Bradford reporter. (Towanda, Pa.) 1844-1884, May 04, 1882, Image 1

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    ltits' hiess slabs.
AIePHERS Y9IING,
4 TTOLVE rs-AT-LAW,
TOWANDA, PA.
I ItcPUERSON,
W. J. YOUNG.
WILLIAMS & ANGLE,
A TTOL' NE IS-AT-LAW,
TOWANDA, PA
Witte—Main street, opposite Post-Otriee.
SI. N. WILLIAMS
DAVIES, 4 HALL,
ATTORiftiY6-AT-LAN,
SOUTH SIPE OP WARD HOUSE.
00:22 1 7L
SAM- W. BUCK,
A rroß.s - s r -A T-L.A W,
TO W A NDA, PENN•A
I=l
)race—At Treasurer's °Mee, In Court floutie
MADILL & KINNEY,
ATTORNEYS-AT -LAW.
eittice—Rooms formerly occupied by T.M. C. A
Heading Room
sos,go
10I1N W.CODDING;
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW, TOWANDA, PA.
i'fbco over Kirby's Mpg Store
TNOMAS - .E. MYER
ATTORNZT-AT-LAW.
WTALUStNO.
tr attention mild to business In the Or
ptans* Court and to the settlement of estates.
September 25, 1879.
I
P"" sr.. - - OVER TON
-- ' '
1
EITOhNEYs) I
Eg . I.AW, I
.. , I
TOWANDA; ! 'A. I
'l. 0 VEETON, BENJ. M.-P=E.
I)ODNEY A. ME'RCUR,
ATTONNILY AT•L&W,
TOWANDA, PA.,
, lit.ltor of Patents. Paitioular attention -paid
I, business in the Orphans Court and to the Settle
welt' of estates.
Once In Montanyes Block . - May 1, '79.
OyERTON & SANDERSON,
.ATTORNEY-AT-LAW •
TOWANDA, PA:
E. O)VERTO'4 JR. JOHN 1 0 : SANDERSON
• VAT H: J E SSUP,
I I • .
• ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR-AT-LAW,
• 310:NTROSE.
- lodge .tossup having resumed the practiceot the
a v in Northern Pennsylvania, will attend to any
I,,,:,ll.usinessintrusted to him in Bradford county.
wishing to consult him, can call on H.
F:sq., Towanda, Pa., wheuan appointment
c is Ue male.
TENILY STREETER,
A - From:Ex AND COUNSELLOR-AT-LAW,
TOWANDA, PA
E.BULL;
SURVEI - OR.
LNG: St'iteLYlNG AND DRAFTING.
~ i lg. e - i ,ver C. P. Welles' fig-Cent Stole, Main
T"n - anda, Pa.
L. HILLIS,
ATNUNKT-AT-LAW,
TOWANDA, PA.
FJ N
I.SBREE & SO,
ATTORN s-AT-LAW,
TOW A)))A, PA.
Eil.S6-FLEI4
rolls w. mix.;
A ri”11:517.Y-AT-LAW AND U. S. Commissiorogn,
TOWANDA, PA,
orih Side Public. Square
ANDREW W!LT,
.ATTORNEY-AT -LAW.
It , d—Mean:4 4 Klock, Ntain•st, over J. L. Kent's
lowa i . May Le consulted in German.
(April 12,76.3
'lll.'B. 'M. WOODI3IJI.Ni
PLyai
fflau and Surgeon. Office ati residence, en
td 0., ,treet, grit door north Of M. E. Church.
April 1, Ib.SI.
KELLY,O P
a ce
W. over M.. Towanda,
T,-eth4nserted on (lobl, Silver,,. Rubber, and' Al
,n lih base. Teeth extracted without pain.
) , .t. 34-72.
D. PAYNE, M. D., *
-
11• PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON.
ornov ..cer Montanyei - Store. °lice boon from 10
.
toll A. M., and front 2 to 4 P. M. _
• Special attention, given to
IIIsEASES DISEASES
or- and • r_. ) or
TIIII EYES. TIIE EAU;
•
. .
C . L. LAMB;
ATTuR W 4.
105 North Franklln•at., Wilkes-Barre, Pa
attention given to collections in Luzerne
n 1 I.l.•kawatina counties. lieferencss: lion. P.
Nt , .rrow; First National Bank, Towanda.
in S. RUSSELL'S • -
GENERAL , •
I SURANCE AGENCY
TOWANDA, PA.
IIDWA.RD WILLIAMS,
•
PRAOTICAL PLUMBER & GAS FITTER
::•r of business, a few doors north of Post-Office
o;umbing, Gas'Fitting. Repairing Pumps of all
; ii 1%, and all kinds of 'tieuring promptly attended
t•:. All wanting work in his line should give him
=I
A. B. AU IN &
OVALEIN IN FINE GROCERIES AND PRO
Vl , lO
Teas, Coffees, Canned Fruits, &c.,
'2. , ' 411.1f...02 Went WAl,l' 31.1 103, 105 and 107 Main
M==E
L. BUL,P,
A. I:. ArSTIN,
20. •h2-IVr
. - __FIRST NATIONAL BANK,
TOWANDA. PA.
APITAL PAID IN
SURPLUS FUND.
Tali Rank offers unusual faclllttls for the trans
of a general banking business.
, -s4
, - N. N. BETTS, Cast%ler
164. POWELL. President.
.1 -
,-r-
TIENItY 1101J'E,
itit.NElt MAIN & WASHINGTON STREET&
Fi, WARD, TOWANDA, PA
eals at all bouTs. Tenni% to suit the times. Lams
times.
stable attached.
PROPRI 'TOR
T•.watta.lv a. '7°-1
AIEAT
.MARKETI
C. M. M Y E R,
i,oested In
BEIDLEJIAN'S BLOCK, BRIDGE STREET,
Keep on hand,
FRESH AND SALT MEATS;
DINED BEEF, FISH, POULTRY,
I; ARDEN VEGETABLES AND BERRIES IN
THEIR SEASON, de
APV- All toodsdellveied free of charge
T . ..... , •••••1%. P. . Map 111, ins
INSURANCE!
C. S. RUSSELL, Agent,
TOWANDA, PA.
