Evening public ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, January 20, 1915, Night Extra, Page 5, Image 5

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    I ' PJiHupilJH i luippi iiyiimn)mnnMii.i.l)i,iMi
EVENING- LEDGER-PHILADELPHIA, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 20, 1915.
ii " "
I
IJJGOMMOTEESMMED
IN BOTH BRANCHES
OF LEGISLATURE
liocal Option Has Majority
jn House Law and Order.
U Liquor Men Retain Con
trol in Senate.
From a Btnff Correspondent
: trTmiftnOnO. Jan. 20 Tho Law and
ThtAtr Commlltco of tho House, to which
K i.i ontlon bill will bo referred during
fojv. present Bosslon, has a majority of lo
L option men sorvlng on It. This should
! iniure that tho local option bill which will
m referred to It during tho piesent Bes-
.in will bo reported out favorably, The
"old stnlwnrta" are on tho Senate
. r.-mltises. The House and Senate com
same
i ui.au were announced by Speaker Am-
ifier and Senator Kllno, President pro
tern i of tho Senate, Immediately after tho
Lrfslaluro convened this morning.
i jjltlie otlier business la scheduled to be
cVne today. Both branches met at 11
o'clock to receive tho committee nppolnt-
' ntntt. Governor BrumbaURh Is upending
J,, any In tho executive offices, receiving
, congTaiuiauuiia. . . .
Xho local option peopla are certain of
majority or ni loam ono in me Mir
ini Order Commlttoo. Thirteen of Its
mtmbers have dcclared-for local option,
u against 12 who nro openly liquor men,
r who aro doubtful on the question.
TUB NEW "SANDBAG" COMMITTEE.
TbK Senate Commlltoe on Exeoutlvo
i- Nominations, of which "Wllllnm E. Crow,
Lof Fayeite. is cumrnnui, aim wnicn noa
''...n called by politicians the "sandbar
Ii, committee," is composed of Senators
t'vi. Snyder, McNichoI, Sproul and
, t Catlln. Senator Varo Is oponly unfriendly
to senator uuuui, unu oumo interesting
lltufttions wilt probably occur If this
eommltteo attempts to hold a club ovor
riovernor Brumbaugh's head.
i? Another Interesting featuro of the com-
jnitiecs io wun. tirw iiioi irum iancasier
County, whero thcro nro no mines, nro
chairmen of tho Mines and Mining Com
mittees of both tho Houso nnd Senato.
Senator John B. Homshor heads tho Son
de eommltteo and Representative Aaron
n. Hess Is chairman of tho committee in
fe tie lower branch.
PHILADELPHIA'S SHARE.
Philadelphia members were well taken
aire of on tho House committees. On
the Important Appropriations Committee
are Edwin It. Cox. Richard Curry, Slg
nmnd J. Gafts, Pntrlok Conner, Mnx Aron.
John McCllntock, William Nledor and
8&muel J. Perry.
Four Phlladelphlana are on the Law
and Order Committee. They are Slgmund
J Cans, Harry L. Hackett, John McClln
toclc and Samuel J. Porry.
H. Atleo Drumbaugh, of Blair County,
a cousin of Governor Brumbaugh, is on
the Law and Order Committee. Ho Is also
on Accounts, Education, Iron and Coal
and Labor and Industry.
The Law and Order Committee of the
Senate is dominated by liquor Senators.
Besides Senator Salus, who Is chairman
of this committee. Senators Vnre and Mc
NichoI aro tho only Philadelphia mem
bers. The Philadelphia Senators who are on
oilier Important Senate Committees aro
the following:
.COm-ORATION'S McNichoI, Var. Patton.
JiHAnuitf iicwicnoi, varo.
UDICIAKV SPLX'lAL-McNIchol, Datx. Pat
ton. W. W. Smith.
MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS Vare, chairman; Mo-MchoU-
Salus, Patlon, W, W. Smith. Farley.
. In addition to this, Senator McNichoI
1 chairman of Elections; Augustus F.
Pali, Expositions Affairs; Owen B. Jen
kins, 'Judicial Apportionment, and William
Wallace Smith, Printing;
BENATE COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN.
The chairmen of tho Senate Committees
we:
APPROPItlATIONa Clarence J. Bucxraan,
Buck.
CORPORATIONS William B. Crow. Fayetta.
EXECUTIVE NOMINATIONS William B.
.Crow, Fayetts.
imciAIlY SPECIAL Charles A. Bnyder.
