Lancaster daily intelligencer. (Lancaster, Pa.) 1864-1928, September 03, 1880, Image 1

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Telune XVlI-Ne.3.
LANCASTER, PA., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 3, 1880.
PHw Tire Ceits.
".-rTi'YewT,TOMywm,TO.ij.'M,1...
czemjifu.
Spring Opening
AT
24 CENTRE SQUARE.
We have tei sale for the coating seasons an
Immense Stock of
Reaiy-Me Clothing,
ei our own manufacture, which comprises the
-atestancl Most
STYUSI DESIGNS.
Conic and sec our
tfEW GOODS
FOB
lEBGHANT TAILORING,
A-liIcli is larger and composed of the best styles
U lie found In the til.'
D. B. Hostetter & Sen,
24 CENTRE SQUARE.
fi-lyd
LANCASTER. PA
I!
AT
H. GERHART'S
Tailoring Establishment,
MONDAY, APRIL 5.
ft
Having nht rcturneil Irein tlie New Yerk
Woolen Market, 1 uni new prepared te exhibit
jneef the Best Selected Stocks of
WOOLENS
FOR TUB
Spring and Summer M,
vex brought te this cltj'. None but the very
jstef
ENGIJSH, FRENCH
AMD
AMERICAN FABRICS,
all the Lending Styles. Prices as low sis the
ewcst,:md all goods warranted its represent
,at H. GERHART'S,
Ne. 51 North Queen Street
SMALING,
THE ARTIST TAILOR.
Closing out enr stock of Light Weights at
cost te make room for
Fall and Winter Stock.
A Large Hue of
English Novelties.
TROPIC AL SUITINGS,
SERGES AND REPS,
BANNOCKBUKNS AND CELTICS,
UAM1HIOOX PAUAMATA
AND BATISTE SUITINGS.
SEERSUCKERS. VALENCIAS, PAROLE
AND MOHAIR COATINGS.
A Splendid Assortment or Wilferd's Padded
Ducks in Plain and Fancy Styles. A Full Line
of
M
All the latest novelties. An examination of
our stock is respectfully solicited.
T. K. SMALING,
ARTIST TAILOR,
121 NORTH QUEEN STREET.
WALL VAVERS, Sx.
PHARES W. FRY,
Ne. 57 NORTH QUEEN ST.
MAKES ALL KINDS OF
VIBE SCREENS
for windows, and pnt up In such a manner
that you need net remove when you close the
window. We have Berne decided bargains in
WALL PAPER.
In order te close will Iks beM very low.
PLAIN WINDOW SU ADES, in all colors and
widths. Extra Wide Goods for Large Curtains
and Stere Shades. Fixtures of Itest Makes.
Hollands, Fringes, Tassels, Cords, Leeps, Paper
Curtains, Ac.
Extension Window Cornice
In a variety of Patterns, will fit anv window
up te five feet In width. Cornice Poles, Ebony,
Walnut and Ash.
ORDERS TAKEN FOR
FINE PIER AND MANTEL MIRRORS.
Fry's, 57 North Queen Street
ne
PE
H1N
ai M Tesn
DKY
DRY GOODS!
H AGER & BROTHER,
NO. 25 W. KING STREET, LANCASTER,
Arc receiving New (Joeds In all Departments. .
OUR STOCK OF
CARPETS,
-
AND -
PAPEE HANGINGS
Fer the Fall Season will comprise all the Latest Designs and Colorings, and le Larger and
mere complete than cvorbefere.
HAGER & BROTHER.
HOUSEKEEPING GOODS
AT THE
NEW YORK STORE.
Bleached and Unbleached Muslins and Sheetings at Greatly Reduced Prices.
LOOM DICE TABLE LINENS,
DAMASK TABLE LINENS,
TURKEY RED DAMASKS.
Towels in 50 Different Styles and Quantities, Table Cevers,
Napkins, Deylies.
SPECIAL BARGAIN,
10,000 IS. NEW DAI CALICOES AT 5 CTS. A YAED.