FIRE, LIFE, AND ACCIDENT
POLICIES
Issued on!the most reasonable terms.
Yone Due retiable companies represeited.
Losses jgdjasted and paid here
T-Itstrai t 2tuti
I 0 Inc c —Mercnr Block
Park street. op Matra
16feb82 E. d. Axamt.
TOWANDA.PA:
=1:11:12
Feb 27, '79
Cnovll-75
L.ELesim
dan.1,1875
Dec. 4. 1879
0. 1). (0)01011ell
8123,000
73,000
C. M. MTlell
MARSH& HITCHCOCK: Proprietors.
VOLUME . XLIT.
suraware, -- pfogeo,
k EL DYE SLUL
Pail & Winter, 1881,
ATTENTION IS INVITED to our
first-class
Heating Stoves.
• Tlieyn''? too well known to require any
commendation—
New geela.,
Westminster,
Crown Jewell.
We also have a line of CIIEA - P BASE
BURNERS, the best of their class in the
market, and well adapted for supplying a
demand for' on efficient_ but inexpenive
eating stove,
WOOD -HEATING STOVES, in great
variety. '
READ TI32S:
300
Happy Thought Ranges
Sold in Towanda and vicinity by
A. D. DYE & CO.
A - LARGE STOCK OF
Wood . Cook Stoves,
_
QARTITAGEMAKE RS' AND
BLACKSMITHS , SUPPLIES,
And a general stock of
BEARD WARE.
MAIN STREET, TOWANDA
Towanda, October ":that
4egef.
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS' MEET
- • INGS.
For the information of the public the
CoArty - Commissioners* hereby give notice
that they will hold a session of.the Board
every Tuesday' at the Commissioners'
011 ice in the Court House at Towanda,
and that-they will bold a meeting of the
Board at the Comity House, at Burling
ton, theTirst and Second. Monday of ea c h
month. Those Ji wing business to firing
before the Board will govern themselves
accordingly.-
DANIEL . lIIIMWORD,
Myreox Kr..cia.r.v, co. Corns
• M. F. RANSOOM,
Attest : Wm.i.Ewts,' Clerk.
ADMIN Ig
TRATOR'S
%etters of administration having Veen grant.
eil to toe undersigned umni the estate „of Elizabeth
Sherman, late of Overton tovenship, deceased, uti
tlce Io hereby given that all persons indebted to said
estate are requested to make 1111 in NI Int e p quient.
and all persons having claims against said estate
must present the same duly authentleat. d to the
undersigned for settlement-.
NELSON SH ERM AN,
Overton, ra.„ 6ar,rB2-it6, Administrators
-A-DMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE.
.-11„etters of adminlatration having been
granted the undersigned upon .the• estate of
Eliza Henson, late of Albany township, deceased
all persons indebted to the estate of said decpdent
are hereby , unlined to make - Immediate pay.
bent, and all having claims against said estate
must present the same duly authenticated to the
undersigned I`Jr settlement.
OLIVER ALLEN, Administrator
Albany, l'a., Capra-we.
A DM NIST RA TRI X'S NOTICE
A
—Letters et administration eum testament,'
anne.ro having been granted to the ttuder.d !fled
upon the estate of Theodore Wilder, late of Spring
field totinship. deceased, notice Is berelii given
that all persons Indebted to the said estate are re
quested to make Immediate payniient, and all per
oils haring claims against said estate TIIIIII2 present
the same dull, authenticated to the undersigned
for settlement. MRS. E. I:. WILDER,
Springfield. Pa.; 131081 Adoinistratrlx.
A DMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE.
—Letters of administration having beast
granted to. the undersigned upon the estate of
Warren Baker, late of Rome township. deceased.
Hotter is hereby given that all p..rsons indebted to
tat said estate are requested to make immediate
payment, and all persons having._tlairns against
said estate must present the same duty autbenU
cated to the undersigned for settlement.
A. L. BARER, Administrator.
IRotneF Pa.. laaprS2 ate:
-- -
ADMINISTRATOR'S NOTICE.
Letters of administration having been grants
ed to the ' , undersigned, upon the estate of Daniel
11. Coburn. late of .-Warren twp.; dried, notice Is
hereby,glveu that all persons indettted to the said
estate are requested to make: immediate payment,
and all persons basing claims against said estate
must present the same duly authenticated to the
undersigned for settlement.
FRANKLIN (*BURN,
Warren, Pa.. 6sprn-w6. Administrator.
A DMINISTRATOE'S NOTICE
A
—Letters of, administration having been
granted to the undersigned opon the estate of kg.
sins Eddy. late of Rome township, deeestiwid, notice
is hereby given that all persons Indebted to the
said estate are requested to make luttnedlate.pay•
'Meta'. at d all persons having all= against said
estate Must present the same duly authenticated
to the undersiped tor settlement.
LOYAL Y. RUSSICLL.
1143t0g Pa.. eaprintAte. Administrator.
Have derived eqme benefit from
the tow of Simmons' Liver Regulator. and wish to
give it a further trial.
HON. .LEX. II STEE NS. Georgia."
"1 hare tteve A r fern .4; b kit s P uet a simple, rates.
came, pimento?, and Iteasttit remedy to
"R.MARKS% IR Lai* nff
ot"
ISSEI
=SEEM
MI
grogling.
Decker Brothert
NEW STORE,
128 & 130 Means Block
Is one of the prettiest stoles in Towanda,
and is tilled with an ELEGANT
' ASSOIt fikIENT of
SPRING GOODS
Which will _be sold at PRIG ES .LOW
AS THE LOWEST.
FULL LINE OF MENS,
BOYS AND YOUTHS
chouillo
Under-
Clothing
TESn3TYLES OF
IMil
HAT E 4 Alin OAPS
FULL STOCK 0? FURNISHING
GOODS, VALISES, TRUNKS,
CANES, UMBRELLAS, itc
Celluloid Cella"! and Cuffs/
And the best line of NECK WEARin the
County always in'istoek.
•
ice Call at . one . stare and examine
Goods and Prices, and you be sure lo buy.
TusCails, I's., 20.m.r52.
OLOTHING !
/lard l'imes Scared
to Death !
