Centre Democrat. (Bellefonte, Pa.) 1848-1989, December 06, 1860, Image 1

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    Ibe Centre 3HK Democrat.
% Jiratilg Sttospptr—itbolti to politics, Ctmptrnntt, literature, Science, %tb, gtajjairics, Agriculture, % Itarkcts, ©ratatimt, Central intelligence, tic.,
J. S. & J. J. BRISBIN,
YOLTJME 26,
®{rc Centre gtmocrat.
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY, BY
J. S. & J. J. BRISBIN.
Office in the Arcade Building, Second Floor.
Tbrms. $1,50 if paid in advance or within six
months after subscribing,otherwise $2 will invari
ably be charged. No subscriptions received for
a shorter period than six months and none dis
continued, unless at the option of the editor, until
all arrearaees are paid.
BUSINESS CARP S*
M'ALLISTER & BEAVER
ATTORN hYcj-AT-LAW, BBLLKFOSTB, FA
Office on Allegheny Street. Feb. 10 59
EM. BLANCHARD-^tokney
. -AT-LAW, bcLLKoNTB, Pknn'a. Office
furmrlv occupied by the Hon. James Burnside.
Jan. 19, '60.-tf.
WW BROWN-*TTORNEY-AT
. LAW Bellkfunte, Penna. Will attend to
all legal business entrusted to him, with prompt
ness. May, 5 '59.
-yAS. H. RANKIN, ATTORNEY-AT
t)l LAW, UKLLEFoJiTK. Pa. will attend prompt
ly to all legal business entrusted to him. Office
next door to toe Post Office. [Sspt. 20, '6O, tf
WM. P. WILSON -ATTORN EY-AT
YY -LAW Cellfo.ntk, Pa , will promptly at
tend to all legal business entrusted to him. office
three doors North of the diamond. jan.l2'6o
T? J. HOCKM AN, SURVEYOR AND
111. CONVEYANCER, Bkloefoxtb, Pa., will
attend to and correctly execute all businesi en
trusted to him. [June 14,-'6O, if.
I? LIVINGSTON PATRICK,
XL. ATTORNEY-Ai-LAW, BKLLF.FUNTB, Pa.,
Will attend promptly to all legal business entrus
ted to him. Office "on Northwest corner of the
Diamond. [Nov. 15, IB6o.—tf.
GEO). L. POTTER. M. D.
OFFICE ou High street, (old office.) Betlefonte
Pa. Will attend to professional calls as
heretofore, and respeotfully offers his professional
services his friends and the public. 0ct.26'58
A. FAIRLAMB. M. D. JAS. A. DOBBINS, M D
FAIKLAMB &. DOBBINS.
DR. FAIRLAiV'J has associated with hiin DR
J. H. DOBBIN in the practice of medicine
xffice as heretofore on Bishop street, opposite the
Temperance Hotel. March 19,57.
DR. JAS. P. GREGG, respectfully offers
his professional services to the people of
Milesburg and vicinity. Residence, Daniel R.
Boiieau'a National Hotel.
Refer to Dr J. al. McCoy, Dr. G. L. Potter, Dr.
J. B. Mitchell. [Nov. 8, IS6o.—tf.
WM. REISER, SURGEON AND
V V PHYSICIAN, having permanently located
offers his Professional services to the citizens of
Pine Grove Mills and vicinity, and respectfully
oslicits a liberal portion of the public patronage.
[Feb. 16, '6o.—ly.
J. J. UNGLiE. Operative
WSraBSStZ. and Meclianical Dentist, will prao-
tice all the various branches of bis
profession in tho most approved manner. Offioe
and residence on Spring St.Bellefonte' Pa.
[Mar, t. '6I"I. tf.
TAMES KIDDEE- attoiuw-at
tl DAW, UKLLKRONRU PA. Will atttend to all
business entrusted to hira with care and prompt
ness, Kefer to Gov. Pollock, Milton Pa. and
Hon. A. G. Gurtin, Beilefonte Pa. Office with
John H. Stover jan. 5, *6O.
JR. MUFFLI, AGKNT FOB TH
, LVKSITBRANCH INSURANCE COMPACT. Per
sons wishing to secure themselves from losses by
fire, will do well to call upon him at the store of J.
R. Muffly A Co., N. E. corner of the Diamond,
three doors above Allegheny street, Bellefonte,
Centie co , Pa. Mar; 15, '<s(l. ly.
WW. WHITE, Dentist, has per
# manently located in Boalsburg, Centre
County Pa. Office on main st., next door to the
store of Johnston A Keller, where he purposes
practising his profession in the most scientific
manner and at moderate charges. mar.
IRA C. MITCHELL. Crnos T. ALEXANDER.
MITCHELL eft ALEXANDER.
ATTORNEY S-AT-LAW, BELLEFONTE PFNNA.
