Pittsburg dispatch. (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, October 06, 1889, SECOND PART, Page 16, Image 16

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OCTOBERS 6,
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!CHE PITTSBURG DISPATCH?
'SUNDAY;
,1889.
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A METEORIC CAREER.
The Louisiana Bond Frauds Direct
Attention to Major Burfce,
EX-TREASURER OF THE STATE.
A Man Who Always Kose Alove Depress
ing Circumstances.
THE PBOSPECr OF A STRUGGLE AHEAD
IRrEail. TTLEOEXM TO THE DISIMTCH.1
Set Oeleaxs, October 5. The dis
closures recently made in connection with
the robbery of the State Treasury of Louis
iana of a vast, and as yet, indefinitely
known sum, represented by bonds of the
State which were commanded by the Legis
lature to be destroyed, but which have in
some mysterious manner, found their way
into circulation, brings into unpleasant no
toriety one of the boldest, brainiest and most
meteoric figures that have flashed across the
Southern political sky since the close of the
civil war.
This is none other than llajor E.
A. Burke, ex-Treasurer of Louis
iana, ex-Director General of the
"World's Exposition at Hew
Orleans in 1SS5, ex-Administrator of Im
provements of the city of Ifew Orleans, ex
State Tax Collector of the richest and most
populous district in the State of Louisiana,
ex-proprietor of the Times-Democrat, the
leading daily newspaper of this city and
section, ex-political manager and "boss" in
general of the Democratic party of
Louisiana, and, finally, ex-plotter and
planner of the bold scheme by which, in
1879, Tildtn lost the Presidency and South
Carolina, Louisiana and Florida secured
local self-government.
Burke has been a truly conspicuous figure
in Louisiana for the past 15 years, "Whence
he came to make this State his home few
know, and though he has never sought to
preserve a mysterious silence aDout ms
earlier life and history, there are not a half
score of men in the State to-day who have
any definite knowledge of who he was and
what he had done previous to his appear
ance in this city.
HIS SAME IS HOT BT7EKE.
He declares that his father's name was
O'Bourke, and he himself was christened
Edward. As he grew in power and influ
ence, and his wonderful talents and re
sources gave him a glimpse of the political
greatness that was in store for him, he
chanced O'Bourke to Burke, and added the
middle name "Austin." From Celtic Ned
O'Bourke he thus became the simple Amer
ican "Edward Austin Burke."
The most autnentic story of his birthplace
makes him a native of Louisville, Ky.
How old he Is no one knows. He seems to
be SO. He has a fine presence, and is of
affable and winning manners, a lorcible
writer and an eloquent speaker. Versatile,
genial, brainy a man who thinks upon his
leet and follows thought by instantaneous
action it is no wonder that he has been a
leader of men.
But to return to what is known of his
life history. At the age of 13 Xed
O'Bourke, as he was then known, was go
ing to school in Louisville. His father had
moved meanwhile to Texas. One morning,
while yonng Xed was engaged in learning
the alphabet of the telegraph operator in
the school of telegraphy, he received a dis
patch from his father saving that he had
jailed in business, and that the son must
give up all idea of an education. But the
younc lellow had no thought of giving up
that best of all educations which consists of
a knowledge of the world and of men. He
laid aside his books, it is true, but he
TVEXT TO SCHOOL TO EVENTS,
and in that grand university achieved a
double first." He did not wend his way
to Texas, but went straightway to a leading
railway official in the city of Louisville and
asked for something to do. Hecould use the
telegraph instrument to a limited extent
and was given a small station on the line.
Here he remained for some time when he
was promoted to the agency ata larger point,
and finally at the age of 17 became Division
Superintendent of the road, with more than
COO men under his control.