- - - - -
"I ,eatmot tell - a - lie, I did it with my
little hatchet, — S 2 ben I knocked the covers of my
immense cases lof LOW PitiCED SPRING
GOODS. and now . !‘
I AM ALL READY
TO - GIVE. 'Y U A WELCOME THAT
BILISNESS.
I have laid in a new Sprint Stock of
fens', booths', Boys' and ebildreni'
-CLOTHING',
st CLOTRIN4
hich is positivelra surprise .to all.
I astonish . . the sightseeer with an unri
valed eollectlon , of elegant styles and beautiful
fabrics.
I delight the purchaser with prices
width wire never before en low.
I afford all an opportunity to secure the
newest and beat Spring gal meets at prien withltr
tbeleineatis.
THESE PLAIN FACTS demand your
attentl4,n, mot we respectfully advise an early es
*Wallah, and Invite It. •
M. E. ROSENFIELD,
TOWANDA, PEN:IsTA
• Min .110Dertistatents.
TUE 'ATIIENS
5- ENT" STORE'
In EASTABROOK BLOCK, has just
• received the biggest assortment of
Dry dine/ Fancy Good s•
Ca,' i ocleery. Glass
• and Tinware. •
For the comic; season we will REDUCE.
Olin Putces in any line of goods. It will ho
fur your nenelit to stay and oxatnine privets.
Our PRICES ARE THE LOWEST
and 'our GOODS THE BEST.
LOEWUS S FREINIUTH.
Athena, Pa., IBaprb2.
TOWANDA s'frcoELT,
7.1La,1.ii Street,
(NEXT DOOll TO DYE & CO.)
Has a coinplete assortment of
DRY AND FANCY GOODS,
Grockery,
Glassware,
Lamps,
#luTt; AND DECORATED CHINA.
Latest designs and - patterns of
CUTLERY, PLATED, Bt,
MAJOLICA WARE,
- BIRD CAGES,
SATCHELS, &c.
For the coming Spring Trade, we adhere
as heretofore to our established principle
—that a quick sale-with a small profit is
better than,a slow miewith a large profit
—and therefore our prices iirany line of
goods will cAmpare favorebly witk' the
prices of any other house. '
12r We endeavor-to sell the best article
for the least possible money.
• _ LOEWUS4 FREIMUTH.
tvgatil l -
a.• ' "'"
• '
:•- • -
TOWANDA, _ BRADFORD COUNTY, PA., `;THURSDAY = MORNING, MAY 4, 1882.
AN ECHO OF BYGONE YEARS.
A roily, comes back from the bigot's, ,eara
- 'Whose melody never grows old,
And 1 listen agati, through my smiles and tears,
Though theo,lnger lay dead aaa Cold. .
'Tts 01 song so sweet, by. a *Mee so rare,
Par purer than any other, .
And I heard It %sato, though trodbled by care,
• The lullaby sung mail mother.
. .
Theta are times, it seems, when all alone,
The singer Is by my side,
And I hear her voice Hof' monotone,
Wks the rise Attu tail of the tide.
While the days go by, till the end of time
And the struggle of life Is elided, -
May the singer never forget her rhyme
Till her bliss and mine \ are blended.
- 7—Foster Cote, td Nem York Muff.
HENRY W4DSWORTH LONGFEL-
Ezcelslor•: At Last the myStm word.
Which erst from thy peu's,Pant has stlrr'd
To deepest depths a Christian world
MO come to thee ;
Set thy soul free
Prom toll's trite trammels and unfuri'd
Thy banner and Archangels' minstrelsy.
Excelsior I Aye, ever thus thy gout _
Itas sweetly phrased the long deatleroll ;
Has breath , d 1n hope, In faith and love,
Supreme In each.
Thatibon might'st reach '
With passport Paradise, and. Prove
Reward watts-tho o whop.actice what they Preach.
Excelsior! Never from purer breast .
Weird wilder wall of fierce Unrest.
Oh, strange anomaly -I for peace
A war cry loud;
The surging crowd
Above a cry that will not cease
Its clarion call ttt ugh thy drat bead is bona.
_ —Georue B. ilerbcyt
'Miss Ruth, M:ijor says it's jes' on
ter sundown, an' told Ine' to ax was
he-ter come. out, yere ?'
'Tell him I'll come in, Cappie.'
Cap spun- around on her hare toes a
few times, then started slowly for the
house, while Ruth swung idly in her
hammock in the shade of the -live
oak, and I exclaimed :
'Think what yon are doing,. Ruth.
He. not happy a. moment without
you. He kives you so that the thought
of not bein,4 able to sail with . .yoti
brings 'on a fever tnrii,and• you know.
he
_had a hemorrhage the last tirpt!
you went riding-without. him. His
life ishound up in you!' •
know it, Aunty, so I shalt go
riding and sailing no more.'
hOut spelt devotion will surely,de
eeive him',
"When he came to us, witti his
doom plainly Written in everPfa-
Lure, Lresolved that if I could rioA,
nurse him bat* to the life he so much
loves, his ls,st days should he as hap-
py as posSible.'
`Suppose he dies deceived,
ing that you loved him—belieiing a
lie?'
'Don't you think when he sees - no
more ftlirou'gli a glassdarkly'that he
will understand P
'But should be recover, do you
think l►e Would thank you for his
'He if .yon had taken all hope and
brightneSs from it?'
'l : assure -you that his happiness
shoidd be, then as now, my first and
only%Ohjeet.'
1-exclaimed aghast, 'you
would. not marry him with no love
to give himloving another as you
do !'
She raised herself slowly on her
elbow, her beautiful brown eyes lOOk
ing steadily through the long lash ' s
wet with tears, and said :
Jiff ' th, I d -- I
Ay de is something that I do not
prize but 'by dying cannot give
him life, so " if by living I can male
his life happy, why not?' Whatever
is for his happiness that I shall
Now I'll gd - and Watch the sunset
with him.'
I sat 'still under the spreading.
branchea.or the great old oak and
watched the swollen river which
seemed trying to force its way tbro'
the great Wall of earth that confined
it to its course, and thought of the
beautiful girl who had just left me.
