Evening public ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, April 26, 1915, Night Extra, Image 1

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NIGHT
EXTRA
NIGHT
EXTRA
ueum
i
VOL. I NO. 102
PlIILADELPIIIA, MONDAY, APKIL 2G, 11)15.
CorttianT. 1815, st me Poena Lmora CoitriNt.
PRICE ONE CENT
m.i I,,. i..i umprwwpMWP
FINANCIAL EDITION
V
S
hi
GERMANS GAIN
NEW GROUND IN
YPRES BATTLE
Kaiser's Troops Still
Hold Lizerne Bat
tle Still Raging on
Flanders Line.
Belgians Retake Luzerne and
Force Invader Back Across
Ypres Canal French Suc
cessful at Het Sas and Hold
Fast.
Austrlnns Carry Trenches on Strate
gic Height Northeast of Uszok
Pass by Furious Assault Ger
mans Rush Reinforcements to Car
pathian Lines to Cracow.
Further gains by the Germans which
advance their lines' at one point, St.
Jullen, to within throe miles of Tpres
and the specific denial of the Allies' as
sertions that Lizerne, on the west bank
of the Ypres Canal, was recaptuted,
were officially reported by tho Berlin
War Office this afternoon. Attacks by
Belgian, British and French troops at
several points on tho line between Dlx
mude and Ypres were repulsed by the
Germans who have- taken BOOp prisoners
and 45 guns. One thousand of the pris
oners are Canadians.
Both London and Paris admit tho ad
vance of tho Germans, but assert that
decided checks have been administered
them In their efforts to draw their lines
closer to Ypres. London officially re
ports that the Belgians have retaken
and now hold Lizerne and that two as
saults by tho Germans between Pas
schendaele and the allied position at
Brodseulde wero repulsed. The British
admit, however, that the Germans still
hold some positions on tho west bank
of the Ypres Canal.
At all points from the North Sea
coast to Lille, the great battle is still
rasing fiercely and both armies are be
ing heavily reinforced. It Is reported
that tho Kaiser has gone to the front
to direct the campaign, and that Gen
eral von Hlndenburg Is In command of
the army. Gains near Verdun are also
claimed by the Germans'.
The Russian army has been rolled
back In the Carpathians, according to
an official announcement made In
Vienna. Uszok Pass Is firmly held by
the Austro-German forces and the at
tempt to Invade Hungary has been
frustrated.
The Germans are rushing heavy re
inforcements to the Carpathians,
Petrograd reports. The Teuton lines in
the region of Cracow and the Strj'J
Concluded on roue Tour, Column One
THE WEATHER
Er-r-r-r, but It's cold! The thermome
ter took a slide during the night and at
I o'clock this morning It was only 62. The
highest point yesterday was 91 degrees.
If you want to visualize that 39-degree
6n$, suppose It were to pull off the same
stunt again from where It Is now. That
would make It about 13. Ouchl Old
B, & B.'s circus can't beat that perform
ance for entertainment. And, incidentally,
It Is such tricks as the one of yesterday
that "hold up men's dress conventions to
supreme ridicule, If there was one time
when a derby hat was a curse it was
reiterday. But, nevertheless, most of tho
trousers In this town would rather Jump
off a Delaware River ferry than don the
hay bennies belore the middle of May, (
What fools these mortals be!
FORECAST
for Philadelphia and vieinitu
r-- .....-,. .
fr.r ianiofu ana tueaaay; warmer
tnmrtfit. N'MLi ,.li. ...-)-
For details, see page 2.
Observations at Philadelphia
B A. M.
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iMtmum temperature ,,, , St
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Il5 H5HIl,C0 Weather, cloudy; temp., RO
t Wen . ..Weather, cloudy: terno.. 51
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Aatand other vehicle. ,,.7i05 p. m
The Tides
PORT RICHMOND.
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CHESTNUT STREET WHARF.
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" wlr tomorrow ,.,,. 6.43 a.m.