Having associated themselves in the practice
ot law, will a'ten 1 promptly to all business en
trusted to their care
Office in the Arcade. [Novi 1, '6o. —tf.
CONVEYANCING.
DEEDS BONDS, MORTGAGES,AND AR
TICLES OF AGREEMENT neatly and cor
rectly executed. Also, attention will be given to
the adjustment of Book Accouuts, and accounts
f Admicstratior s and Executors prepared fording,
office next door to the Post Office.
Oct., 19th, 'SB, IV M. J. KEALSR.
Jtedgggfev T- D.Wlngate
RESIDENT DENTIST-
Office and residonce on the North
lastern corner of tho Public Square, near tho
Court House.
Will be found at his office, except two weeks in
tach month, commencing on the first Monday of
each month, when he will be filling professional
ngagements elsewhere. Oct. 22, '57 48 tf.
JOHN H. STOVER
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW
BELLEFONTE, PA., will practice his pro
fession in the several courts of Centre county.—
All business entrusted to him will be carefully at
tended to. Collections made and all monies
promptly remitted. Offioe, on High st. formerly
opcuped by Judge Burnside, and D. C. Boal, ftq.
wherehe can be consulted both in the English and
intho german language. May 6,'58 —22 ly.
JAS. MACIfAKUS. w. P. MA CM AN U
J: & WIH. P. MACMANUS.
ATTORNEY'S-AT-LAW, BELLEFONTS, PA.,
Office in the rooms formerly occupied by
Linn k Wilson, Allegheny street. Jas. Macman
ushas associated with W. P. Macmanus, Esq., in
the practice of law. Professional business intrus
tedt o their care will receive prompt attention.
They will attehd the several Courts in the Coun
ties of Centre, Clinton and Clearfield.
June 21, '6O, tf.
XT ALE & HOY' ATTORNEYS-AT-
Xl LAW, will attend pro nptly to all business
entru stedto their care, Office in the building
formerly occupied by Hon, Jas. T. Hale.
A CARD.
Messrs. Hale k Hoy will attend to myabusiness
during my absence in Congress, and will be as
sisted by mo in the trial of all causes entrustedto
them. J. T. HALE. jans'lß6o
J CURTIN A BLANCHARD.
ATTOKNEY'S-AT-LAW.BELLEFONTB.PJJ NNA
The undersigned having associated them
selves in the practise of Law, will faithfully at
tend to all professional business entrusted to them
in Centre, Cliution and Clearfield counties. AU
collections placed in their hands, will receive
their promt attention. Office in Blanchard's new
building on Allegheny street.
Nov. 30 'SB CURTIN k BLANCHA RD.
BJUYKIJYG HOUSE OF
WM. F.. REYNOLDS & CO.
BELLEFONTE, CENTRE CO., PRNN'A.
Bills cf Exchange and Notes discounted ; Collec
tions made and Funds promptly remitted. Inter
est paid on Speoial Deposits, Exchange on the
Eastern cities constantly on hand and for sale.
Deposits reseived. April 7 'SB
ST. LAWRENCEHOTEL,
CHESTNUT STREET,
PHILADELPHIA.
WM, B. CAMPBELL,, Proprietor
Apr sth'6o—tf.
HOWELL, & ROE RUE,
MANUFA CTURERS AND IMPORSERS
OF PAPER HANGINGS,
N. E. Cor. of Fourth A Market Streets,
PHILADELPHIA.
©ct. 4,'60, 3m. [R. Q. 0.
J. THORP FLAHERTY,
Importer of •
Havana Sogars,
No. 837 CHESTNUT STREET,
(Adjoining Girard House,)
And Opposite Contixkntal Hotrl,
PHILADELPHIA, PFNJiSYLVANIA.
Ar d.26,-'6O, —ly.
BOMGARDNER HOUSE
CO RNEK OF SIXTH AND R. R. STREETS
OPPOSITE
L.V. AND PENNA. R. R. DEPOTS,
HARRISBURG, FA.
J.W. STONE. PROPRIETOR
Mar. 15th,-1860, ly.
MADAME SIHWEND*S
INFALLIABLE POWDERS,
F3R the speedy and effectual Cure of all Infia
motions, Fever*. Rheumatism, Dyspepsia and
Liver Complaint. Piles, Gravel, and all Acute and
Chronic Diseases of Adult s and Children. —Send 3
cent Stamp to her Agent, G. B. JONES,
Hundreds of testimonials.] Box 2070 Phila, P. O.
Agency, S. W. cor. Third A Arch Sts.
Oct. 4, IS6O. 10L J. Web.
J. PALMER & CO.,
MARKET ST., WIIARF, PHILADELPHIA.
Dealer in FISH CHEESE and Provisions,
Have constantly on hand an assortment of
DRIED <fc PICKLED FISH, Ac., via:
Mackerel, Shad, Salmon, Blue Fish,
Herrings, Codfish, Beef, Pork, Lard, Shoulders,
Hums, bides, Cheese, Beans, Rice. Ao.,
ct. 4, ' CO [J. Web.
