, Viewers appointed to view and mew the
damage. and benefit. arising from the proposed open
log of Allegheny Avenue from the north line of
Ridge street to Island Lane, will meet on the line of
said street, lbw the parpoeise of their appointment, on
SATURDAY, Oct. 12th, 1863, at 2 &clerk p. In.
JAMES IlleA ELA 5,1
JOUR DEAN, Viewers.
ea:2w JAM RICIIET,
(ilia/J.I,ES L. C A LDWELL,
iStteeemsor to Jame* 110Imee d- C.
PORK PACKER
Dealer in BACON, LARD. SUGAR CURED Ildipid
HAWKED BEEF, de.,
CURER MARKET AND FIRST STREETS,
0c,17:17 Prrtsetacu, FA
A large amortment of POCKET AND COUNTING
HOUSE DIARIES, for 1864-4 n raper, in cloth, in
roan, In imitation Turkey, in Turkey Morocco—
with gilt edges and with marble edger—with socks,
patent claims and elactic faeteninge. All slam, and
from the commonest to the eery beet. For wale al
reasonable r►t. by
W3l. G. JOHNSTON A CO., Stationery,
ocl4L3aw-wren 17 Wood street.
BRIVANNI& AND BRASS WORKS
COLLINS & WRIGHT,
(Bo,,ctli.i4:mi to Orin Nowtott.)'
Slannfeetaren of CASTOR FRAMES, MUCEL CEPS,
LADLES, and a greid satiety of BRITANNIA
articles. Also, CARBON OIL LAMP BURNERS
and LAMP BRASSES generally, No. Ma Second
street, Pittsburgh.
WEIL A STONEMAN,
MANTTACTTKEES OF WIRE WORE,
Rare always on hand and nuke to order IRON AND
BRASS SCREEN WIRE CLOTH; SIEVES, Id all
kinds; aimpLirs. for Foundry sae; HEAVY
WORK FORvirmbows, Av. ; BIRD CAGES, OR
NAMENTAL WIRE WORK, for Plower, Sc,
RE' AU attn. of WIRE for Bab, at
fiMmx FOITILTIF STIMET.
ForTHE FALL OF 1863.
200,000 APPpE TRES,
Extra Ilno-2, 9, 4 and 5 years old.—lnciading all the
old leading varieties, and many new once. ,
Alm, a very large neck of PEAR, (standard and
dwarL) CHERRY; PEACE, PLUM. EVERGREEN,
SHADE AND ORNAMENTAL TREES, - ROSPA,
GRAPE VINES, SHRUBS, GREENHOUSE
PLANTS, itc., km, wholesale and retail at very rea
sonable prices. • JOAN MURDOCH, Jr.,
milhdmeir Pittsburgh and Oakland Numerics.
rTMETH EXTRACTED WITHOUT
PALN.—We take this method of Informing oar
friends and the pubic,. generally that we are now
prepared to EXMACt TEETH. WITHOUT PAIN
in the practice of Dentistry. Those who have been
postponing this tench dreaded operation may now lay
aside their ilmrs and give is a call, as triotiPPlmilw,
we hare In me hasheentheroncy tested oaring the
p ast four yearn establish the safe and pain
lees character of the operation. Drugs or Chemi
cal. nor Galvanio Danny wed. AG those wishing
the sersices of a good and reliable Dentist will do
well to pall and consult with .
JAMES & RING, D. D.
No. 9 Fifth
or, Dn. C. KING, No. 47 Smithfield " 7
street, Pmeet,
itts
tough. JeCalimass
RUSSIA.N PEBBLE SPECTACLES.
Notwithstanding the attacks 'of Pilots
spectacle Venders, who lupins to ilk:mimeo( OA
man, the
RUSSIAN PEBBLE SPECTACLES,
Are remising daily the warmest endonementa ot h er
citizens. All that la asksdla to examine all
lithettecle ; then tall and' bxamlne the RUSSIAN.
PEBBLE. onm. For aide by
J. DI.AMOND,PmtIeaI Optleim,
Ifehuhtetttrar of the litoselan Pebble Spectacles,
30 FM limit, Morning Fait Building
INE I'ENNY SONG BOORR
NOW our,
Containing 108 of Atte latch and most
POPULAR SONGS!
'ALL FOE FIRE CENTH—ONS CENT EACH.
