Father Abraham. (Reading, Pa.) 1864-1873, February 04, 1870, Image 1

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    PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY,
RAUCH & COCHRAN,
No. 18, South Queen Street, Lancaster.
TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION.
1 cep", one year....., $ 1.50
lel copies, (each " gg name addreased ' )
Is. 7 .
0000
espies
It
15 copies " i4.(l°
II
V a " .00
And $l.lO Mr each adSional subscriber.
Pol{ CLUES, Tx PACXAGSS
5 topics, (ttene ocktress,) 4 841.0°.50
-Pi-
1 1 4 .11°
. Si ,
41400 tOr sash additional subscriber. 4°
ii.Allsabscriptions must invariably be paid
in advance.
JOB PRINTING
Of eye* deseriptdon, nfttly and promptly m
erited, tit shortrifoU^ Ind On the molt
• • noble ternmsa,
Books (lead Stationery.
SCHOOL BOOKS,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL!
We would resppeittdly call the attention of all
alEßCa tfabiL DIEVOES
• ' Tam,
zotts AND
• SCHOLARS
To Our LARGE STOOK of
SCHOOL BOOKS AND STATIONERY!
Which Will be Solo at the
• tOWEVi i r CASE PRICES:
PAPER AND ENVELOPES
GREATLY REDUCED RATES.
Call before purchasing elsewhere.
.1. B. SHE &EPEES
Cheap Cash Book Store,
No. 52 North Queen-st.,
Lancaster. Penna.
HOLIDAY BOOKS
AND FANCY GOODS,
REDUCED FROM 10 TO 20 PER CENT.
BOOKS FOR THE GRAVE,
BOOKS FOR THE GAY,
BOOKS FOR THE OLD, and
BOOKS FOR THE YOUNG.
BIBLES, TESTAMENTS,
HYMN BOOKS,
WRITING DESKS,
FRENCH AND AMERICAN
WORK BOXES,
LADIES' COMPANIONS,
ALBUMS,
STEREOSCOPES AND VIEWS.
Checker Boards, Games in great variety, Sun
day School Boots and Rewards of all - kinds,
Teachers' Helps, Stationery and Initial Letter
Paper cheaper than was ever offered in Lan
caster.
agrNew Green Backs given to all purchasers.
D. 8. BARE,
West King-at., corner of Fulton Row.
owing
Family k
OVER 400,000 NOW IN USE.
EXAMINE IT BEFORE BUYING. ANY OTHER.
- SOLD ON LNABE PLAN.
Sia.43 Per MC:lo3atia.
PETERSON 4 CARPENTER, Gemara? oigents.
General Office for Lancaster County":
64 North Queen St. 04
octl-6m
HOW TO GET A HOWE !
CALL ON
C. .1 1 A T Agent,
-WO. 25% NOR' QU,SEN STREET,
LAN . .CASTER, PA
yuo
NOWOSaphines
F , .
41% the 'eldest' eadebtfehed eX Mlle, the world/
ii.10ny144141101 the.:
H/PW/ 1
at all the great exilibitions of the World.
ott li aTe l r i e e tetiM ibl grol= it r lY
°1449 7
(OM* BANMAT
1 ' irtnetWirilibt -
EtAli irtc`Bt4 u
,;FAMILY.. Sawa WO*
496 ziaurocalit issifiAreix
IVO taIiNTNIIT STAXIET,
OWiNi&Ws ilWaNUMosi
Tera .... ti p v .„, sti. ras tag s i g o j r ,
= trot autt tea)
Fa ra, tter hus s:thr ia, c imp r iority
- Vor ofile.by • ..*
• GEORGE BP BEER,
North een tree ,
1 ' carter • .
Hotels.
.117 & HOTEL,
A..) •
OP/POSITX PINNA. R. R. DNPOT,
IWIIU3nM/G, PA.
W. IL 111311N47111 4t 00.,
mbill4yl IProprieto.
r‘ph,f, let us strips ots le Ads* the wont ,
ye aro *s; to Mut up As nations wowed,/ to
=
VoL.
Agar caps; Pam deo.
eo H & AMER,
PRACTICAL HATTERS,
To. 015
EAST RING ST., LANCASTER, PA.,
Manaraoturera and Denims In
ALL marml or
HATS AND CAPS.