JSchuylltlll.
1TOIC1AIIY GBNEUAL Henry A. Clark.
'agmcULTUTCE Franklin Martin, Cumbor-
Banks and buildino and loan as-
i SOCIATIONS-E. B. B.ldleman. Dauphin.
CANALS Charles J. Mageo, Allegheny.
CITY PASSENGER ItAIIlVAYS Joseph H.
v'riompaon, Ueaver.
CQNQHESSIONAL APPOimONMJSNT W.
.u. uyncn, uicKawanna,
ttBCTIONS-James P. McNichoI. Phlladel-
rhla.
SbUCVnON John W. Hoke, Franklin.
EXPOSITION AE FAIUS Augustus F. Dalr,
Philadelphia.
JfKDEnAL, nCLATlONS John Oyser. Chester.
FBiAXCB-Wmiam C. Sproul, Delaware.
FOBESTHY Charles D. iMllls. Bradford.
UME AND FISH John P. Moor.. Allegheny.
IN8URANCD-J. F. Graft. Armstrong.
JUDICIAL APPORTIONMENT Owen B.
..Jenkins. Philadelphia.
LAW AND OlLDElt-fiamual W. Balus, Fhlla-
JLfjplSLATIVE APPORTIONMENT
TV. C.
UpCnnnoll Mnrthnmhrlanrl.
,LIBH
ttnv"'wz:jL'jrv,zszz-zi- t ...-.
'MILITARY AFFAIRS "W. S. McKee, Alle-
JJ1.NES' AND MINING-John a. Honuher,
, Lancaster.
MUNICIPAL COItrORATIONa Edwin H.
Vtre, Philadelphia
NEW COUNTIES AND COtJNTT SEATS-S.
It. Purlin f.lirarna
FKiSlONB AND GUATUmES-JWllllam J.
Burke, Allegheny.
rBLNTtKO William "Wallaco flmlth. Phlladel-
Pt'HLIC OUOUND8 AND BUILDrNGS C. D.
IPUULIO IlbALTii AND SANITATION D. P.
PVBUC .ROADS JLXD inGWWATS-T, M.
Ei5!P.IJiEltVICE' OF LIGHT. ITEIAT AND
KJRMS11 " p- Cro't Montgomery.
KaAlLROADS James W. Endsler. Somerset.
II0U8E COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN,
f. The following are the chairmen of the
I House committees!
"ACCOUNTS Joseph Evans, Jr., Luierns,
AGRICULTURE Joslah M. Landls. Montrom.
tAPpilOPniATIONS-James F. Woodwari, Al-
faeny.
fBDllEAU OF STATISTICS Daniel J. Snyder,
i sWestmoreland.
k CENTENNIAL AFPATRS-Cohn a Kaiser,
t .Allegheny.
jIXEOTRlo RATLVfATa Richard Curry, Phll-
I1 COMPARE BILLS Daniel B. Goodwin, Vs.
asoco.
coNduDaaioNAij apportionment-a. a
Etfcln HUrhonv
I CONSTITUTION Al nBFOnM-M!U A. MIH-
S won, Armtronv,
BpOnpORATXON-nobrt P. Habfood, Mo
n-etjo.
OUNTIES AND TOWNSniPB Qeorrs
inosnman, Lancaster,
IJLEeTiQNS-Thomas F. McNichoI Phjladel-
bUUg,
lfrrr
BjiailEHins-Joserh a. etesdle, Allegheny,
IJOUESTRYr-Henry T. Albes. Potter,
f9"C lllram H. Broslus, Jefferson.
50pi)aiCAL SUnVEYa-Samuel McCurdy,
IKSimAfrTP 1lflVa4 T n1Atmtn H.I.MH
ilttON AND COAL c. J.'doodnough, Cameron,
'"D'CJAny. GENERAL William IL Wilson.
1VD1CIARY LOCAL Italnh Qlbson. Lycnm.
I Bi'?BT Sl'ECIAL Samuel A. WhIUksr,
' Jyplt tAL APPORTIONMENT-Judson W.
' tlnuk ?.fo- ... . ,
' Ba-hnVil lt,M flVUPiA4'1 MTMJTt
EJUjv'XSi
AND onnr.nuiinrrii w Williams.
' HS5iATIVB APPORTIONMENT Robert 8.
lAWH?S0"E.h PW'llps. Clearfleld.
I" A,V.DFACTURERS-Edwln R, Cox, Phlladel.
