Pittsburg dispatch. (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, March 15, 1889, Page 8, Image 8

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Remonstrances Against Liquor Li
censes Pour Into the Court.
HOST OF THEJI ARE "GENERAL.
A Case of Treasure Trove Tried in the
Temple of Justice Yesterday.
ILESTI OP LEGAL BUSINESS JUST NOW
A large number ot remonstrances against
the granting of liquor licenses were filed in
the Clerk of Courts office yesterday. Forty
remonstrances vrere received from four
-wards in the city of Pittsburg the Eight
eenth, Nineteenth, Twenty-first and Thirty
sixth. In the Eighteenth ward but one remon
strance was received, and that against Peter
Miner, of Butler street extension. The paper
is signed by 50 persons, and sets forth that "the
applicant habitually violated the law during
the time he has bad license, by selling liquor
on Sunday, and since the last time be was re
fused a license be has peddled and sold beer in
bottles from a wagon throughout the commun
ity of the Eighteenth ward.
Remonstrances were filed against IB appli
cants in the Nineteenth ward. They were all
general remonstrances alleging that the housss
lor which licenses are applied are "not a neces
sity," and that the applicants are "unfit per
sons to engage in the business." The follow
ing are the persons remonstrated against, the
figures given after the applicant's location in
dicating the number of signers to his remon
strance: Charles Neef. 6021 Penn avenue, 74: Adolph
Traucer, 44 Frankstown avenue, 69; Lewis
Christ. 67 Frankstown avenue, 50; Joseph Mc
Kee. 634S Penn avenue. 75; Peter Lauerman, 56
Frankstown avenue, 75: Fred Mausmann, 6347
Station street, 75; Jos. Fleming, 49 Frankstown
avenue, 75; Melkar Balli. 5123 Penn avenue, 60;
Timothy Barrett, 6027 Penn avenue, 76; John
Jacob Arnodt, 155 Frankstown avenue, 75;
Jacob Scnulz, 123 Frankstown avenue, 75;
Nicholas Leech, 104 Frankstown avenue, 75:
Henrv Lucbsinger. 77 Frankstown avenue, 75:
JohnF. Ganster, 27 Frankstown avenue, 57;
Henry Schusler and Cyrus Pool, 15 and 17
Frankstown avenue, 67; John A. Klipham, 6324
Station street, 57; Peter A. Ganster, 35 and 37
Frankstown avenue, 73; Anton Wolf. 6007 Penn
avenue, 73, and Henry Meyer, Broad street, 76.
A DIAGRAM -WITH ONE.
In the Twenty-first ward 16 applicants are
remonstrated against. These are similar to the
papers filed against the Nineteenth ward ap
plicants. They are signed generally by the
same persons. The following persons are
remonstrated against:
B. B. McDowell, Penn and Brushton ave
nues, 183; Thomas Mulvehill, 704 Tioga street,
182; Anton Menikers, 53S Homewood avenue.
ITS; John Kerner. Grazier street, 183; Joseph M.
Einstein, stockyards, 48: Martin J. Reiber,
Railroad street, 45; John A. Miller, 3S8 Franks
town avenue, 6S: Bertha Heinz, 350 Franks
town avenne. 5S; Frank Mismyer, 307 Larimer
avenue, 77; William Dursan, 306 Frankstown
avenue, 55: Thco. Neiss, 200 Larimer avenue,
77; Victor Miller, 221 Frankstown avenue, 50; J.
H. Husman, Pntnam and Railroad streets, 55;
H. J. Brauthoover, 264 Frankstown avenue, 53;
Joseph Krner. 505 Larimer avenue, 79, and Jer
ry Bacon, 263 Frankstown avenue. 58. The re
monstrances against John A. Miller and Ber
tha Heinz were accompanied with a diagram of
the block in which their places are located,
which shows that two other saloons are in the
same square, and the applicants are but a
square lrom the Lincoln schoolhonse.
In the Thirty-sixth ward five of the appli
cants are remonstrated against in U general
way, nothing special against any of them. They
are: Morns Gibausky, 195 Main street, 58; Jon
athan Hay, 209 Main street. 70: George Kilmer,
180 Main street: Charles Turnblacer, 124 Wa
bash avenue, 63; Charles Sellers. 172 Main, 55;
William Gundlefinger, 113 Steuben street, 68.
TEMPTATION FOB THEOLOGY.
Only two wards in Allegheny were heard
from, the Second and Sixth. The officers of
the Theological Seminary sent in a special
remonstrance against Adam Heyl, of 18 and 22
Buena Vista street. The paper sets forth that
in the educational institution is assembled a
large numDer of young men, and in the judg
ment of the remonstrants the estaolishment of
drinking places in the vicinity will be casting a
needless and possibly hurtful temptation in
their wav. There was also a general remon
strance filed against William Heyl, signed by
54 residents of the Second ward.
Remonstrances are filed ajrainst 11 of the ap
plicants of the Sixth ward. They are: Barbara
Herzonroder, 15S Washington avenne, 29;
Sophia Braun, 326 Cbartiers street, 31; Theresa
Heyl, 113 Juniata street,2S: Charles Kraucber,
250 Beaver avenue, 5; John Kelly, 317 Beaver
avenne, 6; John Shorr, 161 Juniata street. 44;
John E. Windle, 397Beaver avenue, 44; Joseph
Mark, 447 Beaver avenue, 41; George bchaffint,
2S2 Franklin street, 44; Henry Lober. 153 Mar
ket street, 44; Joseph Jaukowski, Sedgwick
street, 40.
The remonstrances came in from the bor
oughs with, a rush, with McKeesport in the
lead. Papers were filed against 46 applicants
of this borough. They are general remon
strances, gotten up mostly by the W. C. T. U.
people. The reason generally assigned is that
they are not necessary for the accommodation
of the public and entertainment of strangers or
travelers. Following are the names of and the
number of signers against the applicants:
First ward Mrs.MargaretBrcitinger,100;Dan
iel Butler. 102; Jas. Borlin, 100: A. J. Carver, 104,
Win. J. DennySS; Charles Fechter, 104; Wm.
A. Kelly. 101; Robert T. Carothers, 100; Frank
Beecker, 100; Samuel E. Carothers. 98; George
Altmeyer, 101; Jacob Hugo. 99; George M.
Leppig. 101; Frank Logan. 105; Louis N. Mor
gan, 107: Bernard Morris, 102; Luke Lvnch, 100:
Peter Koch, 100: Bennet Harr, 104: Wm. Mc
Kay, 100; Patrick Nolan, 104; Peter Speilman,
89; Ernest Bercherbach, 101; P. W. Schmidt,
87: Nicholas Wolf, 90: W. F. Weiskircber, 103;
Louis Winkelman, 100.