"When the war cloud seemed about to
burst, youne "Burke," for such he had
then become, hurried to Texas, where his
father was living. He was then 19 years of
age. For a few months he was in the em
Dloy of one of the Texas railroads, but soon
joined the arm v of the Confederacy. A mil
itary career beginning at that age and last
ing but four years in that section of the
country could" hardly be. expected to furnish
many incidents fqr a biographical sketch,
yet even here opportunity was found for
the display of his peculiar apti
tude for overcoming the insuper
able. The Trans-Mississippi Depart
ment was deficient in means ot transporta
tion. Young Burke, then a private soldier,
was one day in the room of the commanding
General, who was bewailing the fact that no
wagons orcarts could then be manufactured
in Texas. The 20-year-old beardless boy,
standing by, declared that he could build
the wagons and carts if the money to pay lor
them was forthcoming. His very audacitv
charmed his superior, and he was bidden to
go at once and within GO days provide 100
wagons and an equal number of carts, with
the necessary horses and mules.
HIS FIBST COKTKACT.
Sufficient funds for the work were placed
at his disposal, and promptly at the ap
pointed time young Burke droveup, and be
hind him trailed out 100 wagons and the
same number of carts. He was at once
made master of transportation of the entire
Trans-Mississippi Department, and at the
close of tbe war delivered to General E.
Kirby Smith, at Shreveport, La., the largest
property account of any officer of the Con
federacy. His receipt from General Smith
for the property thus turned over, and a
complimentary letter from that officer, are
among Major Burke's most treasured pos
sessions, which he is never weary of exhibit
ing to his Iriends.
"When the war closed E. A. Burke be
came a cotton broker in Galveston, Tex.
He was a bold speculator, and for a time
made monev, but one day the collapse came,
and with $30 in his pocket he left Galves
ton for New Orleans. He reached this city
with S10 in his pocket. For several days he
walked the streets trying to secure work
until his money had all disappeared. One
sight he slept on a bench in a public square,
having no means to get a lodging place.
He strolled up Poydras street, not tar from
the heart of the city, and entered a marble
yard to ask for work. He was given the
job of removing a number of marble slabs
irom the pavement to the yard, and his
wages were fixed at 1 a day.
Within two weeks he was made superin
tendent of the yard and his pay increased to
$30 a week. It was not Jong before the
HAVE you seen our kid gloves at 69 cts.
Kxable & Shtjstek, 35 Fifth ave.
"tSSINO MUSEUMT
"Week or October 7, 1ES9,
EARLEiCOTT JUVENILE OPERA CO.
THE MASTODON FA&HION PLATE, OB
DIAMOND FAT LADY.
GREATEST SHOW OF THE SEASON.
ocG-lCW
p UENTHEfrVS ORCHESTRA
Furnishes Music for Concerts, Weddings,
Receptions, etc., etc
Also Lessons on Flnte and Piano.
Bd5-l-su 0 WOOD ST.
motmrna
Have you used
EARS Soap?
Jackson Bailroad, then and now the wost
important railway entering the city, discov
ered the wonderful organizing talent of lue
young man, and he was sought as the gen
eral freight agent of the line. In this posi
tion he had room to develop his marked
ability as an organizer and commander, and
becoming at the same time a popular mem
ber of the favorite company of the volun
teer fire department, always the source of
great political power in this city, he soon
became known to the community as a man
of cool judgment, of marked ability and
unfailing courage.
A BISE JOT THE WOELD.
In the year 1672, less than three years
after he had spent a night on a bench
in a public park because he was utterly
penniless,a Burke was made tbe regular
Democratic nominee for Administrator of
Improvements of the city of New Orleans.
The nomination of an independent candi
date divided the conservative vote, and
James Lewis, a negro aud Republican, was
elected. But in 1874 Burke was again nom
inated for the same positidn and elected by
an overwhelming majority. He thus be
came the dispenser of a greater
amount of political patronage than
any man in the State, not even except
ing the Governor. It is due him to say
that friends and enemies alike commend the
thorough efficiency and economy of his ad
ministration of the office, in which he made
a record never equaled before or since. The
city of New Orleans was clean for two vears
at least, and Burke made it s6.
In the days of the struggle between John
McEnery and Kellogg lor the Governorship.