• When. Major Grant' bad come to
us. sick and apparently dying, -she
had just met the first great sorrow of
her life. A •taisunderrtanding bad
arisen between herself and Frank
Russell, to whom she had given :ill
the loving ile . votion of her warm
heart., • and •by_ the interference or
friends the lovers' quarrel became a
serious matter, and the epgagbment .
;yds broken.. - .
She believed herself deceived and
cast aside for another, and life not
worth, the living, but she was proud,
and lived on bravely, making no
moan:
Major Grant had lost his health by
exposure doing his army life, but
would not for a moment doubt his
entire.recovery He was always bet
ter. Heelung to Ruth—was never
happy wl en she was absent and built
castle alter castle i 1 the air when
beside her. And now _the two were
.watching the. sunset—one believing
the sun of her life had already set in
clouds and darkness, and the light
was fast failing for the other; site
turning—in dis May and dread from
the life.before her—he longing and
striving for the life - that was fast
slipping from him. ' '
A bunch of gray moss 'swung
smartly in my-face and roused me to
the fact, that the wind was rising, for
added to . the mutter* of the river
was the moaning of the pines. 1
Walked hastily to the levee, - • Every
body was there, working or watching,
for shou ld' a jet of water force its
way through undiscovered a 'crevaSse
was certain - and sure destruction.
There was great danger that the
levee could not withstand the force
of the water without the wind, but
with a gale it seemed hopeless.
It was a yearly danger to which
every one had become accustomed,
so that no plans were changed, and
all amusements went on as gaily as
if destruction did not threaten every
home for miles around,and our near
est neighbors had invited us to at
tend a country wedding with them
that night. Ruth-
hesitater]: about
leaving her Invalid, but he urged her
to go, assuring her there WWI no dan.
ger whatever; so when we heard the
call at gate, 'Oh, Misa - Rutk-are
you 'ready?' we threw on , our wraps
rend started. gloves in •hand:
We foutui after varions
tbat - titi liadl7 carder aid owed
WE
REGABrozawi OF
,DENUNCIATION nom ANY QUARTER,
LOW.
" CREVASSE!"
MEI
'''
( . 1 !'•
L i
. • 1 !
.. i. (
~,,‘
~, , 1
away during the'late unpleasantness'
and 11'10140 to return' aid that the
conveyance provided for us wasia
,two-wheeled cart. • We were assured
the straw - on: the bottom was clean
and begged to 'Sit right down, sit
right: down; it's all. clean) And
afteimuch laughing and cro wding,
six--grandma and baby, 'mother
and: sister, Ruth and I, with a. bundle
of . hay for the horse to eaOrere
packed away, and . jolted_ along !right
merrily. We. drove beside the levee,
but the angry rush of the- river-and
the rising wind seemed to occasion
no- uneasiness in our companions.
The house to which we were going
stood on a point Of land. which the
ricer had enerciached upon year after
year until itmas . almost an island,
and it seemed that soon the whole
plantation would be washed away.
I could only wonder at the gayety of
my companionsi . and . to
.divert- my:
mind from . my own fears, asked: •
fins Mir Dora been long engaged r
,'Yes,- tive:years. The•wedning day
has been fixed twice before - ; the
guests invited, the cake ready, and
the bridal veil waiting to be put on.
The first time-Dora was sick, 80 very
sick it seemed impossible that she
could live
.throngh that day, but as
soon as the hour for the wedding was,
; passed 'she began to improve.. _ The
next time the groom fell. and broke
his leg an -hour or two 'before- he
should have been married.'
'How strange - -
'Well, Dora is the last oue of an
old, oldfamily. She had an old nurse
who saw visions and foretold coming
events, who told Dora that she would
never be a wife or mother, and she
almOst began - to believe IL She says
if she fails this time,she will 'never
•
try again.' .
here we are 1. *Back up and
damp your load,' And amid much
noise and chattering we scrambled
to the ground and shook 'out our
-crumpled dresses.li
were reeeiVad by a be ititifol
white haired-old lady, who kissed us
a• 1 and made us Welcome. After . a
glance, at . ;,he bate hands _ about us
we Slipped our :glo'ves into our, pock-,
eta and were , ushered.into the parlor
and joined one of • the two lines that
sat facing each other for the ceremo
ny to begin. 'The white-haired old
holy sat beside Ruth, who had evi
dently taken her fancy. I could see
that the sweet-faced matron was- tell
ing my.gentle the story of her
own daughters's misadventurou-; love
that,. was
.soon to be crowned With
happy fruition. Had...she divined
that my' Ruth was heart-sor e and sick
because of love ? I think so.
The gueSts waited alkwardly as
country people - gathered from far and
near are wont to do. .The servants
moved officiouslyabout -to save the
appearance of .delay. 'At length the
hostess, - with the slightest flush of
annoyance on her fair face, left Rnth
to devote. herself to others. Ruth
came over wherel was standing by
an open - window, and puttink her
hand on my shoulder turned her face
from the light and said :
'Oh, Aunty, I am - so miserable.
Why- is it that:every one else may
.be happy and
There. there, I said soothingly.'
Do not be so weak' And then I
added inn bantering tone, • No doubt
Friink will come back
' Too late," she said, ' I have prom-
iced fn. marry. Major Chant.' •
Why, Ruth 1' •
I had no time to say mire."
The minister appeared ; then came
the bridal : party; the promises were
harids were shaken, congratu
lat.i6ns uttered, refreshments were
eaten, the - liddlers were nailed in and
dancing began. - .
Three hours had passed. The revel
was at its height. The fair bride,
her longldelayed hopes the
gloomy 'prophecy exploded, floated
in and ouLin the mazes of the dance,
the gayest of the gay. Ruth, .her
fait ,face flushed, seemed to have for
gOtten her, sorrow in her enjoyment
of this auspicious occasion. By
. her
grace and' tact. I - could see that she
.
was - adding, ranch to the enjoymentof
others. happy mother of • the
bride moved about among the older
guests,_ dispensing smiles and bring
ing pleasure . wherever she went
Presently R nth Came, and sid . with
a face beaming with joy :
' Oh, Auhty, I am so glad we mime.