. ItEEDT ISLAND.
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wt tomorrow g It a m.
,k BRFAKWATER.
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STREETS JAMMED TO SEE CIRCUS
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The picture shows part of the
to
FLEET AND TROOPS
OF ALLIES ATTACK
DARDANELLES FORTS
Anglo-French Army Be
gins Assault on Turk De
fenses as Warships Re
new Bombardment, Brit
ish Admiralty Reports.
LONDON'. April ZB.
A general attack upon the Dardanelles
forts has L'ten lestimcd, tho British War
Omco announced Into this afternoon.
Troops of the Allies are co-operatlnc with
tho battleships and cruisers ot the French
and British fleet.
An odlclal statement from the Wnr Of
fice Issued by the Government Press
Bureau states that the geneial nttnek
was renewed Sunday, the Allied troops
having been landed before sunrise.
The advance continues, the War Ofhce
adds.
KRONPRINZ WILHELM COALS
READY FOR DASH TO SEA
British Cruisers Wait Off Virginia
Capes for German Raider.
NORFOLK. Va., April K. The German
converted cruiser Kronprinz Wllhelm as
conlins today. Captain Thlerfcldt still
Insisted a dash would be made to sea.
Arriving vessels reported British cruisers
watching off tho capes.
Tho permitted stay of the Kronprinz
Wtlhclm, one-tlmo Hamburg-American
liner and now an auxiliary cruiser of the
German Imperial Navy, Is about half ex
pired, aifd, although no Indication has
been received at tho Treasury or Navy
Departments within the last week that
tho commander ot the ship contemplates
a course different in any respect from
that puraued by Commander Thlerichens,
of the Prlnz Eltel Frledrich, there is more
thnn a ausplclon prevalent among naval
ofllcers here that the Kronprinz may
make a break for the open sea. If condi
tions ure favorable.
Halny weather is overdue in Chesa
peake Bay, for never since the establish
ment of the Weather Bureau, In 1871, has
Virginia known so dry a spring. This
and the fact that the Kronprinz is more
than four knots fnster than tha Prlnz
Elkel and at least ns fast as any of the
enemy ships lying In wait for her sup
port tne theory. Her oaaiy iouiea bot
tom has been scraped and painted.
GERMANS DENY ALLIES
HAVE RETAKEN LIZERNE
Berlin Reports Positions on East
Bank of Canal Still Held.
BEItLIN, April CO. Five thousand pris
oners. Including 1000 Canadians, have been
token by the Get man troops In Flanders,
according to today's official report from
the German General Staff. It states that
the number of guns captured now totals
The report denies the Allies' claim that
Lizerne has been recaptured, declaring
that this town . well aa land taken on
the east side of the Ypres Canal are still
In the hands of the Germans.
On the Meuse heights the Germans have
captured a hill west of Eparges. the re
port adds, and have taken several hun
dred French prisoners and soma machine
guns In the Allly forest.
BRITAIN NEEDS MdRE MEN
Kitchener Not Yet Satisfied, Says
Admiralty Official.
LONDON. April J6.-Addresslng a re.
crultlng meeting, Dr. Thomas J. Macna-
maVa. Parliamentary Secretary of the Ad-
""yiuMiurn' that Earl Kitchener is
not only gratified, but satlsfledwlth the
?esPonses to the call for volunteers, you
fall Into a very serious error. We want
more men We want them now, so that
they may be properly trained to play an
effective part In the struggle."
'0 Years a "Tenderloin" Officer
Sergeant Timothy Cavanaugh, of tho
10th and Buttonwood strU police eta.
tion. is celebrating the 20th anniversary
".ill entry into the service. Ho has
served al" the time In the 'Tenderloin."
h. is one of the most popular men on
The PoS force In the 8th District and
has Vecelved proof of this today In tho
congrltu atlon. that nave been pouring in
? the poll" station and at his home, at
(H Perth street. Lieutenant Stinger gava
htm SO roses
Out of "Work, Kills Himself
Lack of employment and consequent do-
J-fTr WefSe
- ' " "
enormous crowd on Broad street, north of City Hall, which gathered today
sec Barnum & Bailey's glittering procession.