UNITED STATES HOTEL,
BY
L. W. TENBYOK
OPPOSITF PENNSYLVANIA R. R. DEPOT
HARRISBURG PA. •
B. HARTSHORN Superintend en I.
NO pains have been spared to make the abvoe
the first hotel in Harrisbnrg. The table i
always spread with the best the market affords
and the accommodations are suprior to any found
elsewhere in the city. March Ist ISfiO.s
HUGH B.BRIBBEN,
Druggist,
MANUFACTURER OF
EXTRA LIQUOR COLORING,
N. W. Cor. Third A Poplar streets,
Terms Cash.] Philadelphia.
Oct. 3, 1860,— ly.
KLEMM & BR. OTHER~
IMPORTERS, MANUFACTURERS K DEALERS IN
fflusital Instruments,
GERMAN', FRENCH
SAKD
Italian String®,
No. 705 Market Street,
PHILADELPHIA.
Sept. 13,-"
LOUIS GERBER,
IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER OF
FANCY FURS.
For Ladies', Gentlemen's and Children's Wear,
NO. 234 ARCH ST., PHIL'A.
All kinds of Furs Dressed, Clesnod and Repaired.
Furs made to order at the shortest notice.
Full value paid for Shipping Furs.
Furs taken care of during
the Summer
Oct. 4, '6o.—ly.
W. A. ARNOLD. JOHN W. WILSON
ARNOLD & WILSON
WARMING & VENTILATING WAREHOUSE,
No. 1010 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia.
CMILSON's Paten Cone and Ventilating 1
FURNACES, Cooking Ranges,
Balh Boilers,
ENAMELED STATE MANTELS
Common and Low Down Parlor Grates,
Warm Air Registers and Ventilating, Ac. Ac.
Particular attention given tu warming and Ven
tilating Buildings of every discription.
BEXJ. M. FELT WELL, Sup'L
Apr. 26,-1860. ly.
~ TOWXSEXD & CO.,
(Successors to Sam'l Townscnd dc Son,)
No. S9 South Seoond Street, above Chestnut,
IL V) ELPHIA.
IMPORTERS & DEALERS IN
Velvet, Brussels, Tapestries, Three ply, In
grain and Venitian CARHETS ol the
best English A American make.
MATTINGS, OILCLOTHS, (be., &c., d-c.
We solicit an inspection of our assortment be
fore purchasing elsewhere.
Oct. 4, '3o.—3m. [R- G- 0.
HAINES & DOCK.
WHOLESALE GROCERS,
No. 35 North Water Street,
PHILADELPHIA.
GROCERIES, GROCERIES, GROCERIES,
GROCERIES, GROCERIES, GROCERIES,
Merchants of Central Pennsylvania
LOOK TO YOUR INTERESTS 1 !
If you wish to buy cheap go to Haines A
They keep on hand the best articles to be bad
in the City, in their line of business.
Call and examine their goods.
Remember their Firm is at
No. 35 North Water Street,
PHILADELPHIA
Apr- 'GO.—ly-
["WE STAND UPON THE IMMUTABLE PRINCIPLES OF JUSTICE —NO EARTHLY POWER SHALL DRIVEUS FROM OUR POSITION
BELLEFONTE, PA., THURSDAY MORNING, DEC., 6 1860.
NEW TOPOGRAPHICAL MAP
AND
DIRECTORY •
OF
CENTRE CO. PENNSYLVANIA,
BY S.D. TTLDEN,
From actual Measurement by Instrumen
tal Surveys throughout the County.
By H. F. Walliho, Civil Engineer.
THE undersigned proposes to publish by order
a large and accurate Popograpbical Ma} of
Centre county, from thorough and careful sur
veys, by 11. F. Walling, Civil Engineer.
Every road has been carefully surveyed by
course and distance, and the location noted of all
the publio roads, Dwellings, Churches, Post Offi
ces, Hotels, Stores, School Houses, Factories,
Mills. Shops, Mountains, Ponds Streams, Ac.—
The names of Property Holders generally—care
fully including those who order the work—will
be engAved upun the Map, showing the exact lo
cation of each.
Extra Maps of the Principal Villages will be
engraved upon the margin o e the Map ; also a
Table of Distances, showing the number of miles
from ach Post office to every otheJ throughout
the county, together with the latest statistical in
formation. An ornamental border will surround
the Map
The Map will be engraved by the m st skillful
Artists in the country, handsomely colored and
inonnted, and will be delivered to those who or
der for Five dollars per copy.
We are now actively engaged in forwarding the
work, and shall endeavor to give every property
holder an opportunity of ordering a copy, and al
so of examining the work before its final com
pletion; in order to make it entirely satisfactory
as to accuracy, Ac.
