Pittsburg dispatch. (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, August 04, 1889, SECOND PART, Page 16, Image 16

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ON A FfiDIT PACKET.
A Trip Down (he Ohio River in the
Height of the Season.
SCENES 'AT THE FRUIT FARMS.
Millions Invested in Boats, Farms, Labor
and Machinery.
THE TRADE DOUBLIXG EVERY TEAR
rWBITTC rOS THE DIsrjLTCn.
HERE are Jew
among the vast
number of the
readers of TllE
Dispatch that
have the slightest
idea ot the great
outlay of money
and the enormous
amount of labor
involved in bring
ing to their tables
or the city markets
the immense quan
tity of fruit and
vegetables con
sumed between the
first appearance of
the early berries
and the disappear
a n c e of the late
apples.
It was just as the
good people o f
Pittsburg were
seated at the supper table, and the 6 o'clock
whistles had ceased their eternal din in the
mills along the river, that a bis back wheel
steamer swung quickly out from the wharf
below SmithCeld street and started her pad
dles for a 00 mile trip dowu the Ohio
river.
Clouds had hung rather heavily over the
hills on both sides of the river all day, and
darkness closed in early, with droppings of
rain, forming the curtain drawn down to
shut out the last view of the "Smoky City."
There was nothing to listen to but the
steady, and rather solemn, throb of the
boat's engines, and a really giddy young
girl who insisted, despite her mother's en
treating looks, in pounding away at
the "See-Saw "Waltz," "Boulanger
A CHARTEBED
March," and so forth, on the piano
in the boat's saloon, so The Dispatch
commissioner bundled himself up in a big
rubber coat and sauntered down to the
drafty "guards" of the lower deck, where,
in the fitlul glare of the boat's light, he
could see the greatest conglomeration of
bags and barrels, mats and sacks, of round
and square and oblong things, shapes that
made it easv lor the curious to guess what
F- they contained, and shapes the coverings
f- ot which hid their contents from the curi-
L ous gaze more completely than seemed nec-
T essiry to the guesser; but what was of inter
est above all other things were the big piles
'- of brand new "slatted" crates and many
white baskets and barrels on their wav
down river to be filled with the precious re-
inll. oriliA f.n i . nvrn . .nil .nrl a
i THE MATE TALKS.
I The different lots as set together were
I marked lor various landings on both sides
of the river in Pennsylvania, Ohio, "West
Vireinia, Indiana and Kentucky, and while
. the newspaper man was becoming acquaint
ed with the names of the prominent fruit
j growers through the means of the-markings
on the different lots a dark figure came out of
' the darker background of the att deck, and
it proved to be the mate of the boat.
I "Carrying ranch of this sortof stuff now?"
queried "the man in the gum coat, as he
t dropped a tag he had been reading.
p "Well, I gufss you'd think so if you was
; in my place. "Why, huntin' lor room for
the treight we've got to take in down the
river is like huntin' for a cent in a sawdust
pit, and a greater part of the room is taken
up bv these creates and baskets and bar
rels." ; , "Know anything about the fruit trade
along this river?"
"l"cs; I rather guess so. I've spent most
of my time carrying what was raised down
I this river, an' one of the biggest loads of
' berries ever taken out of the country below
"Wheeling was the 3,000 buckets of black
berries the Batchelor brought up from the
Little Kanawha country when I run on her,
! a season or two ago.
j "Captain got something over 5103 for that
rV little 'jag,' and we're goin' todo it agin this
E season if things keeps on the way there
goin.
r "Ye needn't mind stayin' up to-night, fer
f we ain't goin' to load nothin' of that sort till
we get below 'the cluster,' and you'll find
plenty of these wooden buckets, barrels,
f crates and traps to look at when we git down
v. to Martin's Ferry, where they turn 'em
out like our wheel does water." .
' AT EABLY DAW1T.
I His advice to turn in was scarcely needed,
nnd the little stateroom, with its white bed
and a bit ot brussels on the floor, seemed a
better place than the wet, slippery decks and
the cold night without. At C the next
morning The DlSPAicn mau turned out
nnd got down on the wharlboat at "Wheel
ing, where great stacks of barrels, buckets
and crates were heaped about promiscuously,
while iu another section under the shed
were long lines of barrels filled with pota
toes and apples brought from the rezlon in
I and about "Wheeline. The rjrineinsl nor-
I tion of the apples had just arrived from'
frank Mahan's apple houses on the Ohio
river 6 lew.miles above. This grower alone
i handles thousands of barrels ot apples an-
( Dually, from the early "green" to the fall
i' pipiu' and russet, and has built an apple
, bouse at Mahan's landing, the largest in the
country.
From the agent on the wharfboat the fact
, was- gleaned that the- region immediately
adjacent to "Wheeling is devoted more ex-
tensively to the raising of a fine class of
! potatoes for Eastern ana Southern markets,
j nnd that at Martin's Ferry, just across the
! bridge on the ottier side ot the river, most,
if not all, of the boxes, crates, baskets,
, berry boxes and barrels for the fruit trade
as far west as the Mississippi river were
I made.
' "We ship a great amount by boat this sea-
l son that years back found its only outlet by
ran, on account oi we excellent state of tne
water, which allows the boats to run so
steadily that their rates, which were always
below those of the railroad companies, have
now been still further reduced," said the
clerk. "Bntjou'll find more interesting
natters pertaining to the fruit trade further
down stream."
The boat bell iu ringing and the colored
roustabouts were pulling in tat planks, ao
the hunter for fruitv facts had to leap aboard
and twist his way through the staSks ot bar
rels, filled and unfilled, to reach the upper
or passenger deck.