JAPAN MASSES 300,000
MEN ON CHINA'S BORDER
Ultimatum Calling for Compli
ance With Tokio's Demands
Presented by Minister.
rCKIN, April 26.
Doctor Illokl, Japanese Minister to
Pekln, has handed to tho Chinese For
eign Minister a note Insisting on tho
unconditional acepptance of the last pro
posals transmitted from Toklo, accord
ing to a dispatch received from Pekln
trday. Notice was given that further
delay would result In tho breaking off
of negotiations.
Instead of the 120,000 troops which
Japan was reported to have sent to
China, It Is now reported that 300,000
have been massed on Shantung Penin
sula In anticipation of war with China.
The fact that Japan was assembling
great bodies of troops at various points
In Northern China was published In the
Evenino LEDacn on April 15. Tho report
was received from a Phlladelphlan, whose
friend In Japan gave him the trup at-.
tituila of the Japanese 'n (no p.'er
crisis. The letter, which said that war
was confidently predicted and warned
Americans to leave the country, bore out
tho authenticity of the foregoing dis
patch. CHILDREN JOIN SEARCH FOR
EX-I'HILADELPHIAN, MURDERER
Schools Placarded With Descriptions
of Man Accused ot Killing Woman.
New York school children are being
enlisted today In tho anarch for Joseph
Hanel, former Holmesburg prison In
mate, who Is accused of having mur
dered Mrs. Julia Hellner In Brooklyn on
Friday. He has succeeded In eluding the
police thus far.
Circulars beating Hand's photograph
nro being posted In nil the New York
public schools, In tho hope that children
of the higher grades may be able to
recognize him In the event that he has
taken Ehelter as a lodger In any of their
homes.
Besides tho school children, letter car
riers will be asked to aid in the efforts
to find Hanel. Postmaster Morgan has
granted permission to tho New York De
tective Bureau to exhibit Hand's picture
before- letter carriers, who. It Is hoped,
will be able to recognize him should ho
venture into the streets.
Few searches for evidences hnve been
more comprehensive. The warnings sent
out the neighboring cities and towns is
expected to yield hundreds of clues and
responses. To Investigate these and to
Insure that no trace of Hanel may bo
overlooked, Inspector Faurot, of the New
York Detective Bureau, has 100 men In
readlneea for any calls for Identification
that may coma In from outlying towns.
THOUSANDS OF PHILADELPHIANS ,
AGAIN HIT THE SAWDUST TRAIL
But Not at the Tab.ernacle No, Indeed, But Up at 19th Street and
Hunting Park Avenue, Where the Circus Lures and
Reivard8 Its Votaries.
Thousands of Phlladelphlans hit th
sawdust trail this afternoon.
But not at the tabernacle at 19th and
Vine streets. No, Indeed! It was a good
old-fashioned circus this time that made
no pretense of being anything else. By
thousands, young Philadelphia, old Phlla.
detphla and In-between Philadelphia Jit
neyed or trolleyed to Hunting Park ave
nue at 19th street, fought their way
through the hordes of Bldeshow barkers
and, amid an atmosphere of pink lemon
ade, peanuts, popcorn, and all tha old
time trimmings and frills, sat for two
hours enthralled in the wonders of Lai
la Rookh's dancing horses, side-splitting
clowns, trained animals and the like,
The circus this year hits a new tack,
new only, however, because it Is all tha
old stuff once more. In other words, tho
management has gone back to the old
fundamentals and done them better than
they have ever been done before. The
nrst Indication of this tendency to enter
tainment of an ancient vintage Is the fact
that animals predominate,
EYT OPENERS FOR EVERY ONE.
