Pittsburg dispatch. (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, September 08, 1889, SECOND PART, Page 16, Image 16

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THE PITTSBUBGDISPATOHj SUNDAY, 7fSEPTEEEPi889.
f' in
SHOOTING THE HAT.
Cornelius YanderMt Taken at His
Word by a Saucy Belle Who
PEPPERED HIS 100 PANAMA.
A Little Girl "Who Buried Ilcr Treasures
for Use Kext Tear.
PARASOL FLIRTATIONS THE LATEST
ICOJUtESrOVDEXCEOF THE DisrATcn.l
Lenox, Mass., September 6.
r ETEKMINED t o
make tbe most, and
the last of the
summers outing, a
thousand wealthy
idlers fiuish up the
season in the Berk-
shire Hills. They
Kather here in the
. first week of Septem
ber, comine .rom all
the other and bigger
resorts, but more es
pecially from proud
L II M 111 and pretentious New-
1 1 I til I II II A n 4 lis rtOT"
puru vu. .& j
before one small and
K -U-c' exclusive clique
QUllbCU XI en jjwi
Lenox they instituted a ceremonx
that is likely to become a jocose annual rite.
They shot the summer hat. It has lorn;
been the custom in the New York Stock
Exchange to batter all the hot weather hats
worn into that financial mart on or after the
1st of September, and the small boys of the
street, backed by such authority, have habit
ually cried, "Shoot the hat," toeren the
portliest of men who presume to coTer their
venerable heads with summer hats in
autumn.
TAKES AT HIS TVOKD.
At Newport the method of taboo was
more polite. The hat of Conelins Vander-
bilt was chosen for the occasion. It was a
wide-brimmed Panama straw hat, of the
Considering a Proposal.
sort that rich .-.ml whimsical men sometime
pay as much as ?100 for, and thereafter
wear it lor many a year, dehant of changing
styles.
"0, why don't you shoot the hat?" in
quired a'saucy belle of the millionaire, as
he lounged on the Casino veranda.
'"I'll let you shoot it, if you want to," was
the reply.
"Very well. Give it to me."
Mr. Vanderbilt did not seem clad to be
taken at his word, for the hat was a cher
ished one, but be handed it over without a
word, and within an hour the girl had it
placed on a secluded lawn as a target, with
a party of beaux and belles firing at it with
a rifle. The hat was hit and missed until
the fun of it was exhausted, and by that
time it was perforated like the cover of a
pepper-box. This occurred on September 2,
and it was considered such a successful
ceremony that no doubt it will be a Septem
ber episode at Newport regularly hereafter.
The example was potent, and just about
all the fashionable men who have come to
Lenox from Newport are wearing brand
new ana glossy high suk cats, 'ine laaies,
too, are appearing in
KAJtLT AUTUMIT TOILETS,
which are much less showy and gauzy than
those of tbe summer. The picture shows
two toilets, masculine and feminine, con
sidered about right for outdoors in the Berk
shire Hills. What are the wearers doing
in this particular instance? "Well, looking
into the bushes. "What do they see there?
Not much, protably, for their attention is
A Maid Proposition.
fixed upon matrimonial futurity. In plain
English, the marriage question has been
popped, and is under consideration, ulrs.
Paran Stevens, an experienced observer,
tells me that more matches are made amon"
the Four Hundred at Lenox in Septembe'r
than everywhere else all the rest of the year
round. Summer flirtations and intimacies
at the more populous and livelier resorts
are apt to culminate here, in the quietlv
Sentimental atmosphere of the hills, in the
formation of conjugal partnerships. Mrs.
Stevens has spent a ?reat deal of time in
London, and slie spoke of the success of
American girls in foreign aristocratic so
ciety. Ofcoursethereisa dashing of matrimo
nial hopes at Lenox as well as realization of
them, for the mating of human beings,
zspecially if they be wealthy, is not always
accomplished easily or satisfactorily. One
pretty and relatively poor girl, for instance,
is pretty well understood to have set her
heart on marrying a certain rich young fel
low. She devoted her summer to it. and had
reason to suppose that she was
MAKING THE EIGHT IlirBESSIOjr.
Moreover, the father of the young man
took a deep interest in her, and this was
construed as a sanction of the probable
union. The fact of his being a widower
was not taken into account, and that proved
to be a mistake. After the arrival of the
trio in Lenox, one afternoon,, the old man
began to talk to the girl indefinitely about
marriage. It was like the familiar comedy
scene In the plays, where the heroine is mis
led as to whom tbe wooer is stipnlrmr- nf
The Lenox maiden didn't sue pec t, although
the portly widower deferentially uncovered
his almost hairless head, and addressed her
nth unusual formality, that it was he and
,ot Hi sou whom she could wed. But at
W M
Hi' 'BL
HKfXi
1 11
M
for
length he delivered himself of the question
point blank:
"Will you marry me?" ,
She was dumfounded and resentful, but
her placidity of countenance was undis
turbed. "I was not expecting this," she said,
truthfully enough; "I must decline your
bald proposition."