MlmTrWIlllam U Adams, Luserns,
ssS AND MINING Aaron P. Htu. Lan
, Mj'NlCFPAT. vwnmnlmnua TV11flm r
PirvZS?- Iwrencs.
tSOlONa AND OnATUITIKa-T. B. IL
PbiKnSl' VVsahlngton
s'llT?iTJ.N E F 5. Ilsrper. Lawrencs.
. .?wC BUILDINGB-lIarry L. Rhoads. Ln-
S,"nRU'TH A1"5 BANITATION-Blg-Prmfff.'
iM' Philadelphia.
. Ma n0A"3-'lward B. Jones, Busju.
kR1;I,tg Henry I tVllson. Jefferson.
"SRBNOHVtNT AND RBFORM-Jaines B.
vaw ' "'nioreland
NOTED COMPOSER OF HYtvlNS
WRITES SONGS FOR REVIVAL
i i i ii i i
Charles H. Gabriel Submits Composition Inspired by
"Billy" Sunday's Sermon on General Allen.
Charles II. Gabriel, composer of more
than 6000 hymns, and tho best-known
writer of rovlval songs In tho country,
visited "Billy" Sunday In the evan
gelist's temporary homo at 19H Spring
Oarden street today and submitted sev
eral new songs for npproval.
One of tho compositions brought to Mr.
Sunday by tho composer was Inspired by,
ono of "Billy's" sormons this week. In
which he told a pathetic story of General
Ethan Allen and his dylnir daughter,
who was ndvlBed by her father to "Btlck
to her mother's Cod." The hymn Is en
titled "Tho Wnys of the World"; tho
first stanza Is as follows:
Tho ways of the world may tempt you
With their Kllttcr and glint of gold,
Ani 1M promises may allure you.
As jou watch its mlrogo unfold;
Falso prophets, the thloes of Satan.
Like amplros cntlco their prey,
But stick to your mother's God,
Her way Is the safest way.
Iowa, where his father owned a large
DOWMND-OUTER'
TELLS OF DESPAIR
CHANGED TO HOPE
"Booze" Had Put Finishing
Touches on Life Once
Bright With Prospect.
Saved by "Billy" Sunday.
By HEKBEBT ORMONDROYD
(A "BILLY" SUNDAY CONVERT.)
Yes, I'm a "down-and-outer" all rlgVit.
I guess you don't haVe to look twice to
see that, do you? But don't think that
just because I look like a "rummy" that
It was booze that did the business. It
was something elso that put me down,
and the booze just sort of put the finish
ing touches to the Job.
It was like this, I was born In TTybsey,
Yorkshire, England, where my father
worked in the mines. He was a fine old
fellow, and ho always 'nad un Idea that
by working himself to the limit he could
nx things so that my brother and I would
have thlnBs easy after he was dead. And
then there was my mother. That's all
she teemed to think about, too, just how
she could make things nice for us and
bring us up to be good aod-fearlng
men that could look anybody In the face
and know there was nothing to be
ashamed of.
GOOD CHANCE WASTED.
Well, both my brother and I go a good
education, and then we started to work.
I was an expert loom repairer In the
woolen mills, and he was doing work In
another department of the same concern.
Then we got a good chance to go wlt'n
an uncle of ours In the same business,
and everything went fine for a while. We
were able to give money to our father
and mother and had gone a long way
toward being what they wanted us to be.
Then my brother went back on me,
There's no use going Into details, but he
'didn't play square with me and I was
drfven oul I was so hurt and dazed
at first that I didn't realize what had
wasn't long before I had Just about
put the finishing touches to what was
once me. I m nothing but a drunkard
aSd there wasn't anything I wouldn't
stoop to. That was the only way I cou d
forget. Just drowning my sorrows In
booze until I couldn't even remember
!?. I had a brother. ;
it?-just HkeMr.SundaysaysltU.aU
rlgnt. uy -- AZZ aomeZ
tody else How with "them. That'- what I
did Yea I dragged Her right down to hell
with "e and then I left her. That', the
wun my. " . . ,,. tn ,. Now
.Te-, dad.T'gt."but somiwher or
other ve got sou -
TRYING TO FORGBT.
That was thp time I came tp Awerlcai
canie here and tried to fprgtt that a wU
farm. Inspired by the outdoor life he
knew so well, ho began writing; songs at
the age of 13, "Hour by Hour" being his
llrst production.