And just because you have been giving
trained animals the once-oveV for years
back, don't think there is not a trick or
wo in the present show that will open
your eyes In a manner that has the alarm
clock lashed to the mast. You will have
to take our word for this. There la too
much documentary evidence of the state
ment up at the show grounds to go Into
details here.
The spectacle which has been an an
nual feature for as long as the circus hu
ceased to be a one-ring affair la termed
Lalla. Rookh, and more than holds lu
PARADE PASS
t
'iV M .&
t'i!1
ROOSEVELT ADMITS HE
CONSULTED SENATOR
PLATTASTHEBOSS"
Letters Show He Went to
"Organization Head" in
Reference to Appoint
ments and Asked "a Lift"
in Passing Bill.
SYRACUSE. N. Y., April 2-That ho
recognized the late Senator Thomas C.
Piatt aa tho boss and consulted him as
such about appointments, was admitted
today by Colonel Theodore Roosevelt in
tho Barnes-Roosevelt J50.000 libel action.
Tho musty letter of tho late Senator,
brought Into court by William M. Ivlns,
told the story of Roosevelt's consulta
tions with Piatt about appointments and
cross-examination ot the Colonel corrob
orated the let tern....
From tho tmo ho was nominated for
Oovcrnor ofTCew York in 1SW. Roosevelt
had many meetings with Piatt, some at
his own solicitation.
Not only did the Colonel admit freely
that he consulted Piatt about appoint
ments, hut he declared he recognized
him as the "boss."
"You asked for an appointment with
Senator Piatt?" Roosevelt was nsked at
ono point by Associate Counsel Barnum,
for Barnes.
"I did."
"What for?"
"I wanted to consult him," was the
reply.
"As the boss?" aBked Barnum.
"As the boss," replied Roosevelt. "As
the recognized head of the organization."
Throughout the morning's grilling the
Colonel was very pettish and answered
sometimes sullenly.
Roosevplt's first letter to Senator Piatt
was written from Oyster Bay October 21,
1S08. In It the Colonel said:
"I am not responsible for language
quoted. I have never used discrimination
against any man because of race, birth
place and religion. I have always treated
every man according to his merits."
The next was from Roosevelt to riatt
In December, 1S98, In which Roosevelt
auld he could not fill an engagement with
tho Senator Friday, but hoped to see him
Saturday.
ASKED FOR CONSULTATION.
Another letter from Roosevelt to Piatt,
on January t, 1SD3, follows:
"Dear Senator My attention has been
called to newspaper artlces that Black
has consulted mo about the appointment
of a Buffalo Judge-a Mr. Hill. Mr.
Concluded on rate Two, Column Fire
own with Its illustrious predecessors,
enough said.
The biggest treat of all as Is cus
tomary Is reserved till the last, so when
you go don't leave your seats until you
have seen those motorcycles far around
the big gold globe In a manner to make
your eyes pop out.
Classrooms in most of the city's pri
mary achools bore a deserted appearance
today, There were many empty benches.
Thousands of breakfasts were left un
tasted; hundreds of beds had failed to
woo sleep for their restless occupants.
Young Philadelphia had Its ear to the
ground early. Who would miss the cir
cus parade?
SPLENDORS OF PARADE
Lines had also been stretched along
every street Included in the route of the
big parade. Every day last week train
loads of animals and other attractions of
this year's circus backed up at tha circus
grounds, and every feature of the per
formance was Included In today's parade.
Frst came the horses 700 of them. And
more thai) 1IS0 men and women from
every corner of the world were In the
bizarre procession. Some were ahorse and
others afoot. The Chinese performers
quickly caught the eyes of the more ex
perienced young circus fans. They were
In tha. circus parade for the first time
In this city.
The elephants plodded along their way
amid the salvos of the young onlookers,
many ot whom had been awake the
greater part ot the night. But along the
entire route of the parade there was the
usual quota of adult enthusiasts, Busl
nets came to a halt tn the central section
of the city while the cavalcade wended
Its way past on the downward and re
turn trip.