"WHEJf SIOUX DSVILI.E WAS REACHED
the tinv wharf was filled to overflowing
with fruit from Pelly's place just back of
Moundsville. Colonel J. H. Lockwood. of
L the same section, and Thompson, both heavy
growers, were well represented by the ship
ments of apples, tomatoes, clums and pears,
as well as onions, cucumbers and melons.
Thompson's form and orchards are on the
OTiio side opposite Moundsville, and from
Captina Island, between the Ohio and West
Virginia shores, come the finest melons
Packing Avplei for Market
"under the sun." That's about the way
they put it down there, and the appearance
of the melons bear them out. But all of
these heavy growers in this section, and on
westward as far as Otto on the Indiana
shore, own one or more flatboats with boxed
tops, in which they load any large consign
ments of fruit that may be ordered, and then
those who do not have towboats ot their own
charter and seed their fruit away to the
South, East or 'West by this method.
The boat made but slow time below this
point for some miles, for every here and
there along either shore were barrels and
crates, sometimes but a half dozen at a place,
but alongside of each one stood the sturdy
farmer or his boy mounting guard over the
little treasure that would help to buy more
acres or enrich those already possessed, and
it was a lovely picture in the early morning
light, the broad river stretching out far
away till lost at a bend in the blue hills be
yond. The great sweep of pebbly shore
surmounted by the high clay banks scarred
and cut by many a "rise" and just above
the rich "bottom" lands with their generous
orchards where the heavily loaded fruit
trees stood in long lines as trim as soldiers.
Then back and towering high above all of
this were tin big green hillsides, spotted
every here and there with bold juttings of
red and gray rock, again the solitary figure
standing on the slight eminence above the
FBTJIT PACKET.
sandy shore of the river and just where the
little country road came out under the trees
and dipped down toward the river on the
ground.
THE LUSCIOUS FBUIT
in baskets as white as driven snow, covered
over with mosquito netting to keep the flies
and other insects from getting, among the
fruit and inducing rot, or spoiling its smooth,
clean appearance altogether. Sometimes
behind this figure stood the team of old
farm horses and the sled upon which the
load of barrels or of boxes had been brought
from the farm, back m the hills beyond the
wood.
At Sunficb, a landing on the Ohio side.
Mallony's fruit farm is situated and he had
his quota of freight already at the landing.
At Long Beach, West Virginia, nearly
opposite Matamoras, Ohio, the Monteith
farm and orchards are located, and here the
npple country really begins and extends far
dcvn the river Women and men were in
the orchards on ladders picking the fruit of
the plum, apple, peach, or pear trees and in
other places women and girls bent over the
vegetable gardens where long rows of
cucumbers, onions and tomatoes grew.
In other portions of the farm men and
T
A Peach Shuie.
boys) were at work tacking the crates and
boxes together which the boats tossed off to
them. Others, and most of them young
girls, worked swiftly and deftly at packing
the fruit as fast as the receptacles were
ready lor them. As the steamer passed there
were few instances where the entire party
did not salute by swinging their big straw
bats in the air.
Fine vineyards dotted the hill slopes, re
minding one of descriptions of the Bhine
country of Germany. It was near enough
like the original to have brought tears to the
eyes of any Deutscher afflicted with "heim
aich." At the head of Grape Island, and in
numerous other localities between Mustaffa,
Island aud Hanging Bock, large vineyards
were pointed out by the pilot Indeed" that
section of country lying on either shore of
the Ohio river in West Virginia, Ohio and
Kentucky, is a veritable land "flowing with
milk and honey." But it would be utterly
impossible to devote space, to eaah of the
hundreds of places through this country,
though every one is wortbv of mention.
Berry, near Pipe Creek Bend, Dudley, at
Parkersbutg and Alexander at Letart Falls
ship melons, apples, cabbage and potatoes as
a specialty, while the Weldhall vineyard, at
Newberry Bar, W. Va., near the nead of
Mustaffa Island, is getting ready for a big
output this season.
A MELON J-ABM.
At Brush Creek Island, just below Cono
conneque Island, the searcher or news and
pictures found both in one of the funniest
melon farms on the entire river. This,
patch covers a good slice of the island, and,
though the melons are in some cases not
larger than a man's hand and scarcely ever
bigger than his head, they possess all the
richness of flavor aud beauty of color that
b'long to the larcer and higher-rated fruit
When the boat pulled up for a moment at
the base of the greit tree that overhung the
water near the melon farm, a number of
skiffs were clustered near the river's edge
and their occupants were burin?' these
melons at CO oentt a skiff load, while a must-1
THE
' ber of the passengers on the boat purchased
all they could eat of them at 1 cent apiece.
Below this point the boat stopped fre
quently on both sides of the river to load
lruit, but her principal stop was at
Brush Creek landing, where in a few
months thousands of barrels of the famous
"Borne beauty," an apple of exquisite
flavor and beautiful shape, are shipped to
the markets east and west on the river lines.
Alter touching at Point Pleasant, the
birth place of the lamented General TJ". S.
Grant, and halting for a moment at Colum
bia and Dayton, Ky., the big steamer, now
loaded far above her side rails, swung across
toward the Ohio shore and made fast to the
'big wharf boat at Cincinnati, after a trip of
COO miles down the Ohio. After taking on
coal and discharging the great treasures of
garden, orchard and field that were stacked
about her decks, she again cut loose and be
gan her trip up river, to gather f another
cargo of fruit for Pittsburg markets.
DOWN THE BIVEB.