The map will contain all the information usual
ly fouud in Town maps, lor each of the towns in
the county, and it is obvious that the most liberal
patronage is needed to sustain us in producing a
work of so great magnitude and expense. As it
is evidently of such practical utility and intetest
to business men and eitizens generally, present
ing so minute and distinct a representation of the
county, that even the child may readily acquire a
correct idea of each town, village, Ac., and taelr
trne directions, distances from each other, wo con
fidently solicit and expect the hearty co-operation
of the intelligent and enterprising citizens of Ceu
tre county.
S. D. TILDEN. Publisher.
maps are said exclusively by the
Publisher, and no variation in price. No more
maps are printed than what are actually ordered.
Wo the undersigned, having examined there
cent surveys and drafts of Cenire county, also
Topographical Maps of other counties, pulished
by Mr. S. D. Tilden, take pleasure in recommend
ing a Topographseal Map of this county, which ;s
very much needed, being of great practical value
to business men and citizens generally, and from
he united testimonials and recommendations the.'
ave from distinguished gentlemen whre they
ave made surveys and published county maps.—
We feel confident they will furnish an accurate,
reliable and useful Map and Directory well w)r
ty of liberal patronage.
We hope the citizens of this county will interest
themselves sufficiently in this enterprise, so that
the Publisher may engrave upon the margin of
the map, extra plans of the villages in the county
upon an enlarged scale.
Considering the expense of such a survey of the
whole county, and being entirely a local work we
think it is offered to the citizens on very reason
able terms*
Wm. F. Reynolds, James T. Hale, John Hoffer,
Adam Hoy, Wm. A. Thomas, E- C. Humes, lraC.
Mitchell, H. N. McAllister, J- S. Barnhart, as.
A. Beaver, Cyrus T. Alexander, Ed. Blinchard,
H. Brookerhoff, Wm. P. Wilson, Geo. L. Potter,
Geo. Livingston, Jacob V. Thomas, Geo A. Fair
limb, Jas. H. Rankin, James F. Riddle, John
Tonner, Jesse L' Test, Gcorgt W. Tate, John T.
Hoover, P. B. Wilson, James Linn, J. B. Mitch
ell, E. Greene, J. H. Stover, R. G, Durham, Sarn'l
Linn, 11. P. Harris, A, S. Valentine.
Aug. 23, 1860. tf.
BCERHAVE'S
HOLLAND BITTERS
TILIS CELEBRATED HOLLAND REMEDY TOR
DISEASE OF THE KIDNEYS,
LIYEB COMPLAINT,
WEAKNESS OF ANY KIND,
FEVER AND AGUE,
Anu the various affection, consequent upon a disordered
STOMACH OB LIVER,
Sueli-as Indigestion, Acidity of the Stomach, Colicky Pains,
Heartburn, Loss of Appotito, Despondency, Costiveness,
Blind and Bleeding Piles. In all N&TOUS, Rheumatic, anil
Neuralgic Affections, it baa in numerona instances proved
highly beneficial, and in others effected a decided cure.
Tills is a purely vegetable compound, prepared on strictly
scientific principles, after the manner of the celebrated
Holland Professor, Boerhave. Its reputation at home pro
duced its introduction here, the demand commencing with
those of the Fatherland scattered over the face of this
mighty country, many of whom brought with them and
handed down the tradition of its value. It is now offered
to the American public, knowing that its truly wonderful
medicinal virtues must be acknoicledgrd.
It is particularly recommended to those persons whose
constitutions may have beon impaired by the continuous use
of ardent spirits, or other forms of dissipation. Gonerally
instantaneous in effect, it finds its way directly to the seat
of life, thrilling and quickening every nerve, raising up the
drooping spirit, and, in fact, infusing new health and vigor
In the system- . ,
NOTlCE.—Whoever expects to find this a beverage will
be disappointed; but to the sick, weak and low spirited, it
will prove a grateful aromatic cordial, nose eased of singular
remedial properties.
READ CAREFULLY!
The Genuine highly concentrated Bmrliave's Holland
Bitters Is put up in half-piut bottles only, and retailed at
ON* DOLLAR per bottle, or six bottles for FIVE DOLLARS. The
greet demand for this truly celebrated Medicine bas induced
many imitations, which the public should guard against
purchasing.
g®- Beware of Imposition. See that our name Is on the
label of every bottle you buy.
Bold by Druggists generally. It can be forwarded
by Express to most point*.
SOLE PROPRIETORS,
BENJAMIN PAGE, JR. & CO,
MANUFACTURING
jpharmaatttists and (Ktaiata.-
PITTSBURGH, PA.