In tho 45 years that have elapsed since
his first composition, Mr. Gabriel hns de
voted his time almost exclusively to this
work and hns produced such world-wldo
favorite as "Send Me tho Light" and the
"Glory Song."
After attending the tabernacle services
today, Mr. Gabriel will return to Chicago,
whero he will write additional songs to be
used In the Sunday campaign.
Bankrupt Distiller a Suicide
CHICAGO, Jan. 20. Charles Ledowsky,
president of the River Distillery Com
pany, which filed a petition In bankruptcy
yesterday, committed suicide some time
last night on a Michigan Central train.
Tho body was discovered on the arrival
of tho train hero today.
as the other things, only It didn't seem
so hard to forget about my brother since
I had ruined somebody else. too. It was
as though I had revenged myself for
what was done to me by what I had done
to tho girl.
After I had been here awhile I thought
I would siiuaro myself some, so I got a
Job and sent some money to my mother,
but pretty soon It was returned to me
by my uncle, with a letter telling me that
she had died a year before In my brother's
arms. My father had died the year beforo
I left England, but somehow It seemed
worse to know that she was dead.
Well, there isn't much more to tell. I
kept on going along the same old rotten
path nnd I've been Just a plain "good-for-nothing"
evor since. Thore didn't seem to
be much to live for, and I guess being
afraid to die la about the only thing that
has kept me from the short-cuj: across the
great divide.
CHANGED BY EVANGELIST'S TALK.
I say there didn't seem to be much to
live for, but there does now. I camo In
here last week to hear Mr. Sunday talk.
I didn't enro much what he said, but there
was a crowd, and I was curious, I guess,
nnd then It was nice and warm, too. I
didn't even listen to him at first, but then
he begnn talking about God giving every
one n chance to be happy If they will only
repent, and about It's being up to us If
we are to be saved or going to hell. And
then he said a lot about the homes some
of us have wrecked, and thellves we've
wrecked besides our own, and; It got me.
I was crying before he was half through.
It was the first happy moment I had
known for years wnen I weni up aner air.
Sunday called for those who would come
to Christ, and clasped his hand. It may
be too late, but I'm going to be straight
with aod from now on,
Md&&
0H, THESE WOMEN
Asaf ftn Optimist, Teela IFury of Dam
sel Scorned.
Asa Telton, of Camden Is an optimist
He never worries. He Just takes things
as he finds them. It Is this habit that
has caused him much regret Asa Is In
Jail today because he took a gold watch
which he "Jus' natchllly" found In a pile
of dirt. But It appears the dirt was car
lied from the yard of L. M. Nelson, a
jeweler, of 8 13 Broadway Camden. Nelson
contends that Asa should have known
that the watch came from the store, but
Asa explained to the Recorder that he
"discovered It among a heterogeneous
mass of discarded debris and waa not
tntellexually endowed to consider elch
deducshuns,"
It was learned furthermore that such
deductions would have been somewhat
uncomfortable tp Asa's conscience for the
reason that he pawned the watch In Ques
tion and took one of his best girl to a
party with tho proceeds'. Just here (t was
learned that a woman was In back of
Aea' arrest. It was bis other "best girl."
She had beard of the watch, and, after
smacking her lips In anticipation of the
good things which she bad s, right to
expect on account of Asa's good luck,
she was entirely forgotten,
So she told tho police.
Wrhfabj
SUNDAY'S COACHING
ON BASE LINE WON
GLORY FOR MANY
His Nevcr-say-die Spirit
Spurred Runners to Their
Greatest Efforts in Tight
Places.
itr. BraAXev'a career n n procsslonnl
ball player heoan In I87J. He relieved
Spauldinp os th pitcher or the Chicago
IVAIfe Sox when the old star's arm pave
out tn lilj and helped to pttch the team
to a National League championship. Ite
repeated this feat two vear later for the
Providence team, and Joined theAthlctlcs
when Fred Corcy't arm went bad in 1883
and pulled the team froni seventh place
to the championship. He played with sev
eral of the other biff Icaptie teams elf Iho
tame time "Hilly" Sunday was playing
baseball.
By GEO. WASHINGTON BRADLEY
I can nee "Billy" Sundny now stand
ing In the coachcr's box on tho third bnso
lino urglnir a runner to piny tho came for
all there was In him to win a closo gnmo.
He nlwnys smiled, nnd his lnugh was the
Bnmo good henrty lough that ho has now.