Sr. All ovine promptly attended to.
Wile 'AMER.
Muskat Instruments, tte.
WOODWARD'S
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
MUSIC STORE,
NO. 22 WEST RING STREET.
Pianos, Organs, Melodeons, Piano and Melo
deon Stools and Covers, Violins, Guifa s, Ban
los, Tamborinee,Aeoordeons Con PM%
Drums, dflutes,
ar, Tri,a_nglas,a. °ta i g a , li l a
Tuning Tonm. Pitch VIO ws, Cello
Bows, - Violin and G mi, usio Port
folios", lnstruction •of all kinds, Sheet
Music, Musio lu , and every description of
Musical Mere . A11_9140:8 ailed prompt
ly at the usual or i.olesale Prima, and
satisfaction weatinteed.
SirTunintand repairing prom ptlyatiAnded
to. A. W. WOODWARD,
teIPS44 W.
31 No Si Klng-dit., Lancaster.
_T B.
T.., •
DEALER IN
SHEET MUSIC, PIANOS, ORGANS,
MELODEONS,
And Musical instruments Genera/
Solo Agent tor.
STEINWAY & SONS'
WORLD RENOWNED PIANOS.
Also, Agent far
PRINCE & CO.'S ORGANS and MELODEONS.
SirMusio sent by Mall Free of Postage.
No. 8 NORTR PRINCE STUNT;
Lancaster, Pa.
COOK AMOHL DORI
Rooft aw tin •
3. B. lEBVINGHI SEIM MUSIC GHTORB.
Ktorrssna, Onyslita, Mstonsoms, un elle
aorta music Inshtrumental
Der Kerineki is agent for de bereemty Stein
webr Pianos—llloffeera beast um se of doltish.
Der plats is
No. 8 NORD PRINCE STREET, LANCASTER.
N. B. For a first raty gooty Gong, odder an
Aceordeon, odder a Tswcerrioh-Pelf, odder en-
Mob onners musical Inshtrument, klea odder
gross, shtept yusht ni ons Kovinskils, No. 3
Nord Prince Sbtrose, Leaoasts." (notaly
Mou e lournihing Good.
.vpuTourrn,
ovpro, unnumuunt,
' ITO., 18 NORTH MITA 13ThEET,
• •
READING. •
Atinitta on band
Igantara Patent Woolen Golla
Bartion4 09. 1 4 • , ' 0 1 4318,
' XV - " CtoMns•
Always prepared to atteattla ihe dead and
tarnish Oodles, burial emu, &01 at the very
Maio&
' B. • •
>llll l rpr. A L. , • ; A ,
r o
• SO= V71.1 . ''
2COMAN
•
vo KAT ft o f
ruirmitvit,
DISEASES Or TAX .004.14 /
PRODI7OE GRAY WILTICAr. MADNESS!
Tius 106 0
HAULM VIIGHTAIILIa
KOMAR HAIR lucipwrin
will restore it to its lateral bolos and promote
iug=
tieti ea the Hair mat ltee mail.
jante.lmil
B. P. HALL, & 00., Nadu* W. H.,
etor.
Propri.
t Ook :• di
AL RARE CHANCE TO MAKE MONEY!
WANTID IXISEDL&TIBLT,
BiztrTive Men with a capital of from one to
five - hundred dollars sub, (none others need
cell.)
srpSuoh TWENTY to
RUNW l lg i alt PEE DA.T.-igi
This is the bluest that out and Win an
onuses of mea t 'ou the Abater to the mer
chant. for parUoulars call an
HARTMAN,
8. B. Angle . Caktre 881siusjdozoseter, Pa.
jazda4t Moe bolus from 9 to /1 aosmokati 1 to 4 p. m.
trity ibr
giros us
LANCASTER, PA., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4,1870:
Pownisking Goods, &o.
BEST ED GLOVE.
4 'l Manafastarers swig
Dealers in I
Fine White Shire,
;`‘t yr
-BOSOMS,
" • g COLLARS, `"
Patent Spring
OVER GAITERS,
NECK TIES, BOWS, REGALIA,
GENTS FURNISHING GOOl4
SHIRTS MADE TO ORDER. Formula of Maxi.
agement and list of prices sent on applies.tiori
(A PERFECT PIT WARRANTED.)