Second ward F. S. Busch, 276; Frank Ferri
gan, 279; Michael Maloney, 281; John Steinhil
ber, 276: Mrs. Barbara Zimmerman. 276
Third ward Pauline Aubcrle, 120; George P.
Beech, 118; William Buscb, 122: James Crosby.
123; William Dean, 120; Fred Eggley, 121; Se
bastian Englert, 118: Edward Foutchie, 120;
William F. Hunter. 120; David Hardy, Jr., 122;
Konrad Hausman. 119; Catherine Hester, 123;
William Knee, 122; Dennis NilL 120.
BOROUGHS AND TOWNSHIPS.
Braddock came in for a good share of re
monstrances. One paper signed by 19 persons
states that .the saloon of John N. Walters, in
the First ward, is located on the Baltimore and
Ohio Railroad, aud that several persons in an
intoxicated condition have been killed
in the vicinity of it The remon
strance against Owen O'NeiL of the
same ward, signed by 15 people, state
that there are six liquor houses in that ward
now, and that Mr. O'Neil is but one of-the
seven new applicants. A paper, bearing 20
signatures, against Martin McNally states that
his place is also on the railroad and that peo
ple have been killed near his place while under
the influence of liquor. lUie others against
whom remonstrances are filed, are:
First ward John A. Hand, 24; Lnke Gordon,
20; Alex. Ellis, 20: W. M. Bntt, 19: Daniel Gal
lagher, 20; Joseph Love, 17; Michael Qulrck, 16;
P. F. Murray. 17: James F. Ward, 16; T. D.
Cort,20.
Second ward E. F. Kelly. 55: Thomas Cox,
B5; John Costello. 61: William Ketterer, 40;
James Qoinn, 40Helena Zimmerman, 40; F. R,
Darlgreer. 40; J. T. Morrow, 4a
There were remonstrances against 13 appli
cants from Cbartiers borougb, as follows:
Henry Hanna, 30; D. Lutz & Son, 31; Jacob
Ruppel. 30; Julius Gottfried, 31: Morgan Thom
as, 50: Michael O'Keefe, 50; Adam Nnsser. 51;
Joseph Paul. 48: M. D. Silkknitter, 51; Emil
Grimm, 31; Patrick Connors, 51, and Joseph
Adams, 48.
Eleven remonstrances were filed .against
Millvale borough applicants. They were: Ja
cob Lichtinger, 43; Anton Schueiderlochner,
43; Samuel Young. 100; Jacob H. WakLer, 100;
Henry Wagner. 100; Mary C. Reder, 100: Joseph
Miller, 100; J. W. Oesterhng, 70, and Adam
Maurcr, 70.
Five applicants from Verona borongh are
remonstrated against. Thev are: Henry Berg,
7b; Henry ElKins, 97; Samuel Ritter, 78; Fred
X. Voltz, 76: Alex. Mader, 77.
The remonstrances from the townships were
even greater in numbers and of anore damag
ing character to the applicants than those from
the boroughs. There seems to have been a spe
cial effort made in Harrison township against
the applicants for license. The Women's Chris
tian Temperance Union and the Law and Order
Society send in a general remonstrance against
all the applicants in the township. Then there
are special remonstrances against 13 of the ap
plicants. The papers, after setting forth
the Teasons why licenses sbnuld npt be
granted, invite the Court to consider the char
acter of the remonstrants and petitioners, and
earnestly insist on the ground of superiority
of the number and character of the remon
strants to that of the petitioners, that the
licenses should be refused.
Remonstrances were also filed against peti
tioners, in the townships of Stowe, Shaler,
Chartiers and North Versailles.
WELL-KNOWN PETITIONEES.
There were three petitions filed yesterday,
one in support of the license of Louis Lautner
of the Second Ward, Allegheny. It is claimed
that bis is the only saloon on the New Brighton
mad; that it is a necessity and that the pro
prietor is a good man and has always kept a
good bouse.
A number of newspaper men filed a special
etition in regard to the application of George
. Pitfleld, of 69 Wylle avenue. The say that
before the Press Club restaurant was estab
lished they took their meals with Mr. Pitfleld,
and they consider him a proper and safe man
to be intrusted with a license.
An additional petition was filed In support of
the application of John D. Hughes, of Forty
fifth and Butler streets, and is accompanied by
a number of business men of Lawrenceville,
who give Mr. Hughes a very good name.
FINDERS, KEEPERS.
The Familiar Rule Reversed Yesterday In
the Courts.
A peculiar case was tried yesterday before
Judge Collier. It was that of John Warren,
administrator ot George W. Warren, deceased,
against John TJlrich, to recover a treasure
trove. A number of years ago George W.
Warren kept a tavern on the Perrysville road,
near the Allegheny county line. He would
hide his money in out-of-the-way places, where
be thought it safer than in bank. After his
death the tavern was purchased by
John TJlrich, who ran it for sev
eral years and who still keeps it.
About a year ago TJlrich hired a German to
clean out a vault for him. While at work, the
man discovered a package concealed in a niche
in the side of the well. Upon opening it he
found it to be greenbacks, the whole amount
ing to about S700. He made known the dis
covery to Dlricb, and gave to him J320, keeping
the balance. When the heirs of .Warren
learned of this they demanded the money,
which was refused, and the administrator en
tered suit against TJlrich for what was in his
possession.
The case was contested closely yesterday, W.
K. Shiras and C. C. Dickey appearing for the
plaintiffs and J. S. Ferguson for TJlrich. The
only witnesses examined were on the peculiar
ities of old Mr. Warren to show that he was
in the habit of concealing money in that way
and that in all probability this money was his.
TJlrich contended that this was not proof of
ownership and that the money was his until it
was clearly proven who was the rightful owner.
A verdict was rendered for the plaintiff for the
amount in dispute, 320.
KNOCKED INTO THE FIRE.
LUlsatlon Growing Oat of the Late mu
nicipal Elections.
David Blair yesterday entered suit against
Patrick F. Dunn for il0,000 damages. A capias
was issued for the arrest of Dunn. Both men
are residents of and voters in the Second pre
cinct of the Sixth ward. Blair states that last
election he was a supporter of Thomas Mc
Michaels for Select Council, while Dunn was
for J. L. Williams. Blair had been engaged to
work at the polls for McMlchaels, and Dunn
was there in the Interest of Williams.
Blair was standing a few feet from the poll
ing window, just before noon, talking to a
voter. Dunn, without any provocation, he
claims, came up to him and assaulted him,
striking him in the face and knocking him
down. As Blair was standing with his back
toward a huge bonfire, as a natural conse-
?ncnce when he fell it was into the fire. Some
riends pulled him ont of the fire, but not
before he was severely burned.
THEY HARDLY AGREE.
A Woman and Witness Differ na to What
Constitutes a Good Living.
