Evening public ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, October 27, 1914, Night Extra, Page 7, Image 9

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    T
ATTORNEY ACCUSES
"MET" RAILWAY
IN $300,000 SUIT
(Charges Perjury in Awarding
Payment of $5000 Dam
ages to Child and in Pro
curing His Disbarment.
NEW TOniC, Oct 27. Benjamin Oppen
icim, a lawyer, announced today that ho
had brought suit for $300,000 damages
against the Metropolitan Streol Railway
Company.
Back of the announcement lies an amaz
ing charge of how, for 18 years, the
street railway company sought by legal
tricks and the bribery of witnesses to
avoid tho payment of a Judgment for
$S0OO to a little girl crippled for life In a
street car accident. The alleged plot
reached Its climax In the company's
agents procuring tho disbarment of Op
pcnliclm After 17 years' struggle, Oppcnholm has
obtained his reinstatement at the bar
and also a court order directing the com
pany to pay Harriet Nugent, his crippled
client, the 000 with accumulated Interest,
total of $11,000.
Tho company Is now bankrupt and In
the hands of a receiver, Douglas Ilobln
eon, who has refused to pay tho $14,000 to
Miss Nugent.
Miss Isugont was struck by a street car
when she was 8 years old nnd one of her
legs was amputated. Sho Is an orphan
and was recently found In a Brooklyn
etroet delirious from hunger and ex
posure. For 16 days sho had been hob
bling around tho strcots In a vain hunt
for work, sleeping In doorways, penniless
and without food.
After the vordlct In tho damage suit,
It Is alleged, the company sent agents
out to got the witnesses to chango tholr
testimony. The mother of one girl wit
ness. It Is charged, was paid $250. An
other girl, who refused to be "persuaded,"
was dollborately ruined, Oppcnhelm al
leges, through the agency ot a barber
who wns paid to tako her on a trip to
Philadelphia.
Tho next step, according to tho lawyer,
was to "get" Oppcnhelm. Through wit
nesses, whom he says were paid by tho
company, tho Nugent verdict wns set
nsldo and Oppcnhelm disbarred. Years
later an agent of tho company, named
Bragg, produced papers which he had
been ordered to burn, but which he hail
preserved. These papers, It Is alleged by
Oppenholm, proved conclusively tho plot
nqalnst tho crippled girl and himself.
They showed payments to witnesses.
Miss Nugent Is still penniless and ap
parently as far as ever from the $11,000
owing her.
ATJTO PLOWS THROUGH GIRLS
Ono Sister Dead, Two Others Hurt ns
Result.
DETROIT, Mich., Oct. 27. Whllo four
sisters, returning homo from a party,
stood laughing and chatting' early to
day an automobile plowed through the
group and sped on.
A few minutes later Agnes Brown died
In a hospital from a fractured skull.
Two of her sisters, Florence and Jane,
are In tho hospital, seriously Injured.
The fourth sister, Augusta, was unhurt.
Horace H. Ncwsome, general manager
of the American Volturetto Company,
is In a cell charged with manslaughter.
DEACONS CALLED PARASITES
University Head Tells Baptists
Church Officers Throttle Ministers.
ATIANTIC CITY, Oct. 27.-Church
deacons furnish the most serious problem
to be faced today, particularly In the
Baptist denomination, according to Donn
Shallor Matthews, of the University of
Chicago, In an address before the con
vention In session here.
"They are moral parasites who throt
tle tho work of the mlnlstor," he declared.
".Many of them," he added, "are noth
ing more than moral thermos bottles or
flreless cookers, because they show re
ligious Are only occasionally, and then
only when they And things already
heated."
CHILDREN'S CORNER
1 BEFORE THE SANDMAN COMRs"
LATE October! All the leaves
Ronel and the trees looking as
lonesome as only bare trees in
winter can lookl
"I do hate to have my pretty leaves
Bone." sighed a stately beech tree.
Hate to," exclaimed a nearby ma
ple, "that's mild! I feel so naked and
bare I'm ashamed to exist. I begRed
Jack Frost to let me keep Just a few
leaves this year. But he wouldn't
even listen, just whipped off every
one!"