Burke took a prominent part in behalf of
the Democracy. It was the time when
troops had been ordered to the State, by the
National Government, and things looked
squally. The 14th of September, 1874, had
brought a pitched battle between the metro
politan police supporting Kellogg and a
body of citizens supporting McEnery.
On this day and at all times Burke was, if
not the master spirit, at least not far from
the leadership. It was by his well-devised
and cleverly executed plot that the troops
ordered from Holly Springs, Hiss., on the
day of the now historic battle were delayed
long enough to give the citizens the victory,
which, although not immediately effective,
was the beginning of the end of the Kellogg
government. During the hotly contested
campaign of 1876, Major Burke served as
chairman of a committee appointed to act as
a check upon the Republican Returning
Board, and upon his figures and data was
based the claim of Tilden to the vote of the
State as cast.
AIT ASTUTE DIPLOMAT.
After the election and during the period
of the electoral commission, he went as the
representative of the Democratic State Gov
ernment to Washington, where his astute
diplomacy won from the incoming adminis
tration an informal agreement that the
Republican government should be left to
stand or tall as it could, unaided by mili
tary support. This settled the long struggle
in favor of the Democrats, and Packard, the
Republican claimant for the Governorship,
threw up the sponge.
In 1877 Major Burke, now on the topmost
wave of political influence and financial
prosperity, received the appointment of
State tax collector of the richest district in
New Orleans an office worth from 530,000
to 550,000 a year. This he relinquished the
following year to become State Treasurer,
to which position he was elected in 1878.
This office he held for ten consecutive years,
being defeated for renomination in 1888,
after a bitter factional campaign, in which
he espoused the cause of the McEnery party,
which was overthrown by the Nicholis fac
tion at the Democratic primaries through
out the State.
Major Burke's reputation as a political
leader is not confined to Louisiana. At the
Cincinnati Convention which nominated
Hancock he led the delegation from this
State, and at Chicago he not only controlled
his own delegation, which was, from first to
last, almost unanimous for Cleveland, but
took an active and influential part in the
discussion of all the issues that came before
that body, being one of the three appointed
to draft the important tariff resolutions. It
was but natural that a man of Bnrke's
power and influence should seek to enter
journalism. In 1879 he bought the New
Orleans Democrat, and later, in 1881, the
daily Times, and consolidated them under
the name of the Times-Democrat, now one
of the leading journals ot the Southwest, if
not of the Union.
CAPACITY FOE WOBK.
But the crowning work of his life, the
acme of his ambition, as he has often said
to his friends, was in the great New Orleans
Exposition, held in 1885, of which he was
made Director General. Here his capacity
for work seemed enormous. He wore out
everybody about him; but though a thou
sand fell by the way he kept steadily oil.
Nothing escaped him; nothing of value to
the Exposition was neglected. But he did
not know how to husband his physical re
sources, and, worse still, while he worked
for the Exposition his private affairs became
sadly tangled from neglect. He came out
of the Exposition with world-wide prestige,
it is true, but with health and fortune gone.
And it was during these days of arduous
labor for the development of the South
through an exhibition of her resources that
the bonds now fraudulently circulated were
taken from the State treasury. How this
was done no one knows or can know until
Major Bnrke's return from London to this
State. For several months he has been in
the English capital seeking to dispose
of some mining concessions in Hon
duras to an English company. It is not
known here how tar he has succeeded in his
efforts.
Public opinion in the State is divided as
to Burke's guilty knowledge of the abstrac
tion of the bonds. His friends are standing
firmly by him, while his enemies are cry
ing, "I told you so." But until he actually
sets foot on the soil of Louisiana, and makes
his own defense, no one can tell what will be
the outcome. He is a fighter, and neither
asks nor gives quarter, and it is probable
that there will be some interesting develop
ments when he begins to talk. If he falls, he
will bring many men high in public places
down with him.
Specialties for evening wear in brus
sels net, crepe du chene and mouseline de
soie; latest novelties, direct from the Paris
market. Hugus & Hacke.