I never knew it was. such pleasure to
wake others happy. lam not a bit
sad now: I believe
,I could even meet
Frank with composure. Hark! 'What.
is that T' she . exclaimed, turning to
ward tihe open window, through which
came a dull, harsh murmur.
BEfore she had timelo say more
there was an uproar at the lower end
of the room,
,a cry of 'CrevaSse!
Crevasse!' from the affrighted ser
vants., and Frank Russell rushing
through a crowd .of. dancers, leaped
upon a c. air - frA three steps from us
And shouted .
• The levee has broken ; . save your
selves at once, there is no.tiine to
lose.'
There was an instant of awful si
lence; every breath was hushed, and
rosy cheeks were blanched with ter,
ror ; then the voice,of the despairing
bride rang out) •
4 Has it come true! It has come
true!' she cried, and as she tell into
the arms of her husband - the guests
fled ,in every direction. The gray
haired mother, sank upon her knees,.
and we could see her.-lips move in
prayer • .
Franl',u eyes wandered over the
hurrying crowd an instant in search
of smile one he evidently, expected
to see. Even in that terrible moment
I could not help thinking how brave
and handsome he was. I did not
wonder that' Ruth had lost her heart
to him. At length his eye rested on
us. in an instant he was beside _us.
Re put his arm about Ruth as if they
bad parted with kisses but yeiter ,
day, looked quickly back, and, said
as' his face blauched and his lips shut
We can *ply ourselves.
. .
He ,svrung Ruth. lightly through
the ewment.' clasped me by the arm,
and we fled away from ,the.house of
feasting with the bride's.heirrtereird
ingshriek in our earssod the mother's
idonidatti fto• jwiniett izijacOrleis
MEE
prayer ever befdre our eyes as we
dashed out int., the night, and joined
in the wild scramble , for life.
The blackness of -the night, the
roaring of tlw wind, and ,the Increas
lug thunder of the river were enough
to appall the stoutest heart. But. we
were hurried on, stumbling over, roots
and stumps, caught and torn by vines
and briars, dashed against trees by
the rnging wind, spattered by the
spray of the -rising water until we
reached the place where Frank had
left his boat. 1
The river was full of floating trees,
the ruins of houses„ and:ail - the debris
which the mad water had. wrested
from its conquerors. IThe current
was so strong itseemed;certain death
to trust ourselves to it, - but it was
the only chance. We stepped to the
boat, and seized each an oar. We
pushed out and the fight for life be
gan. We were driven against huge
floating logs, again andagain almost
overturned, caught in the baanches ,
of some great tree that' rushed down
the . current, and Which in the dark
ness we could not see. - Cries of ter
ror reached us now and then, but the
thunder of the liberated river filled
the air. ' It seemed the triumphing of
the river god as he swallowed his vic
tims, the human sacrifice to his power.
We were trying to force onr way;
through the crevasse up to'higher
ground when suddenly a bonfire - some
one had lighted hours before blazed
up, and we saw clinging' in tho
brauches of a tree rushing past'us toe
bride clasped - tightly i.i the arms of
he husband. Was the prophecy to
fulfilled, "'lever a wife Cr omother?"
Though the attempt Was madness,
we strove to reach them.' Fortunately
both Ruth and myself . were accom
plished oarswomen and accustomed
to the river. Frank stood up and
called to'Jlieni while we bent, to our
oars withall our strength. The bride:
groom heard us and waVed his hand,
in acknowledgment. Then Frank
took the oars, Ruth the ole that was
used to keep us from c Hiding with
the floating masses, arid we rowed
down the current after the great tree
with its living burden A jutting
bluff for a moment shutout the view
of the
. bonfire. When i shone upon
1
the floating, tree again, only the bare
trunk and dripping bransl.es were to
,he seen. Ruth uttered a moan of ter
tor. Frank changed our course,and
we shot off, into the darkness again.
After flows of desperate fighting for
our lives, the faint light of dawn
c.a'ne id our aid, 'and! at last we were
able, to land. ,
, , •
As soon as our feet were on firm
ground again Ruth turned to Frank
and - held out both her hands with
tears in her eyes and trembling lips,
but said no word./ - I.le drew her to
him and kissed her/ again and again.
Thvy were saved for each other, but,
1 thought of Major - Grant with a
sigh. _ _
We found him at the house of a
frienl miles back from the river,
where he had been borne for safety,
but the excitement and exertion had
been too great for his strength. and
lie was suffering (rem asevere.hemor
rhte which was, wasting his life
blood. Ruth went at once to him,
leading Frank bY the hand.
SOme hours after, as the Sun. was
setting, we were all called to his
room.. Ruth knelt on- the floor at his
bedside with her face buried in her
bands, and the Major's hands rested
on her head.
The dark curling hair lay in damp
rings on his white foiebead, and the
large sad eyes were - lifted as if in
prayer. His lips moved. "Ruth,
dear," he whispered. She raised her.
head. He drew her to him with a
yearning in his eyes that I f ivould not
be fefused. Their lips ;met in one
last, long kisi. Then he reached out
and taking Frank's band tint Ruth's
into it, and blessed them with a look
of unutterable love till the light faded
from his eyes forever. . _
"MARY A. ASHLEY.
—ln Our Continent.
Leigh Hunt.
He is a . mail of thorciughly London
make. such as you could not find
elsewhere and I think about the
best possible to be made of his sort :
an airy, crotchety, and most copious
clever talker, With an honest under
current of reason too, but unfortu
nately not the deepest, not the most
practical -:-4)r rather it is the most
unpractical man ever dealt in. His
hair is grizzled, eyes black-betel,
complexion cf the clearest dusky
brown ; a.thin glimmer of a smile
plays over a face of cast-iron gravity.'