"IJllly" jilways wanted his teammates to
play better, to put mora life Into tho
game, nnd to take a chnnco when a
chance was necessary. "Billy" played
hard himself nnd he was never beaten
until tho Inst man wns out.
"Come on now, old boy," "Billy" would
call out to the runner on second. "On
your toes. Watch tho ball. I'll tnko euro
of that bnsemnn. Go!" And when tho
batter hit tho ball "Billy's" eye followed
It wherever It went, and If thero wns
any chance for the runner to go homo on
the play "Billy" knew It.
"Keep on, old man; keep on, more
speed," he would call to the runner, and
as the runner would reach homo snfely
nnd score tho needed run, "Billy" would
sny, "That's the boy. Why you don't
know how fast you can run."
"Billy" won more than one Rnme for his
team by his work In tho coachcr's box.
He gavo tho team tho cheer that mndo
every man piny harder. That Ii ono of
the reasons why ho was so popular.
"FOUND" BT "POP" ANSON.
Sunday was Just a youngster when
"Pop" Anson dug him out of tho nlfalfa
fields and took him right to the Chicago
Whlto Sox. That was a pretty big Jump
for a youngster, nnd a good many of tho
players doubted If tho boy would tnako
good. Ho was Blender and ho did not Im
press mo ns being nny too strong to com
pete with tho giants then on tho team.
But Sunday had speed, and we soon begnn
to look on him as a marvel for covering
ground.
At first thore wns something wrong
with "Billy" as a fielder. Ho did not
..
VICTJROLA VI
Outfit for
Consists of a VIctrola VI at $25, very
handsome 120 cabinet at $13 and any
dozen ten-Inch double-faced records
you may solect nt $9 making the en
tire outfit only 47.
75 r. a Week Pays for It
NO TJIADWO BTAltPS WITH VICTROLAS
Oil KECORD3. SECOND FLOOn
IMPORTANT WHITE SALE SPECIALS
NEW STYLES IN
American Lady
e
Fill Every Requirement of Design.
Quality and Fit at the Modest Prices
$1 to $5
Thev nerfeetlv Internret the most cor
rect lines In vogue and will form
Desc lounaauon ror miing new gowns.
A Style for Every Figure and
Warranted to Wear, NOT to Rust
$2 and $3 $f fifl
Corsets.. W
C. D. a la Spirite, P. N. and R. & G.
Makes Models for Slender and
Stout Figures
Have high, medium or low bust and
long over abdomen, hip and back.
Sizes 19 to 36.
$6 and $7
Corsets . .
3
High or medium bust. .long skirt.
Rest
uomns una immiicu wun lace
ribbon.
$1.50 Corsets
ana
$"
P. N. and W. B. Nuform .models. Me
dium bust and long- skirt. Sizes
to SO.
SECOND FLOOR
In Shoes of Such High Quality Nobody'd Suspect the Low Prices
WOMEN'S $3.50 & $0 OQ
$4 SHOES at ... . fOi)
All the wanted leathers, with dull or cloth tops; button, lace or Blucher
style; high Cuban, military and regular heels. Sizes 2H to 8.
M
Mn's "Lenards" at
Shoes of tho same quality are sold elsewhere at H.
Children's $1,50 to $1,75
Shoes, 98c
Button shoes of pun-metal calf
and patent coltskln; flexible
sewed oak soles and broad toe
snapes. Bites 10 ti.
Misses' $2 to $2.50 Shoes, $1.49
Samples and surplus stock of a well
known manufacturer. Wanted leath
ers; welted and flexible sewed oak
soles. Sizes 11 H to 2.
Little Boys' $2 Shoes, $1.50
Patent coltskln, gun-metal calf and tan
Bussla calf; broad toe. Sizes B to ISM-
FIRST FLOOR. NORTH
Iwiiiiiiniiii'iUHtiiiiiiiiiiMiniiiiiiiiKiiiiniiin iinminii
: IJT BROTHERS ;
IN OCR
Judge the hits properly, but I don't think
that so many got away from him at that
He made some of the prettiest catches
I have ever seen. He would race across
tho field and tako a head-on dive nnd
catch n ball that looked safe. He became
better as tho years went on, nnd by the
time he wns through with the game he
wns a good fielder, although I never
considered him tho equal of D.ilrymple
or Core, who played1 the other fields when
Sunday Joined tho Chicago team.