SALE AT the following named places 'n
entre county:
J. Harris A Co., Bellefonte; -D. Houser A Son;
Plumville Mills ; Geo. Jack A Co., Boalsburg ,
Adam R. Shaffer, Madisonburg; Samuel Pontius,
£ion; Balser Weber, Howard; H. Brown. Hit.
blersburg j C. G. Rymaa AT. M. Hall, Miles
burg; A. T. Schngll A Co., Port Matilda; Rhule
A Reespaan, Millheim; Sam-Frank, Rebersburg ;
T. Wolf A Son, Wolf's Store; W. Wolf, Centre
Hall; R. H. Duncan, Spring Mills; J.T.Jack,
Potters' Mills ; Peter Kerlin, Churchville ; J. H.
Habn, Springfield; Rankin A Bolinger, Bai
feysviWe; J. Q. Williams, EagieviHe; Nixon A
Co., Mili HaJJ; Joseph Bing, UnionviHe ; Gross
A Yearick, Aaronsburg ; J. 0. Bryan, Pine Grove
Mills; Jacob Daniels, StornistotTn, and by deal
er* generally,
The Fatal Rifle.
A party of man may be easily frightened,
and their number materially lessened by a
single sharp shooter, A fact which is fairly
illustrated in the following from a late Lon
don journal. Mr. M'Kerdy, a gentleman,
speaking to a volunteer meeting at Lesma
hagow, told the following anecdote:
" Many years ago, when traveling on the
continent, I had a servant, an old Prussian
soldier, who rolated to ma the following re
markable circumstance —
" In 1813 or 1814 he belonged to a
of one thousand men of small arms, operat
ing as a guard on the right bank of the
Rhine, while the French were is possession
of the country on the left of the river* The
season was early in autumn, when the weath
er was delightful, and the harvest just gath
ered in.
" One aflernoen the corps bivouacked near
the river for the advantage of water, and the
place was considered perfectly safe from at
tacks, as the opposition bank was a vast plain
of corn stubble, without a single fence as far
as the eye could reach ; an advancing army (
therefore, could be moat easily seen. The
river was unfordable, and about two bun-,
dred yards broad.
" The troops, therefore, considered them
selves perfectly safe from attack, and set
about preparing their supper, and making
themselves comfortable for the night, when a
shot was heard from the opposite bank, and
a cry from the bivouac that a man was woun
ded. Every soldier started instantly to his
legs, and looked across the river, but no one
oould see even the vestige of an enemy,which
greatly surprised all, as theie was no covert,
and the yellow stubble was especially well
adapted to show tbeeraallest o'qjfct for con
sidcrable distance from the river.
" While the whole corps were thus gazing,
a puff of smoke was seen rising about fifty
yards from the'stream, followed by the re
port of a rifle, and another soldier dropped
wounded. In a moment, without the aid of
an officer, about one hundred men rushed to
the water and commenced firing at the spot
whence the shots came, although nothing but
the atubble was to be seen.
" Soon there was another report, followed
bj the fall of another man, which so exas
perated the whole iorce that nearly every
soldier set about firing at the spot which the
puffs of smoke were soen to arise By this
time all were convinced that the mischief
was done by a single rifleman.
" Some eighteen shots had been fired by
the rifleman, and seventeen men bad been
killed and wounded, when, to the great sat
isfaction of all, a man was seen to spring
from the stubble, a lucky shot having hit
him, but this did net take place until many
thousand bad been fired at him.
" Here is an eviderce of the power of the
rifle. The man had laid down in a slight
hollow, so small that it was not perceptible
across the river, and there brought down sev
enteen men, while be lay in almost perfect
satety. lie Dearly routed a little army."
A Mother's Grave
Earth has some sacred spots where wo feel
like loosenging the shoes from our feet, and
treading with holy reverence; where com
mon words of pleasure are*unfitting ; places
where friendship's hands have lingered in
eaoh other's, where vows have been plighted,
prayers offered, and tears of parting shed
Oh, how the 'thoughts hover around such
places, and travel back through immeasured
space to visit them. But of all the spots on
the green earth, none is so sacred as that
where rests, waiting the resurrection, those
we once cherished and lovsd. Hence, in all
ages, the better portion of mankind have cho
sen the loved spots for the burial of their
dead, those spots they have loved to
wander at eventide to meditate and weep.—
But among all the charnel houses of the dead,
it there is one spot more sacred than all the
rest, it is a mother's grave. There sleeps the
mother of our infancy—the guide of our
youth—th 6 counsellor of our riper years
our friends when others deserted us; she
whose heart was a stranger tc every other
feeling but love, and who could always find
excuses for us when we could always find
none for ourselves. There she sleeps, and
wo love the very earth for her sake.
GREATNESS.—AH greatness consists in this
—in being alive to what is going on around
one; in living actually; in giviDg voice to
the thought of humanity ; in saying to one's
fellows what they want to hear or need to
bear at that moment; in being the concretion,
the result of the influences of the present
world. Io no other way can one affect the
world than responding thus to its needs, in
embodying thus its ideas. You will see, in
lookißg to history, that all great men have
been a piece of their time; take them out
and set them elsewhere, they will not fit se
well; they were made for their day and gen
eration. The literature which has left any
.nark, which has been worthy of the name,
ha* always mirrored what was doing around
it; not necessarily daguerreotyping the mere
outside, but at least reflecting the inside—
the thoughts, if not the actions of men -their
feelings and sentiments, even if it be treated
of apparently far-off themes.