ELEGANT STYLES IN CALICOES, MOMIE CLOTHS AND PERCALES. NEW
PALL GINGHAMS. " Popular Goods at Popular Prices," is our motto.
Watt, Shand & Company,
S AND 1 0 EAST KING STREET.
?r-
WATVIMS,
ZAHM'S CORNER,
EE-0PEMD EOR BUSINESS.
Wearcjjlad te announce te our I'l-ii-mls that wc have completed the alterations in our main
storeroom and new eiler u very I'nll and complete Meck ler their inspection, including
Watches, Jewelry, Silverware, Spectacles, American and Fine French Clocks, &c.
Among the dill'erent makes of Watches we carry we e.ill especial attention te
THE LANCASTERWATCH
us one of the lwst in the murKct.
Onr Spectacle Department includes the
Arundel Tinted Lenses,
which afford mere comfort te the eyes than any ethers. Special attention given te lilting glass
es te weak and defective cye-i.
OurfaciliUes ter business In our SALKS, MANUFACTURING and REPAIRING depart
ments are much better than they were, and we feci reasonably sure or meeting the wants of
thOMj who favor ns with their trade. We extend a cordial invitation te all tecall.assurlng them
polite attention, lair dealing ami low prices.
Zalun's Cerner, Lancaster, Fa.
VLOTItlSti.
CLOSING OUT OF SPRIG AM) SUMMER STOCK.
In enlcr te close out our stock of Spring ami Summer Goods te make room for a
heavy Fall Trailc, we are offering great inducements in Men's, Youths' and Children's
Clothing.
In our Custom Department wc have a large let of Piece Goods, which must be
closed out before September 1, regardless of profit.
In our Ready-made Department wc have an unusually fine stock of Summer
Clothing, all of which can be purchased at very lowest bottom figures.
Gentlemen, our facilities arc net equaled in the city. It will cost yen nothing
te examine our stock.
MYERS & RATHFON,
Xe. 12 EAST KING STREET,
OUSTS' UOOJKS.
F
OK LINEN COLLARS
OOTO
ERISMAN'S.
LMtK ft'ANCY STOCKINGS
cie TO
KRISMANVS.
F
OK SUSPENDERS
OOTO
ERISMAN'S.
TfOR MKW STYLK
LINEN HANDKERCHIEFS, GO TO
E. J. ERISMAN'S,
0G NORTH JUEKN STKKKT.
CAMVA1GS GOODS.
Of
MPA1GN GOODS!
New Samples ! New Styles !
Clubs and Committees invited tecalland ex
amine our goods before purchasing.
CAPES, COATS, HATS, CAPS, HELMETS
TORCHES. RADGES, STREAMERS,
FLAGS, BURGEES, (Political
Lanterns very cheap.)
Bunting Flags of All Sizes.
Portraits of Presidential Nominees
en cloth, suitable ler Ranncrs and Transpar
encies. PLASH TORCH.
Every Club ought te have some, even if they
de net nave them for entire Club.
D. S. BURSK,
17 East Kin? Street, Lancaster.
MAititL. works.
WM. P. PBAILEY'S
MONUMENTAL MARBLE WORKS
768 North it aeen Street, Lancaster, Pa.
MONUMENTS. HEAD AND FOOT STONES,
GARDEN STATUARY,
CEMETERY LOTS ENCLOSED, Ac,
All work guaranteed and satisfaction gu en
in every particular.
N. B. Remember, works a', the extreme end
of North Queen stiver. m)
H
UP IUTTKKS f-OK AMi AT I.OCH-
ers Drag Stere, 9 East King street.
UOOVS.
OIL CLOTHS
JEWELRY, Sc.
EDW. J. ZAHM, Jeweler.
LANCASTER, PEXX'A.
Jf URSITVRE.
HEINITSH,
FINE FURNITURE
AJn
Cabiaet Manufacturer.