Judge Hawkins, of the Orphans' Court, spent
all day yesterday listening to testimony In the
suit of Ann Eliza Phillips, of Robinson town
ship, against her son Robert and others, who
who have bought interests in the estate. Peti
tioner's husband. William H. Phillips, by his
will, left Mrs. Phillips the mansion house, and
stipulated that she should have her living out
of the farm.
A great mass of testimony was taken. The
plaintiff claimed about twice what the defend
ants' witnesses testified was necessary to the
maintenance of a woman in ordinary life, and
there was generally a vast amount of discrep
ancy in the views taken. J. G. Bryant, Esq.,
appeared for the petitioner, and J. H. White,
Esq., for the defense.
Grand Jnry Flndlugs.
The grand jury, yesterday, returned another
true bill against Mary M. McMinamien for fortune-telling.
Mrs. McMinamien was convicted
last week before Judge White, of the samo
offense and upon her making a statement
in court, denouncing the action of several per
sons who sued her, then settled the case and
sued her again, the Judge stated that he would
await the action of the grand jury in the cases
pending before it against her.
The other true bills returned were G. Baker
man, Owen Clark, Peter Graeber, John Hutch
inson, assault and battery; Michael Garvey, ag
gravated assault and battery; Albert Jones,
indecent assault; Frank Cumerford, Cornelius
Shonoelan, larceny dud receiving stolen goods;
Joseph Wolf, larceny by bailee; Thomas Dugan
et aL Gust Hoover, Robert Richardson, Timo
thy Healev, entering a building with intent to
commit a felony; George McClelland, stealing
from his employers; Albert Moorhead alias G.
W. Wood, horse stealing; W. T. Taylor, em
bezzlement; William Slgmund, false pretense;
Peter Schon. malicious mischief; M. v. Oliver,
selling liquor without license.
The following bills were Ignored: Michael
Breadnick et al, larceny; H. E. Eiler, assault
and battery; Sigmund Miller, assault and bat
tery. To-Dny's Trial Lists.
Common Pleas No. 1 Ney vs Pius B. and L.
Association; Provost vs Maneese: Fisher vs
Dickson; Mellon etal vs Craig et ux; Mc
Closkey vs Lamb (two cases); Guepner et al vs
Graham et nx; Hawk vs Anderson: Orr vs
Cllshman; Edgar vs Evening Penny Pres3
Company; Knapp vs Scholl, Sr.; Schneider vs
Beuscher; Doll vs same; Langdon vs Chartiers
township.
Common Fleas No. 2 Palmer vs MatchettA
Co.; Kennedy vs Faff: Shocnberger vs Klenc;
Edmundson & Perrine vs Hoffman; Litch &
Son vs Carter. 6wner.
Criminal Court Commonwealth vs George
F. House, Perry Bailey. Charles Cole et al.,
William Buckley et al, Samuel Brady et al,
Joseph Bates, William Johnston, John Beck
man. Walter Bossel, Paul R. Shepardson, James
Durkin, Joseph Lang, Henry Braun et al, P.
H. Hardy, Michael Koelcick, Bert Campbell,
William or James Lyons (two), Thomas Harv
Ington, Joseph Goldberg.
William Burke Wins.
The contest of the will of the late William
Burke was decided in the Orphans' Conrt, yes
terday, by Judge Over, in favor of the will. He
says that the most that could be claimed for
the evidence offered by the contestants was
that Burke, when he executed the will, was
old, infirm and somewhat childish, but this
would not make out a case of testamentary in
capacity. This gives the whole estate to Will
iam Burke, Jr.
A BUI for Lights.
The Philadelphia Company yesterday en
tered suit against Park Bros. & Co., to recover
56,199 of a gas bill. They supply the defend
ants' mill ith gas for fuel and formerly al
lowed them gas free for lighting purposes. In
January, 1S88. they notified them that tbey
would charge them for the gas used for light
ing. They nave never paid, and the suit is
brought for the gas burned from January 3,
1S8S, to November, 1888.
Lines From Lesal Quarters.
Mrs. Anna Oertel, yesterday, entered
suit for divorce from Emil Oertel. She alleges
infidelity and cruel treatment.
A plea of guilty was entered by Jacob Arm
strong to the burglary oi the house of Homer
Allen and taking two watches. He was sen
tenced two years to the workhouse,
John and James Price, Samuel Geiger and
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THE
Albert Campbell, for burglary, and James Mo
Kinney and William O'Herron, for larceny,
were yesterday sentenced to the Huntingdon
Reformatory.
Judge Mages yesterday ordered the dis
missal of the petitions of John Adamson and
Henry Chappel, for the appointment as super
visor of Union township. This decided a tie
vote of the last election.
Chables Huff pleaded guilty to selling
liquor without license and on bun day, and
keeping a bawdy house. He was sentenced to
pay a fine in all of 1,100, and undergo an im
prisonment bf nine months In the workhouse.
H. Baker, who escaped from the jail during
the Connty Centennial, was called up yester
day for sentence for escape. When he escaped
he had but a short timn to serve. He was sen
tenced to finish the old term and undergo an
additional imprisonment of three months.
The case of Simon Shugar, stepfather of
Fannie Cohen, against Frommer & Loudan
for damages, is on trial before Judge Stowe.
The child was knocked down, and her leg was'
broken by a pile of lumber falling on ber. The
lumber had been stacked up by the defendants.
A NUMBEK of the boys who took a lot of arti
cles from the Wood street ruins are on trial for
larceny. They are William Buckley, William
Callin, Lawrence Brown, James Camp, William
KahoeT William McCann and Nathan
Schwartz. The value of goods taken was
about 8100.
Hazelvrood'a Typhoid.
Officers McCune and Craig, of the Bureau
of Health, paid a visit to Hazel wood avenue
yesterday to investigate the water supply
there, which is thought to be causing' ty
phoid fever. They secdred samples of water
from Koehne's pond and a number of wells
and will have them analyzed.
Babby's Tbicofhebous, recommended
a sovereign remedy for all ailments of the
hair and scalp. F
B.&B.
Call and see for yourself if we have exer
cised good taste and judgment in the selec
tion of designs in the new 66-inch black
Chantilly laces. "We are sure about the ex
tra bargain part of the purchase.
Bogos & Buhl,
Cloak Deportment.
Complete line of new Jackets black and
colored, spring designs, just arrived.
mwfbu Hugus & Hacks.
Ladles' Cable Vje Fast Black Cotton Hose
Give best satisfaction 25 cents a pair and in
finer grades. Jos. Hobne & Co.'s,
Penn Avenue Stores.
A Word to the Wise.
Merchants and others intending to remove
April 1 should order their office stationery
of Percy F. Smith, printer, Virgin alley,
one door below Smithfield street. Call and
see samples anil obtain estimates.