As a bnlter Sunday never ranked with
tho heavy hitters. He beat out little hits
ns a rule, and could hardly be classed
with Dan Urouthors, of the Boston team
of that day, or with such men ns Collins
or Cobb. '
Ono tiny when "Billy" wns playing the
field for the Chicago Whlto Sox ho ran
Into a wagon In the outfield nnd severely
Injured his leg. Spauldlng, of the White
Sox, nnd Bancroft had planned to tako
tennis to Cuba that winter, and Sundny
wns to go with the Spauldlng outfit. But
his doctor would not let turn go nnd kept
him In Chicago during the winter to fix
up his teg.
INJURY OPENED WAY.
While "Billy" was In Chlcngo that win
ter ho formed tho habit of going to evan
gelistic meetings, nnd I think that that
Is whero ho laid the foundation for the
work he la doing now. "Billy" went to
tho meetings nenrly every night. He
never wns much thnt could not be con
sidered good, nnd I hnvo hoard of many
times when he went out with tho players
on their drinking parties to steer them
o or the rough spots and take them homo
imfcly without Joining In the party him.
self.
From Chicago "Billy" went to Pitts
burgh. Ho played good ball thero nnd
wns ono of tho few redeeming features
of n poor team. Tho Phillies were glad
to get him nnd It wns a sad blow to base
ball when ho quit tho gnmc. But I think
It was for tho best, ns Billy hns cer
tainly mndo n wonUerful preacher.
TABERNACLE SEATS IN DEMAND
Downtown Headquarters Opened to
Handle Reservations.
Tho demands for reservations for scats
In tho "Hilly" Sunday tabcrnnclo have
become so great that It hns been found
necessary to establish headquarters down
town. Georgo M Sunday, the evnngcllst's
son. wltli two stenographers, have, there
fore, removed to Room ' C10, Stock Ex
change Building, where they will took
nftcr the work In the future.
All reservations have been tnk n, how
ever, up to tho second week In February,
so that It wilt bo Impossible to set asldo
sections for meeting to be held previous
to that tlmo.
CONSUMERS' LEAGUE TO MEET
Speakers Discuss Many Problems nt
Meeting.
The nnnunl meeting of the Consumers'
Lcnguo of Enstcrn Pennsylvania was
held at the New Century Club, 121 South
12th street, this afternoon, A short re
port of tho yenr's work wns road by Miss
Florenco E. Pelrcc, general secretary, and
wns followed by tho election of officers.
Tho spenkers were Miss Juliet Stu
nrt Poyntz, of tho American Association
for Labor Legislation, on "Unemploy
ment nnd tho Consumer"; Mrs. Florenco
Kelly, on "The Consumer nnd Congress,"
nnd II. H. Wheaton, of the Federal Bu
reau of Labor, on tho proposed State em
ployment bureau bill.
STOIID OPEN8. 8i30 A. M. CLOSES AT B30 P. M.
HATS TRIMMED
Double Yellow Trading Stamps With Every 10c Purchase Until
""Noon : After That, Until Closinc Time, Single Stamps
Market Eighth Filbert Seventh
Uodermuslins
They all come within the broad scope of the January
White Sale, which daily starts anew with fresh lots
the best styles and greatest economies.
40c
the
Straight
on side;
$1.50
XllvrJllinfl 1 IAf Hlnl J IpM
ullliilllll In lliXW litlrij
llff'fflflK
Fine nainsook; some with lace yoke, others medallions,
ribbon or embroidery. Cover-and-drawers. A1J sizes.
60c Long Petticoats AQn
Nainsook with deep lace flounce or embroidery trim
med. All sizes.
qrHIHIIIIIIIIII
0,jil I
$1.50 Maids' and Nurses' Dresses . . QO-
Stripe, check and plain colors. Have turn-over collar or high neok
and long sleeves, trimmed with embroidery or finished with braid.
Sizes 36 to 46. One Sketched.
40c Cover-All
Aprons
29c
Stripes and figures; full length;
pocket on side; trimmed with
pipings. One Sketched.
19
3
Come In patent coltskln. cun-metnl calf, tan slated kldskln:
button, lace and Blucher; hand-welted oak soles. Sizes 6H tn
11. All the new styles.
Boys' $3 to $3.50 Shoes
at $1.98
Tan Russia calf, patent colt
skln, eun-metal calf; button
and Blucher cuts: hand welted.
Sizes 1 to 6H in lot.