A line assortment of
UNDERCLOTHING,
LADIES =RENO VEST,
SUSPENDERS
HAND
RI C FY
susirim oks, •
merumiewr,
POMADES
TO ET ARTICLES.
WALKING CANES J I
UMBRELLAS, so.
NO. &j EAST KING STREET,
LANCASTER, PA.
1.1)%in-CLASS GOODS ONLY.
(sepilf-17]
H EAD Q UARTERS
FOB
UNIMACLOTIIING, STOCKINGS, GLOWS,
COLLARS, CUFFS, SLIMY. BUTTOSTS,
4.1 Qent's ware generally, at
ERISMAIPS,
0.41% NORTH QUHRN ST., Lancaster.
Ant ever ous grosser shtook goods—ouitable
for Hrishdogs, Nei-Yohrs uri Winery Presents—
so we
Hols-Dioher, Sehnup-Dicher, Collars, Hem
ermel IVneu,igvehtiekte Heignier-fronts, Pocket
Richer, Perrumery, Hohr-Mil, Cigar Casa, un
onnery fancy articles ons
Z. S. ZaIaMAN , S, -
41% North Queen Street, laneastar.
(Om sign fum gross Shtreanoh Hem.) Ino2o-ly
Varnishes, &c.
AUG. REINOEUL. J.L. REINOIML, JR.
A &J. REINOEHL,
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALER'S
COPAL, WHITE, COFFIN,. BLACK AND
JAPAN
TARNISHES,
LINSEED OIL,
TURPENTINE, &0., U.
NO. 109 NORTH QUEEN STREET,
(In the Keystone Building,)
LANCASTBE, PA.
Also, Mahogany Boards ? Veneers and
Mouldings of difthrent sizes and pat
terns. .All kindslof Turning, suds
as Bed Poitst Table Legs,
Spokes Has Felloes,
8;4,,
Also, AXLES, SPRINGS; Lo. [An &Lys
Denttattv.
Mli te t i ma-
LANOAST June Utah ......_.
41torroita dx_ynns+ , Dr. Win. • %, the
enterpris#lB Dee. hail _rpm faa a
large stocx of teat mid ad the e
sditmenin formerly belonelug az et o
tr b i s
those used by my %Uteri-Dr, 1 3- ,
tiea. In the inunhama r the &Mew ,
himodf w it h imma el tha -. L I u „, 'WI 411 E•
S VS
ejva ti
' -•. ' :9 ' ': I
end hakbeyona doubt one o ~ e: .
gest collections of teeth air& . , , ~.,.,- .te a
State. Persons abating tlia. _,._ , , es
te
OM Whitesir =batn ZDO
lulu, i
eroSen=lut t i, ' e lnlit i11".144°
• . :VAI4III
lir M. innTESIIM ' •
•• • •
D IClifi r I S' T.,: . .
.'l' Orricz ANITII*Opmc, '
~ B ALEIM SING , STRIALICT, •
Witt dew to the (mitt uheek . hoer Velum*
•• * tookiiihryikolllislitim*,,, 1 .
' . tAtirCA..trirmit.' ivit,tt 0r.4.
MOO Aiatuckii wilhOut Pain, tiVAI um, 0
Orstrous Oxide) Goo
' . ' i ' PothfatiV
it. la. *Ma • . • Mali *Ammo.
(Vote' NEWS" POn 'PAics mon i st
paAND cm.trivir inr k ,
rue subm isr v z ust, retirnal front the
Bea Ider Mith the hosed
• sad beat aesortmeat of
.
OV.ER AND DRESS . COATINGB,
All oda:T e st Med grades; Csadateres In grad
gergairtae i tl e tailatrtrate:
within e reach of ev via . fw, oh
we are preimaial to up Pa • style,
and at the saortosanoidesi sad at the lawest
Cash Prices. Oas stook Of
mtee, YOCUM ARD SODS ItaABIE..
WADS CLOTOLWG,
is very 'made
bill ettek
said ary it irw ,g,iest ears, ,
(READY-NAAt , DELPARTMaNT on al floor.)
Wehave a fine doe of
GENTLENEN'S FURNISHING GOODS.