As she left her moorings The Dispatch
representative stepped aboard the Fleet
wood, one ot the large steamers plying be
tween Cincinnati and Louisville, just as the
signal bell for starting on the downward
trip sounded.
The planks were drawn on board and in a
short time the wreathing smoke from the
two steamers, one on its way up the other
down the river, joined far up over the center
of the stream and trailed out, as the two got
well under way, like a great ribbon holding
them together.
Night fell with the customary monotony
on the boatand nothing broke the quiet
spell until at 9 o'clock she began to reach
the fruit growing country on the Indiana
side, and here the hills towered high above
the shore, only broken by an occasional
"jut" rock or a bare spot where a landslide
had cleared the timber out Through the
occasional openings on the densely wooded
hills whenever the mate swung the1 huge
electric light upon the shore, one
might easily discern the long wooden in
clines with their cable and car attachment
which are used by the fruit growers of this
section to biing their products down to the
boats. At Otto, Ind., the largest consign
ment of peaches were taken aboard, and
while loading this lot the picture presented
in the glare of the bright light was both
BEAUTIFUL AND ANIMATED,
the negro roustabouts trotted rapidly to and
fro, their shining black skins in strong con
trast with the snowy crates and baskets they
were handling, every leaf upon every tree
in range of the powerful light was brought
out strongly against the blaek background
of night beyond. While the tiny cars ran
swiftly up and down the incline from a
point far up above the tree tops on the sum
mit of the hill, where a little yellow light
blinked out at the night
At Houston's Land and a dozen other
points on both the Indiana and Kentucky
shores for a distance of 160 miles the boat
stopped throughout the night and following
day loading peaches, pears, apples, toma
toes, and, in fact, everything in the line of
fruit, vegetables or general produce for the
markets of St Louis, Memphis, Vickshurg,
or the nearer city of Louisville
Throughout the summer and fall these
boats are continually loaded to the "rail
lines" with every conceivable product that
the rich soil of these beautifully situated
"bottom lands" will bring forth, and no
one without a personal inspection can
realize the vast amount of stuff handled, nor
the great amount of money and labor In
volved in the fruit trade of the Ohio river.
Juno Jaqeb,
Fine Whiskies.
XXX, 1855, Pure Bye Whisky, full
quarts '. $2 00
1860, McKim's Pure Bye Whisky,
full quarts 3 00
Monogram, Pure Bye Wnisky, full
(jUrI8 m"m x to
Extra Old Cabinet, Pure Bye Whisky,
lull quarts 1 CO
Gibson's, 1879, Pure Bye Whisky, full
quarts 2 00
Gibson's Pure Bye Whisky, full
quarts . 1 CO
Guckenheimer Pure Bye Whisky, full
quarts . 1 00
Guckenheimer Expo rt,Pure Bye Whis
ky, full quarts 1 CO
Moss Export, Pure Bye Whisky, full
quarts 1 25
1879 Export, Pure Eye Whisky, full
quarts 1 25
1880 Export, Pure Bye Whisky, full
quarts 1 00
For sale by G. W. Schmidt, Nos. 95 and
97 Fifth ave.
Grand Hotel.
Thisr pleasant hotel, located at Point
Chautauqua, N. Y., opposite May ville, near
the head ot Lake Chautauqua, has now 400
rooms and every modern equipment for the
comfort of its guests. Its beautiful croquet
lawn's, play grounds, charming views, are
unequaled elsewhere. It has reading rooms,
bowling alley, skating rink and good music.
Table service unexcelled. T.he kitchen is
supplied with pure spring water. Tor
terms address Horace Fox, who is well
known as manager of the Hotel Cooper,
Dayton, O., at Grand Hotel, Point Chau
tauqua, N. Y. su
One Thousand Dlllea ot Transportation and
One ek Board for $12 OO.
The Pittsburg and Cincinnati packet line.
Steamers leaving Pittsburg as follows:
Steamer Katie Stockdale, Thomas 8. Cal
houn, Mastcr.leaves every Monday at 4 p.m.
Steamer Hudson, J. F. Ellison, Master,
leaves every Wednesday at 4 p. M.
Steamer Scotia, G. W. Bowley, Master,
leaves ever Friday at 4 P. M.
First-class fare to Cincinnati and return,
$12 00, meals and stateroom included; or,
down by river and return by rail, $12 CO.
Tickets good until used.
For further information apply to James
A. Henderson, Superintendent, 94 Water
street su
BlcCormlck'a Lake Excnriioa
Thursday, August 8. Trains leave Pitts
burg and Lake Erie depot at 9 A. M., 2:35
and C:10 P. M., oity time.
$3. Cleveland and returh. 3.
$6. Detroit and return. $6.
$10. Mackinac and return. $10.
Tickets and berths secured at McCor
mlck's, 401 Smithfield st su
Fob a finely cut neat-fitting suit leave
vour order withl Walter Anderson, 700
Smithfield street, whose stock of English
suitings and Scotch tweeds is the finest in
the market; imported exclusively for hir
trade. . Su
Physicians join in prescribing and
recommending Bauerlein Brewing Co. 'a
pure, unadulterated beer to their patients
and the public. Put up especially for
family use in quarts or pints and delivered
direct to residences in all parts of both
cities. Call up telephone 1018, Bennetts,
Pa.
Before it ! Too I.nto
We would advise every mother who wants a
good picture of her baby to go at once to
Stewart & Co., 90 Federal St., Allegheny,
where she is sure to get 13 ot them for a
dozen for one dollar.