"So did I," sighed the beech, "but
fince that last hard storm I haven't
had one not even one I"
."Why complain like that." said a
Pine tree reprovingly, "You know the
same thing happens every year. I
should think Wd learn to expect it.
ut you don't seem to, you mourn
and sigh the same way every fall. I
caJI "at a very silly way to act."
Si lyl exclaimed the maple tree
crossly, "you may think so because
you don t lose your leaves. I've no
ticed before that other people's trou
bles are the easiest to bear. If you
lost yours you might call it silly if
you wished I don't."
And the kindly old elm in the centre
p the forest spoke to the quarreling
trees.
"Chiidrenl children!" he said, "don't
luarrel like that. It is useless. Sea
Jons come and seasons go. Your
leaves fall and come again. Why
worry and fret?"
"Oh. that's all very well for you to
fay. declared the beech tree only
half pacified, "but I hate Jack Frost
tor taking my leaves."
Jack Frost doesn't take your
ijves,' end Beech," answered the
0'd elm tree kindly. "Nature lakes
jour leaves because she needs them
o enrich the earth. Jack Frost is
only her servant. At her command he
Joosens them Then the winds carry
nem to the ground and Nature makes
them into rich food for you and all
to eat.
,.The, trees fell to pondering on what
Je elm tree said. And as they
tnousht and wondered the quarreling
,5edfor not even trees can think
Ai?uarel at the sam t'me.
,. the. autumn day the leafless
tmf! ?ond"ed and thought. Almig
wwd guaset, the iecch tree sat J,
EVENIN
U. S. HEEDS JAPAN REQUEST
ABOUT GRIER AT HONOLULU
Will Order German Warship Out If
Found Seaworthy.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 27. Ambassador
Chlnda, of Japan, has delivered a note
from his Government to the State Depart
ment, It was learned today, requesting
that tho German cruiser Geler bo ex
pelled from the port of Honolulu, whero
sho recently put In for repairs.
Steps to comply with the Japanese re
quest were taken by Government officials
today. Honolulu port authorities wero
ordered to report whether the Geler Is
now Beaworthy. If so, an order will be
made, officials asserted, that the Geler
depart Immediately.
Japan pointed out In her note, Stato
Department, officials explained, thnt tho
Gtlcr put liito Honolulu for repairs, that
these have been completed, nnd under In
ternational law the Geler Is not entitled to
remntn longer at Honolulu.
It Is also reported thnt Jnpan strongly
represented that the Geler should not re
ceive a full cargo of coal at most, merely
replenishment of such coal userl while
lying at anchor In tho harbor.
VANDAL AT PRINCETON
Pago In Register Bearing Signature
of Taft Stolen.
TRENTON, Oct. 27. A leaf from the
visitors' register In the Cleveland mem
orial tower of tho Princeton University
Graduate School bearing the name of
sovcral prominent men has been stolen.
Tho rrngo benm tho names of cx-Prcsl-dent
Taft, members of his family nnd
other notable visitors, who had signed
tho book on October 22 last, when the
memorial tower was dedicated.
President Hlbbcn hnn offered a reward
of $100 for the recovery of tho page.
LIQUOR COST FORTY MEN JOBS
Discharged by tho Reading Railway
Shops for Drunkenness.
READING, Pa., Oct. 27. Despite every
effort to keep the facts from the public.
It came out yesterday that 40 employes
of tho Reading Rnllway shops, In this
city, were dismissed by tho company for
drunkenness. Tho specific cause of tho
dismissal Is misbehavior and vandalism
on tho special train provided for tho em
ployes of tho Rending division which
left Philadelphia lust Friday after tho
reception given to Vlco President A. T.
Dice.
It Is alleged tho seats were cut, whisky
flasks thrown through the car windows
and the car generally damaged. A gen
eral order has gone out thnt hercaftor
nny employes of tho company caught In
an Intoxicated condition, on or off duty,
will be summarily dismissed.
SCHOOL APPEAL DISMISSED
County Superlntendant Declared Bids
Were Received Illegally.