All in want of Fine or Fancy Cabinet Werk
would de well te call and examine specimens
et our work.
OFFICE FURNITURE A SPECIALTY.
HEINITSH,
15J ICast King Street.
VU1SA. ASH GLASS H'AJtJZ.
TKUITJAKS! JFKU1T JARS!
CHINA HALL.
Fruit Jars,
Fruit Jars,
Fruit Jars,
Fruit Jars.
AT THE LOWEST PRICES.
C2Scc our window.
HIGH & MARTIN'S,
Ne. 15 EAST KING STREET.
OROCEKLES.
w
HOLKSALK AND KKTAIL.
IJEVAN'S FLOUR
AT
Ne. 227 NORTH PRINCE STREET.
aw-lyd
1 It AIM M'KCULAXION
VT In large or small amounts. $25 or $20,000-
write w.t. seuiiis x, uu., commission fller
chants, 1.10 La Salle street, Chicago, ill., for cir
ulars. m2-iyd
Hancastrr Intrlltgrnrrr.
FBIDAT EVENINO, SEPT. 3, 1880.
THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
MEETING OF THE HOARD OF DIREC
TORS.
Dills Paid Collector Annotated Commit
tees Repert The Kulcs of the ISeurd
ine ini.-inu insurance Company learn
ing ttie Pupils of Pupils Kyes, Arc.
COUNTRY SCHOOLS.
Seme r Their Defect as Noted by a Corres Cerres Corres
eondentMinnesota's Grain Crep.
Meeting of the Scheel Heard.
, A stated meeting of tlie beard of direct
ors of Lancaster school district was held
in common council chamber last evening.
Tlie following named members were
present.
Baker, D. G., Cochran, Ebcrly, Ebcrman
Evans, Harris, Hartman, D., Ilartman, J.
I., Johnsten, Lcvcrgoed, Marshall, Mc Mc
Cemscy, McConeiny, Morten, licimcnsny
der, Rhoads, ichards, Samson, Schwcbcl,
Slayinakcr, Spurrier, Wcsthacfler, Wilsen,
Ycislcy, Zcchar, Christian, "Warfel, presi
dent. Mr. Baker, from the superintending
committee, reported verbally that the
schools were opened September 1st and
referred te arrangements made te accom
modate pupils, as has been hcietoferc
stated in the Intklt.ickn'cei:,
Mr. Evans, from the finance committee,
presented the following bills, which were
ordered te be paid. Abraham Maxwell,
whitewashing, &c, fc3; Gee. "W. Beck,
whitewashing, and cleaning, $10 ; Jeseph
Samson, brushes, $15.30; Samson Rush &
Sen, hauling ashes, $1; JehnB. Reth and
Edw. J. Zahm. for let of ground $2,100;
Christien Dean, whitewashing $1G ; Baum
gardncr, Ebcrman & Ce., lumber, $02,55 ;
Mrs. Constine, whitewashing, &c., $10 ;
Edw. Boekmycr, painting, glazing and
material, $ IS. G5 ; J. C. Seachrist, white
washing, $25 ; Mrs. While, whitewashing,
$15 ; Gee. J. Senscnderfer, whitewashing,
$25; Widmyerand Rickscckcr, repairing
desk, 75 cents.
On motion of Mr. Evans, A. K. Warfcl,
the present collector, was unanimously re
elected te collect the unpaid school tax.
Mr. J. I. Ilartman, from the school prop
erty committee made a verbal report that
the necessary repairs had been made dur
ing vacation te the several school houses ;
a lire escape had been attached te tlie sec
ondary school building at Prince and Chest
nut streets, and the stairway hadjbeen re
modeled with a view te the greater securi
ty of the children in case of lire, or ether
sudden danger, lie also moved that tem
porary partitions be placed in the Lemen
street shoel houses, te avoid the confusion
incident te the recitations of the several
classes. This prevision is made necessary
because of the demolition of the class
rooms of these school houses, te make
room for the new building new in eourse
ofxicctien. The motion was unanimously
agreed te.