Mollod,:pcot-psl3, on meolpt of two 3 rent ramps.
Addrms all order, to Imre prompt attention, to
• .TO/Elf P. EMIT, Publisher.
orb . .3fASOITIC tIALL, TTPTIIsinEET.
SAAC C •
OUTLET SA.N.V MILLS,
ALLECMIniT CITY,
Keeper - e - utitantls on hand • huge ned tW al ?
pawned sleeker DECKING; BOAT AND
RUNK, WLIDOW mars BMM
_L
IRO BOIIBILLN J OHNS,- OPOOTINO; RANREi PAL:
.% do., he., de.
H. will -MI orders- for -RAINED STRIP with
promptnas. and at Air, rates. •
N. B. 3msena WantinglONGll eir POP
LAR ar• partlealary Wiled to mains Ws stoat.
stadtr OrOma on Craig strwkassar Rtelneu ,
,i! :TILL
AMU' .1111•ERTISEZIE4MTS.
Tilit_FALL STOCK lao •
l) .". :5Elv rroacos, l ,, , ~.
AiTkog oilier , Apletund ST AY
pLeit is, Ili b,.t. Ptirx. hille, vw,Yrld.:
1 CAL ENBEIIG'S :F. N. Pit : NOB;:thot twin 11.0 s
'.4 dm ,•••••1. In the corm", •...--i•
yrktE - rro. - s - IY . , y. rlSlNO.:ll2Taeopmr Piss.
Ik•ti tknyst - 1,,,
H. KLY.BER S BRO., No. G 3 Fifth stmt,
Sole Agenis !hi ald'alove
CLO.‘ Iv,
Jit•l rervilod, par Adana. & Co.'s Elpross,
.1 FINE LOT OF CLOAKS,
13=1
pit - Est:it v E YOUR CIDER
THE SULPHITE 01 LIME,
Ihar,rered by Prof. Iforsford, trill pro•ent CLlsr from
toa-alng sour, and also greatly Improve Its quality.
In Forties suffleront fur a barrel, of Cider, with full
directions for use .
For sale In
SDIO SOIMSTON
Cvmer Fonrth and Smith&4d gtreeta
rpliE DRAFT.—Persons who are_ draft
ed, who are entitled to exemption for moos
laid down In the Conscription Art of 31arch 3, 166.3,
or who wish to be relieved by thn payment of S3OO,
frees this present drlft, or sigh to procure...6l4llot°,
to take their pls.:stirring the sear, will and it to their
advantage to call on me, as I am fully prepared with
blanks, Sr. J. K. 31011A315E.,
So. 107 Fourth street, near Smithfield.
JyAilawier.
JOSEPH SNOWDEN,
NOTAiZ-v Frti LI I C
co. SO • DI_kiIICIN D STREET, CITTADVIIOII
Acknowledgment. of. Deed., Dopoeitlons and AM
davits taken. Also, Deed.. Mortgagee, Articles of
Agreement, Leuses and Legal Papers of every kind
ALBUMS '
N large narartnregt nt
PITTOCK'S,
FA",T
13=1
prrroOrs,
CARTES DE VIATE!
IMEEMETEI
PITTOPIPS,
OPPOSITE TILE i'OST OFFICE.
NEGLEY NURSE RY.-Z-ROSES,
SHADE AND ORNAMENTAL TREES,
SHILrBS, VINES and EVERGREENS; WILLOW,
(basket and the ornamental oslen,) ; FRUIT TREES
and harbacinua pintail, all In great quantity and VS.'
riety. BOURDON, CHINA, TEA: and NOISETTE
ROSES, at the low prim of 81.5 per hundred, If or
dered before Trotting time; nod all other Nursery
sleek of the host quality, and at rodnoed pile., in
order to dose nut during the present Fall and next
Spring. Inquireof
_ .
C. B. iiEELEY. a 7 %mond +trx•t
or T. A. MELLON, on the prolniee,
se.W.lnnlon
NTANHOOD ! HOW LOST! HOW
A. RESTORED!—Iust published, in • sealed en
velope. Price Six Cents. Li Lecture on the Nature,
Treatment and Radical Cum of Spsxmaturrhma, or
Seminal Weakness, involuntary Emission, Sexual
Debility, and impediments to Marriage generally;
Nem:mimes., Consumption, Epilepsy and Pits; !left
tal and Physical Incapacity, resulting from Self-
Mame, etc., by ROrrr..l. ectrationott, M. D., autliaor
of the "Greco [Wok, do. ...I Boon to Thousands:of
Sufferers," sent under seal, in a plain envelope, to
any addrers, post-paid, on receipt of six cents or two
postage stamps, by DR. C. KLINE,
Bowery, New York, Poet W.' Dos 458 G
seler-UmilavrT-1.