TRENTON. N. J., Oct. 27. Stato Com
missioner of Education Kcndill today dis
missed tho appeal of Joseph Arnold,
county superintendent of .schoolB, who nl
logtd that bids were Illegally received
for tho furnishings of the William M.
Lannlng School In Ewlng Township by
the School Board there.
The superintendent contended that a
committee of the board had rocclved the
bids under Illegal procedure, being with
out power to award tho contracts.
LOCAL OPTION RALLY
Legislative Candidates Speak at Ger
mantown Meeting.
Oermantown "local optlonlsts" speak
with elation today over the success of a
rally held last night In Tracy Hall, under
the auspices of the Independent Associa
tion. Speakers urged tho support of can
didates favoring local option.
Speakers were James Slmlngton, Demo
cratic and Washington party candidate
for tho Legislature; William Hall, Demo
cratic legislative candidate; William Han
cock, Washington and Democratic party
legislative candidate, and tho Rev. Dr.
Homer T. Tope, superintendent of tho
Philadelphia district of the Anti-Saloon
Leaguo of Pennsylvania.
BOY STUDENT KILLS HIMSELF
Overstudy Leads Him to Send Bullet
Into His Head.
YORK, Pa., Oct. 27. Harry Kinard. 17
years old, Is dead here today as a re
sult of overstudy. He killed himself
yesterday by sendlnir a bullnr into w
head.
Kinard had made arrangements to
matriculate as a student In the Millers
vllle Normal School today and had
studied hard for the examinations.
But tell us one thing more. Friend
lilm. Through the summer we have
played with our leaves sweet melodies
for the people of earth. We have
whispered in their ears the soft mes
sages of the breezes. We have called
the people of earth to the woods, and
we have sung for them its beauties.
Now our leaves are gone how may
w.e,?.end tI,c wood's messages to peo
ple?" "In the winter way," replied the elm
tree, in the winter way. Every night
at twilight, when the western sky
glows red, spread your bare brown
branches in beautiful patterns against
the crimson sky."
And the trees did as they were told;
and they were happy because they had
found work to do.
So every evening through the long
winter, when the twilight sky glows
red, the trees spread their bare
branches in magic patterns tracing a
message from the woods to man.
Tomorrow Jimmy South-Breeze Starts
Bouth.
Copyright, 13 ti, Claia Ingram Judson.
AUCTION SA1.I29
THOMAS 13. LOVATT & SONS
AUCTIONEERS. 220 SOUTH EICJHTJl ST.
NOTICE OF SALE
Columbia, Storage Co., Pauyunlc ave. and
Greenwich st , Philadelphia To Mr. il
uraarord. Edward W. Pickett, Mrs. Mary
Kline, MIm Salome V. O'Urlen, administratrix
eUato Mr Satomo P. Sanborn, Ml as Rosabella
Stuinm. Mrs. Elizabeth Maer, Mrs. Mary
Ifascmu. John W Edward. DaWd Gold
oik. Mr. ElUabcth A. Trull. Miss Manila
Juhnson. Mrs. Catharine Wheeler. John J
Qulnn. Mrs. Mar Elder, Mrs Martha Potts
Mrs. Mllian Nlessen. Mr Mary Dcuber, I-ouls
ltesteln, Mrs. Susan IllUee James Kllicullen.
Mrs. Celeste A Mayo. Harry A Dontn. Will
iam H. Simon, Mrs. John Spatola. Rudolph
Uauerlo Point Breeze Motordrome. Mrs. Mar
garet McElhlnny Mrs I.oulna Phillips, Miss
Mary E. Ellis. Mrs. Annie Mullen Mrs Ray
mond W. Cdhoi'ne Mrs Sadie Nelson. Mrs.
Edward, Qulnn Mrs Eteln Purnvll. Mrs
Margaret Tamart, Frank Carroll Mrs. Sarah
McDonUtle, Mrs Margaret Kaurfman, 'Arthur
Welsh. Mrs. Augusta Oellermann. Elmer J.
Cox, Harry C Roy Mr ilrace Oanlelson
You and each of you are hereby notified that
there are due to Columbia Storage Company
certain vharzes (or household gwjds left jn
tors e by you with said company, thai you
wero duly notified ot this amount, and that
If said charge were not iwtd on or before
October SO, 1VU, foods would be advertised
ana sota.