Mr. D. G. Baker made some objection
te the recent improvements of the Prince
street school building and suggested cer
tain alterations which he thought would
make the building meic safe in case of a
fire or ether cause of excitement. He ob
jected especially te the outside doers be
cause they did net open outwardly.
Mr. Ebcrly asked if it was net a fact
that the outside doers of the high school
building, all of which opened outwardly,
were net all kept locked, except one.
Mr. Baker said if such was the case it
was wrong and should be corrected.
Mr. J. I. Ilartman, from the special
committee te purchase a site for a school
building in the northwest division, report
ed that the committee had purchased from
E. J. Zahm and Jehn B. Reth, i let en
West James street for the sum of $2,100,
the let being 13CJ by 150 Teet.
On motion of Dr. Lcvcrgoed the action
of the committee was approved, the thanks
eftthc beard were extended te them and the
committee was discharged.
Dr. Lcvcrgoed, from the committee en
rules, reported that the manuscript of the
rules adopted at the last meeting of the
beard was in the hands of the printer, lie
stated that the committee had been at con
siderable trouble in hunting up the several
laws relating te school atlairs, which the
beard had directed te be printed with the
rules, and there were se many of them,
extending ever a period of thirty years,
and many of them having been repealed,
that the committee had come te the con
clusion that it would be impracticable te
print them. lie moved therefore that the
action of the beard ordering the acts of
Asscmblyte be printed in connection with
the rules be rescinded, and that the rules
of the beard be printed without them.
Mr. Ebcrly said that there had never
been a resolution passed by the beard that
all the laws relating te the schools should
be printed. The resolution passed provid
ed simply for the printing of the act of
1850 and the amendments thereto. These
arc net numerous, could be collated in half
a day, and would net occupy many pages
of the pamphlet of rules.
Mr. McCemscy speke at some length,
giving a historical sketch of the special
school laws passed by the state Legislature
for forty years past, and showing that
nearly all the previsions of the special
laws had been repealed or embodied in the
general school law.
3Ir. Ebcrly stated that if any previsions
of the law of 1S50 or its supplements had
been repealed they would be indicated by
a star. He regarded it as important te
have the law printed in connection with
the rules of the 'beard, se that all might
knew what the law was.
Messrs. Baker, Ilartman and McCom McCem
sey speke against the printing of the act
of 1850, and in favor of a codification of
the school laws.
After further discussion the motion te
print the law of 1850, in connection with
the rules of the beard, was reconsidered
and rescinded.
The resolution presented at a former
meeting of the beard previing that Lan
caster school district join with ether plain
tiffs in a suit against the Inland insurance
aud deposit company, te recover money
lest by the failure of that institution, was
taken up for consideration.
Mr. Wilsen opposed the resolution. lie
said the debts of the institution at the
time of its failure were $122,000, of which
sum 43 per cent, had been paid. The
claim of the school beard was $1-1,611.
Most of the ether claims were small and
divided amongst a great many depositors,
some of whom were net financially respon
sible. If a lawsuit were commenced the
school beard would be obliged te pay most
of the costs. He believed the money was
irredeemably lest aud there was no hope
of recovering it from the directors of the
defunct institution, nearly all of them
being cither dead or insolvent.
Mr. Jehn I. Ilartman moved te refer the
resolution te the judiciary committee of
the beard winch will be appointed under
the new rules recently adopted.
Jlr. D. G. Baker thought it would be
useless te engage in the proposed suit,
which could result in nothing but costs te
be paid by the beard. All or nearly all
the directors of the Inland were dead or
insolvent, except Mr. Nisslcy and the es
tate of Gen. J. L. Reynolds. It could net
be shown that the beard of directors in
office at the time the Inland)failcd,had ever
been legally elected, or that they had com
mitted any official wrong. If they were
guilty of any offense it was an act of emis
sien te faithfully perform their official
duty, and for this emission they could only
be reached by an action of tort ; and an
action of tort will net held after the death
of the defendant. There had been a won
derful fatality among the Inland directors
Boyd, Reynolds, Muhlenberg and ethers
are dead, and the only one living whose
estate is worth anything is Mr. Nissley,
and he did net believe that a suit against
him could be successfully maintained.