89. Excursion to Chicago, 89.
On Thursday, August 8, the Pittsburg
and Western Ballway will sell round trip
tickets to, Chicago, limit ten days, for $9.
Tickets good going on the Chicago express
leaving Allegheny at 12:10 P. M., Central
time. bu
Patbohize Hendricks & Co., 68 Federal
st, Allegheny, the standard gallery of the
two cities Cibinets only $1 a dozen.
For Picnic Lunches.
The picnic season is now at its height, and
the demand for those delightful little indls
pensables to Ihe picnio lunch basket, Mar
vin's extra soda crackers and superior gin
ger snaps, is enormous. Tuwibssu
Prices greatly reduced on summer
weight blaek dress goods, all wool and silk
and wool fabrics, grenadines, etaainea
batiste, tamlte clalrette, etc..
Huaus A Haoxx.
Vv
PITTSBURG, DISPATCH;.
CLARA BELLE'S GHAT.
The TragiCStory of Three Women at
a Theater Ticket Window
A CLERK'S TERRIBLE D1LEMHA.
He Drops a Nickel in the Slot and Loses His
Presence of Mind.
A VERI DAZZLING SUMMER COSTUME
COBJUSFONDENCE or TUX BISrATCiI.1
EW XOBK, Au
gust 3. The bright
est things in the
generally dull town
are the costumes of
women who come in
for a day from the
ear-by summer re
sorts. One average
example was a suc
cess, if her object
was to attract gen
eral attention, and
give people an elec
tric shock that hot
day. Such a daz
zling array, or such
a combination of
colors, is not often
seen, especially in
the city streets. Her
dress was a satine,
the ground navy
blue, covered with
sprigs of light brown and white, and the
collar and loose "angel sleeves" were the
most vivid grass green! That statement Is
not to be modified in the least It was not
pistache, it was not absinthe or celeden, or
anything but the brightest, most uncom
prom iking of greens. Her hair was blonde
to a vivid yellow, her gloves were gray, her
hat black straw and trimmed with bright
scarlet poppies. Wnen my dazzled eyes
first rested ou her, she was buying ecru
surah silk. Could it be to embellish the
costume she had on? Was her love for color
not yet sufficiently gratified, and was that
ecru to be added in the form of a vest? The
Fates forbid! Should she thus further em
bellish herself it would be necessary to view
her effulgence through the softening medium
of a smoked glass! -
A SUDDEN DROP.
It is not good August policy to overlook
anything with diversion in it I found a
bit this morning. It was one of those terri
fying elevators that drop down like a plum
met instead of moving slowly in the good
old-fashioned way. It was full of people,
both sexes, all ages, all sorts and conditions
of men and women. With mostof them 'twas
their first experience of that kind, and they
suffered about as much as if 'twas a first to
boggan slide. When the elevator stopped
after that indSscribably short trip there came
the sound of a simultaneous gasp, a catch
ing of the breath, and then one of the pas
sengers, a grave-faced matron, turned to the
elevator boy and said: "Now will you
kindly go back ior the roof of my mouth?"
Even that old-time source of amusement,
a theater ticket window with women at it,
is not to be despised. Four ladies enter the
lobby of a Broadway house. The youngest
approaches the window and asks, in a business-like
tone, which is palpably assumed:
"How much are the seats?"
"I can let you have " the seller pauses
and looks over the rows of tickets as if going
to make this a special mater; "I can let you
have very choice seats in the orchestra circle
for $1 CO."
Apiece?"
"Yes, Miss." .
A HITCH 33T THE DEAL.
Hasty consultation with the four ladies,
in the midst of which the severe one starts
for the door, saying, "I won't do it" The
spokesgirl hastily addresses herself to the
seller and the severe lady comes back.
"We don't want.to pay as much as that,
you knew." . ,
The tone isn't business-like any more, it's
confidential and plaintive. The ticket-seller
smiles indulgently and again scans the rows
Sow Mitch Are Tickets, JPleaiet
beside him. He has an air of not knowing
just what he can do for them, which is
rather calculated, he thinks, to make tnem
settle on the first seats he suggested.
"How about the gallery?'r blurts out the
lady of the party who wears glasses.
The seller looks mild disapproval at if,
as a personal matter, he wouldn't like to see
them do it, and a quiet member of the party
objects: "I never was in the gallery."
"Nor I," says the severe one, as if she
didn't mean to begin now either.
The spokeswoman looks discouraged. The
seller, to brace them up, remarks in a sooth
ing tone, while he still fingers the orchestra
circle row: "This theater is quite differ
ent." "Oh, yes; I I know this is a nice place.
We have never been here," the spokes
woman replies, plucking up her business
voice. She doesn't mean to put what she
said just that way, of course, but people who
pretend business will make breaks. "How
much are they?"
'Fifty cents," returns the seller with
gentle dienity.
Another consultation, then the severe one
asks: "Apiece?"
"Yes. madam." More consultation, then
to bring the matter to a head the seller in
quires: "How many did you say?'i
GETTING DOWN TO BUSINESS.
The severe lady comes to the front, and.
eyefng the seller in a way to make him feel
he can't deceive her, asks: "Do ladies go
in the gallery?"
"Oh, dear, yes the best," says the seller,
with just a delicate suggestion of an assur
ance that he wouldn't demean himself by
selling the tickets otherwise, and begins to
sort out the four tickets.
"I will take mine," she adds, presenting
a dollar MIL
The teller holds the tickets suspended,
and remarks suggestively: "It will be $2,
please."
"Yes I know, but I just want mine."
"Ob! Yon don't want four?" This from
the seller with slight severity.