LANDIS, BASEBALL
FAN, BRINGS PEACE
IN MAGNATE WAR
Federal Judge Halts in
Decision Which May
Disrupt Great Sport
of American Public.
Efforts, Launched by Jurist,
to Rearrange Circuit and
Prevent Clash Reported Suc
cessful Disposal of Several
Clubs Now Under Way.
Substantiation for tho rumors that tho
b.ueball war would be at an end shortly
was obtained from one of tho big men In
baseball today. He virtually ndmltted
that tho man who brought about tho set
tlement nan Judge Kennesaw Mountain
l.niidls, before whom the Federal
League's suit to dissolve tho National
Commission and organized baseball as a
trust was tried.
Slnco January 24 the baseball world
has anxiously awaited Judge Landls' do
clslon, which, It was thought, would sure
ly bo handed down tiefoie tho opening
of the season two weeks ago.
When the Federal League llrst brought
tho suit It was hoped by followers of
organized ball that Judge LandlH would
decldo that ho had no Jurisdiction to try
tho case tinder the Sherman antitrust
law. But, as the wcek3 rolled by with
no decision. It became apparent that
Judge Landls realized ho had a serious
problem on his hands and evidently be
lieved that the caso was within his Juris
diction. Several times when taking evi
dence Judge Landls nsked the attorneys
of both sides It they wero sure they knew
what end tho suit might lead to.
RUIN OR PEACE?
On January 2,1, In questioning Attorney
Gates, of the Federal League. Judgo
Landls said: "Do you realize that a de
cision In this caso may tear down tho
very foundations or this game so loved
by thousands and do you realize that tho
dcclson might nlso scilously affect both
parties?"
Several similar remorkH woro made dur
ing the trial by Judge Landls, who Is an
ardent baseball fan and a dally spectator
at the games of all three major league
clubs In Chicago. It Is believed that
Judgo Landls realized that It would be
better for both sides to teach an agree
ment and, with his advice, reorganize nnd
recon-,,lu',.t the national ag?fcement so
that a like situation would never again
present Itself.
According to Information received to
day Judge George Williams, of St. Louis.
a personal friend of Judgo Landls and
magnates of both warring factions, was
asked to Intercede and bring about a
peaco settlement within a certain length
of time. The Federal League would then
withdraw Its suit nnd ask that It be
stricken from the court iccords. Judgo
Williams went to Chicago and after talk
ing the situation over with Judge Landls.
Concluded un Pngi' Tho, Column J'hree
LARRY'S DOUBLE AIDS
ATHLETICS IN SCORING
Baby Ruth Chosen by Carrigan
to Pitch for Red Sox Sum
mer Weather in Boston.
BOSTON. Mass . April 2i5. Mid-summer
weather greeted the 2500 fans who turned
out to witness the last game of the pres
ent series between the Red Sox nnd tho
Athletics. Manager Mack sent Davles to
tho mound, while Carrigan depended on
Ruth. It was agreed to call the game
at 4:50 to allow the Athletics to catch
the Federal Express for Washington.
After both teams hgd failed In the
first, the Athletics got next to Ruth's
delivery In the second, batting In one
run. Lajole doubled, took third on a
racrlftce error and counted on Barry's
single.
FIRST INNING.
Murphy out, Scott to Gainer. Oldnng
out, Wagner to Gainer. Strunk out, Ruth
to Gainer. No runs, no hits, no errors.
Hooper safe on Lajoie's fumble. Wag
ner sacrificed, Mclnnls to Davles, who
covered first. Speaker walked. Lewis
filed to Strunk. Gnlner filed to Murphy.
No runs, no hits, one error.
GEORGE BROOKE VICTOR
AT RACQUET CLUB
George H. Brooke defeated Schotleld
Andrews In the semifinal round of the
singles court tennis championship at the
Racquet Club today In straight sets, by
the scores of 8 games to 3 and 8 to 2
He will play Edgar Scott, the present
title-holder, in the final round tomorrow.