TTSSU
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
HARRIS" THEATER.
"WEEK COMMENCING
MONDAY, OCTOBER 7.
Every axtebxoox and Evzwnra.
Second. "Weolc of tlie Pitts
burg UTavorltes, the
WILBUR OPERA CO,
And the Vivacious Nightingale,
MISS SUSIE KIRWIN,
IN A NEW REPERTOIRE:
Monday NANON.
Tuesday THE TWO VAGABONDS.
Wednesday-THE BEGGAR STUDENT.
Thursday MASCOT.
Friday THE BOHEMIAN CTRL.
Saturday PRINCESS OF TREBIZONDE.
MEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
GRAND
HOUSE
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
i?r
NEW ABVBUnSEXElrTS.
"3gr
E2TBAI
WEEK OF OCTOBER 14.
Matinees Wednesday and Saturday,
Engagement of the Famous
RUDOLPH
ARONSON
Week of October 14 SHEI
ocS-59
E. D. WILT, Lessee and Manager.
ONE WEEK, COMMENCING
Monday, October 7.
Saturday Matinee 'Only.
First Appearance fn Pittsburg of the Distin
guished English Actress,
HELEN BARRY,
Supported by a Specially Engaged Company
from the Union Square Theater, New York
City, Under tbe Management of
J. M. HILL,
In the following repertoire:
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday
Evenings,
Love and Liberty,
A Powerful Romantio Drama, written express
ly for Miss Barry by T. Malcolm Watson, ot
London.
Tuesday and Friday Evenings and Saturday
Matinee.
A Woman's Stratagem,
A Bnarkling Comedy from Eugene Scribe's
"Batailles des Dames."
A Metropolitan Production, In which the
Stage Settings, Costumes and Mechanical
Effects are Entirely New, having ust been
completed at Great Cost, all of which are Car
ried oy the Company.
October 14 Rudolph Aronson's Casino Onen
Co. in "The Brigands." oc5-24
COMIC OPERA CO,,
Presenting the Sparkling Operetta
THE
BRIGANDS!
As Presented for 125 Perform
ances at the
NEW YORK CASINO!
And Four Weeks in Boston.
THE ORIGINAL "CAST.
INCLUDING
THEATRE
Undertime direction of
K.1I.G0MCK&C0.
ONE WEEK, COMMENCING MONDAY, OCT. 7,
Every Evening and Wednesday and Saturday Matinees,
ttAJSZRT TjJuC!T
AND THE
Lillian Russell,
Fanny Rice,
Isabelie Urquhart,
Anna O'Kesfe,
Delia Stacey,
.Laura Russell,
Alice Greeway,
Eva Johns,
. Nellie Duglass,
Clara Randall,
Fred. Solomon,
Geo. Oltni,
HenrrHallam,
Richard Carroll,
A. W. Tarns,
J. A. Furry,
Henry Leoni,
Chas. Priest,
Max Lube,
Chas. Renwics.
Tbe production under the direction of
MR MAX FREEMAN.
Musical Director, MR. GUSTAVE KERKER.
The costumes and scenery are the most elab
orate and gorgeous ever seen in an operatio
production.
Bale of seats begins THURSDAY MORN
ING, October 10, at Box Office, Grand Opera
House. oc8-56
s
TTT
BY JOSEPH ARTHUR
NOTE This Electric Success has played to more people, more money and longer runs In
England and America than any other attraction.
A BEAUTIFUL LOVE STORY. MAGNIFICENT SCENIC PRODUCTION.
Press Opinions Last Season Pittsburg, February 12, 1889,
TIMES. A popular success.
EVENING PRESS. The play was
cheered heartily. By ou packed. '
POST. BUou crowded to see a most
enjoyable performance.
, LEADER, A great go. Entnuslastlo
audiences. Standing room only.
REeEBVED SEATS,
75, 50 aaid 25c.
DISPATCH. Intensely Interesting.
Capacity of the By ou tested.