"No! just mine."
He looks pained, replaces three tickets,
changes the dollar, and delivers one seat all
in a dignified, cot to say injured silence.
The lady with glasses now takes possession
of the window. "Are the seats all together?"
ihe asks.
"The lady only took one seat," tte seller
replies, still in that pained way.
"Of course," impatiently, "that's all the
wanted; but will the seats be together?"
He does not catch the idea, and he con
fesses it The origiualspokeswoman pushes
her head-in under the other's chin onH .-r.
plains cheerily: "We're each coiag'to buy
her own seat1
' "Oh," returns ht, brightening.
"And an tber teethr?"JrslUrkU. aba
vspffp-T-'.
SUNDAY, -AUGUST 4,
eyeglas member of the party, as if she can
wait, of course, but means just the same to
have her answer.
"Yes indeed, madam, all together. Shall
I take the rest of .the tickets from this?" he
adds, fingering the S10 bill that she pays in.
"No just mine.
BEACHING AX UNDERSTANDING.
The spokeswoman again pushes her head
in under the other's chin, saying: "Yon
see, we get so mixed up in our accounts at
night if we all par altogether at once for
anything, so we just made up our minds
eoch to pay separately everr time for any
thing." "Oh, very well. Then I am to make
change each time?" he inquires, in a don't-mind-me
tone.
"I've just got 45 cents in silver," says the
quiet one, hastily. "Ask him to take 5
cents extra for your ticket, Hannah; I'll pay
you to-night, so as to even up."
The seller is beginning to show signs or
Earesis, and Miss Glasses brings him to
imself by speaking in a cold, passionless
voice aud making pauses between words:
"Please take 55 cents for my ticket"
"No." cries the quiet one, "let him take
CO, and then you give him 5 afterward, be
cause we are sure, to get mixed up.
The seller, with trembling fingers, makes
change lor $10, reserving a silver half for
the seat
"Please take this" small stuff instead,"
objects Miss Glasses, pushing back a pile of
coppers and dimes. "I hate to carry it."
Fifty cents is counted out from the lot,
the rest, including the silver half, being re
turned.
"Now give him 5 cents for me," reminds
the quiet one.
"Oh, yes! Here's 5 cents on the lady's
ticket She's only got 45 cents in change,
you know."
The seller's eyes look wild, and he seems
to be in a chill." The severe one steps up
now, saying shortly: "It's all nonsense,
each buving her own. Give me two tickets,
please.'1 She tenders a dollar bill, explain
ing over her shoulder to the quiet one: "I
am getting yours. Yon will pay me when
we get home."
HE SWALLOWS A NICKEL.
The ticket seller, in a state of partial col
lapse, can't seem to think what to do with
the extra C-cent piece. For lack of a better
The Effect of Too Much Change.
idea he puts it in his mouth while he at
tends to the dollar bill. "T t two
seats, madam?" he asks, stuttering on ac
count of the coin in his mouth, and also be
cause he feels his native language slipping
from him.
"Two," returns the severe one in a deter
mined way.
The two tickets are passed through the
wiudow. and the ladies start At the door
a discussion arises. The quiet one has
insisted upon squaring at once with the
severe one. She is sure she will get mixed
if she doesn't The severe one takes the 45
cents, remarking, "Of course its a small
matter, my dear, but I paid CO cents for the
seat"
"Why! the man has it," shouts the quiet
one.
"Oh, the wretchl Of course he has,"
comes in chorus. '
. "And he took the full amount I'll just
have that C cents back," says the severe
lady.
"Well!" objects Miss Glasses, "he owes
it to me, because I gave it to him."
"Then I'm out 0 cents," says the severe
one, as if she were being stuck that way all
the time and didn't like it either.
"I'll tell you how it is," explains the
quiet one. "I owe Hannah 5 cents, and the
ticket-seller owes you C cents."
"That leaves him C cents ahead, and it's
an outrageous shame!" cries the severe one.
"He's been paid for one ticket twice, that's
what it amounts to. He thinks we don't
know, and if you want to go right on pay
ing what he owes, your ticket will cost you
75 centj the first thing you know!"
"Weil,I certainly gave him 0 cents ex
tra," says the one with classes, "and I'm
going to have it back. I don't know which
one of us it belongs to, but he shan't have
it!"
"Well, he shan't have mine, either," adds
the severe one.
A SETEEE BECKONING.
The two stride to the window. AH this
time the ticketseller had been sucking away
at the nickel and wondering what is going
to happen to him. When Miss Glasses
blurts out; "I'll trouble you for that C-cent
piece T gave you," he gives a horrified gulp,
struggles a moment with his collar, and
then says faintly, "I I will give yon an
other one, madaml" He goes on struggling
with his collar, but manages to get a nickel
out of the drawer and deliver it
"You will please pay me back the G cents
you owe me, tool" snorts the severe one.
"My dear madam I !
"Yes. yon did. I gave you 5 cents, and
you had already had the C cents. The lady
only had 45 cents, and both the other lady
and I gave you C cents to make up for it,
and I insist on having it back. It isn't the
amount I care about; it's the principle of it,
and I "
The ticket-seller hasn't an idea on the
subject of any C-cent piece except the one
that is now turning a corner around his
larnyx. Into His levered brain sweeps a
suspicion that he has become one of those
"drop-a-nickel-in-the-slot" machines, and
since a nickel has been dropped into the
slot he feels that of course he ought to show
up with something; probably another nickel
since the lady says so. He gropes blindly
in the drawer, makes a mistake or two, and
finally delivers the right coin. Then, when
they have all gone,-he sits with his head in
his hands and his finger down his throat,
wondering how his cconnts stand. Is he 5
cents out or 1C cents out? He is dead sure
he's C cents in, because he can feel that
nickel making Impressions of the American
shield on one side of his esophagus, and of
a Boman V on the other all the way down.