Many a poor woman thinks she can
do nothing without a husband, and when she
gets ope fiocfs ihe nothing with him^
A Little too Green
The Cincinnati Enquirer tella the follow
ing storyA few day sinoe a newly wed
ded eouple from the interior of'the State ar>
rivei at the Burnett House and took apart
ments for the night at that well ordered ho
tel. It was quite evident that the whole par
ty were unfamiliar with metropolitan sights.
The rooms, corriders. marble floor, gorgeous
drawing-room and well spread table of the
hotel drew from them the most ingenious re
marks of surprise. In the evening they vis
ited the opera-bouse, and were so astonished
by its magnificence that even Mrs. Waller's
wonderful impersonation of "Meg Merilles"
almost failed to interest them. Nothing
more was thought of the veidant trio till
about one o'clock in the morning, at which
time the boot black of the Burnett House, in
making his customary rounds, observed one
of the Benedicts seated in the hall, near the
door of his room. He naively asked the pol
isher of the understandings, if he was the
clerk. Receiving a negative answer, he in
formed the boot black that he should like to
see that individual. In a few moment? one
of the attentive office men was at his side,
and politely asked what was wanted.
" Couldn't you make mo a bed in the par
lor ?" cried the disconsolate individual.
" In the parlor?" echoed the clerk, " I'm
afraid not."
" We'll, I'd like to have one.spread down
some where."
" Why don't you go into your own room? 1 '
asked the clerk.
•'I don't like to," said the bashful young
man.
" Why, what is the matter ?" eontinued
theelerk. " Has your wile turned ycu out
of your room ?"
" No," drawling, " but you see I
have never been married before, and so I
ion't much like to go in, particularly in a
strange place."
"Oh 1 go right in," said the clerk ; " she
won't think it is wrong."
Here the door of bia room opened about
an inch, and through the aparture came a
voice, coaxingly 6aying—
"Do come in, John. I won't hurt you. I
know'd they'd think strange'of yer standing
out there. Come in now, won't yer ? I've
blowed out the it's all dark iu here."
The odor of the room assured tLe clerk that
she had indeed " blow'd out the gas," so
pushing open the door he stopped the flow>
raised a window and returned,to the hall to
pursuade the verdant husband to retire with
his wife. All arguments were fruitless, how
ever, and he was compelled to assign the
simple iudividual a separate room troin that
his wife was in for that night.
The Empress Eugenie
While at Eaux Bonnes, in the Pyrennes,
it is said that the French Empress charmed
every body who saw her, and in a thousand
ways WOD the hearts of the simple mountain
eers with whom she came in eontraot. One
morning, in clambering style, .with an oiled
sack thrown over her dress, and a pointed
stick in her hand to secure her footing Bhe
bad wandered away from ber maids of honor,
and while a'one, met a peasant woman gath
ering the flowers of the linden tree, when ths
following dialogue occurred:
" What are ycu picking there, my good
woman ?"
" Oh, madam, they are lindens."
" Will you sell me those which you have
gathered ?"
" Oh. madam, they are not worth selling,
as I shall only get three sous fur them in the
village ; but I will give them to you."
The Empress accepted them, aDd taking
from her purse three gold Napoleons, pre
sented them to the astonished woman, and
was going away, when tba latter seised her
by the arm.
" Oh, madam, I don't know this mor.ey.
1 have never seen such beautiful sous. Why,
you must be th Emperor's#vife."
"Yes, I am the Emperor's wife," replied
her Mxjcaty, with her usual amiable smile.
"Eh, how is your husband ?"
"lie's very well, I thank you. How is
yours?"
"Mine—oh, he is over yondsr, picking up
faggots, with his three children."
"Three children I —then I must give him a
sou more apiece for each of them."
And the Empress handed her three more
go.d Napoleons, and took her way up the
mountain, the simple b'essing of the good
woman echoing after her.
A lofty City.
Potosi, in Bolivia, South America, is the
bigbeet city in the world, being at an eleva
tion of 13,350 feet, considerably above the
level of the summits of the Alpine mountain
giants, and only 360 feet below the topmost
peak of the icy Jungfrau itself. This is a
tolerably lofty attitude for a city; but then
Potosi is the metropolis of the richest silver
mines in the world, which are worked in the
neighboring Cerra ( Sierra, or higher ridge )
de potosi, at an'altitude of 16,000 feet above
the sea level, a greater height than the top of
Mount Blano ; so that the abundance of the
precious metals, we may suppose, compen
sates the 30,000 inhabitants ( about one half
of whom are of the native races) for the rar*
ity of the air, the rapid alterations of cli
mate, which present the characteristics of the
four seasons every twenty four hours, and
the rugged barrenness of tho surrounding
districts,
Night.