CHRONICLE-TELEGRAPH. Strong
situations and vivid climaxes. Audience
of Immense proportions.
COM.-GAZETTE. Fully up to the
standard.
BIJOU PRICES:
OCTOBER li-I. M. HILL'S "A POSSIBLE CASE" COMPANY.
ocS-41
PITTSBURG
EXPOSITION
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT!
fviZ
p-
Monday Evening, Oct. 7.
Matinees, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
Gus
Hill's
World
of
Novelties.
O. W. Williams.
Billy Carter.
The Great Pirrung.
Chas. Harris.
Miss Nellie Walters.
Phil Sheridan.
Miss Chrissie Sheridan.
Swift & Chase.
Miss Lottie Gibson.
Jas. K Black.
Chas. Hume.
Gus Hill
And the New Comedy, called
Spring Chickens.
Oct It Hyde's Specialty Co. ocM
EXTRA ANNOUNCEMENT!
GOOD NEWS! GOOD NEWS!
The Hit of Last Season Here. '
COMING. COMING.
BIJOU THEATER,
WEEK OP OCTOBER 14.
"A POSSIBLE CASE."
Sydney RosenfeWs Amusing Comedy, acted by
J. M. HILL'S
Union Square Theater Company.
Get the DATE down in your Memorandum
Book. ocS-21
Grand Prize Concert!
WILL BE GIVEN BY
COMPANY I, KNIGHTS OF ST. GEORGE,
WEDNESDAY, October 9, 1889. Doors open
at 7.30; commence at 8 p.m. Tickets, 25c For
sale by members, and at 223 Franklin it. AH
purchasers of tickets for this concert will
please call at Sixth ward school hall, Alle
gheny, as the former location has been changed.
By order of Chairman of Committee.
0C4-55 L. BLATTNER.
"WORLD'S MUSEUM,
ALLEGHENY CITY.
I James Geary.... Manaeer
HOi-rv Unntf HanM.a -ft.
.j mvwu.,,.,..,., ,..wujiupaa i imager
Week, October 7.
The Medical Fraternity Nonplussed, a Theory,
a Study,
ROSE, THE WILD GIRL
A Strange Formation,
GEO., THE TURTLE BOY,
OTHER NEW FEATURES,
And great all new Stage Performance.
Coming, Oct 11 Geary's World's Indoor
Winter Circus.
Postponed one week later, the Grand Prize
Baby Show, Oct. 21. oc6-63
TMPERIAL HALL-
Corner Seventh avenue and new Grant street.
THE IMPERIAL CLUB'S
Famous Thursday Night Receptions
Erery Thursday Night from 8 to L
Yourself and lady are welcome. ocfl-58
The management take pleasure in
announcing that an engagement ha3
"been made with "rnnes' Famous Thir
teenth Regiment Band, of New York,"
commencing to-morrow (Monday) and
continuing every afternoon and evening
until the close of the Exposition. This
famous organization numbers 45 musi
cians of national reputation, and is under
the personal direction of Professor Ihnes.
Mr. Ihnes is, unquestionably, the great
est living Trombonest. He will appear
at each concert and give one of his un
equaled solos.
This is, undoubtedly, thevflnest mili-'
taryband in the country. Competent
judges consider it in many respects su
perior to even Gilmore. The band will
perform, in addition to the regular Pro
gramme, Prof Innes' noted selection,
called "The Congress of Nations," with
lull artillery effects, Battery B, of this
"city, having kindly loaned their cannon'
for the purpose. The cannon will iie?
fired by electricity.
Do not iaii to near tnis grand can- "
bination. No increase in prices. . ' '- -
- i
F Jt
5ff
i .x)TvrTssio3sr
ADULTS, 25c. ,
-.'