All titirvoda have been selted
and pwe at the yew 101;.W essawith awe,
gstess.
All weal& of you Is to. Sall vie OXIMMO ?Pr
t i tg f aVi r giM i ls you ww , ll" trulY
iAIN"i i
Southwest owner oV OenZ aq_n nu.
Lancatter, rams.
Oolattl
FOOTSTEPS AT THE DOOR.
The day is done, and swift draws nigh
The twilight hour, serene and sweet;
The busy crowds go hurrying by
With steady thud of thronging feet,
In many a home glad watchers wait,
As they have waited oft before,
To hear a hand upon the gate,
And well-known footsteps at the door !
Some list for feet that, still and cold,
No more the paths of life may tread,
And miss the strong arms' loving fold,
The tender words so often said.
Alas for such I the desolate,
Who half expectant, as of yore,
Still chide the foolish hearts that wait
To hear the footsteps at the door
Still pass the thronging myriads by,
Nor heed the mourners, watching lone,
The babes who for the father cry,
The 'deee whose light of life is gone;
And some their sadder vigils keep
For living lost ones, mourning sore,
And listening fear, and waiting weep,
And dread their footsteps at the door !
" NONSENSE!"
"Oh very well. It's very easy to say
nonsense."
"Do you mean to say that you belieire
all this stuff?"
"I mean to say that every night, at a
certain hour, those three murderers return
there and hold converse under that gib
bet."
"I can not imagine how a sensible man
like you can seriously' talk so."
" I tell you I've heard them. It's no
mere hearsarwith mei I've heard them.
I once laughed at the idea, just as you do
now. But I heard, and I. laughed no
more. Go you now at any time this night,
if you dare, and I bet any thing you'll
come back believing."
"Done; what'll you bet'?"
" 11l bet my horse against your pony."
"Done. I'll take it."
"Done it is. Here, Brown, you'll do
to hold the stakes."
The above conversation took place in
the "Bed Lion law) Oasedes, a little -
village on. the coast of Maine. The first
speaker was a fine, fresh-faced, broad
shouldered, honest-looking fellow, who
under rough clothing bore the unmistaka
ble signs of a gentleman. The other bad
the air of a sea-faring man, though his
dress was thatof a farmer. Two others
were with him, both of whom had very
much the same appearance. Five or six
others were present, all of whom took a
deep interest in the conversation, and gave
a hearty assent to the bet.
As the bet was made the man Brown
arose and proceeded to take charge of the
stakes. The two men 'alp had made the
bet also rose. By the air of the rest of
the company it was evident that they con
sidered that the bet was already lost by
the unbeliever. They were all inhabitants
of the village. The one who had made
the bet was a stranger; and local pride
was aroused, even if there were no other
ibeling to animate them.
The man who had accepted the wager
began to prepare for his departure. He
took a thusk of' brandy only to encounter
the supernatural foes whom he was au,-
posed, to encounter, and laughingly de
'lalted`Well,” stud one of the spectators, after
Is had departed, Ws gone; the young
gode, get enough of It. ll
"That he said another.
6 ° Hull be baok,ae soon as be gate there. ll
"They've driven oft better toga iban
The °latticing albs chains is enough.) ,
" Yes—let ' alone the voices.”
"The fhlo:lle 4 e /14304 It X Was attack
",Arad I.okquiinvbv4l6l44 490 if there
:hasn't been:anothowthish with the. 2,
"It's &sled ipeny the young• Mier will
bar to_glealiti to nwny.n.
4 Wen; We .. ititovr, better than to
Jatuit,frei
tiv• *va, tem ipacti* these parts
tar t4" '' •
No, el neumenot o ar be wouldn't have
been so . IWO b bsSs. t) • •
Whffii. ,fi rF 'bite Woke ligheking the one
who`.' the l le V / Mt i f /0 1 , 3 tit ° '43 " l.
. 1 5 91 4 , allietlY:4 o so44 BgarFei 4 Y
WIT it IMOD Silt el !Ma,
conk* up' • • village Ares* set all the
• signs and Amiga% eress,taild added to
the
the imperetittonis terror of We company at
• the* Were engaged la VIP*IB
specula oils as to the result of this exper
iment, the young adventurer was going on
•
toward the plans
It was on the summit of a wide, bleak,
and desolate ridp,_tOrminated by a
at the hem of Which the ocean surf beat.
lien, some. years. Vetere, a murder had
been committed by a gang of ruffians.