He never laughs—can only titter,
which I think indicates his worst de
ficiency. • His house excels all you
have ever read of—a poetical Tink
er:lom, without parallel even in; lit
'erature. In his family room, where
areasickly large wife and a whole
shoal of well-conditioned wild chil
dren, you will find half a-dozen old
rickety chairs gathered from half a
dozen different hucksters,- and all
seemingly engaged, and just pausing,
in *a violent hornpipe. On these and
around them and over the dusty ta
ble and ragged. carpet lie all kinds
of litter—books, papers, egg-shells,
scissors, and last 'night when I was
there ttje torn heart of a half-quar
tern loaf. His own room above stairs,
into, which alone I strive to enter, he
keeps cleaner. I t has only two chairs,
a book-case, and 'a writing-table; yet
the Noble Hunt receives you in his
Tinkerdom in the spirit of a king
apologizes for nothing, places you in
the best seat, takes a' window-sill
himself if there is no other, and there
folding closer hisloose-Bowing "mus
lin cloud " of a printed nightgown in
whit:Lillie always writes,:commences
the liveliest dialogue on philosophy
and the prospects.of man (who
(who is to
be beyond measure ‘• happ", yet);
which again he will ct l ?urteously ter
minate the moment you are bound
.to go : a most Interesting, pitiable;
lovable man; to be used kindly but
with discretion.—from one of Oar.
Lyles Leiter*, -
Our Coatinear seyithat marriage is on
the deli's% Thatiaa* be, but the holies
who are over lt and , elder GO iniala ece
iiet tat Oil
.. . . .
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.. ....
. . .
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...
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.. . . . .
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! ' 1• N \:. 7--: li\ lN , ,
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. . .
The Cave Men.
According to Professor Boyd
Dawkins, the numerous discoveries
made in France, Belgium and Switz.
erland have enabled scientists to
form a tolerably definite , idea as to
the eitme man's habits and mode of
life. Ile dwelt for the most part in
caves, and he accumulated enormous
masses . of refuse, bones of the ani
mals on which he lived. In these
refuse heaps Were numerous imple
ments. of stone, bone and antler,
spear-heads, arrow -heads, scrapers, :
elaborately Cut harpoon eads, dab•
orate needles of bone and antler, and
belong with . th these occurred curious
carvings representing the surround
ings of the cave man, and for the
most part reproducing. the forms of
the animals on which he lived. From
the numerous implement.) for scrap.
ing skins,•it might be inferred that
the cave man dressed in' skins, sewn
together by needles. They also wore
gloves, as was known frcim the rep
resentations of gloves, with two,
three or four fingers, and running al
most up to the elbows, :like the 26-
button gloves of the present time
Perforated stones and shells and the
teeth of bears, lions and wolves were
Used ail necklaces and amulets. They
adorned themselves With red raddle.
which might be looked upon as the
lineal ancestor of rogue.
In their hunting they used spears
and arrows. On one bit of antler
found in France they saw the hunter
carefully erecting up to-the gigantic
ox—the great urns; in others they
saw figures of bisons '
reindeer. hors
es, and ibexes ; and in others the
great woolly mammoth was repre
seined so faithfully that were it not
for the disCovery of the. creature in
the frozen morasses 'of Siberia it
would be said that the drawing was
quite wrong. On the other:slabs of
stone might be seen the birds anti
fishes on which the cave men lived.
AU those . outlines had been made
with, a splinter of flint, and were 'en
graved in a great many cases upon
the bones and teeth -of the animals
which were represented. The cave
men also were sculptors, and the
handles 'of some of their daggers
made oC reindeer antler.or ivory rep
resented the forth sometimes of a
kneeling reindeer and at other times
of elephants. * * * The cave
men were hunters_ pure and simple;
without . knowledge of Like metVi tt
without domestic animals, and' vier- -
even ignorant of the potter's art.
Nor bad they left behind them any
ev.dence that they were in the habit
of burying their dead.
Could the cave men be identified
with any livinz rare ? The answer
was to be found in their habits, im
plements and art. On -the shores of
the great Arctic Sea, on' both sides
of Behring's Straits, and along the
: north of the American Continent
and Greenland, lived the Esquimaux,
a people cut off' from all others, and
whose origin was a puzzle to the eth
nologist. Those people bad, exactly
the same habit of accumulating re
fuse, their implements were • exactly
of the same kind, and their art was
identical with that. of the cave_ man
in Europe. They lived also to a
large extent on the same animals,
and they were careless , as to what
happened to their dead. From_ all
taiose lines of argument it might be
interred that the Esquimaux was in
all probability the living -representa
tive of , the cave man, just as the
musk sheep now livin g in Esqui
maux-land was undoubte dly the rep
resentative of the' musk sheep then
living in France.
Women as -Listeners.
Woman is,primarilry a being who l i
listens. §he has in these days lost
much= of her original teachableness.
but she Ills not yet'entirely discard
ed the appearance-of being teachable.
'hiller capacity for he9ring without
obeying lies her _true power. As a
talker, she has her peers; as a listen
er, she is unequalled. • .
as, a' French writer says, the
conversation of women in society is
like . the straw ' in which china is
pSeked4—worthless in itself, but with
out which everything would be-brok
efr—the listening of woman is what
eaves us from• a Babel of tongues
that would bring the sky
_about our
ears in no time. Not that woman - is'
always, r, as a rule, unwilling. to
use her-tongue (there is no need of
being radical, but the listener who •
encourages you with eyei and ex
pression and appreciative laughter is
a woman. She never-lets her glance
wander in an absent manner, to be
brought back to- meet .yours at • au
important Point with an eft at of
Which-you are both keenly.:ebtiscious.
TO'i whom are you tempted to relate .
hits of curious personal . experience,
the- suffering caused by
.some . random
.04ow of outrageous fortune, the fan
.eies suggested by 'some book, some
view, some journey ? To a clever,
sYmpathetie woman; whose eyes.
-brighten with interest or sadden with
sympathy-as she-listens, who seems
to
. anticipate your next- word with
eager pleasure, and who, • for some
reason or other, just then, while you
are.in this eofldential mood, has very
few experiences or fancies of her own
to communicate—only hints at them
—just enough to keep you in counte
nance.—From Lippinestt's
.Magazine.
The Cross-Mark.
.1•••••••••••11,
The mark which peisons who are
unable . ' to write are refklired to make
instead of their signature is in the
form of fi cross, and this practice,
having -formerly been followed by
kings and nobles, is constantly refer
ed to as an instance of the deplore . -
ble ignorance of ancient times. This
signature is not, however, invariable
proof of such igUorance, 'Anciently,
the use of this mark was not confin
ed to illiterate persons; for among
the Saxons the mark of the -e'ress, as
an attestation of the good faith of
the person- signing, was required to
be attached to the *nature of those
who could write, 104 well as those
who could not write In those times
if a man could write:lir even real,
his knowledge was considered proof
poiitlve that he was .in hair Orders.