But he doesn't know yet whether he owes
his employer 5 cents or a dime,
Claba Belle.
i
Aunt Polly Why, Zebadiah Hawkins!
be you crazy?.
Uncle Zeb Git back in tV ring, an' don't
tkulkl Ever Knee Isaac sent me them flies
of NYork papera 'bout Sull'van an' Killen
I've b'en'iest itohinV t'. lick mbi .one.
I .TuAAm1 - - '.3Tf r.-. i r
W'
1 f wl fir
The Influence Spreading,
1889.
TENDER-HBAKTEB MWSB0IS.
An Incident That IHnatratea tbo Good Qaall-
llea of iattlo Gamins. .
New York World.l
Even the roughest New York street gamin
has a tender spot if the "kaleidoscope of cir
cumstances shapes itself in such manner as
to appeal to his better nature. The boys of
the streets have their own battles to fight,
and they are quick, to sympathize with a
helpless creature who is really in hard luck.
This was illustrated the other afternoon
when an Italian peddler, pushing his ram
shackle dray along Printing Honse Square,
struck a protruding paving stone and upset
his cart In a twinkling his bushel of pears
were rolling in all directions, and a score of
newsboys were after them. The Italian
stood in hopeless despair, wrung his hands
and burst into tears.
The astonished newsboys at first Iauehed,
and then, overcome by the poor fellow's
grief, drew near cautiously and emptied
their well-filled pockets into the cart Not
only did they do this, but they also took
hold vigorously and helped the now-encouraged
Italian to gather up the fallen
fruit The pears were soon back in the
dray with not one missing, and the Italian
felt so thankful to the gamins that he .im
mediately presented each one of them with
a large pear. The Boys laughed and soon
disappeared in the crowd. The Italian con
tinued his journey with beaming face and a
much better opinion of Ne.w York newsboys
than he had ever had before.
Then He Baa to Boy Mew Ones,
Atchison Globc.l
A man never knows that a woman has
any old clothes until he has married hef.
Cabinet photos, 89c per doz.
ular Gallery, 10 and 12 Sixth st
Lies' Pop-
MWTSU
EDUCATIONAL.
Two choice schools.
BROOKE HALU Cor stir! j and young ladles.
bllOKTLIUUE MEDIA ACADEMY, for bora and
younirmen. 8W1THIN U. UHOKTLIDGE,'A.M.
(Harvard Graduate), Media, i"a. (near iblladel
pbla.) aul-a
HOLY GHOST COLLEGE
Complete preparatory, commercial and
collegiate departments, reopens WEDNES
DAY. SEPTEMBER-!; new students examined
Monday, September 2. Apply to Rev. John
T. JIUBPHY, C. 8. Sp., President. jy7-2S
-TAZARETH HALL ,
IN NAZARETH HALL.
NAZARETH HALL.
Moravian Boarding School for Boys at Naza
retb. Pa. Founded 1755. Reopens (September
18th. jriB.73-ThSU
CHELTENHAM ACADEMY. OGONTZ,
j jra. unexcelled location ana surronna
lues. New school equipment Gymnasium,
military drill, etc Thorough preparation for
college or scientific school. For circular, etc,
address JNO. CALVIN RICE, A. il.. Principal.
Je2S-53
NEW YORK MILITARY ACADEMY,
Cornwall-on-Hudsoa. Coarse of study in
civil engineering, English and classics. Labor
atory, drawing room and field work. BeauUfal
Daildincs, gronnds, location. COL C. J.
WRIGHT, B. 8., A. M, Hupt; BELDKN F.
HYATT. Comd't of Cadets. jelO-U
St. Mary's Seminary,
For dots between the ages of i and 12 years,
In charce of twisters of Charity.
SETON HILL, GREENSBURG, PA.
The object of this school is to provide for boys
of tender years a place where they may enjoy
the comforts of home and care of parents, to
gether with the oeneflts of salutary discipline
and careful teaching in the usual English
branches.
Terms: Board, tuition, washing, mending and
bedding per session, ten months, fl&u. Music,
etc., extra charges.
N. B. This seminary is sitnated on same
Sounds with St Joseph's Academy for Young
idles.
Session opens first Monday in Septemter,
For prospectus address, as above,
jy26su MOTHER SUPERIOR.
ST. JOSEPH ACADEMY
FOR YOUNG LADIES.
- SETON HILL. GBEENSBURG, PA.
In charge of the Sisters of Charity.
This academy, chartered with rights and
privileges equal to the first academic institu
tions in the State, Is situated on the highest
point of a tract containing 200 acres, in view of
the Pennsylvania Central Railroad. SO miles
east of Pittsburg, and one-fourth of a mile
from Greensbure station.
The plan of instruction is systematic and
tborongb. embracing ail that could be desired
for the highest culture. Besides the graduat
ing departments, a special course meets
the wants of young ladles, who, not wishing to
go through the courses of graduation, are
anxlons to obtain a good practical education.
Terms, board, tuition, bed and bedding, per
session, ten months, $200. The languages,
music, drawing, painting, shorthand and type
writins form extra charge. Elocution, vocal
music in class and fancy work taught free.
The Edison phonograph has been introduced
as an anxlliary in training the voice in elocution
and vocal music. Domestic economy is taught
in each department, and opportunities for oul
inary practice, at the option of narents and
guardian, afforded young ladies who wish to be
come versed in housekeeping.