Mr. Morten speke briefly in favor of
pushing the suit. The school beard and
ether creditors have lest large sums of
money through the mismanagement of the
directors of the Inland. These directors, or
their legal representatives arc responsible
for the losses. There can be no harm done
in trying te recover the money due. There
will be no costs attached te the suit except
office costs, as one of the best lawyers at
the bar is willing te prosecute the suits
without fee or reward, unless the money
is recovered, in which case he wants 30 per
cent, of the amount recovered, and this 30
per cent, can be paid out of the interest
that has accrued en the money claimed.
The office costs would be light; and a due
proportion of them be berne by the ether
claimants, some of whom he knows inti
mately, and knows them te be responsi
ble. Dr. Lcvcrgoed moved te lay the whole
matter en the table, and the motion was
agreed te all the members present voting
"aye" except Messrs. Harris, Johnsten,
and Morten, who voted "no."
The secretary was authorized te have
certain blank forms prntcd for the use
of the city superintendent aud teachers.
Mr. Wilsen read a letter from Dr. Brown
in which he asks permission te examine free
of charge the eyes of the pupils of the pub
lic schools with a view of ascertaining the
proportion among them that have defective
vision and te ascertain the causes thereof.
Dr. Brown enumerated the diseases of the
cycte which children are subject and showed
the disadvantages under which salesmen,
lilread conductors, (engineers and ethers
labor under by being near-sighted or color
blind. Mr. Wilsen offered a resolution granting
permission te Dr. Brown te make the ex
aminations suggested, providing they did
net interfere with the pupils' studies.
Dr. Lcvcrgoed opposed the resolution.
If permission were granted te Dr. Brown
ether professional gentlemen would
make similar applications te examine their
tceth,thc bumps en their heads, their corns
and ether parts of their body. He moved
te lay the resolution upon the table.
The application of Mr. Smcltz, joint
owner with the school beard and the Evan
gelical church, of a pump and well en
North Mulberry street, asking that the
pump and well may become his exclusive
property en certain conditions, was referred
te the property committee with instructions
te report.
Adjourned.
Onr Rural Public Schools.
Fer tllC iNTKLLIOKXCKIt.
" Frem education, as tlicleadins e.iu-e.
The public character its color draws."
While fully appreciating and prizing
our popular system of education, knowing
what a great blessing it is te 'countless
thousands " of peer girls and boys all ever
our land, realizing what a bonanza it has
been te past, is te present and will un
doubtedly be te future generations of
youth, laying for them the foundation of
education they would net receive but for
it, yet ene cannot help observing, if wc
tike the trouble and it is a lamentable
fact that se few de take the trouble te
examine and study the workings and
results of enr country public schools,
that they will frequently be found defic
ient; and we will often be surprised te
find se little geed coming from seme of
them, from which we expected no mere
than they ought te produce
There arc no doubt various causes for
these evils, seme of which should only be
seen te be removed. Others there are per
haps that arc parts of the system itself, as
'nothing is perfect ;" and if we would un
dertake te cure them it might have te be
done te the undoing of some ether parts
that were worse than what we improved.
But it is net these little incurables that
we fear, although wc should watch and
guard against them.
It is the diseased pails that can be
cured, that are se much diseased often
because of inattention, te which we wish
te apply the balm and scalpel..
Our school directors are nominated te
the office because the party ewes them
some little mark of distinction for seme lit
tle service they have done the party.heping
some time te be thus rewarded. There is
no pay in being a school director, but it is
that incstimable prize a public a Hair.