Mothers, Bring the Children,
Before it is too late, to the Elite Gallery,
516 Market street, Pittsburg. Use elevator.
Cabinets, $1 per doz.
A Word About Catarrh.
"It is the mucous membrane, that wonderful
semi-fluid envelope surrounding the delicate
tissues of the air and food passages, that Ca
tarrh makes its stronghold. Once established,
it eats into the very vitals, and renders life but
a long-drawn breath of misery and disease,
dulling the sense of hearing, trammelling the
power of speech, destroying the faculty of
smell, tainting the breath, and killing the re
fined pleasures of taste. Insidiously, creeping
on from a simple cold in the head, it assaults
the membranous lining and envelopes the bones,
eating through the delicate coats and causing
inflammation, sloughing and death. Nothing
short of total eradication will secure health to
the patient, and all allevlatives are simply pro
crastinated sufferings, leading to a fatal ter
mination. Sanford's Radical Cube, by In
halation and by Internal administration, has
never failed; even when the disease has made
frightful inroadc on delicate constitutions,
hearing, smell and taste have' been recovered,
and the disease thoroughly driven out."
Sanfobd's Radical Cote consists of one
bottle of the Radical Cube, one box of Ca
TAimuAL solvent, and ono Improved In
haler, neatly wrapped in one package, with
full directions; price, $1 00.
Potter Drug a Chemical Co., Boston.
Weak. Painful Backs, '
i Kidney and Uterine Pains and Weak
nesses, relieved in one mlnatebythe
Cutlcura Anti-Pain Piaster, the
first and onlv rjain-killlnir nlaster.
New, instantaneous, infallible. The most per
fect antidote to Pain, Inflammation and
Weakness ever compounded. Vastly superior
to all other plasters. At all druggists, 23 cents;
five for $1; or. postage free, of Potteb Drug
and Chemical Co. , Boston, Mass. mf
MRS. DR. OBOSSLEY,
One of the Consulting Physicians of the
Catarrh and Dyspepsia Institute
at 22 Ninth street.
Mr. James Critchlow. residing on Carnegie
street, this city, has for 15 years undergone ter
rible suffering from his stomach. At times It
would give him such pain that he could only live
on lime water and milk. He had great distress
and bloating after eating, with belching of gas.
His liver also gave him much pain, ana his
tongue had a yellow coating. He had a pressure
and pain over the eyes. He lost all ambition
and kept getting worse until he was unable to
do any work. One doctor said he had cancer of
the stomach. After trying 11 doctor all to no
purpose, he began treatment with the physi
cians of the Catarrh and Dyspepsia Institute,
and although 67 years old, he now works every
day and feels well anB hearty. He says: "That
I am cured of the above conditions I hereby
sign my name,
"JAMES CBirCHLOW."
The above lady physician can be consulted
by ladles suffering from diseases peculiar to
their sex. The medicines used are positively
curative, and are so prepared as to allow the
patient to n;e the treatment herself. They
treat successfully catarrh, rheumatism, dys
pepsia, bronchitis, asthma, blood, kidney and
female diseases.
Office hours, 10-A. M. to 4 p. Ji., and 6 to 8 p.
M. Sundays, 12 to 4 p. it. Consultation free
to alL Treatment also by correspondence.
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Great inducements to Correspondence Classes.
Fmspectns, with opinions of Dr. Wm. A. Ham
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ogist, J.M.Bnckler.D.Ueditorotthe ChritOan
Advocate, A. y., Kicuard Proctor, the Scientist.
lions. Jndee G ibspn, Judah 1. Benjamin, and
others, sent post tne by
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ANCHOR REMEDY COMP'NY,
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ABOUT CATARRH.
J. M. Jewell. A Rat. Sunt. Bovs'
Industrial School, Lancaster, 6.,
says: I have no hesitation in rec
ommending your catarrh remedy.
It is bv far snnerior to anv other
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ilrs. M. J Hatton, 72Fortv-thlrd street, says:
The Anchor Catarrh Remedy cured mo of an
aggravated case of catarrh of long standing,
which 1 considered hopeless, aslbad used many
other preparations without relief.
We would be glad to have you give our ca
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PTTTSBTIRG- DISPATOHl
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS,
Uses of
. Silver.
THE rise of the Antique has
brought Silver strongly into
flavor.
Apart from its almost ex
clusive use in wedding gifts, it is,
now largely represented in toilet
and personal necessities. Our
stock illustrates this fully.
The many items for desk and
library service will also be found
here. They are exhibited in unique
and original designs.
We examine the finest specimens
of leading silversmiths, selecting
from their large stooks only suoh
compositions as shall oommand
immediate attention from .critical
purchasers.
THEODORE B. -STARR,
206 Fifth avenue,
Madison Square, New York.
Correspondence invited from In
tending purchasers.
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No. 50 FIFTH AVENUE,
Near Wood Street.
KORNBLUM, OPTICIAN
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mhl2-D
ANCHOR LINE.
Ailiniio Express Servlee.
LIVERPOOL via QUEENSTOWN.
Steamship "crrTOFltOME," from New York,
WEDNESDAY, May J, Jlavffl, June 28, July 24.
Largest and finest passenger steamer afloat.
Saloon passage, SS0 to 1100; second-class, S30.
GLASGOW SERVICE.
Steamers every Saturday from New Yorkto
GLASGOW and LONDONDERRY.
Cabin paacaceto Glasgow, Londonderry, Liver
pool $50 and $G0. Second-class, S30.
Saloon excursion tickets at reduced rates.
Travelers1 circular letters of credit and drafts
for any amount Issued at lowest current rats.
For books of tours, tickets or further Informa
tion Apply to HENDERSON BKOTHEUS. N. Y., or
J. J. MCCOKMICK, Fourth ana Smithfield; A, D.
bCOKF.lt a; SON, 415 Smith field St., Fittsburg; V.
SEilFLE, Jr., 103 Federal it., Alleahenv.
no-i88-irwI
ALLAN LINE
ROYAL MAIL STEAMSHIPS,
THE ONLY DIRECT LINE
From GLASGOW,
LONDONDERRY .
and GALWAY
To PHILADELPHIA.
Passenger Accommodations Unexcelled.
Prepaid Intermediate, $30. Steerage, S19.
Passengers by this route are saved the ex
pense and inconvenience attending transfer to
Liverpool or from New York.
j. j. Mccormick, or a d. scorer & son,
Pittsburg. mhl5-99-MWF
HAMBURG-AMERICAN PACKET CO.-EX-l'RESS
service between New York. South
ampton and Hamburg by the new twin-screw
steamers of 10,000 tons and 12,500 horse power.
Fast time to London and thfe Continent. Steam
ers unexcelled for sarety, Bpecd and comfort.
Regular service: Everv Thursday from New
York to Plymouth (London), Cherbourg (Paris)
and Hamburg. Through tickets to Loudon and
Paris. Excellent fare. Rates, extremely low.