They bad been °Waved and three of the
--ring-leaders • had 'been iatterd in chains
open* lofty gibbet i*the very spot where
the crime had been fitted As the adventurer neared the spot the
wind blew in gusts over the ridge. The
moon occasionally shining out from be
hind a cloud revealed the scene. It was
gloomy indeed, and might well have ap
palled a man even of stottong es. The
gloom of the night formed a d,
and in the fore-ground rose a lofty three
armed gibbet, from each arm of which
there hung suspended the skeleton of a
man in chains. The rushing wind gave
to the scene additional elements of terror.
As it dm*, peat it swung the skeletons
making them vibrate slowly to and fro;
withal! their lead of chains and fetters, so
that they creaked and rattled, and made
him who shall Aare borne the batik, and
widen , and his orphan, to do all which may
and cherish a just and a lasting' peace
)urselyee and with till nations."-4. Z.
Sims
, t , isallannwo.
THE WAGER.
a thousand weird and ghastly sounds in
the lonely darkness.
From the distance there came up a deep,
low, sullen sound, at regular intervals dy
ing and rising again, to die away in long,
low reverberations. It was the ocean surf,
which beat upon the shore not tar away;
for Camden was a fishing village, and the
gibbet stood upon a high cliff which over
hung the beach. The moaning of the
wind, the low, sullen roar of the surf, and
the
clank of the chains, were sufficient to
inspire dread in the boldest heart.
The young man, however, seemed quite
unaffected by any superstitious terrors.
He quietly dismounted, flung the horse's
bridle over his arm, drew his cloak about
him, and waited.
For about an hour he waited patiently,
keeping a wary look about him, so as not
to be surprised in that gloom. The light,
however, was sufficient to prevent any one
from coming near unobserved, and the
watcher felt satisfied so long as he had his
pistols at his belt.
At length he felt conscious of a low
moan, which was entirely different from
any of the sounds which he had hitherto
heard.
It seemed to arise from the ground be
hind him. It was a moan of peculiar na
ture and of penetrating power.
The watcher grasped his pistols and
turned toward the direction from which
the sound came.
Then followed a heavy sigh. He waited.
Than came a deep moan. A smile of con
tempt passed over the watcher's face.
" Very clumsy trickery," he thought.
"If I had the management of it, I would
act differently."
there was a grating overhead.
Heitoitllied: isp. The skeletons in chains
were ilascendiog. They were moving
down slowly. As they descended they
swung in the wind, and were knocked to
gether and dashed against the gallows
tree. Still they were suspended, and were
not coining down without being lowered
down.
The watcher stepped back and coolly
waited with a grim smile on his face. The
skeletons came down slowly till at last
they touched the ground. The watcher
coolly took one of them and gave a violent
pull. It fell down draing a rope a ft er
tt, 'which creaked Atilt tali - 010h a pulley
overhead. The watcher pull edaway at
it, and dragged down a line which was at
least a hundred feet in length. Meantime
the other skeletons kept rising and falling.
Ile caught one of them with the same pe
culiar jerk, and pulled the rope in the same
way. Suddenly the other skeleton began
to ascend!
" No, no, my fine fellow," muttered the
watcher, catching , the chains of his feet
before it got out of reach, and pulling with
all his force. It was a sudden and violent
pull, and the skeleton yielded. Down it
fell, along with the watcher, who fell with
it to the ground. But in a moment he
arose, and, with an audible chuckle, he
pulled this rope down also.
Then he stood waiting cautiously as be
fore. Some time now passed, during
whieh nothing was seen or heard. The
skeletons lay around on the ,heath. The
watcher. malted,
At last a bright light flashed up from
the gravid about twenty yards in froht of
him. It was clOse by the wise of the cliff,
and looked like a crevice. bathe *hist of
the light three figures appeared 4 each
wrapped in a long white sheet.
This spectacle, howep'er l inspired no
terror in the watcher, Who held his pistols
in his hands and wafted.
The three figures,. with low meatus,
marched slowly up tows the gibbet.