Then our directors arc elected because
they are Republicans or Democrats, net
because they are at all interested in educa
tion or arc likely te labor with honest zeal
for its advancement. When I used te be a
school boy (but a few years age) the direc
tors of the township paid us a yearly
visit. On these momentous occasions the
teachers would ask them what classes they
would be pleased te hear recite, whereupon
tlie learned body would held a half
audible consultation and reach the conclu
sion that it didn't make any difference.
Then our teacher, exercising the rules of
performing in going te class and reciting,
which we had heard nothing of since the
"first day of school" when they were made
and were broken regularly each succeeding
day, would march us te the platform an
awful judgement bar then where we
would be "put through" in a manner '
tirely satisfactory," as would be the
en-cx-
pressteu et the impression made upon our
judges, who kucw as little about the les les
eons as we did. Next our copybooks would
be collected for their inspection. Leaf
after leaf would be turned ever, without a
leek at the beautiful curves, perfect shad
ing, uniform height, and the many ether
points that characterize geed penman
ship, ns long as no blot was seen,
and when ene was found hew they shook
their heads, pointed their fingers at it,
looked en the back for the name of the
boy (it always was a boy's and often mine)
who had dared te make such a blot ; his
prospects in life were very dark indeed.
Something should be dene for that boy.
They had no praise for the geed it de
served no credit, only censures for the blot
it could never be excused. Then one of
them would give us a short address where
in would be set forth all the advantages of
education we had and didn't prize ; the
geed books wc had and didn't value ; the
kind teacher we had and didn't love ; the
comfortable (?) school-houses we had and
cut them all up with our knives ; hew wc
would regret the time wc were wasting
when it would be tee late ; that ours was
the worst school he had visited ; that al
together we were a set of ungrateful, in
apprcciativc little wretches whom he feared
would never "amount te a hill of beans."
And would leave. Who has visited our
teachers' examinations and has net re
marked the youth and general seeming in
aptitude of the ones who propose te teach
our youth? The girls have scarcely ceased
te lisp although they have been te 3Iil
lersville. What the boys lack in brains is
made up in conceit. They both knew tee
little te knew hew little they
de knew. I am net speaking of
our exceptional teachers we have a few
but the general class. They have no
knewledge eutside their book backs ; no
experience in the world ; they arc net fit
for anything else, se are made into teach
ers ; their characters are net formed ; they
can set no example ; they cannot rcalize
the responsibilities of the position they
seek, nor discharge them if they did.
These are the gardeners who are te tend
the nurseries from which we transplant
into life. These are the early trainers of
our men and women. "In the education
of our children lies the hope of our nation,"
and these our educators ! We pay pretty
geed wages se geed that is one of the
most paying occupation in the country, but
if it will bring us better teachers let us
pay mere. Our schools are net what they
should 1k. Can we reform them?
Drumeuk.
Minnesota's Mines.
An Inexhaustible Source of Wealth.
Correspondence New Yerk Sun.
A few days age I attended a meeting
which had been called te organize a new
beard of trade in this city. This had been
rendered necessary, in view of the rapid
and unprecedented increase in the grain
production of the state. Competent judges
estimate the wheat crop in this state for
this year at 36,000,000 bushels, valued, at
a low estimate, at $28,000,000. This is less
than 80 cents a bushel. The present price
is 85 te 87 V, according te grade. It may
go higher. Less than 1G0 days age no
part of this great wealth existed. In the
words of ene of the speakers of the occa
sion :
" Little mere than ninety days age, a
bushel of grain placed in the fruitful soil,
by dew and rain aud sunshine, and that
unknown and incomprehensible process
called life and growth, has developed te
twenty bushels. The seed sewn in Minne
sota in April has matured in August into
ever forty mil liens of bushels of golden
grain. Out of the generous soil from
darkness and obscurity and mould has been
lifted ever thirty millions of dollars' worth
of property that actually had no cxistence
ene hundred days age. I doubt whether
California aud the golden slopes of the
Pacific have ever in a single year lifted se
much of the yellow mctil from outef their
mines."