Apply to General office. No, 37 Broadway, New
York. R. J. CORT1S. Manager; C. B. RICHARD
& CO., General Passenger Agents, 61 Broadway,
NewYorktMAX BCHAMBERG & CO.. 527bmlth
field St., 1'lttsburg., fc27-27-WT
THE FIRST CALL ON SPRING WRAPS.
AND THEVRE INCONTROVERTIBLE BEAUTIES.
DOUGLAS $c MACKIE
Would very specially direct your attention to their entirely new and magnificent stock of
Spring Jackets, Wraps, etc It's impossible to convey any adeanate Idea of tbese exceedingly
stylish and handsome garments. Suffice it to say that never before has such a galaxy of beauty
and perfection in the line of Ladies' and Misses' Wraps been submitted for our approval, all at
monev-saving prices. 100 All-wool Striped and Barred Jackets, In lovely, chaste colorings, only
SI 50. The're worthtevery pennv of $3. Averypretty range of Ladies' Stockinette Jackets will be of
fered at prices varying from S2 75 to 8 50; just 51 to $3 50 less than usual. A lovely collection
Wale Stripes and Fancy Corded Black Jackets from 83 75 to 812 50; regular prices range from
$5 to 816. An exquisite assortment of Ladies' Beaded Wraps, Silk and Cloth Wraps, gotten up
with harmonious and artistic effects, trimmed in lace, jet and ginm. all offered at prices ranging
from 82 75 to S25; from 10 to 25 per cent less than usual prices. Spring Newmarkets, latest styles.
And we've got an elegant line of Misses' and Children's Spring Wraps, Infants' Cloaks, Robes,
Short Dresses, Slips, etc Prices away down.
What's the use of paying 50c for Short Curtains when you can get choice of thousands at
Douglas & Mackle's for 80c a piece?
151 and 153 FEDERAL STREET, ALLEGHENY.
mhlO-MWi1
BE CAREFUL
When Making Tour Purchases, and by Doing So
Yotr Will Save Money.
This can only he done by purchasing of a good, reliable firm, and we have that repu
tation. Having 'it, we are bound to keep it Oar prices are tbe lowest and all oar goods
are recommended. So it will pay yon well to deal with us.
NOW IS YOUR TIME TO BUY
As there is but very little time now left before the busy season starts. Come now and
make roar selections. By paying a small amount down, yoa know that we will pack the
goods and store them for you without it costing you a .cent.. Besides that, you now have
the choice of all the newest and best patterns and designs in the house, and it is full of
them. Hurry, now, and get the attention paid you that; cannot be given when we have
become busy.
Lovely iNew Parlor Suits.
Elegant New Bedroom Suits.
N New Oarpeta New Rugs.
' Now Druggots. New Goods.
Everything new from the highest to tbe lowest, and don't forget that anything in
our house can be bought either for
CASH OR VERY EASY PAYMENTS.
HOPPER BEOS. & CO.,
307 WOOD STREET, BET. THIRD AND FOURTH AVES.
SOLE AGENTS FOR THE "NEW HIGH ARM" DAVIS SEWING MACHINE.
Fassenirer Elcvvator. Opes. Saturdays TJivttl XO o'oloolc
mhlO-wTsu
IFKIDAY, MAEOH v 15, '
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
DECIDEDLY STYLISH
-is
RUBEN'S
BROADWAY SILK HAT
$3 $4y $5) $6
We herewith present a sideview of the Spring
Silk Hat, than which there has not been a nat
tier shape out for lo these many seasons.
As will be perceived, the unsightly bell which
imparts to silk hats such a heavy look has
given way to the welcome Innovation of a
slightly taper crown; a change which will be
truly appreciated by the young men.
For the portly or middle-aged gentlemen we
carry a special block. The same being slight
bell crown with extra width of brim. The
variety which we carry enables us to suit the
young and old, the slim and the stout. No one,
no matter how bard to please, will leave our
establishment without being TOPPED OFF to
his entire satisfaction.
RUBEN,
The Hatter and Furnisher,
421 AND 423 SMITHFIEIiD ST.
Mall orders promptly filled. mhlO-wTsu
m
0$
Our stores full of workmen en
gaged in remodelingr.enlarging., etc.
The hammer, the saw, the plane
and the brush are making grand
transformations. Meanwhile our
great
AlterationSale
1
GOES BRAVELY ON.
Everything In the house marked
down to one-half former prices.
Overcoats, Suits, Hats, Furnish
ings, Boys' Clothing, Ladies'
Cloaks and Wraps. Come Early,
as we must
CLOSE THEM OUT.
SALLER & CO.,
Corner Diamond ant MWM. Streets.
mhlO-MjVFSu
SPRING HATS,-
DERBYS,
SOFT HATS.
Latest styles now ready. Prices
the lowest.
THE
HATTER,
434 MARKET ST.
fe25-srwy
D
TJNCAS O. WHITE,
Building Contractor,
71 Diamond street.
Second door above Smithfield,
Pittsburg. fel4-7-HwT
oiati,
tats,
"1889. '
NBW ADVERTISEMENT.
DIJOU THEATER-NEXT WEEK.
COMMEmjING MARCH 18.
Matinees WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY.
BALE OP BEATS, THIS MORNING.
Engagement of the FAMOUS EMMA
GRAND ENGLISH OPERA COMPANY.
Lanrest. stroneest and onlv successful Enellsh
Opera Company in America. With the follow-v
ing popular arasis;
Abbott, Annandale,Bertlni,Fricce,MontegrIffo,
Micbelena, Fruette, Broderick, Allen, Martens.
GRAND CHORUS AND ORCHESTRA.
In this brilliant and varied repertoire:
MONDAY. I First Time in Pittsburg,
SATURDAY MAT. Gilbert & Sullivan's
greatest success
THE "ysOMBN OF THE GUARD,
Or the Merryman and His Maid.
Emma Abbott and Entire Company in Cast.
TUESDAY First time in Pittsburg,
Balfo's Sparkling Opera,
BOSH OF OASTHiB,
Emma Abbott as Queen of Castile.
Entire company, enchanting music, gorgeous
costumes and scenic effects,
WEDNESDAY I Prices, 75c, 60c and 25c.
MATINEE, Revival of the Charming
Opera,
OHTMES OF NORMANDY,
Two Prime Donme, Entire Company.
WEDNESDAY Donizetti's brilliant creation,
LTJOIA, BRIDE of LAMMERMOOR
Emma Abbott and Entire Company In case
THURSDAY EMMA ABBOTT as "Leonora"
in Verdi's Grand Opera.
IL TROVATORE.
FRIDAY Bellini's Grand Opera,
NORMA , NORMA.
Emma Abbott imd Entlre'Company.