The word etinewetorigerkirse on.
MN
DIME
8140 per Annum In. Athenee.
onymous with pennw, and the laity,
or people wha were not - clerks, did
not feel any urgent necessity for the
use of letters;
The ancient use of the cross was,
therefore, universal alike by !.hose
who could and by those', who could
not write. --It'was' indeed the sym
bol of an, oath from • its early
`associations, and generally the Mark.
(hi this account Mr. Charles Knight,
in his notes in the "Pictorial
peare,"Shakes
r explains the expression . of
"God save the, mark !" as a form of
ejaculation approaching to the chi: 7
acter of in oath. The phrase occurs
three or more
,times in the plays of
Sheakespeare, bnt An' a long time
was len by the commentators in its
original obscurity.— Tke Nancheiter
' . ,
Bob Burdette on Bob Irigersoll
In a lecture before the Young Men's
christian association of New -York,
.Burdette. the Hawk-eye mari, talked
of the pilgrimage of - the, Tunny man
in search of-{fun. and - told how and
where funny things are found; and
how. they ire dressed up for the
newspapers' afterward. Hand-made
fun, of that sort of which hunting in
the dictionary for good words upon
which to build bad puns is a sample,
he dealt with, justly and severely. He
spoke affectionately of Col:Ingersoll,
whom he had known, he said, and
found to contain much that is good:
His f-uccess. the lecturer thought, was
owing to his overwhelming .humor,
which made his audiences laugh at
their own dearest creeds. "And I
belieVe," continued Mr. Burdette, se
riously, While his audience was hush
ed, "I -believe . Colonel Ingersoll's
position is sound." There was a-mo
tnetit's hesitation, and all the tittering
stopped. "I know," continued the
speaker, " it isn't th thing to any in
this ball and to this audience • but I
have said it, and I won't go • back on
I have said." It appeared
for • a moment that. Mr.- Burdette's
candor h,tdgot the better of his dis
cretion. Ile continued : - "But that
is the trouble with - ingersoll; it is-all
sound, like a bass druni, and no
-sense." The orthodox andience was
relieved and.expressed itself ingreat
laughter.
. • PUDDINO SAUCE.- Stir a teacupful
of white s►igar att. two tablespoon
fuls of butter smoothly together;
arid the juice and half-the grated peel
of a lemoni and the well.-beaten yolks
of two eggs beat. well together, and
set it on the fire to become well heat,:
ed... Beat the whitey to a still froth,
and stir in quickly for one. minute;
then add a wineglassful of white
wine or cider; beat up for a minute ;
turn into a sauce boat, and serve at
once. -
THE soda-water man minas sizz bltq
uesg in the summer.
Tuts talk about about, blue-bloode d an
cestry is all vein•glory.
THE milkman's motto—The putt.p-i§
mightier than the cow.
1r takes a smart man to c00c:...d ft-cm .
others what he doesn't know.'
A StG.N of indigestion : "Gone to`din
ner ; be back in fire tithinto.”
. THE love of glory can ohly create a
hero ; the contempt of it creates a great
man. .
Pr is bard to catch a . toati's meaning
when ho carries on a dinning conversa-
t ion
Tag reputation of 'a man is like his
shadow. Gigantic when it precedes
and pigmy in its proportions when it fol
lows.
Jour,' B. Goren stated to an Indian:lp-
Ohs . reporter that his heart was still
young.. If Mr. Gough intends to teniain
long in Indiana a young liver• is -what be
neels. . • •
1r is.,asserted over over that. anxie
ty shortens life, but when a chap . sces an
other fellow feeding-his gill sandwiches
at a pic-nic, is ho going to-.sit down and
bid his soul be calm ? Not by it boot-jack.
"'No woman is 'woith looking at after
thirty," said young Mrs. A.., a bride with
all the arrogant youthfulness of twenty.
our summers. Quite trite, My :dear,"
answered Lady P., a very pretty woman
some -ten or. fifteen years older ; " not
worth listenin to before." I -
• "flow profitundly and beautiful is
the night," she whispered,: resting her
finely-veined temple against-his coat col
lar and fixing her dreamy eyes on the far
o-if Pleiades, "how soothing, .poi lest
fut." "Yes," he replied, toying with
the golden .aureola of her hair, "and
what a night to shoot cats."
' FlActilmon .h,*iES—" The State would
be better off' if every ChinaMati was kick
ed out of it to-morrow." His married
friend "Where 'would you
,get your
Washing done then?" Bachelor- Jones =
" Marry 'some nice girl and have it done
at Chorus by six eligible young
ladies who lhappened to overhear Jones
and his friend talking—" The Chinese
Must go
IlEitot.D. 'the editor ! lie is up at four
o'clock •in the morning after items. fie
goeth forth and sticketh his nose in every
body's business. The editor gets three
dollars a week, and is happy. lie gets
invitations to every supper,- and "comps"
to every show,: and free passes on the
railroad, yet 'verily the editor is the poor
est creature on the carth. God help-the
poor editor !
in health froni any cause, especially from
the use of the thousand nostrums that
promise so largely, with long fictitious
testimouials, - have no fear. Resort to.nop
Bitters at once, and in a short time you
will have thermost robust and hloomitir.
health.
In the San Franci;ico Evening Bulletin,
W observe that Mr. Rosenthal, of the
well-known printing Orin, Rosenthal
IlOesch, 588 California street, that city,
said to one of their reporters : '• We all
know aft Jacobi 011, and are perfectly
amazed at tie anddennesis of too relief it
affords. If yon koow of any one who is
suffering With thituaulthao, bruise sr
libido, tat than tO Iwo Elt: ;Wilt
NUMBER 49
Fun, Fact and Facetim.
==
11[Year are Ruined
Perfectly Aosamed.
„.
:1
-.-,:...; . . 1 ".