J. .
rft i'
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"9
eeMT
TO-MORROW MORNING WE C
OMMENCE A PHENOMENAL SALE
OF4-
MEN'S FINE FALL OVERCOATS
To "WZbJLcIfcL "We S:peoaiU.;7"' In.-v-ije G-exLijlexo-enD. "WIlo .n?e 3?at:r?o-n i reL-n g ZMTe:r?o:fcLa:n.-b
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Tadlors
"We Sl3.aH Offer Soxne
5,000 OVERCOATS
And those who are particular about the fit, style and
general make-up of their clothing this notice
should prove of the greatest interest
Promptly at 8 o'clock to-morrow morn
ing this sale will commence and we
shall have displayed on our
counters and tables a stock
of Overcoats which has never
been equaled in extent, assortment
or general excellence in any store in the
United States. It is a stock that combines
all the qualities necessary to make it the best
that the most noted American and foreign manufac
turers, with the aid of the most skilled workmen in
the work, could supply.
10, 12, 15,
16, 18,
20, 25, SO.
are the prices at which you can, at this great sale,
obtain choice of Overcoats, which it is very safe
for us to say never were equaled at any of
the prices named. Out of this stock can
be selected an Overcoat to please
any man. Be advised by us,
don't go to a merchant
tailor until you have at least
seen these goods. We have "regu
lar" and "extra" sizes and guarantee
perfect fit and satisfaction to everyone. The
cut, style, make and trimmings embodied in these
fine grades are equal to and in many instances supe
rior to any custom-made goods obtainable in Pitts
burg, while our prices for the same range from one
quarter to one-half less. We thus point out how you
can save money. Why not do it? Ours is a house
where everybody can trade and trade right
2LT-re:L?y Onn.e of TLese
5,000 OVERCOAT
Marked in plain figures the price it will be sold foe
The ticket giving information relative to quality
and price will be' plainly seen and a very."
t !- i M.S Ml ! )
unci lnspccuuu wui cuuvincc anyone
that it is an utter impossibility for
such bargains to be obtained in - '
any other clothing house
in this city. Those who come
either td buy or inspect thase ele- , '
pant Overcoats will find that thev are4
all made with a care heretofore unknown foJ
. the wearers of Ready-made Clothing and 4that
the prices we shall sell at are much lower than the
merits of the goods should permit Every Overcoat
in the entire stock is a bargain at prices offered.
TjfijjK
10, 12, 15,
$16, 18,
20, 25, 30.
We repeat these prices in order that they shall b
impressed on your memory. No matter where!
you go, in the busy East, the lively West or
the active South these extraordinary
bargains will stand pre-eminent
You have choice of Overcoats
cut long, medium or short '
' box style. Many of them are '
made from the costliest and most
exquisite of imported materials and
they're equal in make, fit and finish to the
most expensive of custom work. You have
doubtless heard such expressions from other cloth
ing dealers of this city and have learned to your
sorrow that "all was not as professed," but you can
rely on any statement we make. Why not investi
gate?. A few minutes spent here means at least the
.saving of a $io bill.
i
OUR BOYS' CLOTHING DEPARTMENT THE FINEST IN THE COUNTRY.
Children's Black Worsted Suits at $2. Nice Suits, corded back and front, $2 50. Fancy Plaited Suits, in beautiful patterns, at $3, $3 50 and $4. Belted and' Plaited fine Cassimere Suits at $4, $4 50, $5 and $6.
Splendid Corduroy Suits at $4, $5 and $6. Children's Overcoats at $2 50, 3, $4, 5, $6 and $8 which you cannot match anywhere else for less than from $x to $4 more money. Boys' .Long Pant Suits at
$3 S $4) $5 $6 $8 and 10. These for pure, unadulterated bargains excel anything ever brought to Pittsburg. Big Boys' Overcoats at $4, $5, $6, $8, $10 and ?iz are so far superior in make and fit to
what is sold elsewhere in Pittsburg as not to be comparable. All stylishly cut aud elegantly made. Goods sold so close as to leave hardly sufficient profit to pay for handling.
G-TTSKTSrS
Goods sent O. O. D. to any part of tho United States or Canada. Send for, our
Elegantly Illustrated Pall and Winter Catalogue.
aOO -to 400 2&&JElJ33Bin2 STBEBT.
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