J - 011.ti HALL a: Co.,
VALLEY FORGE PLOW WOEXS,
PITTSBVIIGII,.I%I
Manufacturers and dealer. in air the different kinds
of PLOWS, PLOW. CASTINGS, SCOOPS, CUT
TLNG BOXES. etc. With greatly incremod
doing business, we earnestly invite dealers to
giro um a call. Manufactory, Temporancovillc.
Warrbonoe, Corns alley and Liberty St., rittab'gh.
JOHN HALL,
T. J. HALL,
STEPHEN WOODS,
ect , am JAS. J. BROWN.
PHOTOGRAPH ALBUMS!
All at) prim!, muss and qualltion
The Cheapest and Best in the City,
HUNT'S,
MASONIC HALL, FIFTH STREET
Deb
$llO BOUNTY.
Colored Reernits Wanted,
AT O. 63 WOOD STREET.
For the EIGIITII REGIMENT E. B. COLORED
TROOPS, which la no* forming at Camp William
Penn, nom Philadelphia, Pa. Pay, Clothing and
Rattans the same at whim toldient
. .
Transportation will be forolahed upon application
to the underatcpull, to aquaria of men of say somber.
Capt T. 8 BETAILESS,
RECRUITING orrwra.
NEAP CASTLE AND BEAVER VAL
LEY BAILMOAD.—On and after MONDAY,
the sth lust., (and mall further notice) trains on the
N. Ck 13. Y. IL L. trill connect at MonunrCcal Sta.
(lon with the mail train on the P., F. W. A C. IL. W.,
leaving Pltieburgh at 7a. is. Also, with the Crest-
Una Accommodation, leaving Pittsburgh at 2;30 P. in.
Through tickets for New Castle, Sharon, Mercer,
Franklin and Oil City, can be procured at the Ticket
eke of the Pittsbnrgh, Fort Wayne ,t Chicago Hall
way Company, in Pittsburgh.
WSL D.DICKSON, Passenger Agent.
New Castle, Fa„ Oct:A, D3CS, °cPi2w
UNIVERSAL CLOTHES IVRL's;GER
V —goad tho following notice from do, Now York
Otrierter,
"The Caressed Clothe. Wriager.—lt is adapted (or
tow everywhere and for everything that le wished,
from the moot delicate fabric to the thick bed-quilt.
It is a decided • institution.' We have stored In dif
ferent apartments any number and variety of mesh
ing machinea, tucks., because Bridget always dote
the meshing, and _Bridget mitt est em 'the like of
them.' We had Wen enough of the 'Wringer' to
know It wee an excellent, article, and we took It
home, and when Monday came we brought out the
'Wringer' end fastened it on thoside of the tub, for
em. Bridget looked on, and when we had adjusted
and exhibited Its mucking penmen, we received the
important advice a' You'd better save your money
than lay It out on Bleb things ea them.' We obtain
ed the promise, however, that it should be tried, and
when we inquirer at evening for the result, Bridget
mu in ecstacy with the • Wringer,' and every week
hasgin'a it a allwoger hold upon the allhutions of
the inmates of the laundry.'
For emio at Nos. 26 and 28 St. Clair street by
J. a H. runaas,
ods • Bete 'Agents for thle county.
xiON. WILSON AI'CANDLESS, Judge
of the United States; Circuit Court, President.
Con. PENN AND ST. CLAM STREETS,
Prrnsorian,
The largest, cheapest and beat,
$3.5 pay• for • fullCoromorclal ooune.
No extra clones far Weeefeetorets, Steamboat;
Railroad and Bank Book-keeping.
Ministen' was at ontehall prim.
/bedews sinter and renew at any time.
This institution le conducted by experienced
Teachers and practical Amonntants, who prepere
your men for active business, at the Mist expense
and shortest time, for the moat lucrative and respon
eible situation*. Diploma' guitsted for merit Only.
Hens the traiverial preUrence for graduates of thi,
°Siege, by bmisten men.