RUBBERS in Subway Store
Every pair guaranteed a new pair for
any that fails
WOMEVS 70o HUIIIIEUS... 30a
IIIBSUV nnd ClIILUHUN'S OC
BOo nd TOO IlUllllEllS ... . OOC
HOYS and YOUTHS' A tig, ACkn
IIKN'8 SI nV'IIUKUS BOo
BIO nBSTAWKANTIlBST OS" HYBRYTUIMQ AT LOWEST PRICE 5 FIETH
WOMEN FARMERS TO SELL
PRODUCTS AT BAZAAR
Suffragists Who Engage In Agricul
ture Will dive Instruction.
Although busy at work campaigning for
votes for women, prominent suffragists
In this city will find tlmo this afternoon
to attend a card party to be given by the
Woman Suffrage party, 21st Legislative
District, at 4101 Chester avenue, at 2:30
o'clock. Tho party will be under the
auspices of Mrs. Robert E. Grantees, Mrs.
A. D. rieck and Dr. E. A. Douredouro.
Miss Jane Campbell will speak.
Suffragists throughout tho city aro mak
ing elaborate preparations for the Key
stone State bazaar, which will bo held on
February 23 and 26, nt tho Now Century
Drawing Rooms, to raise funds with
which to carry on the Campaign In Phil
adelphia and throughout tho Stato.
Ono of the features of the affair will be
tho farm and garden booth, under the
auspices of the Equal Franchise Society.
At this booth women learned in agricul
ture wilt glvo talks on successful methods
of fnrmlng and gardening. Mrs. George
Foulke will bo among thoso who will give
Instruction.
Many useful nrtlcles will be for sale nt
tho booth. Miss Mabel N. Stewart will
sell accessories for outdoor work. Pan
ama hats, garden smocks, nprons, trowels,
rakes, plows, wntcrlng cans, flower pots
and baskets, garden benches and many
other npproprlato articles will bo found
at her countor.
Not only will there be tools for sale, but
farm products as well. Fresh eggs, cel
ery, cress, chickens, butter, squabs and
parsley will bo sold. Many of these nrtl
cles will be donated by Miss Fanny T.
Cochran, who runs a farm at Westtown,
nnd Mrs Horatio Gntcs Lloyd, who has a
farm at llnvcrford.
A meeting of tho Farm nnd Garden
Committee, In charge of the agricultural
booth at tho bazanr, was hold yesterday
at the homo of Mlns Snrah Lowrlo, 1827
Pino strcot, when final plans wcro dis
cussed and decided upon. On the com
mittee are Miss Cnrollno Kntzenstcln,
Miss Martha Davis, Mrs. Wilfred Lewis,
Mrs. Horatio Gates Lloyd, Miss M. N.
Stownrt. Mrs. George Foulke, Miss Emily
K. Smith and Miss Sarah Lovrle.
SAFETY ZONES FOR FRANKEORD
Board of Trade Decides to Establish
Them at Corners.
Tho Frankford Board of Trade ling de
cided to establish safety zones nt two
corners, Frankford avenue nnd Orthodox
street nnd Frankford avenuo nnd Mar
garet steel.
The following officers wero elected at
tho meeting of tho board last night:
George W. Henry, president; John T.
Shaw, vlco president; Evan Chandleo
Patterson, secretary; Will S. Gibson,
financial secretary, and John T. Ward,
treasurer. Tho annual dinner of tho asso
ciation will bo held February 3.
"Came to Hear Sunday," Set Free
Statements that they camo to this city
to hear "Billy" Sunday won freedom for
William Murphy and Daniel J. Hardy,
who wero arraigned beforo Magistrate
Emely today. Murphy said his home was
In Boston. Hardy comes from Lynn,
Mass. Tho men hnd been acting in a sus
picious manner.
: MAIL OR PHONE OltDEUS FILLED i
FREE OF CHARGE
Aprons &
Uniforms
60c Cambric
Brassieres. .
With yoke of eyelet embroidery or em
broidery Insertion nnd eileel reinforced
double Klclcat well lioncill suarnntecd
rust-proof. All le.
$
Muslin Drawers.
25c
or circular style; open or button
laco and embroidery trimmed.
Combinations.
98q
MAIN AIICADE & SECOND FLOOR
Maids' and Nurses'
$1 White Anrons.
69c
Hound or square. One model Is of 3
jnoer jwn wun eyelet embroidery
bands. Gored; deep hem; wide ties.