The watcher moved to one ;e. Sudden
ly, as they came, near, they e a rush
at him. e fire d. One or oi j em dropped.
Instantly he sprang tows the opuaning
froth which they had eMi tr aed, abd pulr
oilt a boat-aWain'a w tle Jo blew
three times a shrill 'Pew ng ' blast. It
was quickly done, and that he waited
with his pistols extended.
Two out of the three figures stood mo
tionless, close by the one, who had fallen.
Groans of.pain came from the fallen figure.
But now other figures appeared span
the scene. At the sauna Of the shrill
whistle, six, or eight men, all armed, sprang
up from behind a hillock, where they had
laln in concealment, and rushed up to the
two figures. In a moment they had sur
rounded' them and seised them. The
watcher then advanced toward them.
" tlris fellow ?" said he stooping
over the wounded man, and s way
the 'sheet with which he Wall oped.
" Ah, ah I my fine ibllow," add he; "it's
you, is it ? So you've lost your bet."
It was the man with whom he had made
the bet. He gave a deep groan.
The watcher then tore away thuheets
from the others. Ono was 13 , rowil—the
man that held the stakes; the other Was
one of the company who bad been at the
inn.
" Pm going clown there into your place.
So lead on," said he.
"Who are you," cried Brown, savagely,
"seizing and shooting innocent persons
like a highwayman ?"
" if you want to know, I'm Cap
tain Sinclair, a United States Custom
house officer. You were playful enough
to bet with me, and I think I've won it.
But come," he continued, sternly, "I've
suspected that you were up to mischief
here. I only came here yesterday. My
predecessor could never trace the extensive
smuggling operations that wont on just
about here; but I thought that perhaps
the gibbet ad something to do with it.
You see I've caught you. "
Brown uttered something between a
curse and an entreaty.
" Tie his hands, lads. Tie up both of
them."
The men obeyed.
CASH RATES OF ADTERTISING
Ton lines of Nonpareil constitute a Square
: • •
• -8
TIME.' cg• I
EI ,
ZI V 8
*4 go X I X I.
1 week ...;$ 75 $ 1.40 $ 2 10'0 850 $ 6 001$ 11 IV
2 weeks... 1 90. 1 SO; 2 70; 450, 8 001 14 (.0
8 weeks... 1 59,2 20 8 80, 8 00.10 00 17 00
1 month...; 175 ' 2 150 3OM 700 12 00j 20 CO
SI months.. 2TO ; 4 02 1 800 10 00 20 00 88 20
8 mosthi..l 4 00. 0:11 9 O 31451 30 00! Li 00
1
6 months.. 7SO 11 OS 10 00‘2110210 1 40 1:2) 70 CO
1 year 12 OA 20 80 00 40 00 60 00 120 00
Executors" Notice
Administrators) Notice
Assi d gnoes ,
A,if
Aud
tole' Notice
SPECIAL MOTTOES—Ten gents a line for iho
lint Insertion, and Seven cents a line for each
subsequent insertion.
REAL ESTATE adVertileinchts, Ten cents a
line for the Ent insertion and Five cents a line for each additional insert ion.
/WALL KINDS or JOB PRINTING executed
with neatness and destuttob.
N 0.12.
"Now 'two of you fellows stay here.
Has any body got a lantern?"
One of the men handed one to him.
He lighted -it, and then 'descended by
the orifice through which the three fig
ures had emerged.
After a short distance, he found himself
in a passage-way which went down on the
side of a cliff that had been severed in
twain. The path sloped steeply for a hun
dred yards or so, and ended in a cavern.
Here there were barrels and boxes in great
numbers, all filled with contraband arti
cles. The cavern itself was just under
neath the gibbet. It was evident that
these smugglers had made use of the gibbet
to frighten people away from their haunt. '
An examination afterward showed that
these three men alone had conducted a
vast smuggling business by means of this
convenient cavern, libey had been com
pletely entrapped by Cllptain Sinclair. As
he said, he had suspected some trickery
about the gibbet. He had made the bet,
and caused some of his men to follow him
and conceal themselves. The result was
as has been described.. The three smug
glers found themselves suddenly cast down
from their dreams of wealth, and on their
way to the State Prison. As for Captain
Sinclair, his brilliant exploit was rewarded
with promotion. —ll'aiTeios Weekly.