In the final ot Class A singles handicap
yesterday, Brooke won an Interesting
match from W. H. T. Huhn. Playing
the best out of five elx-game Bets,
Brooke defeated his opponent by 6-5, 6-t,
6-1.
Italians Before Senate Committee
A committee representing the Italian
Federation of Labor in this city left today
for Harrlsburg, where they will appear
before the Senate Committee, now work
ing on the workmen's compensation
bill. The Phlladelphlans will advocate
that the bill protect aliens as well as
citizens of this State.
Those representing the federation' are
Chevalier C. C. A. Baldl. Emanual W. H.
Mardt. Paul Tranchitella, John Fagano,
John Rlcclardl. Joseph Lombardo, Ernest
Vece, Anthony Giunata and J. W, Hen
derson, Italian consul In this city.
The Kenslngtonlan Says:
Billy Wheaton, the minstrel boy, can be
seen any Sunday morning in Norris
Equare talcing Ms gold flah for a ttrotl.
LOST AND FOUND
LOST Sun4jr, t Fort Side Inn. imitation
turquol and dUrooal rifl. talued aa hair
loam. Libtral reward it returned. Ledw
Branch A 1 10. Ardttot.
LOST a.nlng canary. Reward U returned to
lSia Spruce at;
ODur cloitlAKt aJyrlUmtJ s. fag 11
TODAY'S BASEBALL SCORES
ATHLETICS OIOO
BOSTON 0 0 5 1
rt.tvJflu mid McAvoy; Itulh nnd Carrigan.
FRENCH DKIV23 TAUBfi FROM BELFA'ST
AlUf., April SR. A German Tnube flew over Belfort Sunday
afternoon, but una driven away beforo 11 tUopncd nny bombu.
ZBPMIJ-Itf SEEN ON WAY 10 ENGLAND
ASTBTUnDAM, April 20.A Zeppelin airship flew over the
If.land ot' flchleraomiilsoug todny, pruceediuf; westward lu the
direction of J-ugluud.
BULLETINS
TOHN BUNNY. IWVrE STAR, DEAD
N13W YOItK, April 20. .Tolm "Bunny, the moving picture
comedinn, died today of Bright's discasp at his Brooklyn home.
MILLIONS OF DOLLARS IN WAR CHARITY FRAUDS
I'AKIS, April 20. Wnr charity frauds running Into millions of
dollars have been unearthed in Paris. A judicial inquiiy concluded
today Showed that out of n. total of 147 "chnrlly" ai'Kmiizntionu In
tho department of the Seine nlonc 70 arc cither quite finudulent or
susplcluuuiy irregular. The police nio making wholesale arr&ts.
HATTED BALL BREAKS KNEECAP
Charles Forte, (W years old, 100D South Carlisle street, wno
knocked down by u batted bnstball on Chancellor btrcet, near tho
Bellevue-Stratiord. Into this afternoon. He wns taken to tUo Haluie
maun Hospital suffering ft om a fractured kneecap.
ITALIAN SHIPS HELD UP BY AUSTRIAN SUBMARINE
LONDON, April 26. An official dispatch to the Montenegrin Consul from
Cettlnje confirms reports that the Italian steamship Yolanda was stopped an
searched by an Austrian submarine near the Albanian coast.
GERMANS BLOW UP OWN WARSHIP v
BERLIN, April 26. The Admiralty announced today that the German
auxiliary cruiser Navarre was blown up February 11 by her captain to prevent
Us capture by tho British.
The Navarre was a vessel ot 5794
Line.
EMERGENCY AID TO WORK FOR WAR'S VIHTIMS "-"Si
Members of the Council ot One Hundred of the Emergency Aid Committee
decided this afternoon to continue their philanthropic work In behalf of widows
and orphans of soldiers in Europe throughout the summer. The headquarters, JBj
at 142S Walnut street, will be kept
WATER SUPPLY INCREASED 8,000,000 GALLONS
West Philadelphia's water supply today wns Increased by 8,000,000 gallons of
filtered water per day. Chief Davis, of the Water Bureau, announced that water
had been turned into a section of the extension to the Belmont Alters that ulti
mately will Increase the West Philadelphia supply from 40,000,000 gallons dally
to 55,000,000 gallons.