SECOND FLOOIt
Silks for New Gowns
Spring Fashions Are Virtually Decided These Are the Weaves'
and Colorings That Lead, and Because We Purchased So Early
and Enormously Can
Offer the Most, Unusual Values
$1.50 Soft
Chiffbn Dress
Taffetas,
Ultra-fashionable; 35 Inches
wide. Tbere'a an excellent va
riety of beautiful light and
dark shades; also Ivory and
black.
IDLE SAILORfflEN
ALL 'ON THE BUM,'
BUT PHILOSOPHIC
One Hundred and Ten in
Sorry Plight, but They
Have No Families to
Support.
"We are on the bum," yelled 110 sailor
and firemen, members of the Philadelphia
branch of tho Eastern and Gulf Sailors'
Association, today wTien Walter Nlefson,
their agent, asked thorn haw they were
making out In the hard times. The whole
110 wero crowded Into a low, dark room
nt 2d nnd Walnut streets, the union head
quarters. Nielsen said!
"I would be out of work, only I nm
trying to take care of the rest of the
members. Wo aro In bad shape, and I
can speak for the rest of tho members.
Thcro are three German ships laid up
hero besides five other steamships and
five sailing vessels. Commerce Is at a
low ebb and the prospects of an Improve
ment nre not good.
"But It Is different with the sailor from
other people. Tho wages of tho sailor are
so low that ho cannot afford to keep a
wlfo, so the world over tho dka-scn
sailor Is single. For that reason - Is
better able to get along nt a tlm itko
thli than mnny of the shore folks bo
causo most of fhem aro married nnd
havo families that must suitor too when
times aro hard.
"With tho sailor It Is this way. All
the world over ho Is nt tho mercy of the
shipowners nnd Is a hornless, roofless
man nshoro. Any Vessel In this country
Is permitted by tho laws to ship n man
to any port In the world whether he
hns ever been nt sea before.
"Of course, It Is tho business of the
shipowner to mnko nil tho money ho
can from freights nrs) passenger service,
and, of course, when the ship Is lost her
vnluc la covered by the Insurance. The
sailor never gets nny notice or attention.
He takes caro of himself whon ashore.
"Tho sailor will never get Justice until
the laws of all tho countries mako the
shipowner responsible for tho loss of
life. Then, to protect thomselvos, they
will have to hlro only skilled sailors t8
handle nnd save tho ship In times of
danger.
"That Is why I and my 110 men are out
of Jobs. But wo aro all bachelors arid we
will get along better than many lands
men. We will make out somehow."
DARNELL'S WIFE WINS DECREE
CHICAGO, Jan. 20. The Rev. dames
Morrison Darnell, who fled from his
Kenosha church when his domcstlo
alliances became known, wns freed from
ono of his entanglements today. Doris
Vaughn Darnell, the Chicago girl wife,
was granted a divorce, WOO alimony and
attorney's fees by Circuit Judge .nlkcf
today after evidence hnd been submitted
to show thnt Darnell nnd Ruth Soper, of
Minnesota, had lived together as man and
wife.
:
Men's $1.50 to $1
$2 Gloves .... K
Famous Dent's make. Samples,
nnd gray.
Tan
Women's Gloves ,
50c
Two-clasp
and colors.
Duplex kind In whlto
Kayser make. Washable.
FIRST FLOOR, EIGHTH ST. SIDE
ouses
In Advanced Styles
They're new fashions for Spring
two special, groups
$5.50
Georgette
Crepe Waists
3.50
Like sketch.
In pale pink or
white; sheer and
dressy. Have deep
yokes, hemstitched
seams and small
box plaits: llko the
newest "M o d e 1"
waists.
$1.50 Organdy
Blouses
98c
Sketch shows style.
Have beautifully embroidered fronts.
crochet buttons, dainty lace-trlmmed
collars and revers.
SECOND FLOOR
nninrnnniiminminmTmrniT
Splendid quality merchandise Is offered
in exchange for
YELLOW TRADING
STAMPS
Double Stamps In the Morning-.
$2.00 Lovely $- AtQk
Crepe Meteors,
Beautiful hiBh-srade quality In
the handsomest evening and
street shades, also black. 19 Indies
wide.
$1.25 Imported
Chiffons
98c
Sheer plain and crepe chiffons In
the newest French hues, as we'll
as black. Comes 40 inches wide.
$1 Lustrous
Messalines. .
79c
Very popular allku for watste and
druasM. Nice quality in s. splon
am range of lite latest culura 33
iBcbtm wide.
FIRST FLOOR. SOUTH
i'l
1X0011
LIT imOTUKKS