Did she maliciously emphasize the word
"bald?" There was no doubt of it The
Burying Her Playthings.
widower clapped on his hat, and didn't lift
it again upon bowing her adieu.
BUBTIXG 1IEB TREASURES.
Summer resorts are'apt to be graveyards
of buried hopes, anyhow, but the intermeuts
are not often so attractively made as that
which I witnessed at Long Branch. In the
party which was about to set out for Lenox
was an eight-year-old girl, jnst big enough
to be properly dressed in the most pictur
esque costume, and young enough to be un
affectedly childish. On the day before
Have vou
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j J)M8gt Sfflmk. i3-T lei: 111J.....)idiz$
in , i . MJIft)l'Vl(iil ..I S I tnJjjm ,
quitting the seashore she was seen shoveling
up a mound of sand on the beach.
"What are you doing?" I inquired.
"I am burying my playthings," she re
plied. "They won't be any use to me until I
come back next summer, and so I am cover
ing them up, so they will be safe till I want
them again."
The eirls who have made a summer pas
time of flirtation may as well bury the sea
son's sentiment, if it hasn't by this time
brought a matrimonial engagement The
waves of a social winter may wash ont the
graves, as they will the sand heap which
the little girl made, but there is no use in
lugging worthless things away from a sum
mer resort
THE LATEST AND LAST PAD
of the closing season with the girls is tbe
parasol flirtation. Several years ago a
language of fans was invented by some
body, and it got into considerable use by
roguish maidens. The use of a parasol for
a similar sly purpose is a new whim at
Lenox. Whence it was brought would be
hard to discover, but it is here and a dozen
of onr most approved belles are demurely
employing it A code jnf signals includes a
score or more of meanings. For example,
to hold the parasol across the right shoulder
and behind the neck, with its canopy
spread, exactly as snown in me picture,
is to be interpreted as Saying: "I in
vite you." As to the particular thing to
which she thus calls the fellow, circum
stances must determine. It may be a chat
on a veranda, or a walk through Parson's
Meadow. Perhaps it might prove an in
vitation to matrimony, ultimately. These
things are very subtle.
Kameba.
Notice to G. A. It.
The Pennsylvania Kailroad will accept
all orders issued by Adjutant General
Hastings for transportation to Gettysburg
for tickets, whether the order is drawn on
this or any other company.
P l nrwrT nhnfns S1 Yipr rfnr Trips' Pati.
ular Gallery, 10 and 12 Sixth st. TTSu .
used
Soap?
-v
n'M'.i )Af Yr -r !-! sso'..af 1!. k m .n . sr& iDn-vvtmt
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
BIJOU THEATER,
4
Under the Direction of-----B.M. QTJLIOK & 00.
WEEK BEGINNING MONDAY, SEPT. 9.
MATINEES WEDNESDAY AND SATUBPAY.
'
First appearance in this city in five years of America's Representative
Irish Comedian, .
W.J. SCAN LAN
a-
'PEEK
Under the sole management of AUGUSTUS PITOU, presenting on
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday Evenings and Matinee,
HIS SUCCESSFUL IRISH PLAY
.'. SHANE-NA-LAWN. .'.
Written by James C. Boach and J. Armory Knox (Texas Sittings).
AND ON
Thursday, Friday and Saturday Evenings and Matinee,
HIS LATEST GREATEST SUCCESS
V MYLES AROOJST V
From the pens of George H. Jessop and Horace Townsend.
During the performance of Shane-Na-Lawn, Mr. Scanlan will sing
'Why Paddy is Always Poor," "Peggy O'Moore," "Remember, Boy,
Your Irish," "Scanlan's Rose Song," and his world-famous "Peek-a-Boo,"
and in Myles Aroon the following songs, written and composed by him
self for this play: "You and I Love," "My Maggie," "Live My Love,
Oh, Live," and his latest success, Scanlan's "Swing Song.
BIJOU PRICES:
September 16 L. O. DAVIS IN ONE
CrXvA
THIS
will be a memorable affair in the
purchasing public of both cities, as well as the thousands of strangers who will visit the
Exposition, are cordially invited to call and see
THE GRANDEST STOCK OF FURNITURE, CARPETS, CURTAINS
AND HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS
ever exhibited under the roof of any establishment in this part of the country. All Keech's
efforts of the past are eclipsed and overshadowed by his great preparations to please his
army of customers this season. The entire Mammoth Establishment is filled from basement
to roof with the latest, best and choicest merchandise, and, as this vast stock has been bought
direct from the manufacturers and for spot cash, Keech is in a position to name prices that
no competitor can approach.