COUNSEL FOR RECEIVERS OF INSOLVENT BANKS
WASHINGTON, April 26. B. F. Buchanan, of Marlon, Va., today was ap
pointed counsel for receivers of all Insolvent banks. Mr. Buchanan succeeds
Milton C. Elliott, who was named counsel for the Federal Reserve Board.
UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT REFUSES TO REVIEW CASE
WASHINGTON, April 26. A petition for a writ of certiorari to review a
dispute between the Prepayment Car Sales Company and the Orange County
Traction Company of New York, over pay-as-you-enter cars, today was denied
by the United States Supreme Court.
CHILD DIES OF INJURIES ON STREET
Six-year-old Gertrude Paley, 2120 South 2d street,- who was run over by a
team driven by Frank Griffen, 21 years old, 2S12 North Taney street, several"
days pgo while playing In the street near her home, died today in the Mt.
Slnal Hospital.
PARADE'S LURE COST BOY A FRACTURED SKULL
The lure of the circus parade cost 9-year-old William Ennls, of 21B&
South Darlen street, a .probable fracture of the skull today, when he was run
down by an automobile in Broad street below Walnut. The lad, with several
companions, was waiting to see the parade. He Is now at the Jefferson Hos
pital. He tried to dodge across Broad street and was struck by a machine
driven by Frank Smith, of 2831 North 22d street. Traffic Policeman Renshaw
took the boy to the hospital In the car.
ZEPPELIN DEMOLISHED
AMSTERDAM, April 26. Reports
recent allied air attack on the German
Gontrodo was destroyed and a Zeppelin,
FALL FROM SWING MAY KILL CHILD
Nine-year-old Catharine Possa, 2226 Race street, was -badly Injured today
when the rope In a swing in which she was playing with several companions
broke while the children were high in tho air at the Wood School, 23d and
Shamokin streets. The lttle girl vas thrown to the ground and struck In
the head by the swing. Her skull is believed to be fractured. She Is In tha
Medlco-Chirurgical Hospital.
NINE PERSONS SAVED FROM ASPHYXIATION
Nine persons were saved from asphyxiation today, when 6-year-old Harry
Chckarsky, 1552 North 6th street, awakened by the smell of smoke, gave the
alarm In time to get (wo families out of the house and summon firemen,
who extinguished a blaze which threatened their home. In addition to tha
family of Jacob Chearsky, the house Is occupied by Samuel Welnsteln. whose
13-year-old boy, Sammy, rushed in his night clothes to Randolph and Oxford
streets tnd struck the alarm. Three boys, two girls, two women and two
men were gotten out of the house In safety. The loss was about J1W.
CHILD ACCIDENTALLY KILLS INFANT
HYATTSVILLE, Md., April 26.
and John Lewis Bursey, years ow,
charge of a shotgun. The physicians say thijWouifaed boy will recover. It
Is thought the older boy took two shells out 4fa box In a pantry and placed
them In the old gun. While playing with the weapon It exploded.
PROMISING; YOUNG GOLFER DIES AFTER OPERATION
ATIjANTIC CITY. April 26. John Shaekelford, if years old. one of t-
most promising golfers of his years In the East, is dead at his horns here
following an operation performed in an attempt to preserve his hearing. He
was a son of W.,J Shackelford, himself a tourney -winner and widely known
golfer.
tons, owned by the Hamburg-American dft
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open during tho summer months.
BY AIRMEN'S BOMBS
reaching here today say that In. thb
positions In Belgium an aerodrome at
stored therein, was demolished.
Laurence . Bursey, Infant, was Jsl'ied. 3
severely Avounogd by the accidental dls
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