Night levels all artificial distinction. The
beggar on his pallat of straw snores as
soundly as the king on his bed of down. —
Night—kind, gentle, soothing, refreshing
night—the earthly paradise of the slave, the
sweet obliyion of the care-worn 6oul, the
nurse of romance, of devotion; how the great
panting heart of society yearns for the return
of night and rest ! Sleep is God's special
gift to the poor ; for the great there is no
fixed time' for repose. Quiet, they have
none ; and instead of calmly awaiting the
appro sch of events, they fret and repine and
starve sleep, and chide the tidy hours, as i
every to-morrow were big with the fate of
some great hereafter. The torrent of events
goes roaring past, keeping eager expectation
constantly on tiptoe, and drives timed slum
ber away.
There ie something strangely beautiful in
the contemplation of night—when the shin
ing stars seem to do homage to their pale
faced queen, and the clouds float silently
through the tranquil sky, and the wind
speaks in soft whispers as if fearful]of wa
king the sleepers. Such is the sweet repose
of a blameless conscience, But wh6u the
dews of evening slant dimly away, when
the oheerless curtains of darkness are closed,
when aerial shadows loom up and flit along
the vaulted arah, ''like grim ghosts trailing
blackness through the heavens," Such is
the fearful shadow that hangs over the bro
ken slumbers of a soul in which there is no
peace.
Se&utiful Extract
" Oh, the priceless value of the lova of a
pure woman.l Gold cannot purchase a gem
so precious 1 Titles and honors confer up
on the heart no such serene happiness.—
In oar darkest moments,"when disappoint
ment and ingratitude, with corroding care,
gather thick around, and even the guant
form of poverty menaces with his skeleton
fingers, it gleams around the soul with an
angel's smile. Time cannot mar its I rillian'
cy ; distance but strengthens its influence;
bolts and bars cannot limit jts progress ; it
follows the prisoner into the darkest cell,
and sweetens the home morsel that appea
ses bis hunger, and in the silence of mid'
night it plays around bis heart, and in his
dreams, he folds to hie bosom the form of
her who loves him still, though the world
has turned coldly from him. The couch
made by the hand of the loved one is soft to
the weary limbs of the sick sufferer, and the
potion miDglcd by the same hand loses half
its bitterness. The pillow carefully adjusted
by her brings repose to the fevered brain,
and ber words of kind encouragement sur
vive the sinking spirit. It would almost
seem that God. compassionating woman's
first great frailty, had planted this jewel in
her breast, whose heavenlike influence sbo'd
cast into forgot fulness man's remembrance
of the Fall, by building up in bis heart anoth
er Eden, where perennial flowere forever
bloom, and crystal waters gush from exhaust
less fountains."
Eecipes for Economizing;.
PARTICULARLY APPLICABLE TO HARD TIMES.
FOR LADIES. —Leave your purse in the bu
reau-drawer at home, if necessity compels
you to pass a ' cheap store 1"
If you catch yourself thinking how "nice"
it would be if you could have a new carpet,
just transfer the adjective to another subject,
and reflect how "nice" the old one still looks.
If you see auything going " at a ruinous
sacrifice"—let it go !
Don't subscribe 10 that doctrine of econo
my which buys a shilling calico " to save,"
'and then pays a dressmaker three times the
value of the fabric to make it up.
Settle in your mind just what you can af
ford to buy, before you go to market,
don't allow yourself to be tempted by Vp
" surprisingly cheap" luxury.
Have your purse big enough to hold the
pennies and keep them there.
FOK GENTLEMEN. — Get a porte-monnaie
with a good rheumatic clasp to it—these pur
ses that are easily opened are easily emptied.
If you feel inclined to smoke a six-cent
Havana, just put a good rye-straw between
your teeth instead, and " chaw it" at your
liesuro. It is astonishing how superior you
will find the flavor.
Remember bow superior water ie to sher
ry-cobblers and brandy-smasbes on all oc
casions.
Don't think how long you have bad that
old coat of yours—think, rather, how much
longer you can make it last.
Send one dollar and fifty cents for a year's
subscription to the CENTRE DEMOCRAT. YOU
will find at the end of the year that the mon
ey has been well invested.
DUTY.— Duty ! Oh, great word 1 oh, noble
and beautiful thought 1 The faculty to
think, the thought to speak the word, to feel
its meaning and its power, attests our sub
limed destination. Duty! It is itself but a
purely ideal conception—the ideal of obliga
tion to do right, • because it is light; yet
purely ideal as it is in essenoe, it is an idea
which, when embodied and realized, (as it
may be,) in men's purposes and actions,
gives to human life and human history all
its nobleness—is ths sooros of everything
most fair, and beautiful, and touching ; or
eyerything great, heroic, and sublime,
EDITORS & PROPRIETORS.