COWLEY, the bast Penmen of the Upton,
who the fatted number of First Premiums,
end vier all COmPeliti/rte_tenches:ll4/4 Flusineen
Writing.
WO - For specimens of ‘Penmanship, and Catalogue
containing full Information Malmo twenty-dm mats !.
to
laTalylaw-eItIs. M etT IIINLI 811112'
TAI 4 TED, I —.I6G a Mom—.we Titbit
Agents at $6O a month, expenses paid, to sell
our Veeringly Pricils,Oriesital Bemire, and thirteen
other new, want and entities articles. Fifteen arti
cles cent free. AddrwW.
seLliAnidaws S)I4IV &CAVA, Viddeltint
WANTED,
ibvCoNr. 21AUES.
bi g r rimants thitZirvotnyc L
•.
XEW 4DeMftIZIrEMENTS.
- - -
p 114.111.. ANAIFL:En
' ' 4442 . 2 4.wt Witrikusiit's timcs,
_.;-:-WheelingO'rT a., October 12th, 18 a:
STALED PROPO en SALS will Ini,remired at ida
MOO 12 retiock atnoon otegigher 24th. 1 83 3.
Riir:ds Voithe - Quarterinaser'e Department V. 21
Army, with the follow in :
Two hundred thousandg,
(n4o.olyrints
Oats, in seek., the Oats ta Welch)o).b thlr ushels
ty. or
three ( 33 )
pounds to the buehel,ehd sea. to be good strong
brutap. The grain to be deliveied at Wbeelintr
Wert Na., luarter aithin anon days, On* guar.
ter within thirty days, one quantor withi n yoesy-Aws
days, and Ono qnarter within sittT days fronallate Of
; the sward.
;Two thousand tone (2,000) of good. sound. tem'
charitable, Timothy Hey, hated; to be delivered in
the same ratio with the grain.
Proparala will be considered fcr the entire lot or
for twenty thousand (•32,040) buslwa of Oats or fifty
(„) tow , o f Hay. proposals ennui state the quantity
; offend, tiro piece of' residence oldie bidder, and muss
(.I.” accompanieda guarantee of at lasat two re.
aporillibla perikma that the sender will hall the Ma
-1 tract if awarded to him. Successful bidden will be
notified es soon after the award i. made an possible.
Written contracts will in all easel be entered into,
and contractors will he requirod to give kinds for the
faithful performanos of the contract ir =sals
should be endorsed on the envelope " far
Forage," and be addressed to the undersigned at
Wheeling. Welt Va. The right to rulect any or
bids is rfterred by the Government.
No bids will be 'entertained unless the Garegolte
requirements are complied with.
TEED Mont,
Contain sad Awl QuartermasterWELL
C. B. Army.
oel&td
DRY GOODS STORE FOR SAT.F. in
a flourishing Western town On the P. F. W. &
C. n. It., not over WO mike from Pittsburgh, bOW
doing a large and profitable trade. The stock le
new, and has been selected with reference to the
country trade. Has all tern purchased Cut etch at
lowest market prices.
The present proprietor has decided to retire'from
the trade owing to bad health, and new refurkinge
oilers the stock for sale ; also the good will of the ro
tiring party. The home has a largo and respectable
trade, which can bo retained. The present Mock
will invoice hone morn to ten thousand dcdtars, bed
mold be reduced if desired.
_ .
Portico wishing to know the part iculara tal please
eddrces or call pentonallj on
L & cuonPmornro.
0,15:tt Hand ermeh Plttetrarith,,Pa.."
ASPI.FIN DID DWELLING F OB
SALE, sin:aunt at No. 173 Third street, &w
-ood Ward, Pittsburgh. The lot hes a frost or 30 feet
and extends bark eri fent, on which us erected • taro
hroe-story hetet building. with back building* three
stories. The building I. Mulched In modern style,
arranged with double parlors, (marble mantles,) din.
log room, kittLett, htosoh - y, wlth tabs, torten, store
and bath nom. Alto sacra commodlona bed am
bers. Parties seeking comfortable resident*, the
shore to Jart the plan , . Is °torn] tow.
For tern. mad price tall Re
ocl B. IIcLAIN & C 0.13. ICC Tomei street
ELECTION RETUEINCL
!low the Ladles have Voted.