Said time having expired and you not having
paid sa'd chances, iooJs belonging: to you will
be sold at our warehouse, northeast corner
l'MvuDk avenue and Ureenwi h street. Phlla-
ijbia on Thursday N ,fThr 12 and J9.
1
a T.TOnmattPTTTT,AT13LPHIA TUESDAY, OCTOBER
"DOPEY BEMY'S"
PROFITABLE TRADE
HALTED BY POLICE
T.
ells Judge His Specialty of
"Beating Up" Men In
volved in Labor Troubles
Netted Him $10,000 a
Year.
NEW YORK, Oct. W.-Incomo tax Col
lectors have a now Held to Investigate
among tho gangsters of Now York, If
all gang leaders and gunmen aro profit
ing to the extent of Benjamin Fein,
l;nown as "Dopey Benny." The spe
cialty of "Dopey Benny" has been "beat
ing up" men Involved In labor troubles
nnd ho told Judge Wudhnms his annual
Income was $10,000.
"Dopey Benny" said ho received from
$75 to $300 for "extra work" and worked
on a straight salary of $40 a week. The
scalo of prices for tho "beatings" ad
ministered by Benny or somo member ol
his gang was determined by the risk
Involved and tho extent of tho beating
to be administered.
Having pleaded guilty to a charge of
attempted extortion, "Dopey Benny" re
vealed somo of tho gang operations. He
snld ho worked either for union organi
zations or employers, beating up anyonn
when paid for It. In his earlier opera
tions Benny took part In tho assaults, but
later he merely directed tho attacks,
Btandlng In somo doorway nenrby to sco
that his orders wore carried out. A gas
pipe, wrapped In a nowspaper, was
usually tho weapon used, he said.
Tho arrest of "Dopey Benny" followed
a domand ho mndo upon S. Salmonowltz,
organizer for tho Butchers Union, for
employment nt ?600 during tho strike.
Sulmonowitz said his strike was to be
conducted legitimately and refused,
Bennv then threatened to sco that Sal
monowltz was killed If employment waa
refused. The labor organizer consulted
tho police and "Dopey Benny" accepted
marked $30 bills from Salmonowltz.
SHOWS FIELD FOR CHURCHES
Pastor Urges Protestants to Develop
Central Part of City.
Declaring the removal of many of tho
old Protestant churches from tho central
part of tho city, ea3t of Broad street,
was leaving a fertile field for Christian
work without the proper facilities, tho
Rev. Dr. Edward Yates Hill, pastor of
tho First Presbyterian Church, has urged
that the Protestant denominations get to
gether to provide moro churches and mis
sions for work there.
Tho appeal was made before the Pres
byterian Soclul Union at Its October ban
quet In tho Bellcvue-Stratford last night.
SUFFRAGISTS ELATED
Leaders Pleased With Results
of
Lnst Week's Campaign.
Philadelphia suffragists aro delighted
with the results of tho whlilwlnd cam
paign ot lnst week. Leaders In tho vari
ous districts are proud of their strenu
ous efforts to make Philadelphia tho best
organized city In the State.
Over three-fourths of the legislative
districts of tho city are now thoroughly
organized, with leader, vice leader and
so on, and with many legislative can
didates pledged to support the causo If
they are elooted to the Legislature. Tho
establishment of local district headquar
ters for the distribution of literature on
woman suffrage will soon follow the
campaign Just paBt.
PROBING PRISON "JOY RIDES"
Convicted Bank Wrecker Takes
Jaunts With Sing Sing Officials.
NEW YORK. Oct. 27. With ono Sing
Sing official In Jail for contempt and
another threatened with a similar fate,
tho Kings County Grand Jury met to
day to continue Its probe Into tho al
leged "Joy rides" of David A. Sullivan,
convicted wrecker of the Union Bank
of Brooklyn, now a Sing Sing convict.
Warden McCormlck has explained the
rides by asserting that tho ex-banker
was learning the trade of chauffeur so
that he could earn a living on his re
lease. HIGHWAYMAN STABS STUDENT
Son of Robert 3J. Nlles Held TJp on
Way Home.