N..B. This academy is situated on the same
grounds with St. Mary's Seminary for small
bots.
Session opens first Monday in September.
For prospectus address, as above.
jyM-8n MOTHER SUPERIOR.
MT. DE CHANTAL,
Ntfer Wheeling, W. Va.t
(SISTERS OF THE VISITATION.!
A school of more than national reputation,
offers exceptional advantages for thorough ed
ucation of young ladies in all departments. Li
brary of 8,000 volumes. Fine philosophical,
chemical and astronomical apparatus.
Musical department specially noted. Corps
of piano teachers trained by a leading professor
f rom Conservatory of Stutcart. Vocal culture
according to the method of the old Italian mas
ters. Location unsurpassed for beauty and health.
Ten acres of pleasure grounds. Board excel
lent For catalogues and references to patrons In
all the principal cities, address
se9-q78.su THE DIRECTRESS.
REPORTS.
Atlantic Cltr.
THE ISLESWORTH,
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.
On the beach, sea end of Virginia avenue.
je7-19-EOD BUCK & McCLELLAN.
THE MANSION
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J.
Largest and most prominently located hotel
with a new and first-class Restaurant attached.
830 chairs. Open all the year. Coaches to and
from Beach and Trains. Bropbr's Orchestra.
je2j-51 CHARLES McGLADE.
A8BUBY PARK HOTEL BRUNSWICK
A leading hotel in every respect Beauti
fully situated near the beach. All rooms com
mand an unobstructed view of the ocean. Ap
pointments unsurpassed. Drainage and Sani
tary arrangements perfect. For information
address MORGAN &. PARSONS. jel5
-yf ORAN HOUHE-AT EMLENTON, Pa.,
f-JjjL on the Allegheny river; beautiful loca
tion; lawn tennis and croquet; scenery aeiignt
f ul; pure air and water; first-class accommoda
tions; rates reasonable; 9 miles from Pittsburg
VUA.V.R.R. N.MACKLN.Prop'r.Jr2S-72-Bu
HOWLAND HOTEL,
LONG BRANCH, N.J,
HENRT WALTER,Prop'r., JNO. B.SCHLOSSE8,
Manager, late of Hotel Dnqnesne, Pittsburg:
JI7-69
Thomson House, Kane,
McKEAN CO., PENNSYLVANIA.
2.000 feet above ocean level. Open an the
year. Now prepared for the reception of sum
mer visitors. Rates, $2 00 per day and from
$7 00 to SU 00 per wceb,
Writs for circular.
3JV-41-UWTSU
GH. KEMP, Prop.
RENOVO HOTEL,
RENOVO, Clinton Co, Pennsylvania. 1,200
feet above ocean level. Open, all the year.
Now prepared for the reception of summer
visitors. Rates, S3 00 per day and from 7 09
to $14 00 per week.
Write for circular.
jy9-42-!cwirsu C H. KEMP. Prop.
LENHART COTTAGE,
BEMU8 POINT.
CHAUTAUQUA LAKE, N. Y.
The Lenhart Cottage is sitnated a mlnuta's
walk from boat landing and pnstofflce. It has
a nicely-shaded beach and lawn, which are
always cool and refreshing. We bare a beau
tiful jriew of the lake from all the rooms in the
house. The rate for rooms and board are rea
sonable. Fsrparttenlari address the propria
tor. L L LKMTf AlrT, tMW f etet, Chant. Co.
KW ADVERTISEMENTS.
BIJOU
THEATER.
Under the Direction of R.M.Gulick & Co
First Gun of the Season.
XTrreo JVIxrlxts,
CoMenciiif May, August 15.
WITH SATURDAY MATINEE.
HAVERLY-CLEVELAND
MINSTRELS I
46
COMEDIANS, DANCERS
SINGERS AND JAPS,
INCLUDING
46
BILLY EMERSON and
HUGHEY DOUGHERTY.
Box Office will open for sale of seats SAT
URDAY EVENING, AUGUST 10, and con
tinue as usual.
Reserved Seats, 75c, 50c, 25c.
au3
AVERY PLEASANT EVENING
Can be Spent
EVERY THURSDAY NIGHT
at the
r
GRAND SUMMER NIGHT RECEPTION
At Imperial Hall, corner Seventh avenue and
New Grant street.
Mnslo by the Mozart and Royal Italian Or
chestras. Admission. SO cents. BH8 an!
v
LUCK CORRECTED."
A treatise disclosing tho methods of
Slelaht-ol-Uand Cartl-ftharplnsr
ana tne itxrrrcD uetices ot which tne ureec ei
the hauls eeou "corrects " nis fortune at cartn.
By Prof. EcaEfi Salvzstz, Conjuror.
oir Ready. For contents, extracts, etc., en-
close stamped addressed envelope to EL V. Drage,
o n. v.irage,
P. a Box Ul.
15 Tmary stress, uropfijn, n. i
jy23-9-Su
OPIUM
sell-u9-3u
Morphine and TVTil.tT Habits palo-lea-lr
cured. Treatment scat on trial
free. Confidentially address II. I
KKAMEU, See.. BaSa Ur.j.tu, Ud.
HARRIS'
WEEK COMMENCING MONDAY, AUGUST 6,
EVERY AFTERNOON AND NIGHT.
THE GREAT MYSTIC RUSSO-JEWISH DRAMA,
. MONEY.', LENDER,
' JfIt.Ot,iMil4J lit
AND HIS EXCELLENT
Startling Mechanical Effects. An
Costly Characteristic
SOUVENIR MA-TITVEE.