Anether speaker said that "we have
only begun te dream of the future of the
great Northwest, and it is only necessary
for the beard of trade te work with one
accord and it will be but a short time when
St. Paul, as the natural outlet of the
northwestern states and territories, will
take her proper place in the estimation of
the country at large."
This is interesting reading, because it is
true and because it is a most gratifying
exhibit for astatc se yeungand se sparsely
settled as Minnesota. There arc new about
:;,()()() miles of railroad in the state and
mere arc building constantly. St. Paul
handled last year 1,000,000 bushels of eats,
2,000,000 bushels of corn, and nearly amil amil
lien bushels of wheat. This year it is said
these figures will be nearly doubled. New
elevators are being erected among the rail
roads in this immediate vicinity, building
in the city is very active, a magnificent
Union depot is new being constructed for
the use of the railroads centring here, and
as the last and best evidence of a healthy
activity in business, all the hotels are
crowded te their utmost capacity. The
population of St. Paul is 41,457, while her
sister city Minneapolis, six miles west,
beasts 4S,201. Nearly a hundred thous
and people in two cities that could beast
but a few years age net ever 70,000 be
tween them. This rapid and continuing
increase in population is based en the ma
terial prosperity of the state and the grow
ing wealth of the peeple.
I was very forcibly impressed with a
doubt expressed in one of the speeches at
the beard of trade meeting, whether the
Pacific slope had ever in a single year pro
duced enough money from its mines te buy
this year's Minnesota wheat crop. As a
matter of fact, the Pacific coast has in ene
or two years produced sufficient money te
buy this crop. But at what a cost in
money, in manhood, in moral character,
and what wrecks have been left in it wake !
The lessen of Minnesota suggests a moral
aud a contrast. It shows what may be ac ac
cempliscd in a very few years in a virgin
county. Hundred of foreigners whom I
remembered ns coming into Minnesota
nearly ten years age, with barely enough
money te bring them here, are new the
owners of fine farms ; they have money in
bank, they have catlc and a house and barn,
and are en the high read te fortune.
Rough, uncouth, unlettered, and
unlearned when they arrived here, they
arc new exerting nn inflnence in
local affairs. Many of them held offi
cial positions in the counties where they
reside. They arc all bright, enterprising
lrugal, hard-working and geed citizens.
Each knows that he is a unit of the whole
people, and ns geed "as any one." Am
bition spurs some of them en te be a little
better. If Swedes, Danes, Germans, and
Norwegians can de this, why net some of
the thousands of our native-born citizens
who are holding en by their eyelids te
chance in New Yerk, with every prospect
and an cvcr-prcscnt fear that they may at
any moment drop into the gulf of hope
less and helpless bankruptcy? Minnesota
offers rare advantages. After an exper
ience of very nearly llve years in travel
through the West, and a residence of ever
three years in California, I recognize the
coming greatness of Minnesota. As a
wheat-raising state it will undoubtedly
surpass California in a few years. In the
latter state there is never any assurance
from one year te another that a full crop
will be harvested. A dry winter upsets all
calculations. In Minnesota a fair crop
may be depended en with absolute cer
tainty, and an extraordinary yield very
frequently.
The organization of the St. Paul beard
of trade had for its object, among ether
things, te secure te this city all the advan
tages arising from the grain field. Bat I
am sorry te note an apparant intention of
the Milwaukee & St. Paul and the .Chi
cago & Northwestern railroads te convert
St. Paul into a way station. The policy
of these reads is and always has been te
drain the products of the whole Northwest
directly into Chicago, and there is no
present help for the evil. If New Yerk
capitalists would ceme te the rescue and
construct a read from here te New Yerk,
and retail! control of it, St. Paul would
reap all the honors and seme of the profit
that new gees te Chicago, and New Yerk
would eventually get the Han's share of
both. This is a subject worthy the car
nest thought of the gentlemen who make
and unmake commercial kingdoms in Wall
street. "
AE. McCANN, AUCTIOMtKR OF REAL.