NEW YORK. Oct. 27. Julian B. Nlles,
senior In New York University, who was
stubbed and seriously wounded late last
night In a fight with a highwayman, was
reported out of danger today.
He le tho son of Robert V. Nlles, Repub
lican nominee for Congress from the 23d
New York District. Young Nlles was re
turning home from a lecture when he
was attacked.
RESORTS
LAK15WOOD, N. J.
OAK COURT
A modern hotel with quiet air ot domesticity
and a homellks atmosphere.
E. E. Sl'ANOENBEHO. Mgr.
Grand Republican Rally
ACADEMY of MUSIC
THURSDAY, OCT. 29, P
in the interest of the Entire Republican Ticket
The Following Speakers Will Address the Meeting:
HON. BOIES PENROSE
DR.MARTIN G.BRUMBAUGH
Hon. Frank B. McClain Henry Houck
Gen. Thomas J. Stewart John R. K. Scott, Esq.
Hon. J. Hampton Moore Hon. George S. Graham
Hon. Hampton L. Carson Hon. Edwin S. Stuart
Dimner Beeber, Esq.
MR. WILLIAM
President of the Union
ACordiallnvitationExtendedtoEverybody
WRITES 189 WORDS A MINUTE
FOR AN HOUR ON TYPEWRITER
Englishman Wins International Con
test for Professionals.
NI3W YORK, Oct. 27. With a record of
lf3 words a mlntito for nn hour, Emll
Trefzcr, of England, has won tho Inter
national typewriting content for profes
sional?, amateurs and novices, held at
a business chow hero. Rose Ij. Fritz and
Margaret G. Owens, former professional
champions, were defeated. The previous
record wnc 125 words a minute.
Miss Beselo Friedman, writing fpr half
an hour, won the amateur championship
with a record of 129 words. The novlro
contest went to George A. Mossflelrt. of
Pntcrson, N. J., nt DS words for 15 min
utes. All the winners used the same make
of typewriter.
VIRGINIA PHYSICIANS MEET
First Convention of Medical Society
to Bo Held in Washington.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 27.-Tho first an
nual convention of tho Mcdlcnl Society
of Virginia ever held outsldo tho bounda
ries of that State opened in Washington
today.
Brigadier General William C. Gorgas,
Surgeon General V. S. A., welcomed the
physlclnns on behalf of President Wilson.
Richard Byrd, Speaker of the Vlr? nla
House; Dr. Stewnrt McGulre. of Rich
mond, nnd Dr. William C. White, super
intendent of tho Government Hospital for
tho Insane In this city, also addressed
tho convention. A program of sight
seeing nnd speeches has been arranged
for tho sessions tomorrow, Thursday und
Friday.
SCHOOL PRINCIPAL UPHELD
State Commissioner ICendnll Rules
Boys' Dismissal Was Legal.
TRENTON, Oct. 27. Stato Commis
sioner of Education Kendall today dis
missed tho appeal of Charles Laehdcr
nnd E. K. Edlck, of Maiuisquan, who
contended thnt tho principal of tho high
school In that town had no right to sus
pend their sons from tho Institution.
A baseball team from tho school played
In Trenton, nnd several of the pliyors
did not reach homo until eatly In the
morning. Because of "dlrobedlcncc of
school orders," tho principal disbanded
the team. Tho boys wero to havo plavcd
a gnmo at I-nkowood and they formed n
new club. Tlmy wore warned that If
they went to I.akewood they would be
suspended. When they played tho gamo
tho order ngalnit them was Issued.
TRADE IN SOUTH GOOD
No Business Depression There, Snya
President of Commerce Chamber.
MEMPHIS. Tcnn., Oct. 27. Contrary to
tho Impression prex'alllng In many sec
tions of the country, there Is no Indica
tion of a prostration of business or
panicky conditions In the South, accord
ing to John II. Fahey, of Boston, presi
dent of the Chamber ot Commerce of the
United States.
Mr. Fahey nnd other members of that
organization aro hero on tho last leg of
their tour through tho South, leaving to
night for Birmingham.