SATURDAY NIGHT Balfe's ever Popular
and Admirable
BOHEMIAN GIRL,
Emma Abbott and Entire Company.
mhlS-M
SPRING OVERCOATS.
The merry time of the
clothier's" year comes around
with the making of Spring
Overcoats.
They let our skill have free
play!
You want the artistic side of
tailoring turned out to its
fullest, and we're glad to bring
it to the front.
The long soft roll is the
nobby thing in them this sea
son! The shorter length is
the nobby thing!
So much for style.
Then for elegance. You
can't outstrip it in your wishes.
They're silk-lined throughout;
or silk-faced to the buttonhole
line; or, if you want one with
out these, you'll get good style
anyhow. Isn't it nigh time to
leave your measure for a
Spring Overboat or Suit?
Wanamaker
& Brown,
Sixth street and Penn avenue.
mhl5-D
THE MERCANTILE AGENCY
R. G. Dun & Co.,
Germania Bank Building. CJ Wood street, cor
ner of Diamond, Pittsburg, Pa.
This establishment supplies all necessary
information as to the standing, responsibility,
etc., of business men throughout North Amer
ica. It is the oldest and by far tbe most com
?ilete and extensive system ever organized for
he accommodation of Banking and Mercantile
interests and the General Promotion and Pro
tection of Trade.
Debts Collected and Legal Business Attended
to throughout the North American Continent.
TBI"
CAILUOADS.
PENNSYLVANIA COMPANY'S LINES
February 10, 1889, Central Standard 'lime.
TKAlNa DEPAirr
As follows from Union Station: Kor Chicago. d 73J
a. in., d 12.20, d 1:00, d7:45. except Saturday. 11:20
S. m. : Toledo. 7:25 a. m., d 12:20, dlO and exrept
aturday. 11:20 p. m.,; Crestline. fi. a. m.( Clove
land, 6:15.7:25 a.m., 12:35 and d 11 :05 p.m. : f cw Cas
tle and Youngstown, 7:05 a. m.. 12:20, ?:p. m.;
Yonngstown and N lies, d 12:20 p. m.: Ueadrltle,
Erie and Ashtabula. 7:05 a. m., 12:20 p.m.: Nlles
and Jamestown, 3:5 p. m.; Mas3lllon, 4:10p.m.;
Wheeling and Bellalre. 8:10a. m.. 12:35, 3:30 p. m.;
Beaver Falls, 4:00, 6:05 p. m., 8 8:20 a. m.; LeeU
dale. 5:30 a. m.
ALLEGHRNY-Kocnestef, 6.30 a. m.t Beaver
Kails, 8:15, 11:03 a. m.: Enon. 3:00 p. m.: Leets
dale, 10:00, 11:45 a. m., 2.-C0, 4:30, 4:45. 5:30, 7:00. 9:00
p. m.; Conway, 10:30p.m.: 'lr Oaks, S 11:40 a.
m.: Lectadale. S8:rn. m.
TltAiNS AlUtlVE Union station from Chicago,
except Monday 1:50. d 8:00. d0 a. m.. d 7:35 p.
m.; Toledo, except Monday 1:50, da:Va. m., 7:35
S, m.. Crestline, 2:10 p. m.: Yoongstown and
ew Castle, 9il0 a. m., US, 7:35, 10:15 p. in.; Nlles
and Yonnestowiu d 7:15 p. in.: Cleveland, u 5:50 a.
m., 2:25, 7:45 p. m.: Wheeling and Bellalre, 9.00
a, m 2:25, 7:15 p. m.; Erie and Ashtabula, 1:25.
10:15 p. m.; MassUlon. 10:00 a. ni.: Nlles and
Jamestown. 9:10 a. m.; Beaver Falls. 7:30 a. m
1:10 p. m S 8:25 p. m.: Leetsdale. IOiM p. m.
AllKIVE ALLEGHENY-From Enon, 8:00 a.
ra.: Conway, 6:50; Bocbester, 9:40 a. in.: Beaver
Fails, 7:10 a. m 6:40 p. m.: Leetsdale, 5:S0, 6:15,
7:45 a. m.. 12:00, 1:45, 4i30, 6:30. 9:00 p. tn.: Fair
Oaks, B 8:55 a. m.; Leetsdale, S 6:05 p. m.: Beaver
Falls. 8 8KB p. m.
8. Sunday only; d, dally: other trains, except
Sunday. re"
A LLKUHENY VALLEY KAlLKOAU-
XV-Tralns car0 Union station Eastern Standard
time): Klttannlng Ac. 6:55 a. m.: Niagara Ex..
dally. 8:45 a. re.,llulton Ac. 10:10 a. m.: Valley
Camp Ac, 12:06 n. m.; Oil City and UuBols Ex
press, 2:00 p.m. ; Hultcn Ac, 3:00 p.m. : Klttannlng
Ac, 4:oop.m.; BraebarnEx.,sax)p.m.; aiibm
ing Ac.
LC.SdOp. m.; Braeburn Ac,6tf0p.m.jHnl
Ac, 7 So p. m.; Buffalo Ex., dally,
i. m.: Hnltsn A.- 9:45 n. m.: braeburn Ac
xoa
SOOp,
HlST
p. m. cnureu trains craeourn, u:wp. m.
and 8:35 p. n. Pullman Sleeping Cars between
1. A.: DAVID MCUAKUO. Gen. Sunt.
PrrrsHUKu ajii westekn railway"
Trains (Cet'IStan'dtlnie) I Lcatc. Arrive.
llntlrr Accommodation
Day Ex. Ak'n,ToI., Cl'n. Kane:
6:00 am
7:20 am
920 am
12:30 pm
1:50 pm
7:10 am
7:23 pm
4:00 nm
isuuer Accommoaation
Chicago Exnrcss (dally)....
11:05 am
Newcastle and Greenville Ex
Zellenoplc and Foxburg Ac.
9:38 am
5:30 am
2:10 pm
4140 pm
5:40 .pm
dduk .Aocvnimoaaiioii.
Througn
and sleeper to Chicago dally.
ABBOTTi
f.M...-..Ma.....,....Jj
coach
'44 '-' -i
NEW ADTEKTISEJJ .
KAUFMANNS'
NEWS OF THE HOUR.
The triumph of our Cloak Department is complete. Though we'va
. won the ladies to our side on the cloak question many moons ago,
we have never captivated their hearts as thoroughly as right now
with our Grand Spring Opening Sale of Beaded and Plain Wraps,
Jackets, Jerseys, Long Garments, Beaded Shoulder Capes and
Fichus, Shawls, etc Such a bewildering variety of fine and fash
ionable garments and such wondrously low prices are nothing short
of a revelation to the fair sex and a revolution of the Cloak busi
ness of this city. Our Special Grand Opening bargains will be in,
force during the balance of this week, and every lady who has aa .
eye for beauty, elegance, style and economy should see them.