TAMMANY POLITICIANS AND PUBLIC
I. He was seen at a French ball. He
wore immense diamond studs, a huge blue
necktie, a seal ring nearly as large as a
door-knocker, and a frock coat with silken
facings. A rolling-rimmed silk hat sat on
his head. His moustache was well waxed.
He parted his hair in the middle, cirrieq.
the stump of a cigar between the fingers or
his yellow kids, and spurted tobacco spit
tle from between his teeth. He was fat,
and was loaferish in manner. He worked
his head like a Chinese mandarin when he
talked, and swore terribly at every breath.
A crowd of roughs followed in his wake,
and drank frequently at his expense. As
the morning hours advanced he became
riotous and ugly. He pitched a woman
from a private box to the floor below,
brbakit e 7 her leg, '
and her screams were
drown ity the boisterous applanee of the
roughs. He was a Tafnmany pOliticiad
and a Sheriff's officer.
11. He was seen in a faro bank near the
Fifth Avenue Hotel. He was seated be
hind a table covered with green baize, and
was slipping the cards from a silver deal
ing -box. Occasionally he received a hun
dred-dollar bank note from some one of
the group about the table, who got in re
turn a stack of blue ivory checks. He wore
diamonds, and stripped the cards when it
suited his convenience. He was ruining
a half dozen young clerks and brokers,
and was violating the law. Yet he was a
man of influence, and was a law-maker in
the commercial metropolis of the Western
Continent. He was a Tammany politician
and a municipal officer.
111. He was seen within 'a horse car.
He wore a fine overcoat of beaver cloth,
and the inevitable yellow Bids concealed
his hands. He stared impudeiitly at every
poor girl whoentered the car. He insulted
every lady who casually glanced at him
with his smirks and smiles. The conduc
tor knew him, and recognizing his power,
did not kick him from the car. or be
was a Tammany politician and a munici
pal officer.
IV. He was seen in Broadway, near
Houston street, at 2A. M. He stood
among his fellows beneath a gaslight, and
hie diamond shone like a morning star. A
country merchant passed with a travelling
bag. • The' merchant was struck to the
pavement, and while he was unconscious
the party rifled his paints. During the
robbery the man with the diamond gazed
upon the scene, and sweetly smiled.. He
proutised the boys to see the Judge, and
make( it all "snurs if they were arrested.
And he did Itr For he was a Tammany
politician,. sad * mualuipel officer.
V. He was seen on the second floor of
the City Hall. lie at in a costly chair
fronting an axiom:olv* deek. He shouted
" Ay» in Waal= Waal; and voted away
the peoples money by the hundred thou
sands. Every loafer and every thief
claimed him as as acquaintance. He filled
the air with Sotto roes WWI, and listened
to mysterious whispers over as iron rail
ing.. He coii e r schdmes of public
robbery, and ched 'himself thereby
without chtuger, or he was a' Tammany
politilaian it'd a mu n icipal officer.
VI.. Its was seen upon the bench. He
wore a flashing gem upon his bosolu,
_and
whispered in the ear of the Judge. That
whisper saved a thief from the - State pri
son, or mayhap released a Murderer. It
was all powerful, for it came from the lips
of a Tammany politician and a municipal
officer.
VII.' He was seen among the ward can
vassers on election night. Before be had
gone from the room, the figures bad been
changed to suit his own purposes, and the
will of the people bad been nullified. An
honest man had been wiped out of office,
and a gambler had been thrown into his
place. For it was the will of a Tammany
politician and a municipal officer.
VIII. He was seen in the First Ward.
His temples were heated with wine, and
he was under the control of a bloodthirsty
passion. He drew a revolver. The by
standers fled in terror. Mad with rum
and uttering hideous oaths, he pursued a
workingmaip, drove a bullet through his
skull e and left him dead on the floor. He
was arrested. A packed Coroner's jury
investigated the murder, and rendered a
verdict of partially justifiable manslaugh
ter in the third degree. He was released
on a small bail. For he was a Tammany
politician and a Sheriff's officer.—New
York Sun.
IN FATIfER AtRAHAIL
OFFICERS
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