WOMAN CHASES ROBBERS
CHICAGO. Oct. 27.-Hor husband shot
down by rol icra, Mrs. Joseph Klamut,
2. and tho mother of seven children,
early today poized a revolver nnd pur
sued three hold-up men two blocks, firing
as she ran. A cash box In Klaraut's
cafe wns untouched.
MODKKN DANCING
CHAS. J. DOLL'S
Corner 38th and Market Streets
Beginners' and Dancers' Class
in Modern Dances
Tuesday & Friday, Si Per Month
Polite Assemblies, Mon. and Sat.
PRIZE MASQUERADE BALL
Saturday Evening, Oct. 3 1st
BRANCH ACADEMY
22 South 40th
MISS MARGUERITE C. WALZ
Studio of Modern Dances
1604 WALNl'T STREET.
Mrs Elizabeth W. Reed, Chaperons.
Bprnce aan.
IF YOU WANT TO BE ABLE TO DANCB
better than tho average person consult
Arm-Brust, Chestnut St.. 1113
BALL ltOOM SPECIALIST
Etrlclly prlvats lessons In up-to-the.mlnuts
dances. Classes taught anywhere.
THE C. ELWOOD PAtlPDNTER SCHOOL,
llil Chestnut st . and bmnchen, prlate and
class Instruction dall Vox Trot. Lulu Tado
Oncstsp. Ta Tap, Hesitation, Roull Iloull. '
THE MODERN DANCES
Private Lessons c Classes Taucht Anywhem.
Studio 1,S Manhelm Rt Ih . otn, 1300.
MISS SLOANE and MR. imUST
Hallowe'en Double Event
Next Friday nnd Saturday Night
.MAhK HALL
And Special lUent for Next Slonday Nlcht.
Million Dollar Pier Instructor;.1 Dunso. Ex
hibition demonstrations Prize One-Sten and
Hroltntlon Waltz Contest.
Dance de Danseland
inn time
I.orKi" Attendance nf the Itest
S0T1I AND M(INT!OMi;ilY AVKNUF,
mPTElL PErMNBS
AT LAN IIC CITT N.J.
IN AUTUMN
Provides n charm of comfort and
ease amidst characteristic environ
ment that has established 1c as an
Ideal seashore home
Dire, tly on the ocean front.
Capacity 600.
1VAI.TEK j. ni'znv
T. TILDEN,
League, Will Preside
FORTY-FOUR YEARS
AGO TODAY FRENCH
SURRENDERED METZ
Germans Took 50 Generals
and 173,000 Men as Pris
oners and Received 1341
Guns After Long Siege.
Forty-four years ago today Marshal
Bazalno surrendered tho fortress of Metz
and the French army of tho niilno to
Prince Frederick Charles of Prussia,
after a slciro that had lasted from Au
pust10, 1S70. Thrco marshals of France,
CO generals. C0O0 other officers, 173,000 men,
including 20,000 sick and wounded. Ml field
pieces and 800 fortress guns were sur
rendered to the Hermans, toixether with a
(treat riuautlty of munitions of war. flaunt
with starvation and Illness, the defenders
marched sullenly out and laid down tholr
arms after articles of capitulation had
been signed.
"Tho Drnma of Motz," as It Is termed
by Haron von der Qolz, began on Au
gust U, 1S70, with the Pattle of Colombey,
when the French wero forced to retire
Store Opens 8:30 A. M.
7Mmm
whi?
The Grand
ore of
Just opened up: a group of bleached doialbSesati!ni
damaisk tablecloths from Scotland, with matching nap
kins, in many floral desigms.
(First Floor, Chestnut)
There's a poem in bronze in the statuette
both pose
$46.50.
look
Second Floor, Central, where Victrola
hath charm.
The idea in underwear for extrasized women now
is to use flat trimming the flatter the better. In night
gowns, busts run from 42 to 50 inches; high and low
necks ; $B to $5.
(Third Floor, Central)
Anything more lustrous than the ornate cut-glass
from Berlin in rich metal mountings would be hard to
lay eyes on.
(Fourth Floor, Central)
The Houseware Section says with resonant firmness:
11 Every aluminum thing we sell is guaranteed 99 per
cent, pure,"
(Subway Floor, Central)
Witte's water colors are on demonstration in the
Photo Section.