NUMBER 48
True Prayer
Would you see true prayer ?—would you
know what prayer really is? Step iuto tbe
Egyptian palace where Benjamin stands
bound-—bis amased and trembling brothers
grouped around the lad. Judah advances,
lie bows himself before Joseph. Ilis heart
is lull, llis lip trembles. The tear glistens
in bis manly eye j and now, with tenderness
thrilling in every tone, he pours forth, his
plea of Mtrpissing pathos : ''Oh, my lord, fej
thy servant, I pray thee, speak a word in my
lord's ears, and let thine anger burn against
thy tenants. Aly lord asked his seryants,
saying, have ye a father or 4 brother ? And
we'said unto my lord. We have a father, an
old man, and a ch<ld of his old age, a little
one ; and his brother is dead ; and he alone
is left of his mother, and his father loved
him." Thus on he goes; and every sentence
goes like a knife into Joseph's heart. And
then be closes and crowns his appeal with
this most brave and generous proposal:
"Now, therefore, I pray thee, let thy servant
abide instead of the as a bondsman to my
lord ; for how shall Igo to my father and
tbe lad not with me; lest I see the evil that
shall come upon my father," Joseph's.heart,
which had been swelling with emotion, is
now ready to burst. He can stand it no
longer, nor any wonder. That is true pray
er.
Two women 6tand before Kiug Solomon,
In the darkness of the night, one has orept,
with a noiseless step, to her neighbor's bed,
and while the mother slept, and the babe
slept on ber bosom, softly, cautiously, she
steals the living obild, and leaves her own
cold, dead infant In Us place. They carry
the dispute to' Solomon—each claiming the
living, and each repudiating the dead. With
a skill that earned him his world-wide fame,
the wise monarchy summons nature as a wit
ness. Horrible to hear, he orders the living
child to be divided. The sword is raised—
another each gets a
quivering half—another moment, and inter
ference comes too late. One stands calm,
firm, aolleoted, looking on'.with a oruel eye-
With a bound that carries her to his ft*',
and a shriek that rings wild and high over
all the place, the other—the true mother—
clasps her hands in agony, and cries, "Oh,
my lord, give bar the living child, in nowise
slay it!" That is true prayer. That cry,
that spring, that look of .anguish—all these
proclaim the mother.
Asking a Blessing
It is related tb&t, on a certain occasion, an
English ship of war touched at one of the
ports of the Sandwich Islands, and that the
captain gave a dinner to the royal family of
the islands and several chiefs. The table
was spread upon the quarter-deok, and loa
ded with viands and delicacies of all kinds.
After the company were seated around it,
and the covers were removed, and eycrything
appeared ready for operations to commanoa,
the islanders seemed.to Le in no haste to be
gin, but looked as though something mora
was expected. The captain thought that tba
trouble was with the food rfnd that it was not
what they liked, or that it had been prepared
in a manner to whioh they were not aoous
tomed, and accordingly commenced apobgi*
zing for the fact- lie had, however, a pious
waiter, who stood behind his chair, and who
was quick to discover where the obstacle
was ; and who, whispering to the o&ptain,
said ; "These people are waiting for a blos
sing to be asked." "Ask it, than," said the
captain. TheVaiter did sc—reverently and
giatefully implored the Divine benediotion,
ivo sooner was this done than Queen Pomare,
her family, and the chiefs, soon showed by
the manner they attacked the provisions, that
it was not because the dinner did not suit
thorn, or that they had no appetites, that they
had previously refrained from eating, but bo*
cause no one had "said grace,"
fate of Fast men.
The early. They fall like
shadows, or tumble like wrecks and ruins in
to the grave; often while quite young, al
most always before they are forty. The
wicked liveth not half his days. The world
at once ratifies its truth, and assigus the rea
son by describing the dissolute life of "fast
men," that is, they live fast; they spend the
twelve hours in six, getting through the
whole before the meridian, and dropping in.
to darkness while others are in the glory of
light. "Their sun goeth down while it is yet
day." And they might have helped it.—
Many a one dies long before be need.—
Young man of geniuß, like Burns and Byron,
to whom, when dissipated and profligate,
thirty-seven is so final; your obscure and
nameless wandering stars, whe waste their
time in libertine indulgence—they cannot
liye—-they must die early. They put oa
steam until they burst the boiler ; they rna
at such a rate that the fire goes out for wast
of fuei. The machinery is destroyed by rap
id speed and reckless wear, Nothing oaa
save them, Their physical system cannot
stand the strain they put to it; while tba
state of ihe mind is often such that the 80ul
would eat the substanoe of the most robust
body, and make itself away of escape from
the indessant hell of its own thoughts,
Jfcsj?* Quilp says there are many women
strong enough to hold a horse who ean't Md
their tongse,