140P0 .f, J-R T0......T 4it134,'
Flint • Ilesisage Oyer Mem
Sletiwpioi 1.. 'Aiken a
Wllre-lrerrible illasaireft lIPT Nay -
d/ass he Arlsesis-irbe Zap,
• , lien el tiro
Last. Saturday the first terms
passed over the. new . !Cable between
America and Germany, The follow
ing are the messages sent:
" I take pleasure, Mr. Piesident,
in expressing to you ' the first
direct telegraph line between Ger-
many and, America twhich .has
this day gone into operation),
the satisfaction which l feel at
the. coroplelon ,of this work, which
will serve to prOmote.the develop.
went of the friendly relations be
tween the two agefits."
The President's - message in reply
wasa.s follows
" I have received with much sails
&Won, as the first dispatch over the
new line of telegraph between Ger
many and the United States, your; Ma
jesty's kind message. In common with
ail the people of the United States so
many of whom still speak the German
tongue in their homes,.l share in the
pleasure which. your Majesty ex
presses at the opening of this bdw
line of communication, and in'the
fact that it will serve to promotekhe
friendly relations which we desire
and which it will be my aim to-Pre
serve and increase."
LONDON, April 27.--rThe.marriage
of Prince Leopold - to Princess Hel
ena of Waldeck, took place at St.
George's ChaPel, in Windsor, to-day.
A
the
crowd of people gathered at
the Paddington Station this forenoon
to witness the departure of the wed
ding guests. Windsor was gayly dec
orated with flags and kiunting in honor
of the event - The shops were closed
and the town - Ras crowded with visin?
; tors. Salutes were tired during the
day. The warships . at Port' mouth
and at other p'aces were decorated -
with flags The weather waP flue.
The marriage ceremony, which was
conducted with great pomp,•was con
-
'eluded shortly after one o'clock this
afternoon. The Archbishop of Can
terbury was the chief officiating
clergy man. was assisted by the
Bishops of London, Oxford, Worces
ter and Tirinchestef and the - Dean of_
Windsor, The Queen's arrival at the -
, ChAel was announced by a -flourish
o / trumpets. Her Majesty wore the
insignia of Prince- Leopold and the
Kollinoor diamond. Prince Leopold,
Who has not entirely . recovered from"
the effects of his repent accident,
walked to the altar with the aid of a
cane. The Princess Helena was given
away by her father. At the conclu
sion of the ceremony Prince Leopold
kissed the brick, and the Queen kiss
ed the newly-married couple and the
father and mother of the Princess.
SAN FRANCISCO, April 26.—T' o
town of Galeyville, in Arizona, west.
- of the Mexican line, was burned. and
completelydestroved yesterday after-,
noon, and thirty white_ people were
killed. The Indians scattered into
email bands and started for the Chi
ricahua' \fountains. Colonel Forsyth
with his command started in pnrsuitk
The massacre iF - fully confirm:A by
later deSpatches. Pa - ties arriving
fronithe Burro Mountains report all
quiet in that section. Great fears are
entertained for the safety of the
miners "and prospectors occupying
numerous small mining camps in the
Chiricahua range, where the' Indians
I are known to have taken refuge aster
their escape from the Stein's pack
range..
A special from Santa_ Fe says:`.
" Colonel Forsytbi - after his battle
'with Locos' band on Sunday,_was
joined '‘y "Captain Chaffee with two
companies of cavalry, and expects to
strike them again tomorrow. .He
will keep right on and follow the..ln
diens into Mexico. The whole popu
lation of the. settlement of Galey
ville in ihe ChiriCahua Mountains,
numbering thirt3-five, were killed.
Twenty persons were killed. at Clif
ton and on the roal from Clifton to .
Gilra river. Reports are current that
- Chief Nuna and some renegade
Apaches from Mesealero reservation
were at San Carlos, and joined in
inciting the outbreak. The Indians
were well armed, and well supplied
with ammunition. - Gene* Tuero is
now marching north from Janos with
5 - 00 Mexican troops to attack :the
Indians now going south into the
Chiricahus Mountains.
Another - special from - Santa - Fe
says that Forsyth would -leave for
Stein's Pass this morning on the trail
of a party of. 400 Indiana, of_ whom
115 are bucks. Doubtful Canon is
crossed by the border - line of this
'territory thirty miles from. Lords
burg. All sorts of startling messages
are coming_ here, ,and there is much
excitement among residents of the
territory.
A special from the Tombstone
Citizen : Indians attacked an Ameri
can mining camp at Bacuachi. So
nora, on the 20th of April, killing
Cowrey, Ray and Hickey.: Three
others made their escape. .The In
dians- carried off all the camp prop.
erty of value. Many Americans are
in the neighboring hit's, and more
nm.rdcrs are expected. The Presi.
dent - of Bacuichi, Senor Solazar,"bas
ordered the soldiers lind volunteers
to pursue the Indians and take no
prisoners.
Los DoN4 April 28.—The exectition
of Dr. - Lamm:in took place in the jail
at Wandsworth. Only thre-nreport
ers were present: The procession
entered the yard of the prison at 8:55
o'clock, when the prison belk_began
tolling the death knell . The chap
lain headed the. procession, and was
followed by two officials with wands:
The prisoner, who, until the time of
starting,- was calm an} composed;
looked . awfully` , pale and dejected and
very nervous.. He was supported by
wardens on either side, and, was with
difficulty able
_to descend the steps
to the yard. He was rust by Nor
wood, the executioner, at'the foot of
the steps. The prisoner was bare
headed. The operation of pinioning
seemed interminable. He submitted
without a word, and hardly seemed
to appreciate what was going on.
The steps were about sixty yards
from the ganders: Dr. , Lamson was
supported with difficulty from this
point to the scaffold. He swayed
back s wards and forwards, and stared
wildly around him when placed un
der the noose.: The chaplain, who
appeared to be much affected, then
began to .read a pardon of the burial
service. Dr. Lamson was ; meanwhile
supported by his twn jallOrt ani bad
his legs strapped. Just before the
cap was adjusted he cast down his
eyes.with a look of extrema-despair.
When the dri l l!) fell death was Instan
taneous. The drop was slue feet.
The chaplain, remaiseit 4 i ! be
Tows repaitlig' the Lout prayer.
. Ttke 00 remalaadiulasie# 01a htßre
ffZifi
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