And, now, let's step into the realms of Youth our Boys' depart
ment You'll find it radiant with the best and latest styles of spring
Clothing. We know the wants of Young America to perfection, and
our stock expresses our knowledge. To begin with, the materials
from which our Boys' Clothing is made have been selected with a
special view to resist the roughest and hardest wear, the seams won't
rip, the buttons won't come off; so much for quality. As to prices:
they are the very lowest consistent with honest goods and honest
workmanship; this'll catch the boys' parents. You can easily see
that we can please all in quest of Boys' good and cheap Clothing,
whether kilt, short or long pant Suits. Mothers of boys, we expect
you.
Now, a few words to the gentlemen. Have you bought your spring
Overcoat yet? If you haven't, and are willing to save a few dollars
give us a call. Our variety of spring Overcoats is immense. You
can take your choice from cassimeres, corkscrews, cheviots, diago
nals, wide wales, meltons, crepes, Venetians, covert cloths, etc.
Spring Overcoats in these materials come in an endless diversity of
new shades and colors, and are cut in the latest medium, long and
short English top styles. Concerning our prices: they are low
enough for anybody. To illustrate, take our beautiful Melton Over
coats at $T, our magnificent Cheviot Spring Top Coats at 10; our
elegant French Corkscrew Top Coats at S12; our gorgeous Venetian
Top Coats at 15; our English Covert Cloth Top Coats at $1; our
fine English Wide Wale Top Coats at $zo. These garments are
fully equal to first-class custom work, and are infinitely superior to
the ready-made garments sold elsewhere at far above our prices.
A short Hat chat would be quite interesting to most gentlemen right
now, at the eve of the spring season. We want you to know that
our new spring stock exceeds in size, excels in beauty and outrivals
in cheapness anything of the kind ever known in this city. We now
show all the latest styles of the most celebrated American and for
eign Hat manufacturers. The new Knox shapes Silk Hats can be
found in ouf stock; we have the Youman, Dunlap and Miller shapes
of Stiff Hats in various fashionable colors, and there isn't a new
style of a soft, traveling or crush hat that we can't show. But the
greatest point in our favors are the low prices we name. The large
business we do makes it possible for us to buy our Hats for less
money and sell them at a smaller profit than any other house in
Pittsburg. And the more our trade increases, the cheaper we can
afford to selL This season we'll name the lowest prices yet
DO YOU GET YOUR CLOTHES MADE TO ORDER?
Our Custom Tailoring Department is ready to serve you. The lar
gest assortment ever seen here of Fine Imported Suitings and
Trouserings; the most skillful cutters and the best tailors are at
your disposal. And, remember this: You'll find no war prices
here. Goods Suits to order at $25, S30 and S35; finest at $40 and
45. Come and see us.
KAUFMANN.
Fifth Avenue and Smithfield Street
KAILUOAD3.
PENNSYLVANIA KAILKOAD ON AND
after November 20, 1SS8. trains leave Union
Station, Pittsburg, as follows. Eastern Standard
lime:
MAIN LINE EASTWARD.
New York and Chicago Limited ofBullman Ves
tibule dally at 7:15 a. m.
AtlantleExpress dally for the East, :03 a.m.
Mali train, daily, except Sunday, 8:55 a. m. Dan
day, mall, 8:40 a. m.
Day express dally at 80 a. m.
Mall express dally at 10 p. m.
Philadelphia express dally at 4:80 p. m.
Eastern express dally at 7:15 p. m.
East Line dally at 9:00 p. m.
Greensburjr express 5:10 p. m. week days.
Derry express 11:00 a. m. week dnys.
All through trains connect at Jersey CltTwira
boats of "Brooklyn Annex for Brooklyn. H. Y.,
avoiding double ferriage and Journey through N.
Y. City.
Trains arrive at Union Station as follows i
Mall Train, dally SfiJp. m.
Western Express, dally 7:45 a. m.
Pacific Express, dally 12:45 p.m.
Chicago Limited Express, dally 8:30 p.m.
Fast Line, dally 11:55 p. m.
bOUTHWESr MHX RAILWAY.
for Uniontown, &:4S and dSs, m. and45p.
m., without change of cars: 1.00 p. m.. connect
ing at (Jreensburg. Trains arrive from Union
town at 9:45 a. m.. 12:20. 6:15 and 8:20 p. m.
' WEST PENNSYLVANIA DIVISION.
From FEDERAL ST. STATION. Allegheny City.
Mall train, connecting for Blalrsvllle... 6:45 a. m.
Express, for Blalrsvllle, connecting for
Butler 8:15 p.m.
Bntler Accom.. 8:20 a. m., 2:25 and 5:45 p. m.
Bprtngdale Accom 11:40 a. m. and 8:20 p. nu
Freeport Accom 4:00, 8:15 and 10:30 p. m.
OnSnnday 12:50 and 9:30 p.m.
North Apollo Accom 10:50 a. m. and 50 p. m.
Allegheny Junction Accommodation.
connecting for Butler 8:20 a. m.
Blalrsvllle Accommodation ll:30n. m.
Tra Ins arrive at FED ERALSTKEET STATION:
Express, connecting from Butler 10:35 a. m.
Mail Train 2:Wp. m.
Uufter Accom... 9:25 a. m 4:40 and 7:20 p. m.
Blalrsvllle Accommodation 9:52 p. m.
Freenort Accom.7:40 a. m 1:32, 7:20 and 110 p. m.
On Bandar 10:10a.m. and 70 p.m.
Springdale Accom. 6:37a.m., and 3:02 p. m.
North Apollo Accom 8:40a. m. and 5:40 p. m.
MONONGAUELA DIVISION.
Trains leave Union station. Pittsnnrg, as follows:
For Monongahela City. West Brownsville and
Uniontown. 11a. m. lor Monongahela City and
AVest Brownsville, 7:05 and 11 a. ra. and 4:40 p. m.
On Sunday. 1 :01 p. m. For Monongahela City. 5:40
p. in., week davs.
Dravosbnrg Ac. week davs. 3:20 p. m.
West Elizabeth Accommodation, 8:50a.m.. 20,
630 and 11:85 p. m. Sunday, 9:40 p. m.
Ticket offlces-Corner Fourth avenue and Try
street and Union station.
CHAS. E. PUUH, J. K. WOOD,
General Manager. Gen'l Pass'r Agent.
PANHANDLE BOUTE-NOV.12, 1883. UNION
station. Central Standard Tin. Leave for
Cincinnati and St. Louis, d 7:30 s.m., d 80 and
d 11:15 p. m. Dennlion, 2:45 p. m. Chicago,
126, d 11:15 p. m. Wheeling, 7:30 a. m., 125,
6:10 p.m. Steubenvtlle, 5:55 a. m. Washington.