Every lady and child attending the performance of "The Money Lender." Monday after
noon, will be presented with a fan ot a new and
it ever having been teen in Pittsburg before.
glass opera glasses attached.
Next week-MILNE A EDGAR.
PME
UPHI CI1
UMEDIGINE
ammmMwwmrmmr EFFFrrnTAl
HH rMT jUh IB 3to. "L
lio-mmm IjIa1 AOiZ-y
.. k-asasssn a, .ww vriaaan ssav-ocv. oaaKhT iasasasa ct ar i s. " assssssssssHS. assssssssssi
A ML MimMmm guinex
for Weak Stomacli impaired Digestion Disordered Liver.
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS.
PRICE 25 CENTS PER BOX.
reparoiflyby TB0S.BEECHA1L SLHel
B. F. ALLEN & CO., Sole Agents
FOR 7!TE STATES, 385 fc 3GS CANAL ST., NEW TORE,
Who (if your druggist does not keep them) will mail Beecham's
Pills on receipt of price tot ihguirtjirst. (Please mention this paper.)
lETIE'W"
We have just received and have novr ready for inspection,
beautiful China Dinner Sets, Fish Seta and a full line of nioe
China, odd pieces, to whioh we invite the attention of the ladies.
R. P. WALLACE & CO.,
211
OPPOSITE 8T. CHARLES.
HOPPER BROS. &CO.'S
DISPLAY OF GOODS FOR THE
IF1 .A. ID Xj TRADE
IS SIMPLY MARVELOUS.
Their enormous warerooms are crowded to. excess with a stock that Is not ex
celled in the two cities, comprising all the latest novelties iu FURNITURE and
ART GOODS, and prices, well, they are lower than ever, so much so that our
goods are placed within the reach of all, when you take into consideration the
great advantage we offer the buying public, that is our system of selling on
E-S" TEHls.CS of -""dyCEnSTT.
Our 20 rr cent reduction sale on ICE CHESTS, BKFBIGEBATOBS and
BABY CARRIAGES is still going on, and we are selling our stock off rapidly.
But we still have a few more of them left, so that for only one week more yon can
take advantage ot the discount.
OARPEfSI CARPETS I
Talk about houses dealing in Carpets alone, having a large stock for their
fall trade, why it will do your eyes cood to come down and see ours, and when
you ire down ask to see onr stock of LACE CURTAINS and. DBAPEBXES,
they are simply unexcelled.
EDont forget who we are and where we are, and if you Bake ona pnrehasa
here you are sure to give us your trade in the future.
HOPPER PROS, & CO,,
THE LEADING- HOUSE FURNISHERS,"
307-"W"OOD ST.--307
TS flM U DAVIS SXW1NG HAOHUOa,
HEW ADTBRTISEMECTS.
sVSJQHVaMPwH. 5a"BBBlaaBBB
ADVICE FOE ALL.
Bad and sorrowfully glance into the furor
many sick persons who suffer pain and who
find an early crave through mistaken treat
ment. Do not forget that the proofs are hers
that my celebrated all-Uerman remedies can
not be exct lied. Tbonsand of patients have I
met who said: "I was not a day wltbont medi
cine and grew worse every day." They are cor
rect. Where dangerous operations have been
previously undertaken my remedy has cured la
a short time. My remedies cure, in fact, most
of the chronic diseases where no other medi
cine gives help. Daily sick persons coma to
me and complain tbat they have spent (50, J1U0,
81,000 among doctors, but were not 5 cents'
worth better. When these doctors had received
the money they left the city by moonlight.
Thousands in Pittsburg and vicinity have been
cured within a year by my wonderful remedies.
Look at the following-, a few of those who were
cured in as many weeks as they were years sick.
jur. tv sKucr, curonic raeamaiiim, z years.
Mr. H. Conrad, chronic diarrhoea, 2 years.
Miss Weaver, epilepsy, t years.
Mrs. Kinmler.eye trouble, nearly blind, 30 years.
Mrs. I Mahone suffered years wltn spinal dis
ease, nervousness and liver trouble, leading- M
dropsy.
Mrs. Dickson, asthma, 10 years.
Miss Johnson, dropsy. S years.
Mrs. Gunther. cancer. 2years.
Mrs. KJe nmann suffered two years with terrible
cramps. She Is cured and suffers no more.
It the disease Is not to be recoanised by any
other evidence, then the nrlne is the best meant
ot diagnosis; It shows what and where the tremble
is. As soon as It leaves Its normal straw color,
yon should not rail to nse my celebrated remedies
and be cured from the very root or the trouble.
Mrs. X. X. JCulins,
Tobeseenln tbe Invalid's Home, Ho. 191 Center
ave., Flttsbarg. Certificates are open for Inspec
tion. -eGjt-Tl-.e Wjlle and Center are. cars from Market
st. pass the door. aaS-7
'fimzL
PHOTOGRAPHER. 16 SIXTH STREET.
A tine, large crayon portrait fs GO; see them
before ordering elsewhere. Cabinets, $3 and
U 60 per dozen. PROMPT DELIVERY.
apU-18-xwTsu
THEATER.
Original JPlot. Special Scenery,
Russian Costumes.
elaborate design. A real novelty, nothing llke '
Each of these breeze creators has a pair ol blue
aul-25
varu
GUINEA,
GOOIDS.
Wood Str-
au4--wTSu"
S SjMrS.
.Vto f&r V .X- .-
ial2Jkk..,
.-sa
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