KEECH'S CLOTHING and CLOAK ROOMS, too, are now replete with the latest
Fall and Winter styles. Every taste, purse and requirement can be suited with ease from
the grand stock shown. Come to the opening you'll not regret it.
KZEEOHI'
CASH and
923 and
B"Open-Saturday Nights
Tf
RESERVED SEATS,
75, 50 am-d. 25o.
OF THE OLD STOCK.
se8-35
- A - BOO,'
ND
"W" IE IE IK .
annals of the House Furnishing trade of Pittsburg. The
ZQWQQl
CREDIT HOUSE,
925 Penh Avenue,'
ITeai' ISTixL-Kh. St2?eet.
till io o'clock.
NEW ABYKKTISEaiKKTB. ,
GREATER THAN EVER
THE NEW
WORLD'S MUSEUM
Allegheny City.
JAMES GEARY ......Manager.,
HARRY SCOTT Easiness Manager.
FOR WEEK SEPTEMBER 9.
The Great
WORLD'S MINSTRELS.
32 Artists of Renown,
Comedians, Vocalists and Cancers.
Dnos, Quartets and Quintets.
Elerated First Part, 8 End Hen.
JAPS AND FREAKS.
Special Engagement of tbe Home
Favorites,
C. V. LEWIS QUARTET.
( in theirrellknown choice selection of scngs.
A BIG SHOW, BIG THEATER,
And small Price ot Admission.
lOo. Children, 5a
OPEN DAILY FROM 1 TO 10 P. M.
Next BIG ELIZA, "Weight 900. See her ar
rive and loaded on wagon, B. AT), freight yard,
Monday 10 A. at, September 18. se84
Monday Evening, Sept. 9.
Matinees, Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
THE SHOW
Rose
Hill's
of tbe present Exciting Period.
Bright as the Summer Son.
Gorgeous Costumes.
Special Scenery.
Beautiful Tableaux.
Grand Marches in Guttering
Armor.
A select list ot Specialty
Btars
English
Folly
Co,
And the new Musical Burlesque,
i xjiuuca.
PARISIAN REVELS,
-0R-
OUPID'S CAPERS.
Sept 10 Austin's Australian NoTelty Co.
se8 21
FaLL
s
GWlfPlilttHAFlW)
K D. wiiii'. Lessee and Manager. .
' -
SEPT. ?. IWEEKpSLTvlltolA
TAtfNEHILL'S '
PRIC-A-PRAC
CARNIVAL
A NEW MUSICAL
Comedy Extravaganzi,
PEESENTIHa
Charming Mcstc,
Graceful Dances,
, Jolly Comedians,
Lovely Girls, -Delightful
Singing,
-"f Beautiful Costumes,
OH
FUN,
MUSIC
AND
BEAUTY.
IN SHORT
The Greatest Entertainment
MATINEE I. OF THE I MATINEE
"WED. YEAR. 1 8AT.
Sept. 18 Denman Thompson's "OLD HOME
STEAD." se8-2B
CANADA'S GREAT
ndusf rial Fair
-Aim-
Agricultural Exposition
1889,
TOEONTQ
SEPTEMBER 9 to 21. .
Greater Attractions and a Grander Display
than erer before.
Newest and best special features
that money oan procure.
The greatest annual Far and
Entertainment on the American
continent.
Cheap Esoursions on all Hail
ways. Oyer 250,000 rlsltors attended this Exhibition
lost year. For Programmes, eta, drop a post
card to H. J. HILL, Manager, Toronto.
J. J. WITHROW. Pre. se6-2-rsu
OPENING
m
VOCiMJi
. - -
COMMENCING MORMY, S6TT.
f ajT - . m frti
GraiKlProdiMstfoaC,ito'
sKIPIH A HCi mmm,mmS?J. k
" ? WMWwLW4ffWrj
Elegaht'Oostumes !
Special Scenery!
..' 4IWP
Electrifying Mechanical Effect
The Greatest Dramatic Seprsseii- M
t tetion of Modern Times. '"'
,& :
Week Sept l-"Woaa Agttaat Wmbm.1
M8-7
TMPERrAL HAT.TS " '
Corset Sereotb aTeoae and New Grant street,
PALI, AND WESTER-
SEASON RBCEPTIOHa
EYKBY THURSDAY NIGHT.
Music by ska Ifecart sad Beyal ItaHaa
Orchestras. se&4B
. DESKS
A SPKXALTY.
Tfca Most Cmwximn
STocBca me mfi
a
BEDROCKI'WCm
We ate mannisatttTO tsiij
wonderful eemhinntlon ye
jctuy urm-.
mr& H;" U.
Hl
6TEYENS CHAIR CO.' f
.3tiL
No. 3 SIXTH ST,
mlM6-Bu PITrSBDRG.PA
''l. J l Jtjovw.J-
s
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