5155,8:35 a.m., 1.55, 8:30, 4:55 p. m. Bulger, 10:l4
a. m. Tlnrgettatown,t 11:35a.m.. 5.25 p. m. Mans
Arid. 7:U 110 a. m.. 6:Ja dS:35;10'4O, p.m. Mo
Donalds, d 4:15, d 10.00 p. m. .
From the West, d 1:60, rt.00, a. ra.. 3i dS:34
p.m. Dennlsoi., 9:30a.m. Stcubenvllle, 55 p. m.
Wheeling. lOi 8:45 a-m.. 35, 5:55 p.m. Burgetts
town. 7:15a. m., S 95 a.m. Washington, 0:55,7:50,
9:55 a. m 2:35, 6 3) p. m. Mansfield. 5:35,, 9leo
a,m., 12:45 d6:J) and 100 p. m. Bulger, 1:40p.m.
McDonalds, d 4:3ft a. m d0p. ra.
d dally; a Sunday only; other trains, zept
Sunday.
TO014-D
RAILROADS.
TALTIMORE AND OHIO RAILROAD-.
Jj Schedule in effect November 29, 1888. For
Washington, D. C. Baltimore and Philadelphia,
11:30 a.m.and 10:20 p.m. For Washington. D.C,,
and Baltimore, 70a.m. For Cumberland, t70,
11:30 a. m.. and 10:20 p. m. For Connellsvllle.
t7:00 and 11:30 a. m., fl.-OO, 140 and 10:20 p. m.
For Uniontown, 170,111:30 a.m., tl0 and 40 p.
p. For Mtt Pleasant, T7:0O and tllOa. m,, tl:CO
and t4:0O p. m. For Washington, Pa.. 7:30t
t9:30 a. m., "3:35, t5:30 and 8:30 p. m. For Wheel
ing, "7:30. 19:30 a.m, "335, 8a0 p. m. For Cin
cinnati and St. Louis, "7:30 a. m., 3:30 p. m. For
Columbus, "7:30 a. m., "8:30 p. m. For Newark,
7:30, 19:30 a. m., 3:35, "3:30 p. m. For Chicago,
7:30, l:30a. m.. "3:35 and "8:30 p. m. Trains ar
rive from Philadelphia, Baltimore and TO ashing
ton, 7:10 a. m. and "8:50 p. m. From Columbus,
Cincinnati and Chicago, 7:45a. m. and "3:10 p. m.
From Wheeling. I:1S, 10:50 a. m., 150, "9:10 p,
m. Through sleeping cars to Baltimore, Wash
ington ana Cincinnati.
For Wheeling, Columbus and Cincinnati, 11:55
p m (Batnrday only). Connellsvllla ac at i3;30
am.
Daily. IDally except Sunday. Sunday only.
Tbe Pittsburg Transfer Company wUl call for
and check baggage trom hotels and residences
npon orders left at B. & O. Ticket Office, corner
Fifth avenue and Wood street.
W. M. CLEMENTS, CHAS. O. SCULL,
General Manager. Gen. Pass. Agt.
PITTSBURG AND LAKE EKD5 RAILROAD
COMPANY-Sehedule In effect February 24,
laSO, Central time:
P. St L. E. R. R. DXFABT For Cleveland, 9:23,
7:40 A. M.. 130, 4:15 "9:30 p. it. For Cincinnati,
Chicago and St. Louis, 8:25 A. X., 1:21 "9:30 F. M.
For Bnffalo, 10:20 a. k.. 4:15 "9:30 r. K. For Sala
manca, 1:40 A. H., lav 9:30 r. K. For Bearer
Falls, 5:23, 7:40, 10:20 A. M., ISO, 3:30, 4:15, 530,
9:30 r. M. For Chartiers, SiSSTSiSS, 8)50, 17:00,
7:15, 8:40, 9:, 925, 10:20 A. It? 126, 12:45, 1125,
1:45, 3-0, 4:45, 'MO, 520, 8:20, 10:30 r. M.
AbrTVx From Cleveland, 5:30 A. Jr.. 10.
8:40, "80 p. m. From Cincinnati, Chicago and
St. Louis, 1 80 P. X. From Buffalo. 5:30 A.
M., 10, 5:40 r. m. From Salamanca, 10, "8.-0
r. II. From Youngstown, 5:30, "8 JO, 9:20 A. M.,
10, 5:40, "a.-OO p. M. From Beaver Falls, SilO,
8:50, 7:20, 920 A. M., 10, 1:35: 5:40, "3. CO. P.M.
From Chartiers, 5:10, 5:22, 5:30, 1:42, t:X, 78,
7:30, 8:30, 920. 10:10 A. M.j 120 noon, 12:80. 1U2.
Idi, 3:42. 4:00, 4:35, 50. iilO. 5:40, 9:12 P. K-
P., MeK. 4Y.B.B. DiPABT-ForNewHaven,
5:30 a. m.,"3:J0 p. m. For West Newton. 5:30 A. JC,
3:30 and 525 r. u. For New Haven, 7U0J. Jb,
Sundays, only.
ABRivi-From New Haven, 100 A. Jt.,"?!! P.
V. From West Newton,6:15. 10:00 A. M.,'55p. jc.
For McKeesport and Elizabeth, 5:00 A. M. 3:30,
4:05, 525 r. m.. 17:10 a. M. .
From Elizabeth and McKeesport, 6:15 A. nv.
7:30. 10:00 A. .. :05P. M.
Dally. Sundays only. . . M ,
E. HOLBROOK. General Superintendent.
A. E. CLARK. General Passenger Agent.
City ticket office. 401 Smithfield street.
PITTSBURG AND CASTLE SHANNCK K. R.
Co. Winter Time Table. On and after October
14, lass, until further notice, trains will run as
follows on every day except Sunday. Eastern,
standard timet Leaving Plttsburg-:1 a. hl,
7:15a,m.,8d0a. m., liaoa-BU, l:p.m., l:poa,
5:10p.m. 6:30 p. m.. 9:30 p. m.,Jld0p. m. Ar-llngton-5:45a.
m.. 6:30 a. m. 80 a. ra., 10:90 a.
ra.. 10 p. m.. .2:40 p. ra.. 420 p. m., isia p. m
7:13 p. m., 10:30 p. m. Sunday trains, leaving
Pittsburg 10 a, m.. 12:50 p. m.. 2:30 p.-m., 5:10
p.m.. 0:30 p. m. Arlington 9:14 i. a, Ba.
1-J0p.m 20p.m..6-J0" m.
OHN JAHN. Sapt.
BiSH. BUTTER ' '
RECEIVED DAXTjY
BY GEO. K. STEVENSON 4 CO.
GROCERIES ANB TABLE DELICACIES,
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