We are mudded, through our "'pedal," to en gul
public, man at this malt date, the result of thil
Ladies' vote on a very important question, s malt,
too, while sbosing the sousithaoss plaids Judgment,
.pocks louder than woods for the popularity of the
WHEELIE & WI:WON SEWING 11ACILINIC.
The three leading Sewing Machine Cortpanicebt the
country aro the "Wheeler & Warm," "Singer
C 0.," and "Grater &Baker," end their sales for the
quarter ending Jona 10, which we subjoin, &how
how the ladle Toted:
NV - beau It
Singer &
Showing that the Wheeler d Wilson emptilj add.
during the quarter named, nearly double the amotmt
mode by either et the ether..
Over IM,OOO of these Machined have been doll, and
tho demand for them is greater than era. This
should be regarded Si.toot by those who &sirs to
buy tha H E ST FAMILY SEWEiG MACITIMM.
g Mee, 27 FIFTH STREET, Pittsburgh
WM. SUMNER & CO,
!TEM
DOMESTIC GOODS.
PLUMES, GINGHAM.
New Style De Laines.
TABLE LINENS, BRASIL
CALSSIMICRICS 87. CLOTHS.
SUSPENDERS.
BOOTS AND -SHOES.
A large stock of the abbrs . Just received at
HeCILELLABDI3 AUCTION,
No. 85 FIFTH BTRKET
0e.1.3
STEEL COLLARS I
EATON, MACRON & CO.; "
Nos. 17 AND ID MTH STBEETantomsax, Pa.,
8.1. Agents-for
Atkinson's Steel Collars and. Ont%
Eaamellod White. having tha apparanao and COM
fort of Linen. To inilltary men and trete= thorT,
are Invaluable.
=TAIL IIaCES Or 111117. COLL= AND cons:
Genre Standing CO each:
Turnarer •••._._.....100
Ladles' N'e 100 each.
1 60 Far pair.
Sent by Ca poet on receipt ot 51 15.
Steel Collars mem:culled fir ZS cents ; of we WM
exchange a NEW COLLAII for an' OLD ONE, pt 0....
riding it Li not.brike or bent, for 25 dints. •
The For t
prrice ade suppllai at the Near York Agent's prim
llet add
ess
EATON, 3LACRIME & 00,
Patibumb.
BAILEY' FA RRELT, & co
PRACTICAL PLUMBERS,
't-GAB,AND STEAM EThigU3,
Brass Work, Pipe, Pumps, Valves,
And all kind. of dttiop for Water, Cu and Stet*
AGITATORS AND TAITESTOR-OTL'IIiTINE-
RIES, lined with lead by a now promo
Soo. 129 YOUTII STURM
pURVIANCE'S
PHOTOPIAPIUONIfii
CO.I6ZEB rum .&?,"I) MARKET
(24 and RQ atorles, - Wrer Illetuudion'a Jewelry Step%)
Prreutruz,
PHOTOGTL.A.PBe.
P f ivory goo tad styls, plain or colored, - from tb
popular Carte di Visit* to Cabinet cod life elm
Mr. PVIZTUNCE would partici:duly call t l at.
tentlan Greta AGED AND MIEN to the easy so.
oessibillty of this artablisiment, get 4 ruched by •
single short flight of atiin. Prices moderate, GNI
DILL OF WHITE PINE wanted for
the goor.of the (Vetoer and Chic pension Bridge
Niftier pf 'Lenin! Wenn frakiatessißorml Maim*
itafert.fia inehml &fad.:
Tsci 1 30'
I f e% -
34U 19270,,936400
=7 ):1
The above bill of Joists mast be delivered OA the
Covington aide of the Ohio Kw, at the Bridms, In
the Spring of 1666, and no later thin tuassorJane.
The quality of the lumber. meet beig ol 4Allad aoend,
free from all defects, edges met be fell and ikmuil
and free fine sap. • • "
, Propeleale to writing for thi4ilove .•
dressed to the indelidgned. and accompanied by sat
isfactory references, Win' be nmeived- to the 10th of
November next. JOHN A. ROEBLINO,_
Engereer Covington and - Cbscbmart Midge On
J. ll. Tars.
074114
TATt& - SEVIEKE,' • •-•
PRACTICIM Pala!
°AB 4Unci - B'4a PEMBI4:'‘I'
' sad
N° ' n IP-A4 44 =Ma? Allibdo7 atri
dolt
xo. LtbatyPittiburaau -
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bp • -
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