(Main Floor, Juniper)
lars
All paper festoons for Hallowe'en should
proof, such as Commercial Stationery has.
(Subicay Gallery, Juniper)
A solid mahogany serving tray in
1Tirini 1 ? Sirnrmise tnirnm. n -. i I ,rS -5. All
.. an, .aoy iint-ii.o lUJ5, WUUIU JJICaaC U1C
(Subway Floor, Central)
Among the new sticks for walkers is a hickory cane
grown in Mississippi Valley.
(Main Floor, Chestnut)
Prices on imitation Venice Laces have been so low
ered that they can be had now at 50c a yard up to six
times that.
(Main Floor, Grand Court)
JOHM WAMAMA
PHILADELPHIA
&7. 1914
k.i.i4 v. iina nt rVirfR of Mctz. delay
ing Bazalno's contemplated retret to
Verdun. On August 16 came the Battle
of Vlonvlllo-Mars la Tour, when the army
of tho Hhlne was again checked. Two
days later the Battle of Gravelott, or
St. Prlvat, as It Is sometimes called,
wns fought. Bazalne was defeated, cut
off from his communications with Paris
and definitely forced back Into the forti
fications of Metz. The Investment was at
once begun. The Germans had their First
Army, the Third Division of the reserves
and tho Pocond, Third, Ninth and Tenth
Army Corps.
CinCtE DRAWN TIGHT.
Day by day tho clrclo of steel that
surrounded the ill-fated French army
and Its forttcss drew lighter. On Au
gust 28, preparations were made In Metz
to sally forth In an effort to Join Mac
Mahon's army of Chalons, which they
had found out by signals, had started
forward from that place. On August 31
tho French crossed the Moselle, and
tho battle of Nolssovlllo began. All day
tho French fought, nnd all through the
night. It was only in the afternoon of
September 1 that Bazalne abandoned tho
attempt nnd recalled his forces to their
camps behind the fortifications of Metz.
Then camn the news of the disaster of
Sedan, with tho surrender of the Em
peror and of MacMahon. Hope of de
UVeranro disappeared and tho army of
the Ithlne dug itself In doepcr.
September 2 the French, driven by
hunger, made n sortlo. Whllo the troops
fought trains of wagons camo out of
tho town and filled up from tho fields
with fodder, corn, potatoes and greens.
Again and again tho defenders made
WANAMAKER'S
Organ Plays Tomorrow at
the liimoir Notes of tine
amaimaJicer
and expression glow
(Fourth Floor, Central)
and listen : nearly everyone does on
wafers melt in most
(Subway Floor, Chestnut)
7
these sorties, more or less successful,
Although not able to entirely break
through. On October 7 a furlou fight
resulted In the gain of tho chateau of
Ladonchamps by the French.
IIOBBES FURNISH FOOD.
But the struggle could not continue.
Metz was not prepared for a. siege. There
wero no provisions for tho huge army that
had been bottled up there. The horses
of the army lasted for a while, until the
surviving animals themselves starred to
death. On October 2.5 General Chnrngnr
nler arrived at Cornay with an offer ot
surrender. For a. while he tried ta save
tho fortress. Its commander, General Cof
flnloros do Nordeck, requested that it
fate be considered separately from that
of the army. But the Germans refused to
consider anything but the surrender of
both.
The valiant garrison stood to arms once
more on October 2. but no effort was
mode to fight. The next evening the
protocol of capitulation was signed. Tho
city and the sneampment were an Inferno.
Dead nnd dying nnlmals wore scattered
through the mud by the thousands! the
ground of the camps had been turned by
tho excessive rains Into great swamps In
whose slime the bodies of men nnd horses
were mingled.
"It was a hell on earth that theso
brave defenders had quitted," says Baron
von der Goltz In his story of the fall of
Metz. "Indeed, ono could not but respect
an enemy who, under such circumstances,
had held out so long."
Store Closes 5:30 P. M.
9, 11 and 5:15
a
nspira
with
meanang;
and other music
mouths; 25c a
be fire
a new i
COmlOg
ide; $5.
rf
'