. Estate and Personal Property. Orders
left at Ne. 35 Charlette street, or at the Black
Herse Hetel, 41 and 48 North Queen street, will
receive prompt attention. Bills made out and
trended te witbout.addltienal cost. e27-Iy
JUtT GOODS.
FAIITESTOCK'S,
Next Dw te IktCwBtHewr,
Have opened this day large lines of
DOMESTICS.
ItLEACIIEDANDUXRLKArilKDMITSf.IV
all the populer makes at less than regular
prices.
CALICOES.
We have lust received large lines of PRINTS
of best quality, light and dark, inj
Remnants at 5 and 6 1-4 Cents.
MADRAS GINGHAMS,
In all tbc new styles.
Red, White, Grry, Canten and Demet
FLANNELS.
LINENS, NAPKINS AND TOWELS, In large
quantities.
CHEAPER THAN EVER !
J. B. MARTIN & CO.
Muslins and Flannels
SHBETINU MUSLINS, IUeaehed. all widths,
from Ji te 12-1 yard wide.
FLAMELS. FLANNELS.
New Fall Stj les in
MADRAS GINGHAMS,
PERCALES AND PRINTS.
Me Mi & Cies.
J. B. Martin & Ge.
LANCASTER, PA.
HOOKS ASJ STATIOSEKY.
S(
CIIOOL HOOKS.
SCHOOL BOOKS
An
SCHOOL SUPPLIES
for Lancaster City and County, at
L. M. FLYNN'S
- Ne. 42 WEST KING STREET.
S(
CHOOI. UOOKS,
BLANK BOOKS
AWD
Fancy Stationary
AT
FOIST DEESMTH'S
Ne. 32 East King St., Lancaster, Pa.
nnc234td
SCHOOL BOOKS
FOR TUB
Schools of Lancaster City,
NEW AND SECOND-HAND.
At the LOWEST P KICKS, at the Boek Stere of
JOM BAER'S SONS,
15 and 17 NORTH QUEEN STREET,
LANCASTER. PA..
COAX.
B.
It. MARTIN,
Wholesale and Kctail Dealer In all kinds of
LUMltEIl AND COAL.
49 Yard: Ne. 439 North Water and Prince
streets above Lemen. Lancaster. n3-Iyd
-.
COAL! COAL! COAL! C0AL
Ceal of the Best Quality put np expressly,
for family use, and at the low
est market prices.
TRY A SAMPLE TON.
49- YARD ISO SOUTH WATER ST.
ncZMyd PHILIP SCHUM.SON ft CO.
COAL! COAL!
Fer Reed, clean Family and all ether kinds
of COAL go te
RUSSEL & SHULMYEB'S.
Quality and Weight guaranteed. Orders re
spectfully solicited.
omeKt SS East King Street. YARD:
818 North Frtace Street.
angll-taprlSR
flOALt COALI COALItt
We have constantly en hand all the best
grades or COAL tliat arc in market, which we
arc selling as low as any yard in the city.
Cell and get enr prices before linying else
where. M. F. STEIGERWALT & SON,
8271yd ZSI NORTH WATER STREET..
COHO & WILEY,
3G9SOXTH WATMK ST., Lancaster, llu,
Wbolcsale and Retail Dealers In "
LUMBER AND GOAL.
Coaaectiea Wltfc the Telephonic Exchange.
Branch Office : Ne. 3 NORTH DUKE ST.
fcb2S-lyd
GOAL! - - - COAL!!
GORRECHT & CO.,
Will deliver coal at the following prices :
B. D. Broken Egg and Nnt 9Ut ,
u Steve.. ... .... 2P j
rnlnmrlsK Dmlnn Emniil Nat 4Jt
. fltnYA......... ......... .......... 4. W l
Lvken's Vallev. Broken. Egg and Steve... 4Ml
All Grades Ne. 1 J? ,
WelFritcmAi-Ant0ed.
"-e .- p. W. GORRECHT, At
aug!7-tfd W.A.KEI-